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Lot 504

504: Collection of Twenty-five Silhouettes

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Description

Well-Rounded Collection of Silhouettes

With Folwell’s 1795 Image of George Washington after a Drawing from Life

504.     [SILHOUETTES]. Collection of twenty-five silhouettes in various techniques, including painted, hand scissored, machine cut, and printed; mostly bust profiles, a few full-length. Primarily American, nineteenth century, a few from the late eighteenth century. In some cases the silhouettist is identified. Silhouettists include Samuel Folwell, Peale Museum, Augustin-Amant-Constan-Fidèle Edouart, William James Hubard, and William Henry Brown. Mostly very fine, some framed. See individual condition reports below.

     Silhouettes were popular in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Typically a silhouette is a profile with a featureless interior, usually in dense black ink. Silhouettes fall into several classes: entirely painted on paper, card stock, glass, and other substances; hollow-cut, meaning the artist cut freehanded with scissors a profile from paper, which was then mounted on black paper or fabric background; machine cut using the physiognotrace, or profile machine and pasted onto paper or other substance (the first documented use of the physiognotrace in the United States was 1796 in Philadelphia); entirely or partially lithographed or engraved (most frequently printing was used for backgrounds). All forms of silhouettes may have added detail in colors such as white, gold, silver, and other natural shades.

     The word silhouette came into use in the United States when silhouettist, Augustin-Amant-Constan-Fidèle Edouart (1789-1861), emigrated in 1839. The origin of the term “silhouette” was first used satirically in Europe referring to disgraced, parsimonious French finance minister, Étienne de Silhouette (1709-1767), who in the latter half of the eighteenth century enjoyed making huge numbers of cut paper shadow portraits on black card stock. The phrase à la Silhouette" came to mean “on the cheap.” Silhouettes, known as the “poor man’s miniature,” evoked a mysterious quality and were often placed in the family album. Often silhouettes document costume and material culture of the day.

     The sitter sat between a candle lamp and a glass screen, behind which was a sheet of oiled paper. The artist, working on the other side, drew around the life-size shadow on the paper. The outline was blacked in later, or cut out and backed with black material. Because the profile portrait focuses on proportions and details of the bony structures of the face, the images are clear and simple in a way that normal painting is not. Prior to the advent of photography, silhouette profiles cut from black card were the most accurate and cheapest way of recording a person’s appearance. With the appearance of photography, the art of the silhouette languished. Inventory as follows:

§§§§§§§§§§

Painted Silhouettes

[WASHINGTON, GEORGE (sitter)]. FOLWELL, Samuel (silhouettist). Untitled bust profile of George Washington, facing right, wearing coat with four buttons visible, frilled cravat, hair dressed and tied by a ribbon into a queue, exceptionally well painted and evoking quiet dignity, lower left in ink: “S. Folwell Pinxt.” N.p., n.d. [ca. 1795]. Painted in India ink with some details added in white, on rectangular sheet of laid paper: 28.5 x 20.5 cm (folded into octagon shape: 14.5 x 12 cm); portrait painted within hand-drawn oval (11.5 x 9 cm); silhouette: 9.3 x 6 cm. An excellently rendered likeness leaving no doubt that the sitter is George Washington. Clearly delineated and detailed, including even Washington’s eyelashes. Old dark wooden frame with gilt metal liner and hanging ring on verso, oval eglomisé glass. Laid paper with creases where folded (none visible through frame, two short lines of corrosion at top left (also not visible through frame), very mild foxing.

According to DAB, miniature painter, engraver, and silhouettist, Samuel Folwell’s (ca. 1768-1813) “chief claim to remembrance lies in his silhouette of George Washington, said to have been painted from life. Though executed at an unknown date, it has been several times followed more or less closely by other engravers, and has become a type…. He also engraved a bust of Washington.” According to William Spohn Baker (The Engraved Portraits of Washington, Philadelphia: Lindsay and Baker, 1880, p. 109), a similar painted silhouette by Folwell (now at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania) was sketched by him from life while Washington was attending a public event. Silhouettes of Washington from life are exceedingly rare. Anita Schorsch (“A Key to the Kingdom—The Iconography of a Mourning Picture” in Winterthur Portfolio, Vol. XIV, No. 1, pp. 324-327) states that Washington was attending a church service: “Folwell captured the sacred moment for new American citizens by attempting a visual statement on the condition and direction of Washington’s soul.”

For more on Folwell, see Alice Van Leer Carrick, Shades of Our Ancestors: American Profiles and Profilists (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1928, pp. 18, 22-23 and top left illustration on plate following p. 18), who comments:

“First in peace, first in war—and the most silhouetted of our countrymen!” This is my present definition of General Washington. I doubt if even George the Third ever posed for his profile more frequently… The profile done by Samuel Folwell, of which several examples are in existence, is said to have been taken [when] the General was an unsuspecting subject. It was, I believe, first drawn on paper, then painted solidly in India ink, the high lights being touched in to represent hair, stock, ruffles, and buttons, and was “declared at the time a most spirited and correct likeness.” It was taken in 1795, and in 1846 reproduced and published in Watson’s Annals and Occurrences of New York City and State in the Olden Time… Folwell silhouettes are extremely rare, and bring a very high price.

Various versions of Folwell’s silhouette of George Washington are known to exist, most notably the painted profile at the Historical Society of Philadelphia, which is equal in quality to the present offering. Folwell’s iconic image of Washington is the highlight of this collection.

[ELLEY, SIR JOHN (sitter)]. Unattributed ink and wash bust on card stock, profile of Sir John Elley facing left, wearing coat, high white collar, and military medals (including Peninsular Gold Cross). N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Oval sheet: 8.5 x 6.7 cm; silhouette: 7.7 x 4.5 cm. Face painted in dense India ink, remainder of image painted in shades of gold, charcoal, and white. Identified in contemporary hand in ink and pencil on verso: “Sir John Elley 3).” Fine. Backing sheet behind silhouette has an ink sketch (facing right) that appears to be the preliminary work for the finished work. Old black rectangular wooden frame, gilt metal liner and curved glass, metal hanging ring at top. Another documented silhouette of Sir John Elley is attributed to John Linnell (1792-1882). Elley distinguished himself at Cateau (1794); fought at Waterloo (1815); gained the KCB; became Governor of Galway (1820); a Colonel in the 17th Lancers (1829); MP for Windsor (1835) and finally Lieutenant-General (1837).

FORERY[?], A. (silhouettist). Unidentified painted bust profile on thick card stock (squared at top and bottom, oval at sides), depicting a lad facing left with hand on chest, wearing fancy pink and rose striped blouse or shirt, and white collar of cloth or fur, short wavy hair to nape of neck, face painted in solid india ink. Paris, 1797. In ink below image (difficult to read): “A Forery[?] Paris 1797.” Card stock: 8.7 x 6.1; image: 4.2 x 2.5 cm. Mild browning, else fine. Old black wooden frame in irregular form, with ornate metal pieces at top and bottom, metal hanging ring at top. Similar in style to immediately following entry.

GUILLAUME ET FILS (silhouettist). Unidentified painted bust profile on card stock, portraying a pretty lady facing left, wearing fancy lilac striped décolleté dress with white ruffled neckline, her hair swept back with curls around her face, elaborate upswept platinum powdered hair style, face painted in solid India ink. Paris, 1795. In ink below image (difficult to read): “Guillaume et fils Paris 1795.” Circular card stock: diameter 7.5 cm; image 5.4 x 3 cm. Mild browning, else fine. Matted and framed, image set within circular beveled glass, grey silk mat (worn and stained) with two metal ornaments, engraved rectangular gilded metal frame with hanging metal ring and ribbon at top. Manuscript and printed notes on frame verso indicate the image was once part of the Elizabeth L. Maurier collection which began in the nineteenth century, was augmented to 1925, and subsequently owned by silhouette collector Dr. Milton Grow of New Jersey. Very similar in style to preceding entry.

[NICHOLS, GEORGE K. (sitter)]. Unattributed painted bust portrait on paper, of George K. Nichols (identified on verso), facing left, with curly hair on top, wearing white cravat, white ruffled shirt, some details drawn in white. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. In ink on verso: “George K. Nichols’s profile-.” Oval shape, overall 11 x 9 cm; silhouette: 7.7 x 4.6 cm. Neat old contemporary paper reinforcements to verso (not touching silhouette), generally very good. Old rectangular gutta percha frame, oval brass liner, frame with ornamental metal hook at top.

Unattributed, unidentified rectangular painted bust portrait on wove paper, man with short curly hair, high collar and coat, facing right. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Rectangular sheet size: 9.7 x 8 cm; silhouette: 6.2 x 4.2 cm. Paper browned, otherwise fine. Period rectangular gutta percha frame (with fine craquelure), on which is mounted an ornately engraved heavy brass mat and gilt liner, ornamental circular metal hook at top.

Reverse Glass Painted Silhouette

Unattributed, unidentified reverse glass painted bust portrait of young man facing right, wearing high-collar and cravat, hair and cravat with touches of gilt, gilt stars at each corner of painting, verso with black profile and gilt stars overlaid with thick white paint. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Rectangular glass: 13.3 x 10.2 cm; silhouette: 8.2 x 10.4 cm. A few slight losses to painting, not very noticeable due to black paper sheet adjacent to verso of glass. Old tarnished and worn gilt frame.

Scissored with Painted Details

HUBARD GALLERY (silhouette gallery associated with Master William James Hubard, Child Prodigy Silhouettist, 1807-1862). Scissored, with ink and wash details, on card stock, full-length profile of Sarah Mead Hopwood (identified on old frame backing), facing left, wearing mid-calf dress, grey pantaloons, formal curled hair (with bronze highlights), holding in right hand a traditional cup-and-ball toy, left hand at side painted. N.p., n.d. [New York?, 1823 or after?]. Rectangular sheet size: 21 x 15.3 cm; silhouette: 19 x 7.8 cm. Lower left with small oval blind stamp: “Taken at the Hubard Gallery.” Old wooden frame backing with contemporary note in ink (difficult to read): “Sarah Mead Hopwood aged 18 [possibly 13] years & 3 mo. Dec. 18[??].” With printed trade label: “At the Hubard Gallery. An exact likeness with a Frame & Glass may invariably be had for One Shilling… designated the ‘Hubard Gallery’ & by which name it is now universally known in all principal towns in Great Britain, Ireland, the United States, and the Canadas.” Modern ink note: “Sarah Mead Hopwood Aged 13 yrs 3 mths Dec. 1823” (the year on the modern note is probably in error). Moderate uniform browning and a few inconsequential fox marks, generally very good. Contemporary rectangular maple frame, gilt liner, metal hanging ring at top, glazed.

Alice Van Leer Carrick in her book, Shades of Our Ancestors: American Profiles and Profilists (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1928, pp. 93-95), discusses the rarity of full-length silhouettes and color embellishments. Born in England, Master Hubard began cutting silhouettes at twelve years of age. By the age of fifteen, he was a celebrated silhouette artist having cut the silhouettes of the Duchess of Kent and Queen Victoria. He came to New York in 1824 at the age of seventeen where he set up the Hubard Gallery. Never signing his silhouettes with pen or pencil, he chose instead to stencil “Hubard Gallery,” use an impressed mark stating simply “Hubard” or “Hubard Gallery,” or “Taken At The Hubard Gallery.” He never relied upon machinery for aid in cutting his silhouettes, only common scissors.

In 1827, Hubard took up portrait painting under Gilbert Stuart, although he continued to cut silhouettes. McKechnie tells us that Hubard’s early manager, Mr. Smith, continued to run the Hubard Gallery until about 1845. We know that others, including Samuel Thomas Gill, worked for the Hubard Gallery. The fact that the Hubard Gallery employed several artists and the fact that Hubard continued to occasionally cut silhouettes both in America and abroad makes it very difficult to determine where and by whose hand some silhouettes of this time were created. During the 1850s, Hubard established a foundry in Richmond, Virginia, for casting bronzes. When the Civil War started, he invented and produced an explosive for use by the Confederate Army. He died at his foundry, killed by an exploding shell.

Scissored with Lithograph Background

EDOUART, Augustin-Amant-Constan-Fidèle (silhouettist). Full-length scissored profile on lithographed card stock, portraying C.E. Claghorn (identified on verso), with cut-out collar, facing left, hat in right hand, left hand on hip, standing on a stone porch with stone wall, trees and landscape in distance, shadow cast in foreground. In ink at lower left: “Augn. Eduourt fecit 1843. Philadelphia-.” Philadelphia, 1843. Rectangular sheet: 27.5 x 17.5 cm; silhouette: 19.8 x 5.8 cm. On verso are two old handwritten notes, the first in pencil at left on verso of card stock: “C.E. Claghorn, Jan. 1843-15 yrs. old-,” and in ink on paper label at right on verso of card stock: “‘C.E. Claghorn, Jan. 1843. 15 yrs. old’ (Philadelphia, Pa.).” Barely visible are pencil details, such as fingers, hair, collar, buttons, etc., typical of Brown’s style; see Alice Van Leer Carrick, Shades of Our Ancestors: American Profiles and Profilists (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1928), p. 146. Fine. Old maple frame with wooden gilt liner, glazed.

EDOUART, Augustin-Amant-Constan-Fidèle (silhouettist). Full-length scissored profile on lithographed card stock, portraying O.B. Lindsay (identified on verso), with cut-out collar, facing left, hat in right hand, left hand loose by his side, standing in a pastoral landscape with miniature details of fences, hunter and dog, birds in sky, church, trees, hills, etc., shadow cast in left foreground. In ink at lower left: “Augn. Eduourt, fecit. 1843 Philadelphia.” Philadelphia, 1843. Rectangular sheet: 28.3 x 18.5 cm; silhouette: 17.8 x 5.3 cm. On verso are two old handwritten notes, the first in pencil at left on verso of card stock: “O.B. Lindsay—Jan. 1843—15 yrs. 6 mot old.—” and in ink on paper label at right on verso of card stock: “‘O.B. Lindsay, Jan. 1843. 15 yrs. old’ (Philadelphia, Pa.).” Barely visible are pencil details, such as fingers, hair, collar, buttons, etc., typical of Brown’s style; see Alice Van Leer Carrick, Shades of Our Ancestors: American Profiles and Profilists (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1928), p. 146. Old rectangular maple frame with wooden gilt liner, glazed.

Cut and Pasted Silhouette with Painted Details

B., J. (silhouettist). Unidentified cut and pasted full-length profile on card stock, portraying a stout man with hands in pockets, wearing long coat, top hat, and white collar, on card stock, painted details such as collar, hair, some facial features glibly delineated, floor and cast shadow below in ink wash. N.p., 1827. Pencil note in modern hand on verso: “Signed J.B. 1827.” Rectangular sheet: 28.1 x 18 cm; silhouette: 24.6 x 7.2 cm. Moderate browning and a few stains. Old worn wooden gilt frame, metal ring at top, glazed.

[McKENNEY, THOMAS Loraine (sitter)]. Cut and pasted full-length profile on vellum paper of Thomas L. McKenney, facing right, cane in left hand, right hand holding top hat, details such as hair, collar, hand, and hat inked in white, ground and cast shadow below in ink wash foreground. N.p., 1836. In contemporary ink on verso: “Profile of Thos L. McKenney Sept[?] 12[?] 1836.” Overall sheet size: 28.8 x 20.3 cm; silhouette: 26.5 x 7.4 cm. Somewhat browned and water-stained. McKenney (1785-1859), Indian Office official, is best known for the outstanding album History of the Indian Tribes of North America (1836-1844) which he wrote with James Hall. See Item 433 herein.

Hollow-Cut Silhouettes

D., R.M. (silhouettist). Hollow-cut bust profile on wove paper, depicting Rebecca Davids (identification in contemporary ink at lower left), facing right, young lady with hair in bun, ruffled collar, identified in image in contemporary ink at lower left: “Rebecca Davids” and initials “R.M.D.” N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. The profile is achieved by cutting the image from paper, affixing another sheet of paper beneath, and inking in the profile. Rectangular sheet size: 11.2 x 7.1 cm; silhouette: approximately 7.7 x 4.1 cm. Marginal browning (not visible through frame), otherwise fine. Period black rectangular wooden frame with plain metal hanging ring at top, contemporary black roan backing, glazed.

[MORRIS, LYDIA E. McCOLLUM (sitter)]. Unattributed hollow-cut bust profile of a lady with hair pulled up in bun, high collar, facing left, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper overlaid on rich, shiny navy blue paper sheet below upper cut-out. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Contemporary ink note below image: “Lydia E. McCollum now Morris.” Rectangular sheet: ll.3 x 7.1 cm; silhouette: 7.6 x 4 cm. A few light fox marks, slightly soiled, otherwise very good. Simple wooden frame painted black, metal hanging ring at top, glazed. Lydia E. McCollum Morris (1830-1872) was a member of the Morris family. See Robert C. Moon, The Morris Family of Philadelphia, Descendants of Anthony Morris (Philadelphia, 1898). The next silhouette is a portrait of another member of the Morris family.

[MORRIS, MRS. (sitter)]. Unattributed hollow-cut bust profile of a lady wearing ribboned bonnet, facing left, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper overlaid on thick black fabric pasted to a larger sheet, thereby revealing the image in black. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Brown paper backing with contemporary ink note: “Mrs. Morris—wife to Councillor Morris died February 15th. 1828 aged 92—Mr. Morris died Sept. 1st. 1813. aged 80.” Oval sheet: approximately 9.4 x 7.5 cm; silhouette: 8 x 4.5 cm. Fine. Old oval wooden frame with beaded gilt liner, metal hanging ring at top, glazed. Framing matches that of the immediately following entry.

[MORRIS FAMILY LADY (sitter)]. Unattributed hollow-cut bust profile of a lady facing left and wearing an elaborate hat, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper overlaid on medium-weight wove paper painted dark black on recto. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Oval sheet size: 9.8 x 7.7 cm; silhouette: 8.2 x 5.3 cm. Browned, otherwise very good. Old oval wooden frame with beaded gilt liner, metal hanging ring at top, glazed. See immediately preceding entry.

PEALE’S MUSEUM. Hollow-cut bust profile of John Lawrie Newbold (contemporary ink attribution below image), facing left and wearing a high collar, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper overlaid on larger sheet of white wove paper under which is mounted a dark black satiny swath of fabric. N.p. [Philadelphia or Baltimore?], 1822. Contemporary ink note below image: “John Lawrie Newbold. 28 May 1822.” Extremely faint embossure below image at left, the first word of which appears to be “Peale.” On lower sheet is later pencil note: “Stamped: ‘Peale’s Museum’ with spread eagle.” Rectangular sheet size: 17.8 x 13.6 cm; silhouette: 7.6 x 3.6 cm. Paper browned at blank outer margins, otherwise fine. Rectangular gilt frame, glazed. The silhouette appears to be genuine, conforming with points set out by Anne Verplanck in “The Genuine Article? Distinguishing Real from Fake: Peale’s Museum Silhouettes” in Antiques & Fine Art, Spring 2002.

[THOMSON, ANNA G. (sitter)]. Unattributed hollow-cut bust profile of a girl facing left, bow at back of neck, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper with another sheet behind on which is laid black fabric, thereby revealing the image in black. N.p., 1826. Contemporary ink note below image: “Anna G. Thomson. 1826.” Rectangular sheet: 15.9 x 9.5 cm; silhouette: 6.7 x 3.5 cm. White paper slightly wrinkled due to pasting the two sheets of paper together when the silhouette was created. Contemporary maple frame with wood gilt liner, metal hanging ring at top.

Unattributed, unidentified hollow-cut bust profile of a man facing left, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper overlaid on thick black fabric pasted to a larger sheet, thereby revealing the image in black. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Oval sheet: approximately 9.9 x 7.7 cm; silhouette: 6.5 x 3.9 cm. Fine. In oval engraved metal frame with tan suede mat, metal hanging ring at top, below which is metal engraved ribbon, glazed.

Unattributed, unidentified, hollow-cut bust profile of a lady facing right, simple image, the profile achieved by cutting image from white wove paper overlaid on medium-weight laid paper painted dark black on recto. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Rectangular sheet size: 9.5 x 9.5 cm; silhouette: 7.5 x 3.7 cm. Marginal browning along blank edges (not visible through glass), otherwise fine. Old rectangular wooden frame painted black, ornate brass corner pieces, original black roan backing, glazed. Appears to be a companion piece to the immediately following silhouette. With the two is the printed card of Thomas Sidney of New Orleans with later ink note: “Pair of silhouettes in ebony frames of two ladies’ heads—Made in England circa 1775.” The immediately following silhouette, the other element of the pair, actually appears to be a gentleman rather than a lady.

Unattributed hollow-cut bust profile of a young gentleman facing left, similar style to immediately preceding entry. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Rectangular sheet size: 9.5 x 9.5 cm; silhouette: 7.5 x 3.7 cm. Marginal browning along blank edges (not visible through glass), otherwise fine. Old rectangular wooden frame painted black, ornate brass corner pieces, original black roan backing, glazed. Appears to be a companion piece to immediately preceding silhouette.

Cut and Pasted Silhouette

[BURNS, ROBERT (sitter)]. Unattributed cut and pasted bust profile of Robert Burns facing left, on card stock with printed identification label pasted on recto. N.p., n.d. [nineteenth century]. Rectangular sheet: 7.4 x 4.1 cm; silhouette: 6.2 x 3.5 cm. Burns’ name written in ink on verso. Hairline fissure at center, card stock mildly darkened, generally good. With a small book of Burns’ work.

Cut and Pasted Silhouette with Painted Details

Unattributed, unidentified cut and pasted full-length profile on card stock, showing an unidentified girl (facing right, braided hair, holding bonnet in left hand, right hand drawn in by her side), and smaller lad (facing left, wearing a jacket with many buttons, and holding a toy sailboat in his right hand, left hand drawn in by his side), some details drawn (buttons, dress, collar, hair, ear, etc.), ink wash and cast shadows below. N.p., n.d. [paper back behind silhouette is a portion of a survey dated in 1806 with signature of surveyor Seth Pease]. Overall sheet size: 29.8 x 23.8 cm; girl figure: 18 x 8.5 cm; lad: 14.7 x 7.9 cm. Water spots upper right blank margin, browned. Old rectangular wooden frame with gilt liner.

Lithographed Silhouettes

BROWN, W[illia]m H[enry] (silhouettist) & E.B. & E.C. Kellogg (lithographers). [Title below image] De Witt Clinton Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1844, by E B & E C Kellogg, in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of Connecticut [below image at left] From life by Wm. H. Brown [below image at right] Lith. of E.B. & E.C. Kellogg. Hartford, 1844. Toned lithograph with full-length silhouette of Clinton facing right, standing in room with floral and striped wall paper, floral carpet, rolling table with books, map of New York on wall, silhouette: 24.7 x 8 cm; image: 33.9 x 24.9 cm; image, title, and imprint: 36.8 x 25 cm; overall sheet size: 43.1 x 30.5 cm. Slightly browned and a few stains (mostly confined to margins).

William Henry Brown made his debut as a silhouettist when only sixteen years of age, creating his first profile, a full-length silhouette of General Lafayette. He used common scissors to create his freehand silhouettes, which were superbly rendered with subtle detail. The present format of combined silhouette with lithographed background is typical of Brown’s silhouettes, which were lithographed by the Kellogg firm, often referred to as the Currier & Ives of Connecticut. Brown’s work is very difficult to acquire, even in printed form. Almost the entire edition of Brown’s very rare book with similar prints, Portrait Gallery of Distinguished American Citizens (Hartford, 1845), was destroyed by fire, and it is rare to find a complete copy of the book. The Kelloggs also sold separate lithographs from Brown’s book (as here). Brown’s original silhouettes are difficult to find, despite the fact that he was prolific. See: Alice Van Leer Carrick, Shades of Our Ancestors: American Profiles and Profilists (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1928, pp. 150-162; The author remarks on the value of the backgrounds for the study of American material culture of that time).

BROWN, W[illia]m H[enry] (silhouettist) & E.B. & E.C. Kellogg (lithographers). [Title below image] Martin Van Buren [below title] Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1844, by E.B. & E.C. Kellogg, in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of Connecticut. [below image at left] From life by Wm. H Brown. [below image at right] Lith. of E.B. & E.C. Kellogg. Hartford, 1844. Toned lithograph with full-length silhouette of Van Buren facing left, standing in room with floral and striped wall paper, carpet with subtle design, chair at right, framed painting on wall, silhouette: 22.8 x 5.7 cm; image: 36.7 x 24.9 cm; image, title, and imprint: 36.8 x 25 cm; overall sheet size: 43.1 x 30.5 cm. Uniform light browning and a few marginal stains (not affecting image). See immediately preceding entry.

Included with the collection is a fine copy in dust jacket of Alice Van Leer Carrick, Shades of Our Ancestors: American Profiles and Profilists (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1928. Plus two other printed silhouettes.

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Estimate $7,000 – $14,000
Starting Bid $7,000
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Dorothy Sloan Rare Books

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