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Fine Roman Stone Mosaic Hunting Scene

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Fine Roman Stone Mosaic Hunting Scene

Lot 0110 Details

Description
Roman, the Levant, late Imperial Period, ca. 3rd to 5th century CE. A fine stone mosaic depicting a dramatic hunting scene as the hunter has just struck his target, a stag, with his bow and arrow. For the day, a scene like this was akin to a present-day action film. Note the stag's posture, in profile with a cocked head and legs rearing, as well as the streams of blood emerging from its body amidst spiraling leafy tendrils in the field. The composition is comprised of square stone tesserae in hues of sage green, olive green, golden yellow ochre, russet red, black, and white against a creamy white ground. Size (mosaic): 45.875" W x 34.5" H (116.5 cm x 87.6 cm); (frame): 47.3" W x 36.3" H (120.1 cm x 92.2 cm)

Mosaics (opus tesellatum) are some of our enduring images from the Roman world, not only for their aesthetic beauty, but also because they reveal what Romans chose to depict and see every day decorating their private and public spaces. This piece at first glance seems quite simple - a hunting scene. However, the inclusion of the stag was likely a deliberate choice to honor Diana - the goddess of the hunt, the moon, wild animals, the woods, and nature at large - who was also believed to adore stags. While impossible to know for certain, one can muse on this possibility and certainly appreciate the immense skill and technique it took to create.

In the Roman province of Syria, which encompassed most of the ancient Near East/Levant, mosaics developed as a popular art form from the 3rd to the 5th century CE. Syria was one of Rome's wealthiest provinces, but it was also far removed from Rome itself and Roman culture was overlaid on enduring cultural traditions from Hellenistic Greece and the great civilizations that came before it. Antioch-on-the-Orontes (modern day Antakya, Turkey), was the capital of northern Roman Syria, and its excavations in the 1930s revealed more than three hundred mosaic pavements - of which many embellished public baths.

Provenance: ex-Phoenicia Holyland Antiquities, New York, New York, USA; ex-Fortuna Fine Arts, LLC, New York, New York, USA, collected in the 1990s

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience.

#157323
Condition
Mounted on a concrete backing and framed. Small chips to tesserae, with a few stable hairline fissures to some tesserae and areas of concrete backing, otherwise in wonderful condition with great preservation of imagery and tesserae colors.
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Fine Roman Stone Mosaic Hunting Scene

Estimate $24,000 - $36,000
Jun 10
Starting Price $12,000
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Artemis Gallery

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0110: Fine Roman Stone Mosaic Hunting Scene

Lot Passed
0 Bids
Est. $24,000 - $36,000Starting Price $12,000
Exceptional Antiquities, Asian, Ethnographic
Thu, Jun 10, 2021 10:00 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 24.5%

Lot 0110 Details

Description
...
Roman, the Levant, late Imperial Period, ca. 3rd to 5th century CE. A fine stone mosaic depicting a dramatic hunting scene as the hunter has just struck his target, a stag, with his bow and arrow. For the day, a scene like this was akin to a present-day action film. Note the stag's posture, in profile with a cocked head and legs rearing, as well as the streams of blood emerging from its body amidst spiraling leafy tendrils in the field. The composition is comprised of square stone tesserae in hues of sage green, olive green, golden yellow ochre, russet red, black, and white against a creamy white ground. Size (mosaic): 45.875" W x 34.5" H (116.5 cm x 87.6 cm); (frame): 47.3" W x 36.3" H (120.1 cm x 92.2 cm)

Mosaics (opus tesellatum) are some of our enduring images from the Roman world, not only for their aesthetic beauty, but also because they reveal what Romans chose to depict and see every day decorating their private and public spaces. This piece at first glance seems quite simple - a hunting scene. However, the inclusion of the stag was likely a deliberate choice to honor Diana - the goddess of the hunt, the moon, wild animals, the woods, and nature at large - who was also believed to adore stags. While impossible to know for certain, one can muse on this possibility and certainly appreciate the immense skill and technique it took to create.

In the Roman province of Syria, which encompassed most of the ancient Near East/Levant, mosaics developed as a popular art form from the 3rd to the 5th century CE. Syria was one of Rome's wealthiest provinces, but it was also far removed from Rome itself and Roman culture was overlaid on enduring cultural traditions from Hellenistic Greece and the great civilizations that came before it. Antioch-on-the-Orontes (modern day Antakya, Turkey), was the capital of northern Roman Syria, and its excavations in the 1930s revealed more than three hundred mosaic pavements - of which many embellished public baths.

Provenance: ex-Phoenicia Holyland Antiquities, New York, New York, USA; ex-Fortuna Fine Arts, LLC, New York, New York, USA, collected in the 1990s

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

We ship worldwide to most countries and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience.

#157323
Condition
...
Mounted on a concrete backing and framed. Small chips to tesserae, with a few stable hairline fissures to some tesserae and areas of concrete backing, otherwise in wonderful condition with great preservation of imagery and tesserae colors.

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Artemis Gallery
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686 S. Taylor Avenue Suite 106
Louisville, CO 80027
USA
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