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Italian school; 18th century. Following GUIDO RENI

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Italian school; 18th century. Following GUIDO RENI
Item Details
Description
Italian school; 18th century. Following models by GUIDO RENI (Calvenzano di Vergato, Bologna, 1575 - Bologna, 1642).
"Madonna Orante".
Oil on canvas. Re-coloured.
It presents repainting and leaps.
Measurements: 81 x 65 cm.
Devotional work that presents us the Virgin Mary bust-length, in the foreground and captured at great size, occupying most of the pictorial surface. It is a monumental figure, worked with great delicacy and directly illuminated by a clear, uniform, classical light. Mary stands out against a neutral, flat, dark background, illuminated around her head by the halo of golden light. The Virgin is dressed in a pink tunic, alluding to the Passion of Christ and her own grief at the death of her Son, and a blue cloak, which is common in Marian iconography as a symbol of the concepts of truth and eternity. The figure shows a dynamic, elegantly twisted position, with her face raised towards heaven, showing herself as an intercessor between God and man. As a symbol of compassion and humility, Mary holds both hands to her breast. This is an image of great beauty, with an idealised but naturalistic face, large, expressive, deep-set eyes, drooping eyelids, a long, elegant nose and a small mouth.
Formally, this work is dominated by the influence of Guido Reni The undisputed master of Roman-Bolognese classicism alongside Albani and Domenichino, Guido Reni was undoubtedly the best of the three. Closely linked to the Carracci family and to the city of Bologna, they all had a similar career. They trained in Bologna with Denys Calvaert, and then went to the Accademia degli Incamminati, directed by Ludovico Carraci. In 1600 Reni arrived in Rome, where he worked with Annibale Carracci in the Galleria Farnese. His best period began in these years; in 1609, on Annibale's death, Reni became the head of the classicist school. In the city he was the protégé of Scipione Borghese, the future Pope Paul V, for whom the painter produced one of his most important works, "La Aurora" (Palazzo Rospigliosi). It reveals something that would always be characteristic of Reni's style, his admiration for ancient sculpture. Starting from classical statues, he developed an ideal of beauty and perfection that would be greatly admired by subsequent painters. In 1614 he returned to Bologna for good. Reni's style evolved in a clear direction, becoming more and more sculptural and cold, more and more fully classicist. His mature work was characterised by a cold, silvery palette. Finally, from the 1930s onwards, his style became sketchy, with an unfinished appearance and a tendency towards monochrome, of great interest from a technical as well as a formal point of view.Guido Reni is currently represented in the most important art galleries all over the world, including the Prado Museum, the Hermitage, the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum in New York and the National Gallery in London, among many others.
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Italian school; 18th century. Following GUIDO RENI

Estimate €2,500 - €2,800
Jan 26, 2022
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Starting Price €2,000
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0051: Italian school; 18th century. Following GUIDO RENI

Lot Passed
1 Bid
Est. €2,500 - €2,800Starting Price €2,000
26th January - Old masters
Jan 26, 2022 8:00 AM EST
Buyer's Premium 23%

Lot 0051 Details

Description
...
Italian school; 18th century. Following models by GUIDO RENI (Calvenzano di Vergato, Bologna, 1575 - Bologna, 1642).
"Madonna Orante".
Oil on canvas. Re-coloured.
It presents repainting and leaps.
Measurements: 81 x 65 cm.
Devotional work that presents us the Virgin Mary bust-length, in the foreground and captured at great size, occupying most of the pictorial surface. It is a monumental figure, worked with great delicacy and directly illuminated by a clear, uniform, classical light. Mary stands out against a neutral, flat, dark background, illuminated around her head by the halo of golden light. The Virgin is dressed in a pink tunic, alluding to the Passion of Christ and her own grief at the death of her Son, and a blue cloak, which is common in Marian iconography as a symbol of the concepts of truth and eternity. The figure shows a dynamic, elegantly twisted position, with her face raised towards heaven, showing herself as an intercessor between God and man. As a symbol of compassion and humility, Mary holds both hands to her breast. This is an image of great beauty, with an idealised but naturalistic face, large, expressive, deep-set eyes, drooping eyelids, a long, elegant nose and a small mouth.
Formally, this work is dominated by the influence of Guido Reni The undisputed master of Roman-Bolognese classicism alongside Albani and Domenichino, Guido Reni was undoubtedly the best of the three. Closely linked to the Carracci family and to the city of Bologna, they all had a similar career. They trained in Bologna with Denys Calvaert, and then went to the Accademia degli Incamminati, directed by Ludovico Carraci. In 1600 Reni arrived in Rome, where he worked with Annibale Carracci in the Galleria Farnese. His best period began in these years; in 1609, on Annibale's death, Reni became the head of the classicist school. In the city he was the protégé of Scipione Borghese, the future Pope Paul V, for whom the painter produced one of his most important works, "La Aurora" (Palazzo Rospigliosi). It reveals something that would always be characteristic of Reni's style, his admiration for ancient sculpture. Starting from classical statues, he developed an ideal of beauty and perfection that would be greatly admired by subsequent painters. In 1614 he returned to Bologna for good. Reni's style evolved in a clear direction, becoming more and more sculptural and cold, more and more fully classicist. His mature work was characterised by a cold, silvery palette. Finally, from the 1930s onwards, his style became sketchy, with an unfinished appearance and a tendency towards monochrome, of great interest from a technical as well as a formal point of view.Guido Reni is currently represented in the most important art galleries all over the world, including the Prado Museum, the Hermitage, the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum in New York and the National Gallery in London, among many others.

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