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Tall Greek Hellenistic Core-Form Glass Alabastron

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Tall Greek Hellenistic Core-Form Glass Alabastron
Item Details
Description
**Originally Listed At $2000**

Greece, late Hellenistic Period, ca. 2nd to 1st century BCE. A beautiful core-formed glass alabastron, so-named because many vessels that assumed this form were made of alabaster. The elegant vessel is comprised of opaque dark-blue glass accentuated with opaque yellow trails which are marvered and combed into a feathered design, and elegant spirals of additional yellow glass trails trace around the conical base and cylindrical neck just below the rim. The petite lug handles applied to each side of the neck are formed from solid dark-blue glass. Size: 1.3" W x 7.4" H (3.3 cm x 18.8 cm); 7.8" H (19.8 cm) on included custom stand.

The alabastron is a long-bodied vessel with a rounded bottom, a cylindrical neck, and a flat disk for a mouth. Though usually without handles, some alabastra have eyes or lugs, like this example. According to the Beazley Archive of the University of Oxford, the alabastron shape's history extends back to Corinth, but was only preserved in Athenian pottery examples back to the mid-sixth century BCE. Alabastra were created in many materials, including alabaster, and the Greek term for this stone - alabastron (most likely of Egyptian origin) - was the source of inspiration for the name of this shaped vessel. Many examples were finished with a white ground, as if to imitate this stone. We know from vase painting imagery of women using alabastra following a bath, that these vessels most likely held perfumed oils.

According to the Corning Museum of Glass, core forming is "the technique of forming a vessel by winding or gathering molten glass around a core supported by a rod. After forming, the object is removed from the rod and annealed. After annealing, the core is removed by scraping." This process of glass making was begun in the late 16th century BCE by glassmakers of Mesopotamia, and then adopted by Egyptian glassmakers in the 15th century BCE. The technique almost came to an end in the so-called Dark Ages of Mediterranean civilization (1200 to 900 BCE); however, by the 9th century BCE a new generation of glassmakers took up the technique once again, and between the 6th and 4th century BCE core-forming spread throughout the Mediterranean.

For a stylistically-similar example with a different color scheme, please see "Solid Liquid: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic Glass." Fortuna Fine Arts, Ltd., New York, 1999, p. 25, fig. 23.

Provenance: East Coast collection, New York Gallery, New York City, New York, USA, acquired before 2010

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to recent increases of shipments being seized by Australian & German customs (even for items with pre-UNESCO provenance), we will no longer ship most antiquities and ancient Chinese art to Australia & Germany. For categories of items that are acceptable to ship to Australia or Germany, please contact us directly or work with your local customs brokerage firm.

Display stands not described as included/custom in the item description are for photography purposes only and will not be included with the item upon shipping.

#137698
Condition
Repaired from multiple large pieces, with areas of restoration, and resurfacing along break lines. Minor nicks and abrasions to rim, body, and base, with light encrustations, and minor pitting. Light earthen deposits as well as beautiful rainbow-hued iridescence throughout.
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Tall Greek Hellenistic Core-Form Glass Alabastron

Estimate $2,400 - $3,600
May 26, 2022
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Starting Price $1,200
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0017: Tall Greek Hellenistic Core-Form Glass Alabastron

Lot Passed
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Est. $2,400 - $3,600Starting Price $1,200
CLEARANCE | Antiquities, Ethnographica, More!
May 26, 2022 10:00 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 26.5%

Lot 0017 Details

Description
...
**Originally Listed At $2000**

Greece, late Hellenistic Period, ca. 2nd to 1st century BCE. A beautiful core-formed glass alabastron, so-named because many vessels that assumed this form were made of alabaster. The elegant vessel is comprised of opaque dark-blue glass accentuated with opaque yellow trails which are marvered and combed into a feathered design, and elegant spirals of additional yellow glass trails trace around the conical base and cylindrical neck just below the rim. The petite lug handles applied to each side of the neck are formed from solid dark-blue glass. Size: 1.3" W x 7.4" H (3.3 cm x 18.8 cm); 7.8" H (19.8 cm) on included custom stand.

The alabastron is a long-bodied vessel with a rounded bottom, a cylindrical neck, and a flat disk for a mouth. Though usually without handles, some alabastra have eyes or lugs, like this example. According to the Beazley Archive of the University of Oxford, the alabastron shape's history extends back to Corinth, but was only preserved in Athenian pottery examples back to the mid-sixth century BCE. Alabastra were created in many materials, including alabaster, and the Greek term for this stone - alabastron (most likely of Egyptian origin) - was the source of inspiration for the name of this shaped vessel. Many examples were finished with a white ground, as if to imitate this stone. We know from vase painting imagery of women using alabastra following a bath, that these vessels most likely held perfumed oils.

According to the Corning Museum of Glass, core forming is "the technique of forming a vessel by winding or gathering molten glass around a core supported by a rod. After forming, the object is removed from the rod and annealed. After annealing, the core is removed by scraping." This process of glass making was begun in the late 16th century BCE by glassmakers of Mesopotamia, and then adopted by Egyptian glassmakers in the 15th century BCE. The technique almost came to an end in the so-called Dark Ages of Mediterranean civilization (1200 to 900 BCE); however, by the 9th century BCE a new generation of glassmakers took up the technique once again, and between the 6th and 4th century BCE core-forming spread throughout the Mediterranean.

For a stylistically-similar example with a different color scheme, please see "Solid Liquid: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic Glass." Fortuna Fine Arts, Ltd., New York, 1999, p. 25, fig. 23.

Provenance: East Coast collection, New York Gallery, New York City, New York, USA, acquired before 2010

All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to recent increases of shipments being seized by Australian & German customs (even for items with pre-UNESCO provenance), we will no longer ship most antiquities and ancient Chinese art to Australia & Germany. For categories of items that are acceptable to ship to Australia or Germany, please contact us directly or work with your local customs brokerage firm.

Display stands not described as included/custom in the item description are for photography purposes only and will not be included with the item upon shipping.

#137698
Condition
...
Repaired from multiple large pieces, with areas of restoration, and resurfacing along break lines. Minor nicks and abrasions to rim, body, and base, with light encrustations, and minor pitting. Light earthen deposits as well as beautiful rainbow-hued iridescence throughout.

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