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Michael Faraday, British Scientist, ALS Re: Railway

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Michael Faraday, British Scientist, ALS Re: Railway

Lot 0087 Details

Description
Faraday Michael

Michael Faraday, British Scientist, ALS Re: Railway Telegraphy


1p autograph letter inscribed overall by British chemist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), and signed by him as "M Faraday" at lower right. Written at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London, England on August 6, 1846. On plain cream stationery. Expected light paper folds. Uneven light toning, and pin marks at top. Light mounting traces verso. Else very good to near fine. 4.375" x 7.125".


Michael Faraday, one of the nation's leading scientific minds, wrote an unidentified correspondent about a trip to central England.


In full:


"Royal Institution

6 August 1846.


Sir


I beg to state to you that after remaining in town for a week endeavoring to arrange so that we might see the telegraph at Blisworth Mr Bailey & I went down on Tuesday last (the 4th instant) and remained there two hours examining the apparatus. We did not find it in such a state as would allow us to witness & judge of the practical results - and have agreed to a future examination - This I shall be obliged to defer for at least three weeks.


I am Sir

Your Obedient

humble Servant


M Faraday".


Michael Faraday theorized about (and proved the existence of) numerous foundational ideas relating to electricity and magnetism. He maintained a flat, study, and laboratory at the Royal Institution, and conducted many of his most important experiments there. At the Royal Institution, Faraday had attended lectures as a student; served as a Chemical Assistant after 1813; was appointed a Director of Laboratory after 1825; and accepted the position of Fullerian Professor of Chemistry after 1833.


Blisworth, located in Northamptonshire approximately 50 miles south of Birmingham, opened its first railway station in 1838. In 1842, the town's inhabitants lobbied that the station be granted "First Class" status, which meant that all trains would stop there. Blisworth became a junction station in 1845 when the London & Birmingham Railway opened a branch line running between Peterborough and Northampton. It is more than possible that the telegraph Faraday and his companion investigated that summer day was related in some way to the station upgrade.


The concept of "telegraphic railways" was proposed as a safety feature by William Fothergill Cooke and Charles Wheatstone in 1842. The signalling block system divided the railway line into sections of several miles' length. Entry to and exit from the block was authorized by electric telegraph and signaled by the line-side semaphore, so that only a single train could occupy the rails. Faraday was very involved in the development of telegraphy, and he and Wheatstone discovered the merits of gutta percha as an insulator when the latter suggested it be employed to cover wire proposed to be laid from Dover to Calais.


This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.


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Michael Faraday, British Scientist, ALS Re: Railway

Estimate $600 - $700
Nov 05, 2019
Starting Price $220
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Ships fromWestport , CT, United States
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0087: Michael Faraday, British Scientist, ALS Re: Railway

Sold for $750
18 Bids
Est. $600 - $700Starting Price $220
Manuscripts, Books & Apollo Related Items
Tue, Nov 05, 2019 10:30 AM EST
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0087 Details

Description
...
Faraday Michael

Michael Faraday, British Scientist, ALS Re: Railway Telegraphy


1p autograph letter inscribed overall by British chemist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), and signed by him as "M Faraday" at lower right. Written at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London, England on August 6, 1846. On plain cream stationery. Expected light paper folds. Uneven light toning, and pin marks at top. Light mounting traces verso. Else very good to near fine. 4.375" x 7.125".


Michael Faraday, one of the nation's leading scientific minds, wrote an unidentified correspondent about a trip to central England.


In full:


"Royal Institution

6 August 1846.


Sir


I beg to state to you that after remaining in town for a week endeavoring to arrange so that we might see the telegraph at Blisworth Mr Bailey & I went down on Tuesday last (the 4th instant) and remained there two hours examining the apparatus. We did not find it in such a state as would allow us to witness & judge of the practical results - and have agreed to a future examination - This I shall be obliged to defer for at least three weeks.


I am Sir

Your Obedient

humble Servant


M Faraday".


Michael Faraday theorized about (and proved the existence of) numerous foundational ideas relating to electricity and magnetism. He maintained a flat, study, and laboratory at the Royal Institution, and conducted many of his most important experiments there. At the Royal Institution, Faraday had attended lectures as a student; served as a Chemical Assistant after 1813; was appointed a Director of Laboratory after 1825; and accepted the position of Fullerian Professor of Chemistry after 1833.


Blisworth, located in Northamptonshire approximately 50 miles south of Birmingham, opened its first railway station in 1838. In 1842, the town's inhabitants lobbied that the station be granted "First Class" status, which meant that all trains would stop there. Blisworth became a junction station in 1845 when the London & Birmingham Railway opened a branch line running between Peterborough and Northampton. It is more than possible that the telegraph Faraday and his companion investigated that summer day was related in some way to the station upgrade.


The concept of "telegraphic railways" was proposed as a safety feature by William Fothergill Cooke and Charles Wheatstone in 1842. The signalling block system divided the railway line into sections of several miles' length. Entry to and exit from the block was authorized by electric telegraph and signaled by the line-side semaphore, so that only a single train could occupy the rails. Faraday was very involved in the development of telegraphy, and he and Wheatstone discovered the merits of gutta percha as an insulator when the latter suggested it be employed to cover wire proposed to be laid from Dover to Calais.


This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.


WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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