lots of lots

Einstein Among the Most Important Letters in Private

Discover Similar Items

See All
item-95000647=1
item-95000647=2
item-95000647=3
Einstein Among the Most Important Letters in Private
Item Details
Description

Einstein, Among the Most Important Letters in Private Hands, His Manuscript on the Theory of Relativity, Hitler, and the Nazis, and an Incredible Statement on his own Modesty, In English, 1p, Ready for Display!

Highly important typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), 1 page (11 x 81/2in.; 284 x 215 mm), on his personalized stationery embossed at head "A. Einstein 112 Mercer Street Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A.," 14 April 1944 to David Rothman of Southold, Long Island; some creasing at bottom left corner, not affecting text. The illustrated photo is of Einstein with David Rothman printed from the web.

Shortly before the Invasion of Normandy, Einstein discusses the fate of his original manuscript on the Theory of Relativity and voices his satisfaction with the success of the Allies against Hitler.

Einstein's correspondent, David Rothman, owned a department store in Southold, Long Island. During the summer of 1939, he befriended Einstein while the great physicist vacationed at Nassau Point on Peconic Bay on eastern Long Island. An amateur musician, Rothman organized a musical quartet with Einstein and some local friends, who would get together to play during the course of the summer in what Einstein would later refer to as his "pleasant musical evenings." Though Rothman only had a high school education, he had a keen interest in science and enjoyed talking with Einstein about scientific matters and more. Their friendship blossomed over the summer of 1939 and the warm relationship continued for many years punctuated by visits and correspondence back and forth.

Beginning his letter with fond memories of his summer of 1939, Einstein remarks on the beautiful boat Rothman's son has built and wishes him "happy times in it." He then reminisces: "Your Bay is really the most beutiful [sic] sailing ground I ever experienced and I regret that the health of my family compels me to go to the mountains for recreation."

No doubt answering a question posed by Rothman in a previous letter, Einstein proceeds to explain the fate of his first manuscript on the Theory of Relativity: "My first manuscript about relativity was not burned by the Nazis. I myself threw it into the waste-basket after it was printed judging it was good for nothing. At that time I knew nothing of the snobbery of this human world."

Turning to current events, he comments about World War II: " I feel quite satisfied with the progress of the war and especially with the strength of the Russians. I remember quite well how I trembled for them when Hitler began his attack in 1941."

An exceptional letter with extraordinary content. Much ballyhoo is made of the nearly $3 million “God” letter sold at Christies in 2018 and the $1.5 million dollar “bellhop note” sold in Israel in 2017, but we feel this letter in English is a not too distant cousin for all the reasons set forth in this description. It sold before the big uptick in Einstein Prices in 2011 at Sothebys for $104,500. But we must ask, could this be the next million dollar Einstein letter?

Buyer's Premium
  • 25%

Einstein Among the Most Important Letters in Private

Estimate $75,000 - $80,000
Jan 06, 2021
See Sold Price
Starting Price $25,000
Shipping, Payment & Auction Policies
Ships from Westport, CT, United States
University Archives

University Archives

badge TOP RATED
Wilton, CT, United States
2,108 Followers
Auction Curated By
John Reznikoff
President

Related Searches

logo
www.liveauctioneers.com
item

0082: Einstein Among the Most Important Letters in Private

Sold for $80,000
17 Bids
Est. $75,000 - $80,000Starting Price $25,000
Rare Manuscripts, Autographs and Books
Jan 06, 2021 10:30 AM EST
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0082 Details

Description
...

Einstein, Among the Most Important Letters in Private Hands, His Manuscript on the Theory of Relativity, Hitler, and the Nazis, and an Incredible Statement on his own Modesty, In English, 1p, Ready for Display!

Highly important typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), 1 page (11 x 81/2in.; 284 x 215 mm), on his personalized stationery embossed at head "A. Einstein 112 Mercer Street Princeton, New Jersey, U.S.A.," 14 April 1944 to David Rothman of Southold, Long Island; some creasing at bottom left corner, not affecting text. The illustrated photo is of Einstein with David Rothman printed from the web.

Shortly before the Invasion of Normandy, Einstein discusses the fate of his original manuscript on the Theory of Relativity and voices his satisfaction with the success of the Allies against Hitler.

Einstein's correspondent, David Rothman, owned a department store in Southold, Long Island. During the summer of 1939, he befriended Einstein while the great physicist vacationed at Nassau Point on Peconic Bay on eastern Long Island. An amateur musician, Rothman organized a musical quartet with Einstein and some local friends, who would get together to play during the course of the summer in what Einstein would later refer to as his "pleasant musical evenings." Though Rothman only had a high school education, he had a keen interest in science and enjoyed talking with Einstein about scientific matters and more. Their friendship blossomed over the summer of 1939 and the warm relationship continued for many years punctuated by visits and correspondence back and forth.

Beginning his letter with fond memories of his summer of 1939, Einstein remarks on the beautiful boat Rothman's son has built and wishes him "happy times in it." He then reminisces: "Your Bay is really the most beutiful [sic] sailing ground I ever experienced and I regret that the health of my family compels me to go to the mountains for recreation."

No doubt answering a question posed by Rothman in a previous letter, Einstein proceeds to explain the fate of his first manuscript on the Theory of Relativity: "My first manuscript about relativity was not burned by the Nazis. I myself threw it into the waste-basket after it was printed judging it was good for nothing. At that time I knew nothing of the snobbery of this human world."

Turning to current events, he comments about World War II: " I feel quite satisfied with the progress of the war and especially with the strength of the Russians. I remember quite well how I trembled for them when Hitler began his attack in 1941."

An exceptional letter with extraordinary content. Much ballyhoo is made of the nearly $3 million “God” letter sold at Christies in 2018 and the $1.5 million dollar “bellhop note” sold in Israel in 2017, but we feel this letter in English is a not too distant cousin for all the reasons set forth in this description. It sold before the big uptick in Einstein Prices in 2011 at Sothebys for $104,500. But we must ask, could this be the next million dollar Einstein letter?

Contacts

University Archives
(203) 454-0111
88 Danbury Road, Suite 2A
Wilton, CT 06897
USA
LiveAuctioneers Support
info@liveauctioneers.com
iphoneandroidPhone

Get notifications from your favorite auctioneers.

As Seen On
NBC
ABC
Today
Chicago Tribune
Architectural Digest
Shop With Confidence
Since 2002, LiveAuctioneers has made exceptional items available for safe purchase in secure online auctions.
TOP