Man slashes auctioneer’s throat with knife, charged with attempted murder

SALEM, Ore. (AP) – A 22-year-old Coos Bay man has been jailed on charges of using a boxcutter to slit the throat of an auctioneer in Woodburn.

Jeremiah D. Thomasson made a brief court appearance Wednesday on the charges of attempted murder and assault. He was assigned a lawyer and held without bail. He is to return to court next week.

Marion County sheriff’s Lt. Sheila Lorance says Thomasson invoked his Miranda right to silence, so investigators haven’t asked him about his motive.

Auctioneer Chuck Boyce had been auctioning items outside a shop when the attack occurred. Deputies told KGW-TV that the perpetrator fled the scene, jumping a fence into a nearby mobile home park.

Boyce was reported in good condition at a Portland hospital after the attack, which took place on June 30. He told station KPTV there was, in his mind, “no reason, nothing justifiable, to do something like this.”

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Information from: KPTV-TV, http://www.kptv.com/

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-07-01-09 0312EDT

The main building of the National Archives houses the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Historical items missing from National Archives

The main building of the National Archives houses the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The main building of the National Archives houses the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

WASHINGTON (AP) – National Archives visitors know they’ll find the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights in the main building’s magnificent rotunda in Washington. But they won’t find the patent file for the Wright Brothers’ Flying Machine or the maps for the first atomic bomb missions anywhere in the Archives inventory.

Many historical items the Archives once possessed are missing, including:

  • Civil War telegrams from Abraham Lincoln.
  • Original signatures of Andrew Jackson.
  • Presidential portraits of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
  • NASA photographs from space and on the moon.
  • Presidential pardons.

Some were stolen by researchers or Archives employees. Others simply disappeared without a trace.

And there’s more gone from the nation’s record keeper.

The Archives’ inspector general, Paul Brachfeld, is conducting a criminal investigation into a missing external hard drive with copies of sensitive records from the Clinton administration. On the hard drive were Social Security numbers, including one for one of former Vice President Al Gore’s daughters.

Because the equipment also may include classified information, Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, calls it a a major national security breach.

Brachfeld has documented thousands of electronic storage devices, including computers and servers, that have gone missing over the past decade from the National Archives and Records Administration.

Grassley, who has demanded an accounting of all missing items, said the loss of historical documents “robs our nation of its history and is completely unacceptable.”

The Archives’ stewardship of the nation’s records has been questioned before. In a well-publicized incident, former President Bill Clinton’s national security adviser, Sandy Berger, took documents from the Archives in the fall of 2003 while preparing, along with other ex-Clinton administration officials, for testimony to the Sept. 11 commission.

In September 2005, Berger was sentenced to two years of probation, 100 hours of community service, a $50,000 fine and loss of his security clearance for three years.

Some records have been missing for decades from the Archives’ 44 facilities in 20 states and the capital, including 13 presidential libraries.

“When I came here nine years ago, there was no acknowledgment that we had a problem,” Brachfeld said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Since then, he has started a recovery team that attends trade shows and Civil War re-enactments, and enlists the help of dealers and researchers to recover historical items that belong to the government.

The agency has two missions that sometimes are in conflict: preserving documents and making them available to the public in monitored research rooms with surveillance cameras.

“We do not have item-by-item control,” said Archives spokeswoman Susan Cooper. “We can’t. We have 9 billion documents. We don’t know exactly what’s in each of those boxes. There’s no point in preserving materials that cannot be used.”

Each missing historical item has its own story.

From 1969 to 1980, the patent file for the Wright Brothers Flyer was passed around multiple Archives offices, the Patents and Trademarks Office and the National Air and Space Museum. It was returned to the Archives in 1979, and was last seen in 1980.

In 1962, military representatives checked out the target maps for the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The maps have been missing ever since.

In May 2004, one of FDR’s grandsons asked to see a portrait of his grandfather at the Roosevelt presidential library in Hyde Park, N.Y. It couldn’t be found, and hasn’t been seen since 2001.

Shaun Aubitz, a former employee at the Archives’ facility in Philadelphia, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 21 months in prison in 2002 for stealing – among other items – 71 pardons signed by Presidents James Madison, James Polk, Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes and Lincoln. The Archives recovered 59 of the records that had been sold to manuscript dealers and collectors.

In 2005, researcher Howard Harner was sentenced to two years in prison, two years probation, and a $10,000 fine after pleading guilty to stealing more than 100 Civil War-era documents from the Archives between 1996 and 2002. Fewer than half were recovered.

A 40-year-old National Archives intern in Philadelphia stole 160 Civil War documents. About half were sold on eBay. The documents included telegrams about the troops’ weaponry, the War Department’s announcement of Lincoln’s death sent to soldiers, and a letter from famed Confederate cavalryman James Ewell Brown Stuart. A financially strapped Denning McTague was sentenced in the case to 15 months in prison in 2007. He had told a psychiatrist that he was angry that his internship was unpaid.

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On the Web:

List of missing items: http://tinyurl.com/kvmmd2

Archives home page: www.archives.gov

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-07-01-09 1206EDT

A rare 18th-century edition of Johann Sebastian Bach's choral songs is one of only nine works by the German composer to reach print before 1802. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

Bach choral edition, Beatles acetate in Bought IT Sold IT’s July 11 sale

A rare 18th-century edition of Johann Sebastian Bach's choral songs is one of only nine works by the German composer to reach print before 1802. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

A rare 18th-century edition of Johann Sebastian Bach’s choral songs is one of only nine works by the German composer to reach print before 1802. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

PERKASIE, Pa. – A rare 18th-century volume of Johann Sebastian Bach’s choral songs, Vierstimmige Choralgesange, will be sold July 11 by Bought IT Sold It. The first authorized complete edition of Bach’s choral songs is estimated at $13,000-$15,000. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding for this online only auction.

The auction will also include several other classical signed first edition masterpieces from Haydn, Gluck, Schumman, Ravel, Brahms and a first edition Auernhammer Sonatas by Mozart.

Another piece that deserves a look is a rare early Beatles acetate mono recording for Let It Be/You Know My Name with Apple green crayon writing on the face. Believed to be John Lennon’s personal copy, the recording is estimated to bring $1,500-$3,500.

An estate lot of Victorian, Edwardian and Art Deco jewelry includes a 1.25-carat emerald ring accented with .72 carats of diamonds in an 18-karat setting.

Additional items include about 50 lots of antique Japanese netsuke, inro, tobacco pouches, kiseru and yatate.

Several pieces of fine art including Albert Fields authenticated Dali prints, Anthony Quinn sculptures and an original Danielle Rochon pastel on canvas.

There are 200-plus lots of various memorabilia including sports, political and animation. Highlights include a Ronald Reagan signed lobby card for the 1949 comedy Girl From Jones Beach, a dual signed Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris photo, a collection of signed Rocky Marciano letters and numerous original UPI or AP press photos covering sports and mafia including Al Capone and John Gotti.

 

The auction will be July 11 beginning at 10 a.m. Eastern. For details phone 215-453-3936.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The autographs of New York Yankees sluggers Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris are on this 11 by 17 photograph, which has a $500-$1,000 estimate. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

The autographs of New York Yankees sluggers Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris are on this 11 by 17 photograph, which has a $500-$1,000 estimate. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

Exquisite detail depicting a snake and a rooster decorate this Japanese inro netsuke from the Meiji period, circa 1870. The black lacquer box has five compartments. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

Exquisite detail depicting a snake and a rooster decorate this Japanese inro netsuke from the Meiji period, circa 1870. The black lacquer box has five compartments. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

‘Fragments d'ou Jour' by Daniele Rochon has an estimate of $12,500-$17,500. The original pastel on canvas measures 39 by 29 inches. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

‘Fragments d’ou Jour’ by Daniele Rochon has an estimate of $12,500-$17,500. The original pastel on canvas measures 39 by 29 inches. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

Antique jewelry in the Bought IT Sold IT auction will include this 1.25-carat emerald ring accented with diamonds. It has a $2,000-$3,000 estimate. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

Antique jewelry in the Bought IT Sold IT auction will include this 1.25-carat emerald ring accented with diamonds. It has a $2,000-$3,000 estimate. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

On the 40th anniversary of the first lunar landing, this 1969 poster autographed by astronaut Buzz Aldrin has a $300-$500 estimate. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

On the 40th anniversary of the first lunar landing, this 1969 poster autographed by astronaut Buzz Aldrin has a $300-$500 estimate. Image courtesy Bought IT Sold IT.

Two figures were trimmed from the left side of Rembrandt's 1642 masterpiece 'The Night Watch.' Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Rembrandt’s works on exhibit in high def

Two figures were trimmed from the left side of Rembrandt's 1642 masterpiece 'The Night Watch.' Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Two figures were trimmed from the left side of Rembrandt’s 1642 masterpiece ‘The Night Watch.’ Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

AMSTERDAM (AP) – The life work of Rembrandt – all 317 known paintings, 285 etchings and more than 100 drawings – goes on display next week in full-size digital reproductions that attempt to recreate the works as they emerged from the artist’s studio rather than as they exist today.

In some ways, the high resolution images are more authentic than the real paintings, said Ernst van de Wetering, a leading Rembrandt scholar who supervised the project.

Employing computer wizardry, pieces of canvas or panel that were sliced off centuries ago have been patched back on. Colors are restored to the vibrancy they had when they came off the master’s brush. Details hidden in darkness because of aging pigments emerge into view.

The Complete Rembrandt, Life Size exhibition opens Sunday in the former Amsterdam Stock Exchange building and runs through Sept. 7.

Not everyone is happy with the idea of passing off posters as true art. But even Van de Wetering, who has examined much of 17th-century artist’s work with x-rays and microscopes, said he discovered details he had never seen before.

“I got surprises,” he said, as he watched the folds of painted cloth materialize on the computer screen and dark corners highlighted.

Organized chronologically, the exhibition brings together work from more than 100 museums and collections around the world to offer viewers “a walk through Rembrandt’s mind,” said the art historian. It follows his 45-year evolution from young painter to possibly the most famous master of his day, and the sudden leaps of inspiration and conceptualization in between that jolt him to new levels.

Van de Wetering heads the Rembrandt Research Project, created in 1968 to verify whether disputed works were true Rembrandts. Since then, it has disallowed about half the 600 paintings that once were attributed to the Dutch master, identifying them as either works by his students, copies by later admirers or deliberate forgeries.

The group of experts also has authenticated several previously unknown Rembrandts.

Over 40 years Van de Wetering has learned to dissect a Rembrandt into its smallest components, from the paint he used, the grounding of the work, the grain in the wood from which he cut his panels and the number of threads in his canvas.

Working with that knowledge and from contemporary copies by students, Van de Wetering could reconstruct works like The Night Watch, arguably Rembrandt’s most famous work, which has been radically altered and which he calls “a ruin” of the original.

“It’s a wreck,” he said in an interview.

In the exhibition, a copy of The Night Watch – a 1642 group portrait of an Amsterdam militia in colorful formal attire – as it is in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum, stands next to a recreation of the original. Over the years, the massive painting had been trimmed on all sides, and two figures were cut completely from the left side. The result moved the two central characters to the middle of the canvas, destroying Rembrandt’s intention to convey an image of motion.

Van de Wetering reconstructed the original work using a small copy painted by Amsterdam artist Gerrit Lundens seven years after Rembrandt finished The Night Watch. The copy not only included the pieces later lopped off but its colors had better retained their brightness because it was painted on panel.

Van de Wetering worked with computer specialist Aehryan Hesseling to alter high resolution photographs. The images were then printed and mounted by the Van Straaten company, which specializes in billboards and large-scale advertising.

The exhibit revives a 3-year-old debate about the value of seeing copies of the full range of Rembrandt’s work as compared with viewing a few originals. The argument first arose during an exhibit of 290 photographs – some of them poor quality – for Rembrandt’s 400th birth anniversary.

Van de Wetering argues that the reproductions have the advantage of stripping away the aura of awe viewers often have when they see an original, which hinders their assessment of the work.

Axel Ruger, director of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, complained in 2006 that the organizers appeared to see no qualitative difference between a reproduction and the real thing.

“Reproductions cannot convey anything of the wonderful three-dimensional quality of Rembrandt’s painted surfaces,” Ruger wrote at the time. A spokeswoman said the Van Gogh director has not changed his mind, but declined to comment specifically about the current exhibition.

Rather than duck the controversy, Van de Wetering reprinted Ruger’s complaints in an epilogue to the book accompanying the show.

He argues that Rembrandt made copies of his work, and had his students make more copies, because he wanted a wider audience.

“Rembrandt would have been very happy if he had known we were doing this,” he said. “But the copies he made of his works are many times worse than ours.”

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-07-01-09 0616EDT

Lorado Taft is pictured working on the 'Fountain of Time' at his Woodlawn studio. The 126-foot-long fountain was installed in Chicago's Washington Park in 1920. Image courtesy Chicago Daily News Collection at the Chicago History Museum.

Illinois town awards last Lorado Taft sculpture place of honor

Lorado Taft is pictured working on the 'Fountain of Time' at his Woodlawn studio. The 126-foot-long fountain was installed in Chicago's Washington Park in 1920. Image courtesy Chicago Daily News Collection at the Chicago History Museum.

Lorado Taft is pictured working on the ‘Fountain of Time’ at his Woodlawn studio. The 126-foot-long fountain was installed in Chicago’s Washington Park in 1920. Image courtesy Chicago Daily News Collection at the Chicago History Museum.

OREGON, Ill. (AP) – Perhaps it was fitting that when he died in his studio home in Chicago, sculptor Lorado Taft was creating a memorial piece commissioned to be placed on a grave. It was to depict a man young, with face and arms upraised and be called Aspiration.

But that final piece was never finished. All that was thought to remain of Aspiration was an old photograph that shows a working plaster model in the center of Taft’s studio at the time of his death, in 1936.

That is, until now.

Before he embarked on the full-size version of Aspiration, Taft created a 14 1/2-inch version. Unlike the plaster model that is thought to have since disintegrated, his minor version was cast permanently in bronze. Now, after changing hands several times, a pair of keen eyes and a winning online bid on eBay have ensured that his final bronze piece will become a permanent part of the Taft legacy in the town of Oregon.

Aspiration, the miniature, arrived in town recently and will probably be on display soon in the Eagle’s Nest Colony Art Collection of the Oregon Public Library. The collection is named for he colony that Taft created and mentored in the woods of what is now the Lorado Taft Field Campus of Northern Illinois University on the western banks of the Rock River north of Oregon.

Lynn Allyn Young, the founder of Chicago-based Artistic License Limited, found Aspiration for auction on eBay. Young, who once presented a photo lecture on Taft and is writing a book on his work, contacted Betty Croft of Oregon, who helped to buy the statue.

The final bid, according to the Web site, was $2,275.

“It is truly a rare find and a treasure,” Croft said.

It was made to be a sketch model for a 10-foot marble memorial statue for the grave of Emmons McCormick Blaine Jr., who died of pneumonia in 1918 at the age of 28.

Blaine was the grandson of Cyrus McCormick, who founded a company in Chicago that would become International Harvester Co.

Taft historians assume that the larger piece was destroyed, but the small statue probably was given to Blaine’s mother and disposed of by trustees of her estate after she died in 1954.

The statue showed up in 1955 in a Chicago antique shop, where it was bought by Thomas McDonough and his wife. They made inquiries to art experts and people who had known Taft to confirm that it was an original piece.

Mary Webster, who had been Taft’s assistant and secretary, knew of the piece and that it had been cast in bronze by Gorham Foundries, but she had not seen it again.

Oregon Library Board President Terry Schuster said he was pleased with the addition to the library’s collection.

“It’s a perfect fit for this community,” he said. “With our ties to art and to Lorado Taft, to actually have the last piece he worked on is priceless.”

With his Eternal Indian towering down over the Rock River valley, his stony vision of Civil War soldiers gracing the lawn of the Ogle County Courthouse, and playful fountains still delighting children in Mix Park, Taft made a mark on Oregon that has endured more than 70 years after his death.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-06-30-09 0303EDT

LA curator to head Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum

AMSTERDAM (AP) – Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum says it has appointed American Ann Goldstein as its new artistic director from 2010.

Goldstein is currently senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.

The Stedelijk is currently undergoing a major renovation and is due to reopen in March or April 2010. It is holding an exhibition in the nearby Van Gogh Museum.

Tuesday’s statement says Goldstein was the unanimous choice of the museum’s board and says her appointment underscores the museum’s image as a showcase of modern and contemporary art and artists.

Goldstein says she is honored to be leading the museum at an “exciting and decisive moment in its history.”

Goldstein succeeds Gijs van Tuyl, who has led the museum since 2005.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-06-30-09 1311EDT

 

The graphics on the box declare this Ives train set is an all-American toy. The set has a $6,000 high estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Catch a train at New England Toy & Train Exchange sale July 10-11

The graphics on the box declare this Ives train set is an all-American toy. The set has a $6,000 high estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

The graphics on the box declare this Ives train set is an all-American toy. The set has a $6,000 high estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

DANBURY, Conn. – Bidders attending the New England Toy & Train Exchange’s Summer Auction will be whistling the old Judy Garland show tune Trolley Song before the nearly 800 lots are sold July 10 and 11. Several early trolleys will be featured during the second day of the sale. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Expected to generate the highest price is a scarce, early Lionel 3 Trolley in Standard Gauge. The sides are clearly marked “No. 3 Electric Rapid Transit.” It has a $3,000-$7,000 estimate.

A nice Lionel 1 Trolley and Trailer in Standard Gauge, circa 1907, are nicely matched and could roll to $2,500-$5,000.

“It’s unusual to find a trolley and trailer together. The trailer was optional and a lot of times people didn’t buy them,” said Mark Tobias of New England Toy and Train Exchange.

An original Voltamp 2120 United Electric Trolley in Gauge 2 could charge from $3,000-$6,000. It has strong lettering and is free of touch-ups, which is unusual.

“They didn’t use primer so the paint often flaked. Guys would grab a paint brush and paint over the bare spots,” said Tobias.

Another highlight of the NETTE’s Summer Auction will be one of the nicest Ives boxed sets the auctioneers have ever encountered. The Ives No. 1105 outfit includes a bicycle-wheel 1100 electric locomotive, an FE Tender with gray frame, 50 Baggage Car, 52 Newark Coach; 52 Washington Coach and has super paint with bright lithography. The set is in C7+ condition and expected to go to $2,500-$6,000.

Also from Voltamp is a 2130 Steeple Cab Electric engine capable of pulling in a $2,400-$5,000 bid. The Gauge 2 train engine is clean and all original.

A rare boxed Lionel Smooth Yankee Set no. 5224E, uncataloged from 1935 consists of a 616 Diesel with red top, 617 Coach and 618 Observation car, all having smooth sides in silver paint. In C6+ condition, this set has a $1,000-$3,000 estimate.

Another rare set is the Lionel Baby Railchief set released in 1937 as a Macy’s employee promotion. This five-piece passenger train in C6 condition and with its boxes merits a $2,000-$4,000 estimate.

The auction will begin Friday at 6:30 p.m. Eastern with the first of 257 lots, a Lionel Donald Duck and Pluto handcar. The clockwork mechanism winds but no longer runs. Showing other signs of wear, the 1930s toy has a $100-$400 estimate. Saturday’s session will begin at 10 a.m. Eastern.

Following the trains on Saturday, 91 lots of toys, mostly cars and trucks, will be sold. A collection of 18 Cortland trucks, many in original boxes, will be sold, including three circus wagons pulled by an elephant. Fifteen Schuco toys will be sold including a tin lithograph Curvo motorcycle with its illustrated box and instructions.

Presale bidding was most active for a Weeden live steam derrick, circa 1900, and a postwar boxed Technofix roller coaster.

The auction will be conducted at New England Toy & Train Exchange, 110-112 Beaver Brook Road in Danbury.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Voltamp's 2120 United Electric Trolley in original condition is a  It has a $3,000-$6,000 estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Voltamp’s 2120 United Electric Trolley in original condition is a It has a $3,000-$6,000 estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Lionel's No. 3 trolley is a scarce early example having an unusual cowcatcher. It carries an estimate of $3,000-$7,000. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Lionel’s No. 3 trolley is a scarce early example having an unusual cowcatcher. It carries an estimate of $3,000-$7,000. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Developed in the United States in the early 1900s, the Steeplecab Electric sometimes pulled interurban cars or served as switchers. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Developed in the United States in the early 1900s, the Steeplecab Electric sometimes pulled interurban cars or served as switchers. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Only one car of Lionel's early Trolley and Trailer set had an engine. The lead car pulled the trailer. The set has a $2,500-$5,000 estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Only one car of Lionel’s early Trolley and Trailer set had an engine. The lead car pulled the trailer. The set has a $2,500-$5,000 estimate. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Catching the rare 1935 Lionel Smooth Yankee Set #5224E is tough. Bidding is expected to reach $1,000-$3,000. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.

Catching the rare 1935 Lionel Smooth Yankee Set #5224E is tough. Bidding is expected to reach $1,000-$3,000. Image courtesy New England Toy & Train Exchange.