Cast-iron Gong Bell See-Saw toy, one of 20 bell toys in the sale, estimate $3,500-$5,500. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

RSL’s Oct. 17 Bountiful Harvest includes fine banks, toys

Cast-iron Gong Bell See-Saw toy, one of 20 bell toys in the sale, estimate $3,500-$5,500. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Cast-iron Gong Bell See-Saw toy, one of 20 bell toys in the sale, estimate $3,500-$5,500. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

TIMONIUM, Md. – RSL Auction Co. will conduct its Bountiful Harvest sale featuring approximately 500 lots of antique toys and banks on Oct. 17, 2009 at Richard Opfer’s auction gallery in the Baltimore suburb of Timonium. A multiple-consignor offering of top-tier pieces hand-picked from seasoned collections, the traditional auction event will feature a full complement of remote-bidding options, including phone, absentee, fax, email and live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com.

“This is a good-looking sale,” said RSL partner Ray Haradin, a long-time specialist collector of mechanical banks and American toys. “Rather than having a mega-sale of a single collection that runs the gamut from low end to high end, we took a small grouping of particularly nice pieces from each of six very particular collectors. Together, it makes a great selection.”

The auction consists of seven basic categories: European tinplate wind-ups, tinplate autos, American tin/clockwork toys, American cast-iron bell toys, cast-iron horse-drawn toys, mechanical banks and still banks.

Highlights in the European section include eight Lehmanns, with top lots being a pink-version Li-La, $1,200-$1,800; a Paddy & the Pig, Onkel, Daredevil, and a boxed, near-mint Motor Coach, $900-$1,200. Martins include a Delivery Boy, Drunkard, and Bear. A standout lot within the European tin is the Buster Brown and Tige with lamppost toy in beautiful condition, estimated at $4,500-$6,500.

Twenty lots of penny toys will be available. Bonzo on a platform, a clockwork limo, a very nice transfer wagon, and clowns tossing a ball (estimate $700-$1,000) lead the category.

European autos include an 11-inch-long Ebo limousine with driver, finished in bright, fancy colors and made in Germany around 1920. It could realize $3,500-$5,500 on auction day. Another fine German-made car is the Distler saloon, which also carries a $3,500-$5,500 estimate.

Approximately 20 American clockwork tin toys will be offered, including an Ives bareback circus rider on horse, estimate $8,000-$12,000; and a spectacular Althof Bergmann carousel, estimate $7,000-$10,000.

A parade of 20 American bell toys is led by a variant of Gong Bell’s See-Saw toy. “Gong Bell made a See-Saw toy of a boy and girl with a central bell in a cast-iron shield. This one is the rarely seen variation with a lead eagle between the boy and girl,” said Haradin. It is expected to make $3,500-$5,500 at auction.

Two near-mint Hubley Royal Circus toys, including a coveted Calliope (estimate $12,000-$18,000), will be auctioned, both with their original boxes. Also in the cast-iron section are a few Hubley airplanes – most notably the America and Friendship models – and four extremely desirable blinking-eye clocks, including examples of the Lion, Topsy, and the Banjo Player.

Ten early friction toys made during the period 1911-1925 include manufacturers’ names such as Clark and Dayton Friction. “The most interesting piece is a 28-inch-long Converse Dewey loco and tender 999,” said Haradin. “It replicates the first train to exceed 100 miles per hour, which happened around 1910.” The toy is estimated at $600-$900.

Among the top entries in the mechanical bank section is a Kenton Hardware Mama Katzenjammer Bank that is widely considered to be the best extant example. “It’s one of the two best, for sure,” said Haradin. Formerly in the Bob Brady collection, it carries a presale estimate of $40,000-$60,000.

Another important mechanical bank, also ex Bob Brady collection, is a Shepard Hardware Picture Gallery bank, estimated at $35,000-$55,000. A very rare Prussian Marksman “shooting” bank of either English or German manufacture comes with provenance through the John Haley collection. One of perhaps only three known examples, it will cross the auction block with hopes of achieving $25,000-$35,000.

Other mechanicals worthy of a shout-out include a boxed, near-mint Stevens Artillery bank, Union version with blue-jacketed soldier, estimate $6,500-$8,500; and a Judd Co. (Wallingford, Conn.) American Giant bank, one of about15 known examples and estimated at $15,000-$20,000.

Around 100 still banks have been consigned, including several coveted spelter banks. A 7-inch spelter Grandpa Cat with large pipe could smoke up a winning bid of $3,000-$5,000; while a Wheat Seller bank depicting a man in a top hat with a sheaf of wheat is estimated at $1,400-$1,800.

Leon Weiss, who is one of three partners in RSL Auction (the other two being Ray Haradin and Leon’s brother, Steven Weiss), explained the company’s philosophy: “We pride ourselves in the way we produce our sales. We’re not a clearinghouse. We’re very selective about what we sell, and we always try to make decisions that are in our consignors’ best interests. For instance, we originally intended to hold this auction in June, but because of the exceptional quality of the consignments, we elected to wait and let the economy start performing better. We knew that in the long run this would be better for our consignors. In retrospect, we think this was a wise decision, because the demand for high-end toys at auction has really heated up. Any hesitations that toy and bank buyers may have had didn’t last very long, and we think October will be prime time for toys.”

RSL’s Bountiful Harvest auction will take place on Saturday, Oct. 17, 2009 at Richard Opfer’s auction gallery, 1919 Greenspring Dr., Timonium, MD 21093. The sale will commence at 11 a.m. A preview will be held on Thursday, Oct. 15 from 2-7 p.m.; Friday, Oct. 16 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and on auction day from 8-11 a.m. Complimentary lunch and soft drinks will be served at the auction.

Catalogs will be available one month prior to the sale. The cost is $30 postpaid for softcover and $55 for hardcover, to U.S. addresses. Add $10 for international shipment. Special hotel rates are available at the Crowne Plaza in Timonium, which is a short walk on the same street as Opfer’s gallery. For reservations, call 1-877-270-1393.

For information about any lot in the auction, call Ray Haradin at 412-343-8733; Leon Weiss at 917-991-7352, or Steven Weiss at 212-729-0011. E-mail raytoys@aol.com or geminitoys@earthlink.net. View the fully illustrated electronic catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Lehmann near-mint Motor Coach with original box, estimate $900-$1,200. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Lehmann near-mint Motor Coach with original box, estimate $900-$1,200. Image courtesy RSL Auction.


Buster Brown and Tige with lamppost tin toy in fine condition, estimate $4,500-$6,500. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Buster Brown and Tige with lamppost tin toy in fine condition, estimate $4,500-$6,500. Image courtesy RSL Auction.


Kenton Hardware Mama Katzenjammer Bank widely considered to be the best extant example, ex Bob Brady collection, estimate $40,000-$60,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Kenton Hardware Mama Katzenjammer Bank widely considered to be the best extant example, ex Bob Brady collection, estimate $40,000-$60,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.


Shepard Hardware Picture Gallery bank, ex Bob Brady collection, estimate $35,000-$55,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Shepard Hardware Picture Gallery bank, ex Bob Brady collection, estimate $35,000-$55,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.


Grandpa Cat still bank, 7 inches high, spelter, estimate $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Grandpa Cat still bank, 7 inches high, spelter, estimate $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.


Near-mint Hubley Royal Circus Calliope with original box, estimate $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Near-mint Hubley Royal Circus Calliope with original box, estimate $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.


Clowns tossing a ball, one of 20 tinplate penny toys in the sale, estimate $700-$1,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Clowns tossing a ball, one of 20 tinplate penny toys in the sale, estimate $700-$1,000. Image courtesy RSL Auction.

Image courtesy Meadows School of the Arts.

Meadows School of the Arts announces new Meadows Prize for artists

Image courtesy Meadows School of the Arts.

Image courtesy Meadows School of the Arts.

DALLAS – The Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University has announced the launch of the Meadows Prize, a new international arts residency to be awarded to up to four artists a year.

Prize recipients will be professionals with an emerging international profile who are active in a discipline represented by one of the academic units within the Meadows School: advertising, art, art history, arts administration, cinema-television, corporate communications, dance, journalism, music and theatre.

The prize includes housing for a one-to-three-month residency in Dallas, transportation expenses, studio/office space and project costs, in addition to a substantial prize/stipend. In return, recipients will be expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed either in the Meadows School or through a local professional arts organization, a new tradition of community outreach involving students, a new work of scholarship, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline, among other possibilities.

The Meadows Prize is sponsored by the Meadows School and The Meadows Foundation, in partnership with the new Dallas Center for the Performing Arts and local Dallas arts organizations.

“Dallas is becoming an international destination for cultural tourism, thanks to its growing private and public collections of major works of art, its signature new facilities for the performing arts, and its well-established, sophisticated media community,” said José Bowen, dean of the Meadows School. “To become a leader in the creative world, however, Dallas must also become a preeminent center for the generation of new and innovative art and scholarship. With the establishment of the Meadows Prize and our associated collaboration with partner arts organizations in Dallas, our goal is simultaneously to stimulate the creation of new works, provide unique learning opportunities for our students, and raise awareness of Meadows and Dallas as centers of artistic excellence.”

A nominating committee of 12 international arts professionals is currently working on selection of the prize recipients. The nominating committee includes Dore Ashton, award-winning art critic, historian, professor and author/editor of 30 books on art and culture; Joanne Cassullo, New York-based philanthropist and arts supporter; James Houghton, the Richard Rodgers Director of the Drama Division at The Juilliard School and the Artistic Director of Signature Theatre in New York; artist/architect/filmmaker Alfredo Jaar; Golden Globe- and Emmy-winning actress Laura Linney; Marla Price, director of the Museum of Modern Art in Fort Worth; Deedie Potter Rose, chair of the Dallas Museum of Art board of directors; Severino Salvemini, professor of organization and human resources management at the SDA Bocconi School of Management in Italy; Paul Taylor, choreographer and founder of the Paul Taylor Dance Company; Jaap van Zweden, conductor of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra; Stan Wojewodski, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Directing at the Meadows School; and John Zorn, experimental New York composer, performer and producer.

The Meadows Prize winners will be announced in October during the opening of the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts and will begin their residencies in Dallas later in the fall.

# # #

Entrance to USS Midway Museum. Image courtesy of USS Midway Museum.

Former museum employee pleads guilty in theft case

Entrance to USS Midway Museum. Image courtesy of USS Midway Museum.

Entrance to USS Midway Museum. Image courtesy of USS Midway Museum.

SAN DIEGO (ACNI) – A woman accused of embezzling more than $100,000 from her former place of employment, the USS Midway Museum, pleaded guilty on Aug. 26 to charges of grand theft and fraudulent appropriation by an employee.

Prosecutors said that during her three-year term of employment as accounting manager, Monay stole 21 cash deposits totaling $111,000. Monay reportedly resigned from her position two days after a fellow employee in the museum’s financial department reported finding bookkeeping irregularities.

According to a report in the San Diego Union-Tribune, Veronica Gonzalez Monay, 35, now faces a possible prison sentence of up to four years. Monay is currently in county jail in lieu of posting $100,000 bail, with sentencing set for Sept. 24.

A fabled U.S. Navy aircraft carrier, the USS Midway was commissioned a week after the end of World War II and embarked on an unprecedented 47-year odyssey that set new standards in naval aviation. More than 225,000 Americans took part in the craft’s long tour of service that ended after the Midway served as the Persian Gulf flagship in Desert Storm. The USS Midway is the longest-serving U.S. Navy carrier of the 20th century and for a decade between 1945 and 1955, was the largest ship in the world. Its flight deck measures 4 acres.

Now a hands-on museum, the USS Midway provides an opportunity for visitors to enter a floating city at sea and walk in the footsteps of 225,000 Midway sailors who served aboard the ship. Guests can spend the day exploring more than 60 exhibits with a collection of 25 restored aircraft or try their hand at piloting one of three flight simulators.

# # #


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


USS Midway with San Diego skyline in background. Image courtesy of USS Midway Museum.

USS Midway with San Diego skyline in background. Image courtesy of USS Midway Museum.

Painting stolen from Maryland exhibit returned

FREDERICK, Md. (AP) – Frederick Police say a $2,000 painting stolen from an exhibit in December has been returned.

Officers say an unidentified man contacted them on Tuesday to say he had the missing painting. He brought the painting to police and it was confirmed to be Rocky Road Covered Bridge by local artist Carol Hutson. The painting was stolen from the Frederick Arts Council between Dec. 16 and 17, 2008.

Police say the man who returned the painting is not believed to have been involved in the theft. The painting was returned to Hutson, and police have reopened the investigation into the theft.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-08-25-09 1738EDT

Robert Kret, newly appointed director at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Image courtesy Georgia O'Keeffe Museum.

O’Keeffe museum names new director, Robert Kret

Robert Kret, newly appointed director at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum. Image courtesy Georgia O'Keeffe Museum.

Robert Kret, newly appointed director at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Image courtesy Georgia O’Keeffe Museum.

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) – The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum announced Tuesday it has hired Robert A. Kret as its new director.

Kret, currently the director of the Hunter Museum of American Art in Chattanooga, Tenn., will begin the job Oct. 26. He succeeds George King, who left last month after 11 years to head the New York-based American Federation of Arts.

The Santa Fe museum, a top tourist attraction, has the largest collection of O’Keeffe’s paintings, drawings and sculptures in the world, nearly 1,200 pieces.

It also has a research center for the study of American modernism and owns O’Keeffe’s former homes and studios in the northern New Mexico village of Abiquiu and in a rural area nearby.

“From my perspective, it seemed like a nice combination of the visual arts as well as … historic preservation” Kret said in an interview.

Kret, 48, has been director since 2000 at the Hunter Museum, where he oversaw an expansion and renovation project that was part of a broader, public-private waterfront redevelopment effort.

Kret said the museum on a riverside bluff had been “disconnected, physically and sort of intellectually” from the community.

The expansion roughly doubled the number of visitors, the size of the staff and the museum’s operating budget, and the museum’s education programs have made it a more integral part of the community, he said.

Before the Hunter Museum, Kret was director at the Miami University Art Museum in Oxford, Ohio, and the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wis.

He also was executive director of the Ella Sharp Museum in Jackson, Mich., and director of museums for the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities in Boston.

O’Keeffe, one of the foremost American painters, lived for almost 40 years in northern New Mexico. She died in Santa Fe in 1986 at the age of 98.

The museum is dedicated to perpetuating her legacy, and museum officials recently got into a flap with Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary School in Albuquerque over what the museum viewed as possible trademark infringement because of the use of the artist’s name on school-related items.

The differences were resolved and the museum plans to work with the school on art projects for students.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-08-26-09 0400EDT

Salvador Dali, 1939, from the Carl Van Vechten photograph collection, Library of Congress

Houston Salvation Army receives gift of purported Dali artworks

Salvador Dali, 1939, from the Carl Van Vechten photograph collection, Library of Congress

Salvador Dali, 1939, from the Carl Van Vechten photograph collection, Library of Congress

HOUSTON (AP) – A donor who wishes to remain anonymous has given a Houston charity items offered as originals by famed Spanish artist Salvador Dali.

The Salvation Army has put the abstract pieces on display at one of its thrift stores. Certificates of authenticity accompany the artworks by Dali, who died in 1989.

The items range from drawings to lithographs to individual prints. A bronze crucifix is part of the display.

Assistant store manager Carl Roberts says written bids will be accepted through the end of September.

Roberts says the woman who donated the items previously gave the charity other Dali artworks, which were auctioned online.

On the Net:

www.salvationarmyhouston.org

 

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-WS-08-26-09 0709EDT

Andy Warhol at a 1977 White House reception for artists. National Archives photo, public domain.

Twenty-two years after his death, Warhol’s junk lends insight

Andy Warhol at a 1977 White House reception for artists. National Archives photo, public domain.

Andy Warhol at a 1977 White House reception for artists. National Archives photo, public domain.

PITTSBURGH (AP) – A cardboard lid is lifted and four archivists peer inside. A postal box from Paris. Who sent it? A piece of crusty wedding cake. Whose? Another box: $17,000 in cash. Yet another: An autographed picture of a naked Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

These are some of the many items workers have uncovered as they sift through 610 cardboard boxes, filing cabinets and even a shipping container filled with what would be considered junk by most people but has a whole different meaning since it was collected by pop artist Andy Warhol.

The archivists, hired with $600,000 from the Andy Warhol Foundation and several other smaller grants, have six years to comb through everything from taxi cab receipts to fan mail, meticulously cataloguing, photographing and, when possible, researching the often bizarre items before entering them into a database.

“He really didn’t like organization and there would be several boxes going at a time,” says Matt Wrbican, who is overseeing the cumbersome project.

Now the spouses of the 19 heads of states and representatives of the European Union coming to Pittsburgh in September for the Group of 20 global economic summit may also get a peek at the papers, stamps, photos, gifts and nicknacks that made up Warhol’s life.

“I would like to give them a Warhol experience,” says Thomas Sokolowski, director of The Andy Warhol Museum, who will host the spouses for lunch during the Sept. 24-25 summit.

The idea, he says, is to give them white smocks and gloves, just as the archivists wear, and a box to sift through.

The White House hasn’t decided whether to go for it, he says, and if it does, any boxes would be vetted in advance to ensure nothing crops up that is offensive – such as porn – or truly disgusting – like the oozing, decades-old soup cans Warhol often dumped inside.

Warhol was never one to throw things away, Wrbican says. In fact, when he died in 1987 at 58, his four-story Manhattan townhouse was packed with stuff: shopping bags filled with antiques, clothes, books and other artifacts from his daily expeditions, boxes, piles of furniture and even a drawer of gems worth $1 million.

“The only rooms that looked like a normal house were the bathroom and the kitchen,” says Wrbican, who has been going through the artist’s things since 1991.

However, there was no rhyme or reason to the collecting until about 1973. That’s when a Warhol associate suggested the artist carry a box around to dump things inside. Each “time capsule” was filled, taped shut, dated and sent to a New Jersey storage facility.

In the 18 months since the project began, the archivists have opened 177 boxes – each with an average of 400 items, some with as many as 1,200. Today, Wrbican said, just one of the boxes is insured for the amount of money the time capsule collection was appraised at a few years after Warhol’s death.

In September, the archivists will begin blogging about the “Object of the Week.” What could appear: Wrbican’s favorite, a mummified human foot belonging to an ancient Egyptian; a Ramones’ 45 record signed by the punk rock band’s lead singer Joey Ramone, found by cataloger Marie Elia; or the orange nutbread cataloger Liz Scott discovered – sent to Warhol by one of his Pittsburgh-area cousins with a note telling him to enjoy it with a cup of coffee.

“So he just threw it in a box,” Scott laughs, twisting her face to describe the tangy smell that wafted out of the box.

So, you’re wondering, whose wedding cake was it? Caroline Kennedy’s – married in 1986 to Edwin Schlossberg. And where is it? The trash.

And how did Warhol come to possess a naked poster of Jackie O signed, “For Andy, with enduring affection, Jackie Montauk”?

As it happens, says Wrbican – who along with other researchers authenticated the signature through handwriting comparisons – Onassis was a frequent visitor to Warhol’s Montauk, New York, beachfront estate.

So, after her second husband, Aristotle Socrates Onassis, got a paparazzi to take pictures of her skinny-dipping and it landed in the hands of Larry Flynt, who turned it into a poster for his porn magazine, Hustler, Jackie O sent a copy – likely as a joke – to Warhol, Wrbican said.

“I really doubted it was her signature at first,” he says. “But it really matches her writing.”

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-08-19-09 1045EDT

Cover image of L. Frank Baum's 1900 book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Public domain image.

Kansas celebrating 70th anniversary of Oz with OZtoberFEST

Cover image of L. Frank Baum's 1900 book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Public domain image.

Cover image of L. Frank Baum’s 1900 book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Public domain image.

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) – The 70th anniversary of the release of the MGM musical The Wizard of Oz won’t pass unnoticed in the home state of its central character, the feisty Kansas farm girl Dorothy Gale.

The capstone of Kansas celebrations of the August 1939 release of the iconic film will be Oct. 3-4 at a special edition of the annual OZtoberFEST in Wamego, the northeast Kansas town that has embraced all things Oz more so than any other in the state in which L. Frank Baum’s set the books that inspired the movie.

However, commemoration of The Wizard of Oz at 70 already has commenced in Topeka, the capital city whose capitol dome is the color of the Emerald City.

The Great Overland Station, the railroading museum, is showing through October All Aboard the Oz Express, which contains just a fraction of the Oz memorabilia collected by Jane Albright since she was a girl growing up in Topeka’s Potwin neighborhood.

I grew up reading Oz books,” the former Jane McNeive said recently at the display in the station’s Fink Exhibit Gallery. The books, she said, “present Oz as a very real place,” and one with which the young girl was fascinated.

“I remember when I was little, my parents were planning a trip to Utah, and I was just really cross that they weren’t taking us to Oz,” she said. “It seemed possible because when you read these books, Dorothy keeps getting there.”

By the time Albright was a student at Hayden High School and later The University of Kansas, she was collecting more than just Oz books. After friends gave her some Oz collectibles, Albright began acquiring more, particularly vintage games and toys.

Albright found items that date back to around 1900 when Baum published the first Oz book. There are Valentine’s Day cards, jars of Oz peanut butter, even an Oz snowboard. She has posters of the original movie and its many international editions. There are Oz books from around the world, especially Russia where Oz sequels have become so popular some think it originated in that country.

One section is devoted to holiday ornaments, nutcrackers and other seasonal Oz items, with a nod to the fact that Baum wrote non-Oz books, too, including The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus.

Albright’s material also includes acknowledgement of the spin-offs of Oz, including the Broadway musical Wicked and other film adaptations of the Baum story or movies and television programs that reference Oz or use it as a jumping-off point.

Although the walls are covered, display cases jammed and exhibit areas crammed with Oz memorabilia, Albright said visitors to her home wouldn’t think anything was missing from her collection there because it is so extensive. She also is putting together an exhibit of Oz dolls for the United Federation of Doll Clubs Museum in Kansas City, Mo.

As an active member of the International Wizard of Oz Club, Albright also is organizing its annual convention which will be Oct. 2-4 in Manhattan and Wamego. In Manhattan, the English Department at Kansas State University will conduct a symposium, Recreating Oz, in conjunction with the convention, which also is timed to coincide with Wamego’s OZtoberFEST.

All four of the still-living actors who portrayed Munchkins in The Wizard of Oz who still make public appearances will attend OZtoberFEST for autograph sessions and cameo appearances in the Columbian Theatre’s annual production of the stage musical version of The Wizard of Oz. There also will be hot-air balloon rides, presentations, a display of gowns worn by Judy Garland and other activities.

Albright said she intentionally made the All Aboard the Oz Express exhibit at the Great Overland Station one that people coming to the International Wizard of Oz Club convention or OZtoberFESt would want to stop and see, as it isn’t duplicative of what is on display at the Oz Museum in Wamego.

Another much-anticipated lead-up to OZtoberFEST will be the release next month of a 70th anniversary edition of The Wizard of Oz.

Each of the 1939 film’s original Technicolor camera negatives was scanned and reassembled in a new digital master with twice the resolution seen in the master for the film’s previous DVD releases. People can see the result in movie theaters Sept. 23 at a special one-night screening.

The one in Topeka will be at 7 p.m. Sept. 23 at the Hollywood 14, where the tickets already are on sale.

Then on Sept. 29, The Wizard of Oz 70th Anniversary Edition will go on sale, including a commemorative set with nearly four of all-new and never-before-available bonus features housed in numbered collectible packaging. It will sell for a limited time only for $69.92 for DVD and $84.99 for Blu-ray Hi-Def. There also will be a two-disc special edition DVD set for $24.98.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-08-22-09 1501EDT

Experience Music Project building, design by architect Frank Gehry. Image by Rebecca Kennison, accessed through Wikimedia Commons.

Suit dismissed against architect Frank Gehry over jewelry designs

Experience Music Project building, design by architect Frank Gehry. Image by Rebecca Kennison, accessed through Wikimedia Commons.

Experience Music Project building, design by architect Frank Gehry. Image by Rebecca Kennison, accessed through Wikimedia Commons.

LOS ANGELES (AP) – A judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit against Frank Gehry by a company that claimed it was owed money for a jewelry line designed by the famed architect.

Circa Publishing Enterprises LLC sued Gehry in May 2007, claiming it had exclusive rights to the line the architect designed for Tiffany & Co.

A Superior Court judge dismissed the lawsuit after several days of testimony during a trial. The ruling came shortly before attorneys were to make their closing arguments to jurors.

“It’s a resounding victory both for our justice system and for him, both as an artist and a human,” said Gehry’s attorney, Patty Glaser.

She said Gehry was “totally vindicated” by the ruling.

An attorney for Circa Publishing Enterprises did not immediately return a phone message seeking comment. The company claimed it was due half of the profits from Gehry’s deal with Tiffany.

Glaser said Gehry ended his agreement with Circa before the deal for the Tiffany jewelry line was completed. The items he designed included earrings, rings and other items based on his distinctive fish shapes and freeform aesthetics.

Gehry’s work includes the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain; the Experience Music Project/Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame in Seattle, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-08-24-09 2043EDT

This W. Britains circa-1953 Toy Town Officer, one of only two known examples, is typical of the quality and rarity of goods seen at the Old Toy Soldier and Figure Show. The figure serves as the annual event’s mascot. Image courtesy Norman Joplin.

International crowd expected at Sept. 12 London toy soldier show

This W. Britains circa-1953 Toy Town Officer, one of only two known examples, is typical of the quality and rarity of goods seen at the Old Toy Soldier and Figure Show. The figure serves as the annual event’s mascot. Image courtesy Norman Joplin.

This W. Britains circa-1953 Toy Town Officer, one of only two known examples, is typical of the quality and rarity of goods seen at the Old Toy Soldier and Figure Show. The figure serves as the annual event’s mascot. Image courtesy Norman Joplin.

LONDON – On Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009, promoter and toy soldier authority Norman Joplin will present his annual Old Toy Soldier and Figure Show at the Holiday Inn Bloomsbury, on Coram Street in London. Sponsored by Old Toy Soldier magazine, the show is held in the hotel’s combined Academy, Booker and Turner Rooms, and this year will feature 52 dealers selling antique and vintage toy soldiers and civilian figures from 75 tables.

“There may be bigger toy soldier shows, but this event is the only one that is a dateline show,” said Joplin. “The dealers sell only items made during the 90-year period between the 1890s and 1980s, and that’s what attracts buyers from all over the UK, Europe and even the United States. In all, there will be between fifty and seventy-five-thousand soldiers and figures available for purchase.”

High-profile British dealers who will be taking part include Lynn Kenwood, Ged Haley, Bill Kingsman, and principals of The Toy Cupboard, a business known for its inventory of extremely rare civilian figures. Continental vendors include Francois Beaumont (France), Nils Fischer (Sweden) and Thomas Finck (Germany). American dealer, publisher and auction company partner Ray Haradin will also be there, offering a fine selection of early productions by Britains, Heyde and Mignot, as well as coveted “dime store” figures.

In addition to browsing and buying, attendees will be able to chat with Hugo Marsh of Special Auction Services, Leigh Gotch of Bonhams, representatives of Old Toy Soldier magazine, and author Peter Greenhill, who will be launching his new book published by GMC Publications titled The Heraldic Sketchbook.

“We are honored that Peter has chosen to introduce his new book at this show,” said Joplin. “Peter has continued the tradition of Richard Courtenay heraldic figures by adding to the original range and producing his own widely admired line of figures under the branding of Courtenay Greenhill. Collectors are excited over the prospect of meeting Peter.”

The camaraderie with fellow collectors from around the world is, to many, the highlight of the show. “It’s a unique opportunity that happens only once a year, where everyone gathers together to buy, sell, deal, swap and socialize,” Joplin said. “We don’t charge admission for anyone under 16 because we want to encourage parents to bring their children and instill an interest in collecting toy soldiers and figures to a whole new generation. It’s a timeless, ageless hobby.”

Show details: The Old Toy Soldier and Figure Show, sponsored by Old Toy Soldier magazine, will take place at the Holiday Inn Bloomsbury, Coram Street, London, from 10:30 a.m. till 4 p.m. Admission is £3 ($5), under 16 free. Early buying starts at 6:30 a.m. and costs £15 ($25). The venue is only two minutes’ walk north of Russell Square Underground station.

For additional information, call 262-692-3913 in the USA or 01926 496062 in the UK, or visit www.normanjoplin.com. E-mail info@normanjoplin.com.