Charles Lindbergh became an American hero when he flew alone across the Atlantic Ocean to Paris in 1927. The public bought posters, dishes and drapery fabric like this piece that shows his face and airplanes. It was recently offered for sale at Early American History Auctions of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

Kovels – Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 31, 2009

Charles Lindbergh became an American hero when he flew alone across the Atlantic Ocean to Paris in 1927. The public bought posters, dishes and drapery fabric like this piece that shows his face and airplanes. It was recently offered for sale at Early American History Auctions of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

Charles Lindbergh became an American hero when he flew alone across the Atlantic Ocean to Paris in 1927. The public bought posters, dishes and drapery fabric like this piece that shows his face and airplanes. It was recently offered for sale at Early American History Auctions of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

Many different drapery fabrics and bed coverings were decorated with pictures of the famous men of the day. Some were made for political campaigns. A printed fabric of the “Apothesis of Franklin” that pictured both George Washington and Benjamin Franklin was made in 1785. Another showed William H. Harrison, a log cabin and other symbols from the 1840 campaign. Zachary Taylor was shown riding a horse on many different fabrics in the late 1840s. Fabrics were also made during the campaigns of Ulysses S. Grant (1868) and James Garfield (1880). Horace Greeley was suggested in a fabric decorated with rows of his hat, initials and pipe, but no picture. Many fabrics picturing past presidents and heroes were made in years celebrating world’s fairs and events like the country’s centennial and bicentennial. There was even a drapery fabric that pictured Charles Lindbergh and his plane after his successful 1927 flight. Collectors tend to think that designs and pictures of past events were made at the earliest possible date. So a fabric showing George Washington must have been made in 1776. Not true. Each national celebration seems to inspire both old and new designs related to U.S. history.

Q: I have an eight-sided “Dr. Cronk Sarsaparilla” bottle and haven’t been able to find any information about it. Can you tell me anything?

A: Dr. Cronk sarsaparilla beer was bottled in both stoneware and glass eight-sided bottles. All of the bottles, as well as Cronk bottles in other shapes, appear to date from the 1840s-60s. Some experts think the brand name “Dr. Cronk,” while originally used by a brewer named Cronk, was later licensed to various manufacturers and bottlers. A stoneware Cronk bottle in excellent condition sells for $50 or so. A glass bottle sells for at least 10 times as much.

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Q: I collect old school slates. I know they wrote on slates instead of paper in schools in past centuries. When did students stop using slates?

A: Slate is still used as blackboards in many school buildings, although new rooms use painted or dry erase boards. Small pieces of slate, usually framed with wood and bound in red cord, were used by American students until about the 1880s. The cord binding helped keep the slate from making scratching noises when it was dragged across a desktop. Early slates were often marked with the owner’s initials. Slates for school children were still being sold in some areas in the 1930s.

Q: What does the term “blown out” mean when referring to Wave Crest vases?

A: Wave Crest is an opaque white glassware made around the turn of the 20th century. The glassware line was decorated and marketed by the C.F. Monroe Co. of Meriden, Conn. Most of the glass pieces Monroe decorated were made by the Pairpoint Manufacturing Co. of New Bedford, Mass. “Blown out” means the same thing as “mold blown.” It refers to a technique of blowing glass into a mold that has a deeply cut design. The glass is forced into the design in the mold, resulting in a glass shape with a highly raised surface design. Wave Crest is just one of many types of blown-out glassware.

Q: I found an old pair of iron andirons in my grandparents’ basement. There’s an impressed mark on it that says “Bradley & Hubbard.” What can you tell me about the company?

A: In 1854 Walter Hubbard and his brother-in-law, Nathaniel Lyman Bradley, formed a partnership in Meriden, Conn., to make clocks and various metal household objects, including andirons. Eventually, Bradley & Hubbard became best-known for its lamps. The company was bought by another Meriden firm, Charles Parker Co., in 1940. Bradley & Hubbard made iron andirons in several different designs. Depending on type and condition, they sell for hundreds of dollars into the low thousands.

Tip: Do not store food in a cast-iron pot in the refrigerator. The pot’s seasoning will be harmed by food or moisture.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Need more information about collectibles? Find it at Kovels.com, our Web site for collectors. Check prices there, too. More than 700,000 are listed, and viewing them is free. You can also sign up to read our weekly “Kovels Komments.” It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is delivered by e-mail, free, if you register. Kovels.com offers extra collector’s information and lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and much more. You can also subscribe to “Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles,” our monthly newsletter filled with prices, facts and color photos. Kovels.com adds to the information in our newspaper column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

CURRENT PRICES

    Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Mattel Big Jim action figure doll, jumpsuit, grenade belt, press back button and he makes karate-chop movement, 1971, 10 inches, $15.
  • Owens vase, bulbous, white ground and green poppies, marked, 4 x 12 inches, $150.
  • Sample bicycle model, metal, rubber tires with tread, chain drive, rubber handle grips and saddle, kickstand, painted black, 1920s-30s, 18 x 10 x 5 inches, $165.
  • Czechoslovakian glass vase, cylindrical, horizontal ribbing in pink, 2 black applied handles, 5 x 8 inches, $210.
  • Felix the Cat doll, composition, name on chest, original tail, 1920s, 13 inches, $345.
  • Cadillac toy car, tin, battery-operated, lithographed interior, hood emblem, plated accessories, whitewall tires, Normura, Japan, mid-1950s, 13 1/2 inches, $410.
  • Lemp Brewery charger, St. Louis, barmaid, man and boy listening to Falstaff tout his favorite beer, 1912, 24 inches, $675.
  • Coca-Cola calendar, 1932, “The Old Oaken Bucket” print, by artist Norman Rockwell, 12 x 24 1/2 inches, $700.
  • American Renaissance carved armchair, mahogany, scroll back with husk-carved stiles, padded arms, sphinx supports, upholstered, lotus-carved legs, c. 1870, $1,175.
  • George III sterling silver cake basket, rectangular, lily-of-the-valley swing handle, gadroon and shell rim, reeded border, marked “NK,” 1817, 12 1/2 x 11 inches, $2,115.

Available in September: The new full-color “Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide, 2010,” 42nd ed., is your most accurate source for current prices. This large-size paperback has more than 2,500 color photographs and 47,000 up-to-date prices for more than 700 categories of antiques and collectibles. You’ll also find hundreds of factory histories and marks and a report on the record prices of the year, plus helpful sidebars and tips about buying, selling, collecting and preserving your treasures. Available at your bookstore; online at Kovels.com; by phone at 800-571-1555; or send $27.95 plus $4.95 postage to Price Book, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

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© 2009 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

Skinner's Boston gallery. Image courtesy Skinner Inc.

Skinner to host free appraisal evening, Sept. 17 in Boston

Skinner's Boston gallery. Image courtesy Skinner Inc.

Skinner’s Boston gallery. Image courtesy Skinner Inc.

BOSTON – Skinner Inc. will host an Evening of Art and Antiques Appraisals on Thursday, Sept. 17, 2009 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. in its Boston gallery, located at 63 Park Plaza. The event is open to the public and free of charge. Attendees are encouraged to bring items of interest to learn about both their historic and monetary value.

During the event, Skinner appraisers, who regularly appear on a popular PBS-TV series Antiques Roadshow, will verbally appraise all categories of art, antiques and collectibles, including paintings, prints, jewelry, carry-in furniture, art pottery, art glass, lamps, 20th-century design, Asian works of art, books, manuscripts, clocks, folk art, silver, and much more. Appraisers will provide their opinion on up to three items per person. Photographs can be substituted for very large or fragile items.

Skinner will also be accepting consignments of material brought to the event. Coins and stamps will not be included.

Karen Keane, CEO of Skinner, Inc., commented: “Skinner is pleased to host this event for the people of Boston and beyond. These events enable us to better educate the public on what Skinner and the auction world is all about. While it’s the million-dollar auction items that make the headlines, we want people to know that Skinner handles a broad range of art and antiques and that we accept items for consignment year-round in both our Boston and Marlborough galleries.”

Keane continued, “These appraisal events are great fun. We just never know what will turn up.”

To R.S.V.P. or for more information on Skinner’s Boston Appraisal Evening, call Skinner’s Boston gallery at 617-350-5400.

Visit Skinner’s auction catalogs for past and upcoming sales online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Vasily Kandinsky, White Cross (Weißes Kreuz), January–June 1922. Oil on canvas, 100.5 x 110.6 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 76.2553.34. © 2009 Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.

Guggenheim gala to mark 50th anniversary with Kandinsky opening

Vasily Kandinsky, White Cross (Weißes Kreuz), January–June 1922. Oil on canvas, 100.5 x 110.6 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 76.2553.34. © 2009 Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.

Vasily Kandinsky, White Cross (Weißes Kreuz), January–June 1922. Oil on canvas, 100.5 x 110.6 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 76.2553.34. © 2009 Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.

NEW YORK – On Wednesday, Sept. 16, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum will host the 2009 Guggenheim International Gala, its annual fundraising celebration, now in its fifth year.

The gala is chaired by Richard Armstrong, Director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Museum; Maria Baibakova, Isabella and Theodor Dalenson; Danielle Ganek, Art Garfunkel, Sarah Jessica Parker, Amy Phelan, and Jacqueline Sackler. Honorary chairs are Phyllis and William Mack; and Jennifer and David Stockman.

The Guggenheim will honor Deutsche Bank, its visionary partner, with a special tribute.

A star-studded event among the full year of 50th anniversary programming, the 2009 Guggenheim International Gala will take place within the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright-designed landmark on Fifth Avenue, where guests will enjoy a preview of the full-scale Kandinsky retrospective that opens to the public on Sept. 18. In addition, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s new performance installation, Levels of Nothingness, commissioned and produced by Works & Process at the Guggenheim, will premiere with two 25-minute performances at 8 pm and 10 pm.

The evening will begin with cocktails at 7 p.m. in the rotunda and in the newly opened Cafe 3 space overlooking Central Park. The spiraling ramps will offer a preview of Kandinsky, a major exhibition of almost 100 paintings and more than 60 works on paper by Vasily Kandinsky, a pioneer of abstraction and an artist whose work was collected in depth by Solomon R. Guggenheim.

Music will be provided by Dustin O’Halloran, whose piano compositions were featured in Sofia Coppola’s film Marie Antoinette, along with a string quartet.

Peter Hoffman of the SoHo restaurant Savoy, long recognized for its commitment to sustainable agriculture, is preparing a special menu showcasing seasonal organic ingredients from local farms.

A pristine white decor with Swarovski crystals designed by Michael Gabellini of Gabellini Sheppard Associates will provide a backdrop for the bright spectrum of the Kandinsky canvases in the exhibition and the guests’ suggested attire, black tie with colors inspired by Kandinsky.

Before or after dinner, guests are invited to the museum’s Peter B. Lewis Theater for the debut of Levels of Nothingness. Inspired by Kandinsky’s The Yellow Sound (1912), Mexican-born Rafael Lozano-Hemmer creates an installation where colors derive automatically from the human voice to generate an interactive light performance. Isabella Rossellini will read seminal philosophical texts on skepticism, color, and perception, as her voice is analyzed by computers that control a full complement of rock-and-roll concert lighting. The audience will have the opportunity to test the color-generating microphone as well.

As a gift from the Guggenheim to its friends and supporters, a limited-edition art object, a miniature organ emitting both music and light by Peter Coffin titled Clavier à lumières, will be given to all guests. In tandem with Kandinsky’s explorations of synaesthesia, the New York-based Coffin’s work reimagines the notion of a unified sensory experience, operating as an instrument of integrated color, light, and sound.

The annual gala was the recent recipient of three awards at the 2008 New York Event Style Awards for its transformation of a raw parking garage for the 2007 Guggenheim International Gala. Funds raised from the 2009 gala will support the exhibitions and programming at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

In-kind support for the Gala is provided by Swarovski. Levels of Nothingness is made possible by Deutsche Bank and Colección/Fundación Jumex.

To purchase tickets or for ticketing information, contact Bronwyn Keenan at bkeenan@guggenheim.org or call 212-423-3539.

Lehmann 'Lo and Li' clowns, prewar Germany, tin windup, estimate $12,500-$18,100. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Antique toys with a European flavor in Antico Mondo’s Sept. 5 sale

Lehmann 'Lo and Li' clowns, prewar Germany, tin windup, estimate $12,500-$18,100. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Lehmann ‘Lo and Li’ clowns, prewar Germany, tin windup, estimate $12,500-$18,100. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

COLOGNE, GERMANY – Four times a year – in March, June, September and December – Germany’s fourth-largest city, Cologne, is the meeting point for toy collectors from all over the world. That’s when Antico Mondo holds its auctions featuring toys of all types, with a particular emphasis on tin toys, model cars, trains and toy railroad accessories.

Antico Mondo’s next auction, including 890 lots of antique and quality vintage toys, will take place on Sept. 5, with Internet live bidding provided by LiveAuctioneers.com

Antico Mondo concentrates on toys 
produced from the beginning of the 20th century through the late 1960s. While its headquarters are located in a Sürth, at the southern end of Cologne, Antico Mondo’s sales have a global reach.

“Our concept is very simple,” Antico Mondo’s corporate statement explains. “We avoid spending a lot of money on facilities, etc., in order to keep the costs low.” Since 2006, Antico Mondo has offered its customers Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com. Since implementing LiveAuctioneers’ services, Antico Mondo says they’ve attracted bidders from more than 50 countries – and they’re repeat customers. According to Antico Mondo, Internet bidding “guarantees high [prices realized] and satisfied customers and sellers.”

AnticoMondo’s Sept. 5 sale includes a sizable selection of early 20th-century German tin windup toys by Ernst Paul Lehmann. Sure to be a favorite, the Lehmann Lo and Li clowns toy is estimated at $12,500-$18,200. Other desirable Lehmanns include a Man Da Rin, Halloh motorcycle with rider, and boxed versions of both the Dancing Sailor and Uhu racer.

Toy vehicles by Distler and Tipp Co., and trains/accessories by the platinum brand, Marklin, will quite likely fly off the starting line toward their respective presale estimates, and then some. Both a Distler Horch sedan and a large Tipp Co. sedan 9590 in top condition carry individual estimates of $13,400-$19,500.

Our pick to watch is the Marklin prewar hand-painted tin 0-gauge European train station in all-original condition. It’s expected to make $7,890-$11,480.

For further information, call Antico Mondo: 49 (0) 22 36 96 18 94 or e-mail anticomondo@netcologne.de.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet through www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Antico Mondo Auktionen’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Distler Horch sedan, prewar Germany, tin windup. Estimate $13,400-$19,500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Distler Horch sedan, prewar Germany, tin windup. Estimate $13,400-$19,500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.


Tipp Co. sedan 9590, prewar Germany, tin windup, largest and rarest Tipp sedan, top condition. Estimate $13,400-$19,500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Tipp Co. sedan 9590, prewar Germany, tin windup, largest and rarest Tipp sedan, top condition. Estimate $13,400-$19,500. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.


Marklin prewar Germany train car, HS Lok, tin, electrodrive. Estimate $9,800-$14,200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Marklin prewar Germany train car, HS Lok, tin, electrodrive. Estimate $9,800-$14,200. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.


Marklin train station 2012, prewar Germany, 0 gauge, all original. Estimate $7,890-$11,480. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Marklin train station 2012, prewar Germany, 0 gauge, all original. Estimate $7,890-$11,480. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com and Antico Mondo.

Mickey Mouse, from the Walt Disney Company logo. Fair use, U.S. Copyright Law.

Disney buys Marvel, home to 5,000 comic-book characters

Mickey Mouse, from the Walt Disney Company logo. Fair use, U.S. Copyright Law.

Mickey Mouse, from the Walt Disney Company logo. Fair use, U.S. Copyright Law.

BURBANK, Calif. – At the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, Mickey Mouse is rolling out the red carpet to greet his new cousin, Spider-Man.

The Walt Disney Company announced on Monday, August 31, 2009, that it would buy the company legendary comic book writer/editor Stan Lee helped to build: Marvel Entertainment. The deal, said to be worth about $4 billion, pays Marvel shareholders $30 in cash and about ¾ of a Disney share for each Marvel share they own.

“The boards of both companies have approved the deal, which was valued at $50 a share,” The New York Times reported.

“We believe that adding Marvel to Disney’s unique portfolio of brands provides significant opportunities for long-term growth and value creation,” Disney CEO Robert A. Iger said in a statement.

“Disney is the perfect home for Marvel’s fantastic library of characters given its proven ability to expand content creation and licensing businesses. This is an unparalleled opportunity for Marvel to build upon its vibrant brand and character properties by accessing Disney’s tremendous global organization and infrastructure around the world,” Marvel’s CEO Ike Perlmutter said.

MarketWatch reports that under the terms of the deal, Disney will acquire ownership of Marvel including its more than 5,000 Marvel characters. Perlmutter will oversee the Marvel properties and will work directly with Disney’s global lines of business to build and further integrate Marvel’s properties.

Marvel’s third-party deals (Sony for Spider-Man, Fox for X-Men and Fantastic Four, and Paramount for distribution of Marvel’s self-financed slate of films) will remain in place.

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Thanks to Scoop! for this contribution to Auction Central News. Visit them online at http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com.

Café des Artistes. Wikimedia Commons photo taken Oct. 4, 2008 by participant/team Team Boerum as part of the Commons:Wikis Take Manhattan project.

After 92 years, New York’s Cafe des Artistes closes its doors

Café des Artistes. Wikimedia Commons photo taken Oct. 4, 2008 by participant/team Team Boerum as part of the Commons:Wikis Take Manhattan project.

Café des Artistes. Wikimedia Commons photo taken Oct. 4, 2008 by participant/team Team Boerum as part of the Commons:Wikis Take Manhattan project.

NEW YORK (AP and ACNI) – The owners have closed Manhattan’s Café des Artistes, citing the economy and a union lawsuit.

Jenifer Lang, whose husband, George, has owned the French restaurant since 1975, calls it “a death in the family.”

Bill Granfield, president of Local 100 of Unite Here, said the restaurant – which he described as “great” – had fallen behind on its payments for medical insurance and welfare funds.

The Café des Artistes was located in the lobby of Hotel des Artistes, at 1 W. 67th Street. The part-Gothic, part-Tudor-Revival co-op building designed by George Mort Pollard was opened as artists’ studios in 1916. The restaurant opened a year later.

It was a popular spot for many celebrities because of its privately secluded yet hip atmosphere.

The restaurant’s famous murals were the work of Howard Chandler Christy. There were six panels of wood nymphs – the first of which was completed in 1934. Other Christy works on display included paintings such as The Parrot Girl, The Swing Girl, Ponce De Leon, Fall, Spring, and the Fountain of Youth. Among the 36 nudes was a painting of a man possibly modeled after the actor Buster Crabbe.

In the 1960s, a dispute arose between the outgoing tenant and the landlord over who had rights to the murals. Under common law, assuming the parties had not agreed otherwise, fixtures, i.e., accessions that had inured to the realty so that their removal would cause material harm to the freehold, would become property of the landlord upon the termination of the lease.

The parties settled the dispute, each presumably unwilling to run the risk of receiving nothing because of an adverse judgment. In any case, per the settlement terms, the tenant was allowed to take and keep several of the murals, but the majority of the murals remained in the restaurant, and the landlord replaced with mirrors those sections that had housed artworks the tenant took.

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Information from: The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com. Auction Central News contributed to this report.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-08-31-09 0655EDT