Museum, arts advocates in Pa. stunned by proposed tax on patrons

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) – A plan to extend Pennsylvania’s sales tax to the performing arts, museums, historical sites, zoos and parks is partly designed to shift the taxpayers’ share of financing those activities onto their patrons, an architect of the proposal said Tuesday.

“The idea was to try to make it a user fee as much as possible,” said Sen. Jake Corman, R-Centre, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

The plan, a late addition in the negotiations that yielded a deal that would end Pennsylvania’s status as the only state without a complete budget, has provoked strong opposition but advocates for the arts likely face an uphill climb in their effort to derail it.

The proposed elimination of the current exemptions for artistic and cultural events is expected to generate roughly $120 million a year – about twice as much as those activities currently receive through various state appropriations, Corman said.

A portion of the revenue would be funneled into a special fund reserved for supporting the arts and cultural institutions. The rest would help pay for other items in the nearly $28 billion state budget deal struck by Gov. Ed Rendell and leaders of three of the four legislative caucuses.

The percentage that would be earmarked for the special fund was still being firmed up – like many details of the budget deal – and could generate more or less than previous appropriations for artistic and cultural events, Corman said.

“It’s up in the air because it hasn’t been written,” Corman said in a telephone interview from his district office in Bellefonte.

The idea surfaced for the first time Friday night, shortly before the governor, Corman and other top lawmakers announced the budget deal may end an impasse nearly three months into the new fiscal year.

The partisan deadlock forced tens of thousands of state employees to temporarily work without pay until Rendell signed a partial budget in August providing limited funds to keep state government operating. But some daycare centers have closed, some preschools have not yet opened and mentally ill people have to wait longer for counseling because hundreds of nonprofit agencies have not received state reimbursements they rely on.

The money to be generated from extending the 6-percent tax to artistic and cultural events was a final component to seal an agreement between Senate Republicans and Rendell, who had demanded more reliable sources of revenue before he would sign on.

Advocates for arts groups said they were stunned by news of the proposal and said it would discourage people from attending performances or visiting cultural institutions.

“What were you thinking?” asked Peggy Amsterdam, head of the Philadelphia Cultural Alliance at a Monday night meeting where hundreds of arts leaders criticized the budget negotiators and vowed to try to block the proposal.

“It will price everyday people out of arts experiences and it will push key cultural institutions to the brink,” Amsterdam told the gathering at the Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts.

On the other side of the state, the executive director of the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre expressed a similar sentiment.

“It’s a bad idea to tax the nonprofit arts sector,” said Harris Ferris. “Many of us have adjusted our ticket prices and packaged them to be accessible to the greater community. We want people to be able to come to the performing arts, which is a $2 billion annual sector of the economy.”

A spokesman for Hershey Entertainment and Resorts Co., which books major concerts at Hersheypark Stadium and the Giant Center near Harrisburg, said the state should be promoting cultural activities for families, not making them more expensive to attend.

“We are most disappointed that there weren’t any advanced discussions regarding the impact that this new tax would have on individuals and families who want to attend these cultural or live entertainment events,” said the spokesman, Garrett Gallia.

Philip Horn, executive director of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, which dispensed $14.5 million in state grants to nonprofit arts and cultural organizations last year, said he did not learn about the proposal until Saturday.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-09-22-09 1428EDT

Frida Kahlo and husband Diego Rivera in a photograph taken by Carl Van

Mexican prosecutors probe possible Frida Kahlo fakes

Frida Kahlo and husband Diego Rivera in a photograph taken by Carl Van

Frida Kahlo and husband Diego Rivera in a photograph taken by Carl Van

MEXICO CITY (AP) – Mexican federal prosecutors said Tuesday they are investigating a claim that more than 1,000 items attributed to artist Frida Kahlo were forged.

The Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Trust filed a complaint saying signed paintings, notes and drawings featured in two recent art history books are fake, the Attorney General’s Office said.

“We must stop the commercialization of false works,” said Hilda Trujillo, director of the Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Museums.

The works in question come from a private collection and appear in two books, Finding Frida Kahlo and The Labyrinth of Frida Kahlo: Death, Pain and Ambivalence.

Kahlo, who died in 1954, was known for her tortured self-portraits and a tumultuous relationship with Mexican muralist Diego Rivera, who she married.

Katharine Myers at Princeton Architectural Press, the publisher of Finding Frida Kahlo, said it plans to keep selling the book.

“In the book, we state that the pieces have not been 100 percent authenticated, that it’s still being researched,” Myers said.

Members of the trust and some art history scholars hope the publishers will take the books off the market, saying at a news conference in Mexico City that the consequences could be severe if the books keep being sold.

“This will infect all the studies of Frida Kahlo with a virus, with bad, inaccurate information,” said James Oles, an assistant professor at Wellesley College who has joined with other art historians in criticizing the publications.

The owners of the art, according to Oles, say the collection came from five boxes that Kahlo gave to a carpenter.

Oles said items in the collection include significant spelling errors, low-quality paintings and other suspicious details.

“What woman signs her recipes? No one, unless they want to sell them,” he said.

___

Associated Press writer Istra Pacheco contributed to this report.

Copyright 2009 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-09-22-09 2008EDT

This little Chinese famile rose bowl soared over its humble pre-sale estimate ($150-$300) to become the top lot of the sale. It was purchased from The Chinese Shop in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s by Thomas Williams and sold September 13 for $115,000.

Chinese Famille Rose does it again at Brunk Auctions

This little Chinese famile rose bowl soared over its humble pre-sale estimate ($150-$300) to become the top lot of the sale. It was purchased from The Chinese Shop in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s by Thomas Williams and sold September 13 for $115,000.

This little Chinese famile rose bowl soared over its humble pre-sale estimate ($150-$300) to become the top lot of the sale. It was purchased from The Chinese Shop in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s by Thomas Williams and sold September 13 for $115,000.

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Twice in the past six months, a piece of 18th century Chinese famille rose porcelain offered for sale at Brunk Auctions has risen from humble beginnings to stardom. In May, bidders took a 12 inch vase from an opening bid of $800 to $1,236,250. On September 13, a tiny bowl began at $150 and finished at $115,000. That’s not déjà vu all over again, but it’s close.

The vase in the May sale was Imperial porcelain from the Qianlong dynasty (1736-1795). Lot 738 in the September auction, a famille rose bowl with peonies and insects and a two inch repair to its rim, was smaller and earlier. It dated from the Yongzheng dynasty (1723-1735) and measured a scant 2 inches by 4 ¼ inches. In May and again in September, a low pre-sale estimate reduced in-house expectations.

The improbable little bowl was part of the Chinese porcelain collection of the late Thomas Benjamin Williams (1898-1974). Williams moved from Hendersonville, North Carolina, to Washington, D.C. in the 1930s. He purchased the bowl and other porcelain items in the 1940s from Washington’s The Chinese Shop. Other items from his collection came from Hammer Galleries, New York.

Earlier in the day, another Yongzheng period piece from Williams’ collection destroyed its pre-sale estimate. The finely textured 11 inch liver red bottle vase purchased in the 1940s had a respectable $4000 to $8000 estimate. Originally from the William Randolph Hearst collection, the vase sold for $105,800, the second-highest price achieved in the sale.

The two-day sale began early on September 12 with another unusual collection. Lots 1 through 34 were rare Oriental carpets deaccessioned from North Carolina’s famous Tryon Palace after 30 years in storage. They generated strong interest among antique rug collectors and within the textile trade.

Purchased in the 1950s and ‘60s from textile experts such as Vojtech Blau, French & Company and others of equal reputation, many of the carpets were installed in the reconstructed capitol building when it opened in 1959. They were removed from exhibition after it was learned that no carpets of any type were part of Tryon Palace’s 18th century décor.

Five of the 34 Tryon carpets topped $15,000; 13 (38%) exceeded the high end of their pre-sale estimate.

Leading the way was a 21 ft. 7 inch by 11 ft. 6 inch Ottoman carpet, from late 16th to early 17th century Cairo, Egypt. Blending several carpet-weaving traditions, it was probably produced for the royal court. The Ottoman opened at its $25,000 reserve and sold to a bidder in the house for 74,750.

The second highest Tryon carpet and the cover lot for the catalog was a 30′ 10″ by 11′ 11″ Indo-Persian carpet dating from the Safavid period (16th to 17th centuries) in Persia. Tryon Palace purchased it in 1958 from French & Company, New York City. Records indicate that it was purchased originally for the Braganza Palace, Lisbon, Spain. The massive carpet and an 11 ft. 11 inch by 32 inch fragment sold for $57,500.

The Hickory Museum of Art, the second oldest art museum in North Carolina, deaccessioned 112 lots of British, German, Italian, Mexican, French and Spanish paintings and Asian art and ceramics. Two of the museum’s portraits exceeded $20,000: Mrs. Thomas Babington at $46,000 and James Hamilton, Marquess of Abercorn at $29,900. Both were unsigned, but strongly attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence (British, 1769-1830). Verso on Mrs. Babington’s portrait was an inscription giving information of the portrait’s date, subject and artist. There was also a long auction history beginning at Christies in 1901.

Brunk Auctions Fine Art Specialist Laura Crockett did extensive research on the Hamilton portrait. She found a photograph of it in London’s National Portrait Gallery and it is mentioned in the complete catalog of Lawrence’s work. Crockett compared the crackle pattern of the Hickory Museum portrait with the London photo and they matched. “It was a neat find,” said Crockett.

Other Hickory Museum lots that sold well include a 16th century Italian School portrait of an elegant woman in profile in an embroidered and jeweled gown. It far exceeded its $1500-$2500 estimate to sell for $21,850. A lovely scene, “Consolation in Prayer” by Carl Wilhelm Huber (German, 1814-1879), depicts a family gathered around a fireplace in prayer. It sold to the phones for $14,950 (est. $5000-$10,000).

A truck-load of Southern furniture deaccessioned by Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA), Winston-Salem attracted bidders in all venues – in-house, on the phone and Internet and absentee. The in-house favorite – judging from how often it was inspected during preview – was a circa 1770 Virginia Chippendale spice chest. Its figured walnut door opened to reveal 10 interior drawers, five of which extend the entire width of the chest (17 ¼”). The skirt and bracket feet were original. It sold for $12,650 (est. $4000 – $6000).

The top MESDA furniture lot was another unusual piece: a1780-1800 North Carolina Chippendale pewter cupboard in walnut with poplar the secondary wood. Constructed as a single unit with two dovetailed drawers and two panel doors on bracket feet, it brought $48,300 (est. $5000-$8000).

Outside of collections by Thomas Williams, Tryon Palace, Hickory Museum and MESDA, there were a number of exceptional individual consignments:

· A 1760-1780 Boston Chippendale game table in mahogany that descended in the Harwood family of Littleton, Massachusetts, exceeded its high estimate to sell for $74,750.
· Six 17th or 18th century Flemish Old Master panels that gave a panoramic view of a busy town and attributed to J. Grauwels (Flemish, active 1798-1815) sold just above its reserve for $25,300.
· “The Brook,” a signed 32 inch by 40 inch oil on canvas by Walter Emerson Baum (Pennsylvania, 1884-1956) of a woodland scene sold just above its low estimate for $18,400.

“It was hard to narrow this sale down to a few key lots,” said principal auctioneer Bob Brunk. Hammer price plus buyer’s premium for 990+ lots was $2,542,190.

Visit the catalog with prices realized for this sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Brunk Auction’s complete catalog.

# # #


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This palace-size 17th century Indo-Persian with elegantly drawn compartments around the perimeter was one of 34 carpets deaccessioned by Tryon Palace, North Carolina. In a rich array of colors with silk-wrapped selvedge, it brought $57,500.

This palace-size 17th century Indo-Persian with elegantly drawn compartments around the perimeter was one of 34 carpets deaccessioned by Tryon Palace, North Carolina. In a rich array of colors with silk-wrapped selvedge, it brought $57,500.


Accompanying this circa 1811 portrait of Jean Babington is an appraisal from Newhouse Galleries, dated December 22, 1982. Mrs. Babington is arrayed in a white empire gown with her hair wrapped in a scarf. At $46,000, her 30-1/8 inches by 25-3/8 inch Thomas Lawrence portrait was the highest priced painting in the two-day sale.

Accompanying this circa 1811 portrait of Jean Babington is an appraisal from Newhouse Galleries, dated December 22, 1982. Mrs. Babington is arrayed in a white empire gown with her hair wrapped in a scarf. At $46,000, her 30-1/8 inches by 25-3/8 inch Thomas Lawrence portrait was the highest priced painting in the two-day sale.


Unsigned, but attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence (British, 1769-1830) is a half-portrait of James Hamilton, Marquess of Abercorn, in his earl’s robes. The frame is early 20th century carved and gilt wood. Consigned by the Hickory Museum of Art, the 30-1/8 inch by 25 inch oil on canvas sold for $29,900.

Unsigned, but attributed to Sir Thomas Lawrence (British, 1769-1830) is a half-portrait of James Hamilton, Marquess of Abercorn, in his earl’s robes. The frame is early 20th century carved and gilt wood. Consigned by the Hickory Museum of Art, the 30-1/8 inch by 25 inch oil on canvas sold for $29,900.


This circa 1770 Chippendale spice chest in walnut with poplar secondary was originally purchased in Petersburg, Virginia. The unusual 23 ¾” by 17 ¼” by 9 ½” chest deaccessioned by MESDA of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, brought $12,650.

This circa 1770 Chippendale spice chest in walnut with poplar secondary was originally purchased in Petersburg, Virginia. The unusual 23 ¾” by 17 ¼” by 9 ½” chest deaccessioned by MESDA of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, brought $12,650.


The grandson of Jonathon Harwood, Littleton, Massachusetts, consigned this 28 ½ inch by 32 inch by 15 inch Boston Chippendale game table. With fold-over mahogany top, cabriole legs with acanthus carved knees and ball and claw feet, it was the top furniture lot at $74,750.

The grandson of Jonathon Harwood, Littleton, Massachusetts, consigned this 28 ½ inch by 32 inch by 15 inch Boston Chippendale game table. With fold-over mahogany top, cabriole legs with acanthus carved knees and ball and claw feet, it was the top furniture lot at $74,750.


This little Chinese famile rose bowl soared over its humble pre-sale estimate ($150-$300) to become the top lot of the sale. It was purchased from The Chinese Shop in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s by Thomas Williams and sold September 13 for $115,000.

This little Chinese famile rose bowl soared over its humble pre-sale estimate ($150-$300) to become the top lot of the sale. It was purchased from The Chinese Shop in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s by Thomas Williams and sold September 13 for $115,000.

David Davidovich Burliuk (Russian, 1882-1967), Fisherman's House, oil on canvas, estimate $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

Desirable 1930-1990 Russian artworks in Aberdeen’s Oct. 3 sale

David Davidovich Burliuk (Russian, 1882-1967), Fisherman's House, oil on canvas, estimate $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

David Davidovich Burliuk (Russian, 1882-1967), Fisherman’s House, oil on canvas, estimate $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

LUTZ, Fla. – Aberdeen Auction Galleries’ Oct. 3 sale will feature more than 300 lots of Russian, European, American and Oriental paintings and drawings, with additional inclusions of icons, sculptures, bronze works, and porcelains. Coins and fine silver also will be offered, with a highlight of the section being silver designs by Russian notables including K. Fabergé, I. Khlebnikov, A. Kuzmichev, P. Ovchinnikov, G. Klingert and Grachevs.

The auction will be conducted in two sessions: Fine Art and Numismatics, with Internet live bidding provided by www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

The Fine Art session will feature oil paintings, watercolors and drawings the following artists:

American artists: Johann Berthelsen (1883-1972), Nick Eggenhofer (1897-1985), Warren W. Sheppard (1858-1937), Fritz Precht (X1X), Paul Bernard King (1867-1947) and Alexander Charles Stuart (1831-1898).

European artists: Wilfrid Constant Beauquesne (French, 1840-1913), Honoré Daumier (French, 1808-1879), Heinrich Stohl (Stahl) (Austrian, 1826-1889), Louis Reinhardt (German, 1849-1870), Pal Fried (Hungarian, 1893-1976) , Herbert Alker Tripp (British, 1883-1954), Tito Corbella (Italian, 1885-1966), Jean Louis Forain (French, 1852-1931) and Giuseppe Salvati (Italian).

Aberdeen Auction Galleries is a recognized specialist in Russian art. The company’s owner, Alex Turchak, is especially proud of the 1930-1990 Russian artworks included in the upcoming sale. “We will be offering original fine art oil paintings from the most outstanding Russian Impressionism artists of the Soviet impressionism era, as well as spectacular works by the best Contemporary Russian artists of today,” Turchak said.

Among the notable Russian painters included in the Oct. 3 auction are: Rufin Gavrilovich Sudkovski (1850-1885), David Davidovich Burliuk (1882-1967), Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957), Konstantin Alexandrovitch Weschtschiloff (1877-1945), Nahum Tschacbasov (1899-1994) and Alexis Matthew Podchernikoff (1886-1933). Still others include Vladimir Vishnevsky (b. 1938-), Elena Krylenko (1895-1956), Liubov Sergeevna Popova (1889-1924), Gavril Pavlovic Kondratenko (1854-1924), Vera Rockline (1896-1934), Zinaida Jewgenewna Serebriakova (1884-1967), Vladimir Georgievich Behteiev (1870-1971), Johann Walter-Kurau (Latvian, 1869-1932), Domashnikov Boris Fedorovich (1924-2003) and Ilia Glazunov (b. 1930).

The Numismatics session will include an important collection of Russian and world coins; and world paper money from the 1300s to the 1900s. Many of the coins are NGC and Paper Money PMG graded.

The sale begins at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time on Saturday, Oct. 3. For information on any lot in the sale, call Aberdeen Auction Galleries at 727-656-2974. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

Click here to view Aberdeen Auction Galleries’ complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Pal Fried (Hungarian, 1893-1976), Honthy Hanna, oil on canvas, estimate $2,000-$2,500. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

Pal Fried (Hungarian, 1893-1976), Honthy Hanna, oil on canvas, estimate $2,000-$2,500. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.


19th-century Russian silver and enameled items, by famous Russian makers. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

19th-century Russian silver and enameled items, by famous Russian makers. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.


Gavril Pavlovic Kondratenko (Russian, 1854-1924), seascape, oil on canvas, estimate $10,000-$14,000. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

Gavril Pavlovic Kondratenko (Russian, 1854-1924), seascape, oil on canvas, estimate $10,000-$14,000. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.


Stations of the Cross, oil on canvas, one of 10 19th-century Continental school paintings in the sale, estimate $2,000-$3,000 each. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

Stations of the Cross, oil on canvas, one of 10 19th-century Continental school paintings in the sale, estimate $2,000-$3,000 each. Image courtesy Aberdeen Auction Galleries.

John James Audubon's 'Blue Crane, or Heron' sold for a record $82,250. Image courtesy Neal Auction Co.

Audubon Blue Crane print sets record in Neal Auction’s $2M sale

John James Audubon's 'Blue Crane, or Heron' sold for a record $82,250. Image courtesy Neal Auction Co.

John James Audubon’s ‘Blue Crane, or Heron’ sold for a record $82,250. Image courtesy Neal Auction Co.

NEW ORLEANS – With a John James Audubon print selling for a world record price of $82,250, Neal Auction’s Fall Estates Auction on Sept. 12-13 surpassed the $2 million mark.

A Southern collector paid the record price for the Havell engraving of Audubon’s Blue Crane, or Heron, which was an elephant folio engraving. Bidding soared past the $30,000-$50,000 estimate.

An early 18th-century American William and Mary maple and mixed woods armchair, deaccessioned from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, sold well above its presale estimate to achieve $42,300. Accompanied by a distinguished provenance which includes that of legendary collector Ima Hogg and dealer Israel Sack, as well as a by a copy of Hogg’s 1953 purchase receipt from John Kenneth Byard of Norwalk, Conn., the armchair witnessed considerable attention and scrutiny from museum professionals, dealers and private collectors.

Part I of Neal Auction Co.’s sale of Museum of Fine Arts, Houston deaccessions achieved a total of $153,000.

English furniture consigned by an East Coast collector included a professionally restored George III mahogany and satinwood breakfront bookcase, which generated significant presale exhibition interest from the local collecting community where many old homes are large enough to accommodate such a substantial piece. The breakfront bookcase, which stood 8 feet 6 inches by 9 feet 9 inches, sold for $41,125 to a New Orleans family.

Neal Auction Co. offered Part I of the Robert and Edna Moore collection of American Art, which included four William Aiken Walker (American/Charleston, 1838-1921, active New Orleans, 1876-1905) paintings. Lot 260, the first of the Moores’ Walker paintings offered this sale, was a 6 1/4- by 12-inch oil on board depicting male and female cotton pickers with children. Carrying a low estimate of $20,000, the painting rose to $35,250 amid intense competition.

A second painting by Walker, also depicting male and female cotton pickers, more than doubled the low estimate of $12,000 to achieve $27,025.

Neal Auction’s sale included a customary selection of English and European art, including an Edouard Léon Cortès (French, 1882-1969) painting, a Parisian street scene, which commanded a respectable $28,200. Capturing a $21,150 winning bid was a sporting painting of a foxhunt by Thomas Blinks (English, 1860-1912).

A painting of a swamp by Joseph Rusling Meeker (American/Missouri, 1827-1889) finished just shy of its high estimate at $22,325.00.

An early English case piece from the East Coast collection responded well to a New Orleans sale venue. The circa 1770 George III inlaid mahogany bureau bookcase, 92 1/2 inches tall, sailed past its high estimate of $18,000 to finish at $22,200.

Also, the John W. Mecom Collection of Mardi Gras memorabilia exceeded the estimate with $36,000 in proceeds going to benefit the Galveston Art Center, Hurricane Ike Restoration Project.

For details contact Neal Auction Co., 504-899-5329 or go to the Web site www.nealauction.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A New Orleans collector paid $41,125 for this circa 1790 George III monumental breakfront bookcase. Image courtesy Neal Auction Co.

A New Orleans collector paid $41,125 for this circa 1790 George III monumental breakfront bookcase. Image courtesy Neal Auction Co.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

Estate antiques, deaccessions highlight Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 sale

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

DOWNINGTOWN, Pa. – Pook & Pook Inc. will launch its fall catalog season with an 830+ lot sale on Oct. 2-3 featuring items from estates and educational institutions, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Woodmere Art Museum, Washington County Maryland Historical Society, the Pennsylvania estates of Walter Bott Loucks Jr., Richard Wright and Nicholas Muhlenberg; and the New Jersey estates of Catherine Nicholson and Myra Godley, to name a few. The Friday, Oct. 2 session commences at 6 p.m. Eastern Time and continues on Saturday, Oct. 3 with a starting time of 10 a.m. Internet live bidding will be provided by www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Friday evening’s offering will begin with Oriental room-size carpets and throw rugs. A fine Serape, ca. 1900 with a large blue center medallion on a red field (est. $12-18,000) is one of the featured items. Other rugs include a Mahal with tree of life design, a large Agra with floral pattern and two silk carpets deaccessioned from the Woodmere Art Museum.

The estate of Walter Bott Loucks Jr. continues the Friday evening items. A rare New Brunswick, N.J., Chippendale walnut linen press with the label of Matthew Edgerton Junior (est. $15-30,000) will be an fine addition to someone’s collection, as will a stunning Montgomery County, Pa., Queen Anne tall clock by Jacob Godschalk (est. $20-30,000). The clock has a sarcophagus bonnet with gilt flame finials enclosing an 8-day engraved brass face works with name boss.

One of the furniture highlights from the Loucks estate is an exceptional Philadelphia Federal satinwood veneered mahogany games table, ca. 1795 (est. $30-$60,000). The skirt with its highly figured veneers inlaid with astragals, its delicate tapering legs with inlaid panels and tapering bellflowers make this table a bold statement.

A pair of oil on canvas over mantel landscapes by James Ross (British, ca. 1735), an enchanting portrait of a young girl holding a bird in her finger, and a pair of China trade oil on canvas courtyard scenes represent some of the fine paintings of Mr. Loucks. Other items of note include a Chinese enamel 6-piece tea service, early 19th century made for the European market (est. $5-10,000), a Philadelphia Queen Anne candle stand (est. $5-8,000), a wonderful English quillwork-framed looking glass (est. $8-12,000) and a New England William and Mary walnut veneer tall chest (est. $15-25,000).

The sale will continue with some exciting pieces of fine jewelry primarily from the Estate of Myrtle Quier of Reading, Pennsylvania. A diamond ring in a platinum setting containing a 6-carat marquise-cut diamond (est. $8-10,000) is sure to attract attention together with a fine diamond band with platinum filigree setting containing five old European cut diamonds. One of featured items will be a diamond and platinum bracelet, ca. 1930, with four large diamonds and twelve other center diamonds and 256 melee diamonds (est. $10-15,000).

The Friday session with conclude with a selection of decoys to include two miniatures by Ward Brothers, several from New Jersey makers and Mason Factory, and an early Virginia goose and swan.

A Confederate cavalry saber made by the Nashville Plow Works will lead the charge of edged weapons, followed by 90 lots of firearms. A sustained volley is anticipated as bidders shoot it out over 15 Winchester rifles, a fine Parker Brothers BH grade double-barrel shotgun, a pair of boxed English dueling pistols, several Civil War muskets and rifles as well as British flintlock pistols. A close-range battle will be fought over a Starr Army revolver, Manhattan percussion revolvers, 10 Colt revolvers, a pair of H. Aston percussion pistols with saddle holsters and a Henry Derringer pistol among others.

Saturday morning will begin with two fine Pennsylvania tall-case clocks. A York Chippendale walnut clock by Jacob Spangler has a broken arch bonnet and an 8-day painted dial works (est. $8-12,000), and the Philadelphia Chippendale walnut clock by George Miller of Germantown descended in the family of George Rittenhouse (est. $10-15,000).

The first section of a collection of historical blue Staffordshire continues the sale, including many American views, approximately 75 pieces. Several fine mocha ware groups will be sold, including a large bowl with earthworm decoration on an orange ground, a pitcher with seaweed decoration on a brown ground, a bowl with twig decoration on a black ground and a tankard with gray checkerboard design.

A feature in Saturday’s sale is an important Philadelphia silver coffee pot, ca. 1780, bearing the touch of Joseph and Nathaniel Richardson (est. $20-30,000). It has an elaborate engraved monogram for Mordecai and Hannah Lewis, double-bellied form, foliate spout and scrolled handle. Other silver objects include a Tiffany flatware service, a Boston tankard by Coney and several pieces by Hester Bateman including a teapot, a two-handled cup and a mug.

Another highlight is an important Wilmington Delaware mahogany desk and bookcase, ca. 1798 from the Thomas Robinson family, with its original bill of sale from the cabinetmaker Joseph Newlin (est. $25-45,000). This is one of three pieces by Newlin known, one in private hands and one at the Historical Society of Delaware. Several Philadelphia chairs are to be sold including three Delaware Valley Queen Anne walnut armchairs, a four shell Chippendale dining chair and a pair of Hepplewhite mahogany shield back dining chairs.

Other prominent furniture pieces include a Massachusetts Chippendale mahogany block front desk, ca. 1770, a Pennsylvania Chippendale walnut secretary desk and bookcase, a small Pennsylvania Chippendale slant front desk with bold ogee bracket feet, and a Bergen County, N.J., painted poplar Dutch cupboard.

A wide range of specialty items is incorporated into this sale. Four carousel figures will cross the block. These include an excellent giraffe attributed to Looff, with a carved saddle with the cantle having a bird terminal, scenic panels of swans and the majority of its original surface (est. $30-50,000); a circa-1910 polar bear, a zebra retaining an old surface, and a child’s duck gondola.

Two Native American tobacconist figures and a massive American painted-zinc spread-winged eagle originally from the Merritt Museum of Childhood will be offered. An exceptional pair of carved and painted female nudes, most likely ornaments for a theater organ carry an estimate of $20-40,000.

Items of a political nature are always of interest including a pair of bronze profile busts of George and Martha Washington in high relief by Edward A. Kretschman, probably made for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition.

Another unusual item is an outstanding hand crafted copper weathervane of a Baldwin American type locomotive (est. $7-10,000), together with a rare Chinaman hitching post ($8-12,000).

Sure to interest many bidders is a Victorian carved-oak tall-case clock, late 19th century, attributed to R.J. Horner (est. $40-60,000). It has a nine-tube, three-weight movement with Whittington and Westminster chimes and the case is adorned with mermaids and griffins. A collection of early Halloween and Christmas candy containers and figures are to be offered, including jack-o-lanterns, belsnickles and nodders.

Several painted dower chests with be sold, including a Lehigh County, Pa., example with pointed star, philphlot and heart decoration on a stippled ground (est. $15-25,000); and a Berks County, Pa., example with white panels of potted flowers.

Jacob Maentel, the well-known folk portrait painter of Pennsylvania, is represented by an endearing watercolor depicting a young girl seated in a blue Windsor rocking chair holding a floral garland and seated under a tree with stone farm buildings in the background.

Also in the folk art category is an oil-on-poplar panel Peaceable Kingdom, after Edward Hicks, depicting William Penn making peace with the Indians and a child surrounded by wild animals. This scene appears to have been executed after Hicks painted an identical Peaceable Kingdom that is now at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Rounding out the sale is a selection of chalkware, miniature furniture, spatter, gaudy Dutch, portraits, miniature portraits, stoneware, redware, fraktur, Georgian furniture, Chinese figures and furniture, etc.

For further information on any item in the sale, call Pook & Pook at 610-269-4040. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view Pook & Pook, Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.


A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

A highlight from Pook & Pook’s Oct. 2-3 auction. Image courtesy Pook & Pook.

Alexander Roux of New York is credited with producing this fine American rococo rosewood and marble-top duchesse. The rare dressing table with mirror has a $6,000-$9,000 estimate. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

Fine furniture, New Orleans treasures at St. Charles Gallery, Sept. 26-27

Alexander Roux of New York is credited with producing this fine American rococo rosewood and marble-top duchesse. The rare dressing table with mirror has a $6,000-$9,000 estimate. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

Alexander Roux of New York is credited with producing this fine American rococo rosewood and marble-top duchesse. The rare dressing table with mirror has a $6,000-$9,000 estimate. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

NEW ORLEANS – Outstanding artwork, exquisite estate jewelry and fine antique furniture comprise the top lots at a New Orleans Auction St. Charles Gallery sale Sept. 26-27. An example of the latter is an American rococo rosewood and marble-top duchesse attributed to Alexander Rou of New York. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Selling on the second day of the major auction, the ornate dressing table has all the attributes of a special piece. Not only is it carved rosewood, but it also has a “dished-out” marble top. “Some would have an ogee or fancy edge on the marble, but a few were worked to leave about a one-inch lip around the perimeter of the marble top,” said Greg S. Kowles, a furniture specialist at St. Charles Gallery. “It’s in beautiful original condition.”

The duchesse, which stands 81 1/2 inches high by 49 1/2 inches wide, was made in the late 1850s or 1860s, said Kowles. It boasts a $6,000-$9,000 estimate.

Also selling on Sunday is an Extra Grade Wooton Patent Secretary. “Wooton made desks in four grades: Ordinary, Standard, Extra and Superior. The Superiors are so rare and in high demand that they can cost up to a quarter-million dollars,” said Kowles. “The Extra Grade came in three sizes and this desk is the largest. John Rockefeller had an Extra Grade Wooton. The Extra Grade is sometimes called a Rockefeller desk,” said Kowles.

The Wooton in the sale is constructed of walnut, burl walnut and figured maple. It is 79 inches high, 45 1/2 inches wide, and 32 1/2 inches deep. It was made in the third quarter of the 19th century. The estimate is $25,000-$45,000.

Another furniture highlight is a Regency mahogany sideboard with ebony inlay. At 99 inches wide and on large carved paw feet, the sideboard is of large scale and has an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

One of the paintings in the sale is a landscape by Elliott Daingerfield (American, 1859-1932). Daingerfield was already a highly regarded New York artist when he became inspired at the sight of the Grand Canyon, which became his favorite subject. The Pond – Late Afternoon, a 30 1/2- by 36-inch oil on canvas has a $40,000-$50,000 estimate.

Two paintings by New Orleans artist Clarence Millet (1897-1959) will also sell on the second day of the auction. One is a street scene titled St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans. The oil on canvas board painting is 18 by 15 inches and has a $9,000-12,000 estimate.

“That’s real New Orleans,” said Tessa Steinkamp of St. Charles Gallery. “He loved painting the cobblestone streets, the carriages and people in period clothing.”

Several pieces of Newcomb College Pottery will be featured in the sale. A 5 1/2-inch vase potted by Jonathan Browne and decorated in an artichoke décor and vellum glaze by artist Sadie Irvine has a $2,500-$4,000 estimate.

A stunning example of the jewelry to be sold is a 14-karat yellow gold pendant necklace containing a pear-shaped Paraiba tourmaline weighing 59.45 carats, surrounded by a double row of round brilliant-cut diamonds with a total weight of 6.77 carats.

View the fully illustrated catalogs and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery, Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The Wooton secretary is pictured in the open position with its writing surface lowered. The compartments on either side of the main case swing closed when the desk is not in use. The Extra Grade model is estimated at $25,000-$40,000. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

The Wooton secretary is pictured in the open position with its writing surface lowered. The compartments on either side of the main case swing closed when the desk is not in use. The Extra Grade model is estimated at $25,000-$40,000. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.


New Orleans native Clarence Millet (1897-1959) said that he painted what was familiar to him, like this street scene titled ‘St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans.' The 18- by 15-inch oil on canvas board carries an estimate of $8,000-$12,000. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

New Orleans native Clarence Millet (1897-1959) said that he painted what was familiar to him, like this street scene titled ‘St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans.’ The 18- by 15-inch oil on canvas board carries an estimate of $8,000-$12,000. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.


Elliott Daingerfield (American, 1859-1932) painted ‘The Pond - Late Afternoon.' The oil on canvas, 30 1/2 by 36 inches, has a $40,000-$50,000. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

Elliott Daingerfield (American, 1859-1932) painted ‘The Pond – Late Afternoon.’ The oil on canvas, 30 1/2 by 36 inches, has a $40,000-$50,000. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.


Newcomb College Pottery artist Sadie Irvine (1887-1979) decorated this 5 1/2-inch vase in the ‘Artichock' décor in 1932. The art pottery vase carries a $2,500-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

Newcomb College Pottery artist Sadie Irvine (1887-1979) decorated this 5 1/2-inch vase in the ‘Artichock’ décor in 1932. The art pottery vase carries a $2,500-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy New Orleans Auction, St. Charles Gallery Inc.

Platinum and diamond articulated brooch (est. $10/12,000)

Fine jewelry and silver add sparkle to Cowan’s Oct. 2-3 auction

Platinum and diamond articulated brooch (est. $10/12,000)

Platinum and diamond articulated brooch (est. $10/12,000)

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s 900-lot Fall Fine and Decorative Art auction offers a broad selection for collectors, with Continental paintings, furniture, and other decorative arts to be sold on the first day of the two-day auction, and American furniture, folk art, paintings (including a group of works by Cincinnati artists), and decorative arts on board for the second day.

The sale features significant Continental and American silver pieces from several centuries, English porcelain from the collection of the late Tom Forshee of Chelsea, Mich., the contemporary fine art collection of Betty Asher of Los Angeles, the antique scrimshaw collection of an Atlanta, collector, and groupings of fine jewelry and English Regency furniture.

“We are pleased with the diversity of this auction, as comprehensive collections of a number of different categories of fine and decorative art are represented. Buyers are sure to find objects of interest to enhance collections, however varied they may be,” said Diane Wachs, Director of Fine and Decorative Art.

A Georg Jensen sterling coffee and tea service in the “Blossom” pattern (est. $20/30,000) is the highlight of a wide-ranging group of silver to be offered. While the service is circa 1940-60, Jensen designed the pattern around 1905 to 1908. The earliest examples of hollow and flatware offered include nearly 20 lots by Hester Bateman, the 18th-century London silversmith who, at 52 years of age, took over the silver business at her husband’s death in 1760. She developed and popularized the Classical style in English silver in her own right; several such works are presented in this auction. Several pieces of Cincinnati silver, including silver vessels by Beggs & Smith (est. $4/600), a julep cup by J. J. Bangs (est. $6/800) and an Edward and David Kinsey repoussé cream and sugar (est. $8/1,200) are featured.

Cowan’s will also offer porcelain from the collection of the late Tom Forshee, which represents the evolution of styles in English teawares, from lovely Chinese export of the 18th century, to English renditions of Chinese export, to the true English style of the 19th century. American porcelain examples to be offered include two selections from White Houses china services; a porcelain soup bowl from Abraham Lincoln’s State Service carries an estimate of $20/25,000, while a dessert saucier from what is possibly John Quincy Adams’ daily service is estimated to sell for $5/7,000.

Fine art to be sold during the first day of the auction includes works from the collection of the late Betty Asher, a collector and dealer in Los Angeles who represented in her gallery and collected works by living artists. Included in this auction is the oil on canvas Man with Figurines by Viola Frey (American, 1933-2004) (est. $10/15,000); a mixed-media sculpture by Horace Clifford Westermann (American, 1922-1981) titled The Unaccountable (est. $20/30,000); and works by Claes Oldenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, and Andy Warhol, among others. Several Cincinnati paintings will also be sold, including a trompe-l’oeil by Charles Meurer (1865-1955), which is estimated to bring for $6/8,000.

For the first time, Cowan’s will offer over 30 lots of fine jewelry, highlighted by a platinum and diamond articulated brooch that is estimated to bring $10/12,000. Other featured pieces include two lots of Art Deco jewelry, a platinum and diamond line necklace and a gold and diamond brooch, both estimated at $4/6,000; a multi-colored South Sea pearl necklace estimated to sell for $3500-4500; and a circa 1950 14-karat gold and diamond covered watch estimated at $2/3,000.

Folk art to be sold includes a strong collection of over 50 pieces of antique scrimshaw, featuring a whale’s tooth with whaling scene and American ship estimated at $10/15,000. The detailed piece is engraved with polychrome ink on two sides, one side with a whaling scene of fully rigged ship, a pod of whales, and whale boats, the other with a ship under sail flying the stars and stripes. The comprehensive collection includes busks, sewing baskets, several jagging wheels, canes, and cribbage boards, among other fine scrimshaw examples. An 1850s Southern portrait of a child with pet dog and squirrel attributed to Louis Bahin (1813-1857) is another leading folk art work, with an estimate of $8/12,000. French-born Bahin lived and worked in Natchez, Miss., in the 1850s, painting portraits for prominent families, as well as landscapes.

An English Regency Mahogany Library Bookcase, estimated to sell for $4/6,000, is a focal point of a fine group of Regency furniture to be sold during the first day of the auction. Other furniture highlights include a Tennessee sugar press, circa 1840-1850 (est. $2/4,000); a New York mahogany chamber/dressing table, circa 1790-1800 (est. $2/4,000); and a Massachusetts tiger maple chest on frame, circa 1740-1760 (est. $4/$6,000).

For questions about any item in this sale, call 513-871-1670. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

Click here to view Cowan’s Auction, Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Georg Jensen sterling coffee and tea service in Blossom pattern (est. $20/30,000). Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions.

Georg Jensen sterling coffee and tea service in Blossom pattern (est. $20/30,000). Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions.


Louis Bahin attributed Southern portrait (est. $8/12,000). Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions.

Louis Bahin attributed Southern portrait (est. $8/12,000). Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions.


Scrimshawed whale's tooth with whaling scene and American ship

Scrimshawed whale’s tooth with whaling scene and American ship


Important genre painting by Abbott Graves (est. $30/50,000). Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions.

Important genre painting by Abbott Graves (est. $30/50,000). Image courtesy Cowan’s Auctions.


Abraham Lincoln State Service porcelain soup bowl (est. $20/25,000)

Abraham Lincoln State Service porcelain soup bowl (est. $20/25,000)

Circa-1890s lithographed-paper sign advertising Soapine Soap, Kendall Mfg. Co., Providence, R.I., with desirable whale image, 38 inches by 30 inches. Estimate $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Lifetime collection of Americana, folk art at Morphy’s, Oct. 8-10

Circa-1890s lithographed-paper sign advertising Soapine Soap, Kendall Mfg. Co., Providence, R.I., with desirable whale image, 38 inches by 30 inches. Estimate $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Circa-1890s lithographed-paper sign advertising Soapine Soap, Kendall Mfg. Co., Providence, R.I., with desirable whale image, 38 inches by 30 inches. Estimate $15,000-$20,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

DENVER, Pa. – An honored lifetime collection of Americana and folk art, the Joseph and Lilian Shapiro Collection, headlines Dan Morphy Auctions’ Fall Sale slated for Oct. 8-10 at the Morphy gallery in Denver, Pa. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.com.

More than 500 lots of select offerings from the Shapiro Collection – antique advertising signs, salesmen’s samples and patent models; product cabinets and packaging; and early hand-carved folk art – will be offered. The celebrated 30-year collection has been featured in numerous national magazine and newspaper articles, and was showcased in a special 2005 exhibition at the National Heritage Museum in Lexington, Mass.

The Thursday, Oct. 8 session opens with 40 jewelry lots, followed by 150 general antique lots and the day’s main attraction: the Shapiro collection.

“This collection is going to make a lot of people happy because it crosses over into so many subcategories, like black Americana, Native Americana, early American inventions, and even Halloween and political themes,” said gallery owner Dan Morphy.

Within the Shapiro collection is a remarkable grouping of 100+ folk-art bride sticks. Skillfully hand-carved and painted, the rarely seen decorative objects date from the early 19th century to around the turn of the 20th century. Each was a custom design, to be given as a gift to a new bride. While not meant for practical use, they replicate the plainer forked sticks that women of the 19th century used for pushing down laundry into tubs of boiling water. “Some of these sticks have cross-hatching, mother-of-pearl inlay, and wonderful folk-art carving on them – hearts, half-moons, a horse’s head, even a carved, caged ball that’s like a whimsey,” said Morphy. “Many of the pieces were formerly in the collection of folk art dealers Betty and Joel Schatzberg.”

The more than 200 advertising items in the Shapiro Collection include dye cabinets, display cases, and a huge array of tin, enameled-metal, porcelain and reverse-on-glass signs. A late-19th-century Soapine Dirt Killer reverse-on-glass sign, estimate $10,000-$15,000, with sharp, rich colors and desirable whale-logo graphic, was once displayed in the executive offices of Kendall Manufacturing Co. in Providence, R.I., producers of Soapine. A paper version of the same sign carries a presale estimate of $15,000-$20,000, a reflection of its rarity and extraordinarily fine condition.

The graphics on some of the signs, soapboxes and packaged soap bars in the collection display insensitive themes that were considered acceptable in previous centuries. A lithographed-paper sign depicting Uncle Sam kicking a Chinese man out of the country, a reflection of the anti-Asian sentiment during the mid-19th-century Gold Rush era, is estimated at $2,500.

Although the Shapiro collection is first and foremost an Americana and folk art collection, its underlying laundry and soap theme reflects Joe’s profession – he was a distributor of Whirlpool commercial laundry equipment. The collection includes a 30-piece panoramic timeline of washing machines, mostly of wood and dating back as early as the 1830s. Additionally, 25 to 30 early salesmen’s samples replicate drying racks, ironing boards, scale model washers and related equipment – some of which were featured on PBS Television’s Antiques Roadshow.

The Friday, Oct. 9 session commences with 100 marble lots from California-based collectors Bob and Penny Robbins. Top lots include a superb selection of hand-made Indian Lutzes, sulphides, onion skins and swirls. A rare, red-base Guinea sulphide is expected to bring $3,000-$5,000. A fantastic selection of machine-made marbles from the Robbins collection features examples by Peltier, Akro Agate and Christiansen Agate Co., with most in 9.5 out of 10 condition or better.

Bob and Penny Robbins’ advertising collection consists of “smalls” of many types, with most in near-mint or near-mint-plus condition. More than 600 lots are devoted to the collection, which includes 100+ coffee cans, 50 tobacco cans, 200 talc tins, 100+ peanut butter pails, 100+ pocket mirrors, 100 tip trays more than 25 match strikes. Among the collection’s highlights are a near-mint Lowney’s Cocoa string holder, $4,000-$7,000; and Five Brothers Plug Tobacco tin-over-cardboard sign, $4,000-$7,000.

Day two concludes with 150 holiday lots. “This group includes some of the rarest and best Halloween material we’ve ever auctioned,” said Morphy, pointing to a veggie man driving a pickle-shape hot air balloon, $3,000-$4,000; elephant-head jack-o-lantern, $2,000-$3,000; and veggie man candy container, $3,000-$4,000.
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The Saturday, Oct. 10 session features more than 200 examples of early comic character toys, including Popeye, Felix and rare Disney. Highlighting the selection is a lineup of 100 premium-quality comic character toys from the Carl Lobel Collection, including literally every Popeye toy ever made by Marx and Chein, with original boxes. Popeye-related toys in the collection include a flawless example of Hoge’s tin Popeye in a Rowboat, considered by many collectors to be the quintessential Popeye toy. The rowboat carries an estimate of $4,000-$6,000.

Obscure and rare, a Louis Marx Smitty Scooter toy from the Lobel Collection, estimate $3,000-$5,000, retains its very rare original box and is one of only a few known to exist. Other elusive 1920s comic-strip toys depict Buttercup and Spare-Ribs; and Snowflake and Swipes. Each of the toys is boxed and estimated at $1,000-$1,500. The grouping is rounded out nicely with Charlie Chaplin, Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd toys.

Other consignors have added choice inclusions to the third session, including boxed Disney celluloid toys, additional Disney and Popeye toys, mostly boxed; and a fine-quality single-owner collection of 100 cowboy cap guns and holsters, also mostly boxed. A Roy Rogers Flash Draw boxed gun and holster could hit the bull’s eye at $2,000-$3,000.

The closing session will also feature cast-iron horse-drawn toys, trains, pressed-steel and cast-iron toys; trains, figural doorstops, and approximately 100 bank lots. A Girl Skipping Rope mechanical bank, from the family of the original owner and in excellent working order, is estimated at $18,000-$22,000. In the still bank section, a Battleship U.S.S. Iowa in pristine condition could make $3,000-$4,000.

For questions about any item in the sale, call 717-335-3435. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

Click here to view Dan Morphy LLC’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Tin litho Lowney’s Cocoa string holder, patent date March 18, 1908. Estimate $4,000-$7,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Tin litho Lowney’s Cocoa string holder, patent date March 18, 1908. Estimate $4,000-$7,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Cast-iron still bank replicating Battleship Iowa, circa 1902, manufactured by J.& E. Stevens. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Cast-iron still bank replicating Battleship Iowa, circa 1902, manufactured by J.& E. Stevens. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Miss Pepsi-Cola cardboard sign, copyright 1907, framed size 27½ inches by 34 inches. One of only three known examples. Estimate $7,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Miss Pepsi-Cola cardboard sign, copyright 1907, framed size 27½ inches by 34 inches. One of only three known examples. Estimate $7,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Marx Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd tin wind-up toy car with original box, 16 inches long, dated 1939. Provenance: Collection of Carl Lobel. Estimate $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Marx Charlie McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd tin wind-up toy car with original box, 16 inches long, dated 1939. Provenance: Collection of Carl Lobel. Estimate $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Cast-iron mechanical bank known as Girl Skipping Rope, manufactured by J. & E. Stevens Co. From original owners. Estimate $18,000-$22,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Cast-iron mechanical bank known as Girl Skipping Rope, manufactured by J. & E. Stevens Co. From original owners. Estimate $18,000-$22,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Roy Rogers toy gun double holster set with original box. Estimate $1,500-$2,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Roy Rogers toy gun double holster set with original box. Estimate $1,500-$2,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Joseph swirl marble, 1- 5/16 inches in diameter, brilliant colors. Estimate $800-$1,200. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Joseph swirl marble, 1- 5/16 inches in diameter, brilliant colors. Estimate $800-$1,200. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Rare Halloween jack-o-lantern depicting veggie man piloting a pickle-shape hot air balloon. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Rare Halloween jack-o-lantern depicting veggie man piloting a pickle-shape hot air balloon. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.


Folk-art wooden laundry 'bride stick' with nicely carved and etched hearts, diamonds and stars; 19th century. Estimate $400-$800. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Folk-art wooden laundry ‘bride stick’ with nicely carved and etched hearts, diamonds and stars; 19th century. Estimate $400-$800. Image courtesy Morphy Auctions.

Roman, Apulia, Underworld Painter, large red figure hydria, estimate $20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Ancient civilizations come to life in Malter’s Oct. 4 auction

Roman, Apulia, circa 4th century B.C., hydria, estimate 20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Roman, Apulia, circa 4th century B.C., hydria, estimate 20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

ENCINO, Calif. – Southern California’s Malter Galleries Inc. has a treat in store for collectors of antiquities from Egypt, Greece, Mexico and other ancient cradles of civilization. The company’s Sunday, Oct. 4 Ancient Art from Around the World auction, which will commence at noon Pacific Time (3 p.m. Eastern Time), features more than 250 select items, some coming from long-held collections. Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

The sale will open with a fine selection of Ancient Egyptian art, led by a choice early dynastic alabaster vase measuring 10½ inches tall, with a pre-auction estimate of $5,000. Another beautiful piece from this section is lot 5, a brilliantly painted Middle Kingdom wooden coffin mask estimated at $8,750. Scarabs, ushabti, several nice bronzes and other attractive wooden pieces make the Egyptian offering in this auction quite desirable.

The auction continues with exceptional Greek antiquities. A life-size marble head of (perhaps) the goddess Aphrodite, lot 87, dates from the late 5th to the early 4th century B.C., and comes to Malter Galleries from an old New York City Collection. It has a pre-auction estimate of $14,000. Lot 93 is a wonderful Hellenistic, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. bronze figure of Mars, with an estimate of $6,000.

The Roman art section is highlighted by two especially fine pieces. Lot 96 is a fantastic, large circa 330-315 B.C. Apulian red-figure “hydria” that was painted by the Underworld Painter.” Standing 20 inches tall and coming from an old Florida collection, the vessel is expected to fetch $20,000.

An equally stunning red-figure skyphos, a wine krater for the funerary revels, is entered as lot 97. It stands over 10 inches tall and has an estimate of $10,000.

Lot 102 is a large and quite impressive terra cotta Daunian “askos.” Its pre-auction estimate is $3,500.

Roman glass, Luristan bronze weapons and ancient through modern jewelry are also included. Lot 217 is a stunning lady’s 7-inch yellow and white metal ruby and diamond bracelet has an estimate of $4,500. An exquisite design with perennial appeal, it was appraised in 1995 for $9,200.

Chinese and Japanese art is also strongly represented in this auction. Snuff bottles, ivories – including lot 171, a circa-1900 artwork of top quality, featuring Japanese Samurais, might earn in the vicinity of $1,500 at auction.

The auction continues with great Pre-Columbian art, some of which came from the same Florida collection mentioned previously. Lot 224 is a large and choice Colima “dog.” Lot 220 is a marvelous 12-inch crème ceramic Jalisco “hunchback” figure, and lot 223 is a tall standing Jalisco “ball player.” The auction concludes with a couple of nice, old maps and a fine selection of antique canes.

For additional information on any item in the sale, call 818-784-7772. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet through www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

Click here to view Malter Galleries Inc.’s complete catalog.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Egypt, Early Dynastic alabaster vase, estimate $5,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Egypt, Early Dynastic alabaster vase, estimate $5,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Egypt, Middle Kingdom, funerary coffin mask, estimate $9,000-$17,500. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.
Greek, marble head of woman, estimate $14,000-$28,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Greek, marble head of woman, estimate $14,000-$28,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Hellenistic, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., bronze figure of Mars or warrior, estimate $6,000-$12,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Hellenistic, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., bronze figure of Mars or warrior, estimate $6,000-$12,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Roman, Apulia, Underworld Painter, large red figure hydria, estimate $20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Roman, Apulia, Underworld Painter, large red figure hydria, estimate $20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Japanese, carved ivory Samurai warriors, circa 1900, estimate $1,500-$3,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Japanese, carved ivory Samurai warriors, circa 1900, estimate $1,500-$3,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Lady’s 7-inch ruby and diamond bracelet, estimate $4,600-$9,200. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Lady’s 7-inch ruby and diamond bracelet, estimate $4,600-$9,200. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Western Mexico, Jalisco, circa 250 B.C.-350 A.D. figure of hunchback, estimate $4,500-$9,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Western Mexico, Jalisco, circa 250 B.C.-350 A.D. figure of hunchback, estimate $4,500-$9,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Western Mexico, Jalisco, circa 250 B.C.-350 A.D. figure of bell player, estimate $5,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Western Mexico, Jalisco, circa 250 B.C.-350 A.D. figure of bell player, estimate $5,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.


Western Mexico, Colima, redware dog, estimate $5,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.

Western Mexico, Colima, redware dog, estimate $5,000-$10,000. Image courtesy Malter Galleries.