Circa-1615, James I sculpted and painted alabaster bust believed to be a depiction of the eminent 17th-century botanist and physician Dr. Peter Turner. Entered in Dreweatts' April 14 auction with an estimate of $75,000-$105,000. Image courtesy Dreweatts.

Premier UK auction house Dreweatts signs on with LiveAuctioneers

Circa-1615, James I sculpted and painted alabaster bust believed to be a depiction of the eminent 17th-century botanist and physician Dr. Peter Turner. Entered in Dreweatts' April 14 auction with an estimate of $75,000-$105,000. Image courtesy Dreweatts.

Circa-1615, James I sculpted and painted alabaster bust believed to be a depiction of the eminent 17th-century botanist and physician Dr. Peter Turner. Entered in Dreweatts’ April 14 auction with an estimate of $75,000-$105,000. Image courtesy Dreweatts.

NEW YORK – LiveAuctioneers.com, which provides Internet live-bidding services to more than 900 auction companies worldwide, has entered into a marketing agreement with the renowned British auction house Dreweatts.

It is anticipated that LiveAuctioneers will be working cooperatively with Dreweatts on 30 to 50 auctions in their first year of collaboration. Under the terms of the new agreement, LiveAuctioneers will present and promote Dreweatts’ auction catalogs online, and enable bidders to participate in Dreweatts’ sales either absentee or live via the Internet as those sales are taking place.

“It is a great honor for LiveAuctioneers to be working with a company as highly regarded as Dreweatts,” said LiveAuctioneers’ CEO Julian R. Ellison. “Dreweatts has operated at the top tier of fine art valuation and auctioneering in Britain for 250 years. They respect tradition, and their long-held reputation for appraising and auctioning quality estates is impeccable, yet they’ve also been open to adopting new methods of generating maximum returns for their consignors. They were right on the front lines in adding Internet technology to their marketing plan. Their Newbury-based Donnington Priory salerooms first embraced online bidding in 2006, which was a signal to other auction houses that they also had better get on board with the Internet.”

It will be an especially busy year for Dreweatts, said Scott Miles, LiveAuctioneers’ Senior VP Sales. “Dreweatts has formed a marketing alliance with another of our clients, Bloomsbury Auctions – a world leader in antiquarian books and manuscripts. This has cemented Dreweatts as a major force in the UK market. They’ll be reciprocally sharing their resources with Bloomsbury’s galleries, not only in London but also New York and Rome. Dreweatts is poised to become much more of an international force.”

Miles said LiveAuctioneers views the new association with Dreweatts as “a wonderful opportunity to expand our presence in the UK and Continental Europe, and at just the right time, since bidders are now able to take advantage of our bidding platform’s foreign language translation and instant currency conversion features.

“We have always had a strong commitment to both the British and greater European market, but an association with Dreweatts lends further credibility to our company,” Miles continued. “We’re extremely pleased to be included in the overall marketing strategy that Dreweatt so effectively employs.”

Dreweatts’ first auction conducted with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers will be a 334-lot, April 14 sale featuring furniture, carpets and works of art. A star lot in the sale is a circa-1615, James I sculpted and painted alabaster bust believed to be a depiction of the eminent 17th-century botanist and physician Dr. Peter Turner. The bust reputedly was erected in the South Aisle of Saint Olave’s Church in the City of London, where Turner was buried. Saint Olave’s famously survived the Great Fire of 1666, the flames coming to within 100 yards or so of the building. Sadly, the church was gutted by German bombs in 1941 during the London Blitz. Presumably the bust of Dr. Turner was salvaged from the ruins, but its history since the Blitz is undocumented. The highly important architectural element is expected to make $75,000-$105,000 at auction.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

The natural sapphire in this platinum and 18K gold ring weighs 11.06 carats. From the late 20th century, it has a $35,000-$55,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

Dallas Auction: gold jewelry will exceed melt value at Apr. 7 auction

The natural sapphire in this platinum and 18K gold ring weighs 11.06 carats. From the late 20th century, it has a $35,000-$55,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

The natural sapphire in this platinum and 18K gold ring weighs 11.06 carats. From the late 20th century, it has a $35,000-$55,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

DALLAS – With the price of gold hitting record highs, Dallas Auction Gallery offers a gentle reminder that consumers should do their homework before selling gold jewelry and accessories.

Tough economic times and compelling gold exchange commercials have created a jewelry-selling craze, but savvy sellers should think twice before putting unwanted or old jewelry in an envelope and mailing it to a buyer. Kathi Shuford, Appraisal Services CEO and acting director of Dallas Auction Gallery, warns that gold exchange offers may not yield the best return.

According to Shuford any piece of fine jewelry that has aesthetic value should not be sold for scrap. Such examples include any piece of quality craftsmanship, or made by a recognized and collected designer, or of a particular period such as Victorian, Edwardian, or produced during a fashionable age such as Art Nouveau or Art Deco.

The prices paid by exchange dealers are determined by gold spot prices and are usually based on the karat weight of the metal, as well as the total weight of the gold handled in the transaction. Sometimes additional fees are charged, said Shuford.

Jewelry sold at a live auction is exposed to an international audience. Collectors of high-end and signed jewelry are very Internet savvy. They understand the value of signed and period pieces and comb the on-line auction catalogs of high-end reputable auction houses for these valuable pieces. In December 2009, the last auction in which Dallas Auction Gallery offered jewelry, 20,846 unique visitors from 36 countries viewed more than 300 lots in the Live Auctioneers on-line catalog.

Dallas Auction Gallery has several pieces of jewelry in its April 7 auction from consignors who carefully weighed their options. One such client, Muffin Lemak, who consigned jewelry in the December auction, had never thought of auctioning her gold and diamond bracelet until she met with Dallas Auction Gallery.

“When presented with the idea of selling my designer jewelry at auction I was excited. I love collecting pieces from young avant-garde designers as well as the established design houses,” said Lemak. “Unfortunately, a few of my purchases over the years haven’t really ended up suiting my style. So, rather than stare at my mistakes in the jewelry box, I decided to sell. There were several bidders competing on my lots and I was thrilled with the results.”

The April 7 auction will feature outstanding pieces from David Webb, Van Cleef and Arpels, Henry Dunay, and several Art Deco and retro pieces. Live Auctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Highlights for the April 7 auction are a David Webb 18K gold, diamond and enamel bracelet having 75 round brilliant cut diamonds totaling 3.00 carats, est.$15,000-$25,000; a platinum and 18K gold, diamond and natural sapphire ring, est. $35,000-$55,000; a platinum and 14K gold and diamond ring, 5.09 carats, flanked by tapered baguettes, est. $11,000-$16,000; David Webb 18K gold and black enamel earrings, est. $4,000-$6,000; and a set of Van Cleef and Arpels brooch and earrings set having 25 round brilliant cut sapphires and five round brilliant cut diamonds, .30 carats approximate total, est. $6,000-$9,000.

To join DAG for the April 7 auction or for more information, visit www.dallasauctiongallery.com or call 214-653-3900.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A David Webb design, this 18K gold, diamond and enamel bracelet having 75 round, brilliant-cut diamonds totaling 3.00 carats has a $15,000-$25,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

A David Webb design, this 18K gold, diamond and enamel bracelet having 75 round, brilliant-cut diamonds totaling 3.00 carats has a $15,000-$25,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.


‘Van Cleef and Arpels NY’ is signed on this brooch and earrings set dated December 1963. Having 25 round, brilliant-cut sapphires and five round, brilliant-cut diamonds, the set has a $6,000-$9,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

‘Van Cleef and Arpels NY’ is signed on this brooch and earrings set dated December 1963. Having 25 round, brilliant-cut sapphires and five round, brilliant-cut diamonds, the set has a $6,000-$9,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.


These 18K gold black enamel earrings are stamped ‘Webb 18K.’ Designed by David Webb, the pair has a $4,000-$6,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

These 18K gold black enamel earrings are stamped ‘Webb 18K.’ Designed by David Webb, the pair has a $4,000-$6,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.


The round, brilliant-cut diamond at the center of this platinum and 14K gold ring weights 5.09 carats. It carries an $11,000-$16,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

The round, brilliant-cut diamond at the center of this platinum and 14K gold ring weights 5.09 carats. It carries an $11,000-$16,000 estimate. Image courtesy Dallas Auction Gallery.

The 75 pieces of Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica porcelain dinnerware offered in Michaan’s auction April 3 are in excellent condition. With 12 dinner plates the set is estimated at $50,000-$70,000. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

Flora Danica dinner service ready to bloom at Michaan’s, April 3

The 75 pieces of Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica porcelain dinnerware offered in Michaan’s auction April 3 are in excellent condition. With 12 dinner plates the set is estimated at $50,000-$70,000. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

The 75 pieces of Royal Copenhagen Flora Danica porcelain dinnerware offered in Michaan’s auction April 3 are in excellent condition. With 12 dinner plates the set is estimated at $50,000-$70,000. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Royal Copenhagen has been producing Flora Danica porcelain dinnerware since the late 18th century. Seventy-five pieces of what is considered to be one of the world’s most luxurious dinner services highlight Michaan’s Auctions’ Spring Auction on April 3.

The sale of exquisite furniture, decorative arts, jewelry and fine are will begin Sunday at noon Pacific. Live Auctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Twelve dinner plates and several serving pieces are included in the Flora Danica set, which carries an estimate of $50,000-$70,000. Except for minor chips to several pieces, which are noted, the set is in excellent condition.

Also from the 18th century is a Dutch Rococo floral marquetry secretary bookcase. The lower bombe case, which is mounted on hairy paw feet on the front, has a sloping fall front that is heavily inlaid. The piece stands 94 inches tall and has a $20,000-$30,000 estimate.

At the head of the line of paintings is an oil on canvas by Emile Antoine Bayard (France, 1837-1891) titled Merrymaking in a Field, which has a $30,000-$50,000 estimate. On the contemporary side there’s Anton Henning’s Portrait of a Matron in a Green Dress, mixed media on canvas, 55 inches by 51 1/4 inches, which has a $20,000-$25,000 estimate. The German artist signed his initials on the lower right.

Additional paintings in the auction include Pastoral Scene on Russian River by Frederick Ferdinand Schafer (Californian, 1839-1927), oil on canvas, 30 by 50 inches, estimate: $3,000-5,000; Tahoe’s East Shore by Thomas (T.M.) Nicholas (American, born 1963), oil on board, 20 by 16 inches, estimate: $6,000-8,000; and Poppies and Lupin, California landscape by Angel De Service Espoy (Californian, 1879-1963), oil on canvas, 28 by 38 inches, estimate: $4,000-6,000.

The auction will begin with about 50 lots of fine jewelry, which will include a pair of jadeite, diamond, and black onyx earrings in 18K white gold. Their estimate is $9,000-10,000.

Other highlights of the 340-lot auction include a large George III sterling epergne, Edinburgh, circa 1792, estimate: $15,000-$20,000; a Tiffany & Co. sterling flatware service in the English King pattern, estimate: $9,000-$12,000; a Fereghan Sarouk carpet, approximately 13 feet 7 inches by 23 feet, estimate: $10,000-$15,000; Chinese cloisonné moon flask vase, estimate: $2,000-$3,000; a ladies Patek Philippe 18K yellow gold hunting case pendant watch, estimate: $1,500-2,000; and an American Renaissance Revival gilt bronze and ebonized credenza, circa 1870, estimate: $7,000/8,000.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Edinburgh silversmith Robert Wilson made this George III sterling epergne circa 1792. Weighing 160 troy ounces, the 19 1/2-inch-tall epergne has a $15,000-$$20,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

Edinburgh silversmith Robert Wilson made this George III sterling epergne circa 1792. Weighing 160 troy ounces, the 19 1/2-inch-tall epergne has a $15,000-$$20,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.


‘Sheep and a Goat in Landscape’ is after Eugene Verboeckhoven (Belgium, 1799-1881). The dramatic painting is oil on canvas, 33 1/2 by 43 1/2 inches. It is signed lower right ‘Eugene Verboeckhoven 1849.’ It carries a  $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

‘Sheep and a Goat in Landscape’ is after Eugene Verboeckhoven (Belgium, 1799-1881). The dramatic painting is oil on canvas, 33 1/2 by 43 1/2 inches. It is signed lower right ‘Eugene Verboeckhoven 1849.’ It carries a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.


Cherubs, birds and butterflies adorn the floral marquetry on this 18th-century Dutch Rococo bookcase. Measuring 94 inches high by 49 inches wide and 25 inches deep, the beautifully crafted piece has a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

Cherubs, birds and butterflies adorn the floral marquetry on this 18th-century Dutch Rococo bookcase. Measuring 94 inches high by 49 inches wide and 25 inches deep, the beautifully crafted piece has a $20,000-$30,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.


Emile Antoine Bayard (France, 1837-1891) signed his ‘Merrymaking in a Field’ on the lower left ‘Emile Bayard.’  It has a $30,000-$50,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

Emile Antoine Bayard (France, 1837-1891) signed his ‘Merrymaking in a Field’ on the lower left ‘Emile Bayard.’ It has a $30,000-$50,000 estimate. Image courtesy Michaan’s Auctions.

One of 26 photo portraits of martial arts legend Bruce Lee from the film Game of Death (Golden Harvest, 1978). Selection of photos was sold for $1,100 in a Dec. 13, 2008 auction conducted by Profiles in History. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Profiles in History.

Bruce Lee’s wife, daughter open Hong Kong exhibit

One of 26 photo portraits of martial arts legend Bruce Lee from the film Game of Death (Golden Harvest, 1978). Selection of photos was sold for $1,100 in a Dec. 13, 2008 auction conducted by Profiles in History. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Profiles in History.

One of 26 photo portraits of martial arts legend Bruce Lee from the film Game of Death (Golden Harvest, 1978). Selection of photos was sold for $1,100 in a Dec. 13, 2008 auction conducted by Profiles in History. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Profiles in History.

HONG KONG (AP) – On Tuesday, Bruce Lee’s wife and daughter unveiled an exhibition of the late kung fu star’s personal items, photos and movie posters in Hong Kong.

The exhibit, which includes a boxing head guard and a pair of sunglasses used by Lee, is part of a tribute to the late actor at the 34th Hong Kong International Film Festival. The festival is also hosting a seminar on his work this Sunday and screening nine of his movies in honor of what would have been his 70th birthday later this year.

I think that he would be thrilled to know that his legacy has gone on and on for as long as it has and that it will continue to go on and inspire people for many, many more years to come,” said Lee’s daughter, Shannon Lee Keasler, who attended the opening ceremony with her mother, Linda Lee Cadwell.

Lee became a chest-thumping source of Chinese pride by portraying characters that defended the Chinese and the working class from oppressors in films like Return of the Dragon. He died in Hong Kong in 1973 at age 32 from swelling of the brain.

I think my father continues to be really influential because he was so unique. There hasn’t really been anyone like him,” Lee Keasler said.

Lee’s daughter said earlier that plans to convert her father’s old house in Hong Kong – now used as an hourly love motel – into a museum and to build a new museum in Seattle, where Lee studied and taught martial arts, are in the fundraising stage.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-03-30-10 0906EDT

 

Utah residents plead guilty to trafficking American Indian relics

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Two southern Utah residents pleaded guilty Monday to stealing government property and illegally trafficking in American Indian artifacts.

Brent Bullock and Tammy Shumway were among 26 people indicted after a long-running federal sting targeting those who illegally dig up, sell and collect Indian artifacts in the Four Corners area. Both initially pleaded not guilty to several felony charges after the case broke last summer.

Each faces a maximum of 12 years in prison. Sentencing is set for July.

Bullock, 61, sold several ancient Indian items to an undercover operative in 2007, including a blanket fragment for $2,000 and a hoe-like tool for $500, according to court documents. He also offered to sell several ceramic figurines taken from U.S. Bureau of Land Management land.

Bullock said he wanted to sell the items because he was in debt, according to a search warrant affidavit.

Investigators said Bullock acknowledged to the informant that the items came from public land in Utah but filled out paperwork saying they were from private land in Colorado.

Shumway, who introduced Bullock to the informant, was charged because the 40-year-old woman aided and abetted the deals and signed a falsified paper about the items’ origin as a witness, federal officials said.

In U.S. District Court on Monday, Bullock and Shumway acknowledged they knew the items had been illegally dug up from public land in Utah. As part of a plea deal, they each pleaded guilty to one count of trafficking in stolen artifacts and theft of government property. Prosecutors agreed to seek a reduced sentence.

They said little in court on Monday except to acknowledge details of the plea agreement and the charges. They declined to comment after the hearing.

Bullock’s attorney, Earl Xaiz, said his client was never into artifact collecting for the money and hadn’t planned to sell any of them before he was approached by the government informant.

The cases are among the first to be resolved following one of the nation’s largest investigations into artifact looting on public and tribal lands in the Southwest.

Starting in 2007, Utah antiquities dealer Ted Gardiner spent more than two years working with the FBI and the Bureau of Land Management, striking deals for more than 250 artifacts worth more than $335,000. Many of the transactions were secretly recorded.

Court papers said Gardiner was typically paid $7,500 a month.

Of the 26 indicted, two people committed suicide shortly after the charges were announced. Two others, a mother and daughter from Blanding, pleaded guilty and were sentenced to probation in September.

Gardiner died March 1 from a self-inflicted gunshot after a standoff with police in a Salt Lake City suburb.

Trials for several other defendants are scheduled for this spring and summer.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-03-29-10 1905EDT

 

Robert Furber, nurseryman and gardener at Kensington, has the honor of having his name on ‘Twelve Months of Flowers,’ a set of 12 hand-colored copper-engraved plates published in 1730. Each print measures 16 inches by 12 inches. The rare set has a $40,000-$50,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

Travel around the world at PBA Galleries’ April 1 auction

Robert Furber, nurseryman and gardener at Kensington, has the honor of having his name on ‘Twelve Months of Flowers,’ a set of 12 hand-colored copper-engraved plates published in 1730. Each print measures 16 inches by 12 inches. The rare set has a $40,000-$50,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

Robert Furber, nurseryman and gardener at Kensington, has the honor of having his name on ‘Twelve Months of Flowers,’ a set of 12 hand-colored copper-engraved plates published in 1730. Each print measures 16 inches by 12 inches. The rare set has a $40,000-$50,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

SAN FRANCISCO – Before panning for gold in the hills of California, planting rice in Ecchu Province of Japan, or growing flowers like those cultivated in Kensington Gardens three centuries ago, you will want to check out PBA Galleries’ Americana-Travel-History Maps-Prints auction on April 1. Live Auctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

More than 400 lots of Americana, maps and prints will be sold beginning at 1 p.m. Pacific.

Among the more colorful highlights is a set of a dozen hand-colored copper-engraved plates titled Twelve Months of Flowers. The set of 12 unbound plates, 16 inches by 12 inches on 18 1/4- by 14-inch sheets, were published in London in 1730. They depict still-life engravings of flowers grown by Robert Furber at Kensington. The artist was Pieter Casteels and the engraver was Henry Fletcher. The trio produced the prints for a publication that was conceived as both a commercial venture – to sell bound sets of the engravings, and as a high quality seed catalog for Furber`s nursery at Kensington. The rare set is expected to raise $40,000-$50,000.

Capt. W.A. Jackson’s 1851 Map of the Mining District of California should hit pay dirt. The hand-colored lithographed map measures 22 3/4 inches by 19 3/4 inches and is laid down on modern linen backing. Jackson, a mining engineer who had personally explored the region, delineated the major mining centers of 1849 and the road and trails leading to the gold fields. The attractive and elaborate map has a $10,000-$15,000 estimate.

A rare 19th-century Japanese map of the rice fields of Yada village in the Fushiki region of Ecchu Province is also offered at PBA Galleries’ auction. The ink and watercolor on paper map is 58 1/4 inches by 98 1/2 inches and has a $12,000-$15,000 estimate. The lot also includes a rare 1991 geography book about the region. The very same map is reproduced in the book.

For more information about PBA Galleries visit the Web site www.pbagalleries.com or phone 415-989-2665.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A famous diagram showing the arrangements for transporting slaves on the slave ship Brookes folds out of a 155-page British abstract of evidence in a case to abolish the slave trade. The 1791 bound volume has a $3,000-$5,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

A famous diagram showing the arrangements for transporting slaves on the slave ship Brookes folds out of a 155-page British abstract of evidence in a case to abolish the slave trade. The 1791 bound volume has a $3,000-$5,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.


A superb facsimile of the Declaration of Independence is the highlight of a complete nine-volume set ‘American Archives.’ The compilation of important American documents and records, published by Peter Force from 1837 to 1848, has a $12,000-$18,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

A superb facsimile of the Declaration of Independence is the highlight of a complete nine-volume set ‘American Archives.’ The compilation of important American documents and records, published by Peter Force from 1837 to 1848, has a $12,000-$18,000 estimate. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.


An ink and watercolor on paper map of Yada village in the Fushiki region, Ecchu province, in Japan, designates a plan for rice fields. The rare map, which dates to the mid-19th century, measures 58 1/4 inches by 98 1/2 inches. It carries a $12,000-$15,000. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

An ink and watercolor on paper map of Yada village in the Fushiki region, Ecchu province, in Japan, designates a plan for rice fields. The rare map, which dates to the mid-19th century, measures 58 1/4 inches by 98 1/2 inches. It carries a $12,000-$15,000. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.


W.A. Jackson’s 1851 ‘Map of the Mining District of California’ was considered to be the best map of the gold region published at that time. The large-scale map measures 22 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches. It is expected to sell for $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

W.A. Jackson’s 1851 ‘Map of the Mining District of California’ was considered to be the best map of the gold region published at that time. The large-scale map measures 22 3/4 by 19 3/4 inches. It is expected to sell for $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy PBA Galleries.

Civil War carte de visite of a standing Union soldier from the Army of Tennessee. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Nate D. Sanders.

Tennessee archivists searching for Civil War memorabilia

Civil War carte de visite of a standing Union soldier from the Army of Tennessee. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Nate D. Sanders.

Civil War carte de visite of a standing Union soldier from the Army of Tennessee. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Nate D. Sanders.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee archivists will be hitting the road to search for Civil War memorabilia for a digital exhibit commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

Staff members from the Tennessee State Library and Archives are looking for Civil War manuscripts, artifacts and photographs to be digitally copied and preserved.

The project, called “Looking Back: The Civil War in Tennessee,” is similar to an effort during the 1980s when staff members visited courthouse squares with a mobile photo lab to copy historically significant photographs.

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For more information, visit www.tn.gov/tsla/cwtn.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-03-30-10 0404EDT

 

Althorp House, Northamptonshire, UK, in a 2006 photo taken by Andrew Walker. Appears courtesy of the photographer through multi-license with GFDL and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-2.5 and older versions (2.0 and 1.0)

Christie’s to auction antiques from childhood home of Princess Diana

Althorp House, Northamptonshire, UK, in a 2006 photo taken by Andrew Walker. Appears courtesy of the photographer through multi-license with GFDL and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-2.5 and older versions (2.0 and 1.0)

Althorp House, Northamptonshire, UK, in a 2006 photo taken by Andrew Walker. Appears courtesy of the photographer through multi-license with GFDL and Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-2.5 and older versions (2.0 and 1.0)

LONDON (AP) – Rare antiques from the ancestral home of Diana, Princess of Wales – including a 12 million pound ($18 million) Rubens portrait from the 17th century – will be offered for sale this summer, Christie’s auction house said on Monday.

Christie’s said it will sell about 20 million pounds ($30 million) worth of artifacts from Althorp House, in Northamptonshire, central England.

Althorp – Diana’s childhood home and the site of her burial following her 1997 death – is now occupied by Diana’s brother Earl Charles Spencer. He recently announced his engagement to Lady Bianca Eliot, who will become his third wife.

The auction house said the Spencer family hoped to sell off a variety of valuables to invest the funds raised and protect the long-term future of the stately home.

While none of the lots to be auctioned were purchased by Diana, many have been in her family for centuries, including the Rubens portrait, Commander Being Armed for Battle, owned by the Spencer family since 1802.

The portrait was painted in 1613 and 1614 and depicts a bearded man, believed to be the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, being fitted with his armor.

“This magnificent work by Rubens is one of the most important works by the artist to remain in private hands in the U.K.,” said Richard Knight, of Christie’s. “It is a museum-quality masterpiece and will have wide international appeal.”

Other lots include English and French furniture, a mid-17th-century painting by Giovanni Francesco Barbieri and 19th-century horse-drawn carriages.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Planters Mr. Peanut invented by a Virginia schoolboy in 1916, but this authentic Mr. Peanut costume representing the enduring American icon was worn on the Atlantic City Boardwalk in the 1950s.

Fine bronzes, Mr. Peanut suit, Native Americana at Stephenson’s, Apr. 16

Planters Mr. Peanut invented by a Virginia schoolboy in 1916, but this authentic Mr. Peanut costume representing the enduring American icon was worn on the Atlantic City Boardwalk in the 1950s.

Planters Mr. Peanut was invented by a Virginia schoolboy in 1916, but this authentic Mr. Peanut costume representing the enduring American icon was worn on the Atlantic City Boardwalk in the 1950s.

SOUTHAMPTON, Pa. – Stephenson’s Auctioneers and Appraisers of Southampton (Greater Philadelphia), Pa., will present a Spring 2010 Antique and Decorative Arts Auction on Friday, April 16, that is so large and diverse, selling will begin at 2 p.m. Eastern, two hours earlier than usual. Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Rather then picking a handful of highlights, Stephenson’s owner and auctioneer Cindy Stephenson notes the interesting and unusual collections that are included in the quarterly specialty sale.

“We have one estate of a railroad collector and somewhat of a hoarder,” said Stephenson. The collection includes telegraph senders and receivers, advertising, railroad locks, lanterns, badges and uniform buttons. There’s even a set of Deagan plate chimes for use in a railroad dining car.

Of interest to automotive collectors is the colorful selection of early porcelain-enamel license plates.

Many of the antiques in the sale are from a Pottstown, Pa., four-story home of a doctor, whose unmarried daughters are now also deceased. Included are several nice Pennsylvania cupboards and approximately 15 Persian rugs.

Bronzes include a 19th-century French bronze statue of a woman, sculpted by Emile Pinedo (est. $1,000-$2,000), and a French bronze and ivory figure of a child puppeteer by Omerth (est. $800-$1,200).

The auction will include approximately 50 lots of artwork, many by listed artists.

More than 100 lots of fine jewelry also will be offered.

A collection of cut glass has been consigned by a Bucks County, Pa., collector who is downsizing, said Stephenson.

Christ Home for Children, a longtime Philadelphia charity, is among several consigners of American Indian artifacts, which include a Zuni bear figure fetish, Joseph Lone Wolf seed jar, a double gourd pot and two display boards (about 4 by 6 feet each) mounted with numerous items including a purse belonging to the wife of a Cheyenne chief.

Among the unusual collectibles to be auctioned are a 1950s-vintage Mr. Peanut costume worn on the Atlantic City Boardwalk to promote Planters nuts, and a collection of more than 200 German tobacco trading cards from the 1930s, all bearing Nazi propaganda. The cards are in very good condition.

“It’s a varied auction, and it should be good,” Stephenson said.

The auction will be conducted at Stephenson’s facility at 1005 Industrial Blvd., Southampton, Pennsylvania. Preview inspections are scheduled for Thursday, April 15, from 1-5 p.m.; and Friday, April 16, noon till 2 p.m.

Stephenson’s conducts general auctions every Friday at 4 p.m.

For details on any lot in the sale, contact Cindy Stephenson at 215-322-6182 or visit the Web site: www.stephensonsauction.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet during the sale at www.LiveAuctioneers.com

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


French bronzes in Stephenson’s auction include a figure of a woman, sculpted by Emile Pinedo; and a bronze and ivory figure of a child puppeteer by Omerth.

French bronzes in Stephenson’s auction include a figure of a woman, sculpted by Emile Pinedo; and a bronze and ivory figure of a child puppeteer by Omerth.


One of about 15 Persian carpets that will be sold by Stephenson’s Auctioneers on April 16.

One of about 15 Persian carpets that will be sold by Stephenson’s Auctioneers on April 16.


Several large cupboards will be sold at Stephenson’s auction including this Pennsylvania corner cupboard from the mid-1800s.

Several large cupboards will be sold at Stephenson’s auction including this Pennsylvania corner cupboard from the mid-1800s.


Numerous spelter figures will be sold at Stephenson’s Spring 2010 Antique and Decorative Arts Auction.

Numerous spelter figures will be sold at Stephenson’s Spring 2010 Antique and Decorative Arts Auction.


German tobacco cards of the late 1930s touted the Nazi war machine. More than 200 of the cards will be sold at the April 16 auction.

German tobacco cards of the late 1930s touted the Nazi war machine. More than 200 of the cards will be sold at the April 16 auction.


More than a dozen early porcelain enamel license plates will be sold at Stephenson’s auction.

More than a dozen early porcelain enamel license plates will be sold at Stephenson’s auction.


A pair of beaded moccasins is included on this large display board of American Indian artifacts, one of two such displays to be sold at Stephenson’s auction.

A pair of beaded moccasins is included on this large display board of American Indian artifacts, one of two such displays to be sold at Stephenson’s auction.

Gray’s Auctioneers wins national certification from women’s council

CLEVELAND – Gray’s Auctioneers LLC has received national certification as a Women’s Business Enterprise by the Ohio River Valley Women’s Business Council, a regional certifying partner of the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC).

WBENC’s national standard of certification implemented by the Ohio River Valley Women’s Business Council is a meticulous process including an in-depth review of the business and site inspection. The certification process is designed to confirm the business is at least 51% owned, operated and controlled by a woman or women, as well as financially and operationally solvent.

By including women-owned businesses among their vendors, corporations and government agencies demonstrate their commitment to fostering diversity and the continued development of their supplier/vendor diversity programs,” a Gray’s spokesperson stated in a press release issued by the auction house.

About Gray’s Auctioneers Llc:

With more than two decades of experience as a licensed auctioneer, Deborah J. Gray returned to Cleveland to open her eponymous auction and appraisal showrooms in June 2007. As VP of Operations for Sotheby’s, the largest auction house in the world, Deborah was uniquely qualified to start a new auction and appraisal service in northeast Ohio. In February 2010, Melanie Halloran, a specialist in the Books & Manuscripts department at Christie’s, joined Gray’s as their Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts. Gray’s on-staff team of appraisers offers USPAP certified appraisal services for insurance and estate tax purposes, as well as fair-market value reports if an item’s worth is all that is required.

Through their state of the art Web site and their global partnerships, they attract bidders from all over the world, who can bid through various methods including live via the Internet through www.LiveAuctioneers.com. Gray’s commitment to excellence in customer service is demonstrated by the elimination of punitive fees and the holding of accurate reserves. Gray’s experts work closely with banks, trustees, executors, institutions, corporations and attorneys to inventory, appraise and realize the full value of collections & estates. Gray’s Auctioneers provide pick-up and local delivery services with their own Mercedes truck, together with their experienced team of fine art packers and movers.

To learn more about Gray’s Auctioneers Llc, please visit www.graysauctioneers.com.

About WBENC:

The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council is the nation’s largest third-party certifier of businesses owned and operated by women in the United States. WBENC is a resource for the more than 700 U.S. companies and government agencies that rely on WBENC’s certification as an integral part of their supplier diversity programs.

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