RCA introduced the Victor Special Model K portable phonograph in the mid-1930s. Contained in an Art Deco aluminum case, the highly collectible machine has a clockwork motor, folding winding handle, electric pickup, 10-inch turntable and a built-in speaker. Image courtesy Skinner Inc. and LiveAuctioneers archive.

Snap, crackle and pop: Vinyl records, turntables keep on spinning

RCA introduced the Victor Special Model K portable phonograph in the mid-1930s. Contained in an Art Deco aluminum case, the highly collectible machine has a clockwork motor, folding winding handle, electric pickup, 10-inch turntable and a built-in speaker. Image courtesy Skinner Inc. and LiveAuctioneers archive.

RCA introduced the Victor Special Model K portable phonograph in the mid-1930s. Contained in an Art Deco aluminum case, the highly collectible machine has a clockwork motor, folding winding handle, electric pickup, 10-inch turntable and a built-in speaker. Image courtesy Skinner Inc. and LiveAuctioneers archive.

HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) – His 16-year-old daughter and her friends couldn’t identify the round black disc.

“Is it an overly large CD?” they asked Shane Jensen.

How it could even play music was another matter.

“All they knew were cassettes and CDs,” he said with a chuckle.

Yet, from the turntable his brother bought him a few years ago, the 39-year-old has been playing the tunes of Earth, Wind and Fire and Freddie Jackson on what else but vinyl records.

Maybe it’s nostalgia of his childhood for this Gen Xer – a yearning for a time when music was much more than just background noise. Moreover, those vinyl records collecting dust in a cardboard box in many an attic might be worth something.

He’s not the only one who is partaking in the vinyl renaissance of sorts. Vinyl record sales reached 1.9 million units in 2008, and then grew to 2.5 million in 2009, according to industry tracker Nielsen SoundScan. CD sales, meanwhile, have dipped, being replaced by downloading services such as iTunes. Nielsen estimates sales dropping about 20 percent in 2009.

Vinyl’s resurgence, as it continues to climb, hasn’t gone unnoticed by local businesses.

Ron Klassen, with Hayes Sight and Sound, said he’s seen an uptick in sales of new turntables. Customers also are bringing in their old consoles from the 1970s that have been sitting in garages or storage for years in an effort to get them working again.

At CD Tradepost, manager David Thornhill sifted through a box of vinyls he plans to start selling – original 33s with the covers for bands such as Foreigner, the Eagles, ABBA, Peter Frampton and Fleetwood Mac.

Topeka and Wichita stores began selling vinyls earlier this year with much success, he said.

“The way we listen to music is changing for a lot of people,” Thornhill said, adding that many want a warmer, richer sound of vinyl that can’t be found on a digitally mastered CD.

They want the sound they grew up hearing, he said, complete with the pops and cracks of a record that has been played over and over again.

Even some artists are putting their newest releases on records, which can be purchased at Hutchinson’s Hastings. Aisles at many record stores hold new records – from classic rock to the vinyl versions of recently released tunes such as popular artists like Lady Gaga and 50 Cent.

Jensen, however, prefers browsing secondhand stores and rummaging through garage sale tables to find his classics – sometimes getting lucky and finding vintage items for cheap.

Those jumping on the trend would find it fortuitous if they ran into Terry Manche’s sale at his home on Carole Street, where a small portion of his 20,000-record collection was situated amid books, tools and trinkets.

For $1, bargain hunters could buy 45s containing the songs of Bing Crosby, Wayne Newton, Tony Bennett and the Rolling Stones – all still within the original sleeves.

Jensen, who worked the state fair and trade show circuit from 1974 to 2000, selling fossils, antiques and collectibles like records, said it was time to “declutter.” Autographed records, however, will stay put in storage, at least for a while.

It doesn’t surprise him that vinyl has made a comeback, he said, noting he still plays records on one of his jukeboxes.

For him, the medium never left.

___

Information from: The Hutchinson News, http://www.hutchnews.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-CS-04-26-10 1022EDT

Dick DeVos ran unsuccessfully for governor of Michigan in 2006. Image by Jake Novak, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

DeVos family gives Kennedy Center $22.5M for arts

Dick DeVos ran unsuccessfully for governor of Michigan in 2006. Image by Jake Novak, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dick DeVos ran unsuccessfully for governor of Michigan in 2006. Image by Jake Novak, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Kennedy Center in Washington is announcing the largest private donation in its history – a $22.5 million gift from Dick and Betsy DeVos to endow its Arts Management Institute that trains the nation’s arts leaders.

Betsy DeVos says arts organizations have been struggling in the recession and need expert leadership to survive. The gift announced Monday is among the largest ever for the Michigan couple.

Dick DeVos, an Amway Corp. heir and Republican, ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2006. DeVos spent more than $35 million to challenge Democratic incumbent Jennifer Granholm. His family also owns the NBA’s Orlando Magic.

Former President George W. Bush appointed Betsy DeVos to the Kennedy Center’s board. She is a former chairman of Michigan’s GOP.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-CS-05-03-10 1200EDT

A German self-propelled gun/assault gunner wore this World War II- era wraparound-style tunic, which may have been cropped from a trench coat. It features cavalry collar tabs, skulls on the collar, iron eagle swastika patch, ribbon bar and ribbons sewn on the left side. It has a $1,200-$1,850 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Universal Live will disperse spoils of war at May 9 auction

A German self-propelled gun/assault gunner wore this World War II- era wraparound-style tunic, which may have been cropped from a trench coat. It features cavalry collar tabs, skulls on the collar, iron eagle swastika patch, ribbon bar and ribbons sewn on the left side. It has a $1,200-$1,850 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

A German self-propelled gun/assault gunner wore this World War II- era wraparound-style tunic, which may have been cropped from a trench coat. It features cavalry collar tabs, skulls on the collar, iron eagle swastika patch, ribbon bar and ribbons sewn on the left side. It has a $1,200-$1,850 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

NORTHBROOK, Ill. – Universal Live and Midwest Estate Buyers will present an outstanding grouping of military and aviation collectibles from World War II through the Vietnam period in their live online auction May 9 from 1-5 p.m. Central. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding services.

The 225-lot auction will have a concentration of U.S. and Nazi Germany material. The largest number of items in the collection is from World War II Germany.

This military auction contains many varieties of World War II items, primarily German, Nazi, United States and British. There are helmets, flags, bayonets, swords, uniforms, medals, art, coins, paper money, holsters, belts, albums, canteens, gas masks, chevrons, patches and even two practice grenades.

Universal has been an online auctioneer since 1994. The company averages approximately 10 to 15 auctions per month.

For details phone 847-412-9900.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


An enlisted man in a German Army Panzer unit would have worn this cloth cap during World War II. The scarce cap is expected to sell for $490-$755. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

An enlisted man in a German Army Panzer unit would have worn this cloth cap during World War II. The scarce cap is expected to sell for $490-$755. Image courtesy of Universal Live.


This is a Nazi M40 model double decal black helmet is fully leather lined for heavy combat. It has been ‘de-Nazified’ with both decals scratched out. It carries a $600-$925 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

This is a Nazi M40 model double decal black helmet is fully leather lined for heavy combat. It has been ‘de-Nazified’ with both decals scratched out. It carries a $600-$925 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.


This classic U.S. Navy wool uniform has a Seabees (construction battalion) patch, a rank patch of a petty officer second class-metalsmith and a ruptured duck patch. It has a $100-$305 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

This classic U.S. Navy wool uniform has a Seabees (construction battalion) patch, a rank patch of a petty officer second class-metalsmith and a ruptured duck patch. It has a $100-$305 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.


The side of this U.S. dummy grenade is stamped ‘GRENADE HAND PRACTICE.’ It is 3 1/2 inches high by about 2 1/2 inches in diameter and has a $150-$230 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

The side of this U.S. dummy grenade is stamped ‘GRENADE HAND PRACTICE.’ It is 3 1/2 inches high by about 2 1/2 inches in diameter and has a $150-$230 estimate. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

ECU's portrait of Queen Elizabeth may have been painted by Tudor court artist Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, who is pictured in an engraving based on a 1627 self-portrait. Image courtesty of Wikimedia Commons.

Team seeking answers about Queen Elizabeth painting

ECU's portrait of Queen Elizabeth may have been painted by Tudor court artist Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, who is pictured in an engraving based on a 1627 self-portrait. Image courtesty of Wikimedia Commons.

ECU’s portrait of Queen Elizabeth may have been painted by Tudor court artist Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, who is pictured in an engraving based on a 1627 self-portrait. Image courtesty of Wikimedia Commons.

GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) – Each week, as many as a dozen faculty and curious students ride or climb to the top of East Carolina University’s Joyner Library. They cluster in a room with a conference table in the center and lined with ancient books.

All chat excitedly as they wait for her arrival, talk about what they’ve found the last two months as they gazed at her under magnification or ultraviolet light.

ECU conservator Susanna Grieve lifts a blue, quilted blanket off an inconspicuous black box in the corner and folds back two protective wooden panels. The flashes of visiting media fire, but she remains still, not looking altogether pleased – the left side of her face screwed into a near grimace.

But the flaming hair and porcelain skin equally saddled with heavy, dewy pearls leave no doubt. It’s Queen Elizabeth I immortalized in paint, the portrait the size of so many posters hanging in nearby dorm rooms.

There is much more the experts in the room don’t know. Those details include when she was painted, who painted her and how she wound up sitting in a gatehouse where visitors paid admission to visit a Dare County historical attraction.

A team at ECU is determined to find out.

The portrait was purchased from the Berry-Hill Gallery in New York City, according to June Bell, governing board chairwoman for the Elizabethan Gardens. She and Dare County historians have been cobbling together a past for the painting in attempts to help the authentication process.

Bell thinks a North Carolina garden club and a private donor matched funds to purchase it for about $3,000, and it was bought specifically to hang in the gatehouse.

It’s been cleaned several times, twice in-state but once in Washington, D.C. People passed the queen every day, but no one ever expressed a thought that she might be worth something, Bell said. Six million dollars, actually, is where estimates have come in if she’s all she’s cracked up to be.

And cracked she is, Grieve said, and weathered. It’s Grieve’s job to verify the information estimates are based on: that the portrait was painted in 1592, possibly by Tudor court artist Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, and was crafted late in the queen’s life – a period which historians say she went to great lengths to destroy.

“I looked at her, and she was amazing,” Grieve recalled. “The way she’s posed and looks at you, it’s like ‘Wow. This is the queen.’”

She described the persistent glare as they tried to photograph the work, quipping, “It’s almost like she wasn’t giving us anything to work with.”

Grieve was hired last July to reinvigorate ECU’s conservation program, and history professor Larry Tise put her to work straight away. He noticed the painting years ago in his prior work as director of the state archives. It became his personal goal to see it identified and properly stored. It took more than two years to convince the board.

Tise has done some authentication of his own though he, like Grieve, is more at home with artifacts than art. Honored as the Wilbur and Orville Wright Distinguished Professor of History, he’s identified a table from the Wright brothers’ camp and targets they used for shooting practice.

“Eastern North Carolina is a treasure trove of things sitting around that people have seen and don’t really know what they are,” Tise said.

The team tries a different authentication procedure on the painting every Wednesday from 3-5 p.m. Each is noninvasive. This week, they used an X-ray fluorescent spectrometer, which measures levels of elements on the painting’s surface. Those can help identify the type of pigments, which are matched with the time period artists used them.

“We do science,” Grieve said.

There are symbols on the back – a V and a six – and the professors conjecture the body and background may have been painted prior to the head and face. The portrait has been restored a few times, each one masking potential clues, Grieve said. Many details remain a mystery.

There’s been no “smoking gun” to prove authenticity, Grieve said. But the team also has found nothing that proves otherwise, including a prior study conducted in 1985.

This high-profile project could show the world ECU is equipped to take on this kind of research. Tise hopes it will be “a lightning rod” for other challenges and notes that no other state schools are actively authenticating and preserving state artifacts.

Professors already made headway with preservation work on the Queen Anne’s Revenge, the remains of a 300-year-old ship piloted by infamous pirate Blackbeard. That’s been possible because the university has one of only three underwater archeology programs in the nation.

“We’re here to help preserve North Carolina cultural heritage, their family heritage,” said Grieve, who said her students are doing pro-bono work for the Village of Yesteryear and are willing to take on more local projects.

As for the queen, she again will be on display Aug. 19, as Dare County and the Elizabethan Gardens celebrate the anniversary of Virginia Dare’s birth. Historians believe Dare to be the first child born in the new world.

Bell said her board is not even talking about how conditions might change if the painting is as valuable as estimates project.

“I don’t even want to get my hopes up that high,” she said.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-ES-05-03-10 0002EDT

Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, Hatteras, N.C. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NC archaeologists plan to move shipwreck to museum

Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, Hatteras, N.C. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum, Hatteras, N.C. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

COROLLA, N.C. (AP) – One of North Carolina’s oldest shipwrecks will soon be on the move.

Archaeologists are trying to determine the best way to move the 12-ton, 37-foot-long shipwreck from Corolla about 90 miles down the Outer Banks to the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras.

The wreck was discovered by beachgoers in 2008 and moved to higher ground last month.

Archaeologists haven’t been able to identify the ship or pinpoint its age. But artifacts including coins from the reign of France’s Louis XIII and England’s Charles the First indicate the ship may have been built in the mid 1600s.

There are thousands of shipwrecks along North Carolina’s treacherous Outer Banks, but older wooden vessels are a rare find because they are usually destroyed by wind and waves.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-ES-05-02-10 0731EDT

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist's official photograph. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Fla. GOP plans to auction oil painting of Gov. Crist

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist's official photograph. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist’s official photograph. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) – An oil painting of Gov. Charlie Crist, which was displayed in the lobby of the Republican Party of Florida’s headquarters in Tallahassee, will be auctioned.

Spokeswoman for the Republican Party of Florida Katie Betta says the portrait will be auctioned on eBay starting either later Friday or over the weekend.

Crist’s painting was taken down on Thursday after Crist announced that he will run as an independent for the state’s open Senate seat in November’s election.

Because he is no longer affiliated with the GOP, other items bearing his signature or likeness were also removed.

The portrait is the only item to be posted on eBay.

___

Information from: The Tampa Tribune, http://www.tampatrib.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-ES-04-30-10 1426EDT

An advertising print depicts Betsy Ross stitching together the Stars and Stripes. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Book Review: Betsy Ross biography by Marla R. Miller

An advertising print depicts Betsy Ross stitching together the Stars and Stripes. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

An advertising print depicts Betsy Ross stitching together the Stars and Stripes. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

Betsy Ross and the Making of America (Henry Holt, 480 pages, $30), by Marla R. Miller: Every American schoolchild knows the legend of Betsy Ross, the humble Philadelphia seamstress who received a surprise visit from George Washington in the summer of 1776 when the great general and his young nation needed a new flag.

But in Betsy Ross and the Making of America, the first full-length biography of this beloved figure from the Revolutionary era, University of Massachusetts, Amherst professor Marla R. Miller shows that Ross’ role in creating the original Stars and Stripes, a story handed down from generation to generation within the Ross family, is actually more complex and elusive than the standard version of events might suggest.

A specialist in the history of women’s labor in early America, Miller places Ross in a rich context of female industry, Quaker religion and Revolutionary politics, tapping into a growing interest not just in the Founding Fathers but also in the Founding Mothers, including real-life people like Abigail Adams, who exerted significant influence on opinions and events, and semifictional figures like Molly Pitcher, who now play a mostly symbolic role in the narrative of American history.

Ross, an authentic individual whose story is steeped in myth, straddles both categories, and much of the excitement of this book derives from Miller’s expert ability to sort fact from fiction, drawing on a wide range of documentary sources to show how Ross and other colonial women contributed to the nation’s culture and economy at the dawn of the republic.

___

Jonathan Lopez is a author of The Man Who Made Vermeers, a biography of the forger Han van Meegeren.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

AP-WS-04-29-10 1439EDT

This red clay vase is marked ‘Matt Morgan Pottery’ and '1884.' The landscaped decoration on the 7-inch vase was hand-painted.

Kovels – Antiques & Collecting: Week of May 3, 2010

This red clay vase is marked ‘Matt Morgan Pottery’ and '1884.' The landscaped decoration on the 7-inch vase was hand-painted.

This red clay vase is marked ‘Matt Morgan Pottery’ and ‘1884.’ The landscaped decoration on the 7-inch vase was hand-painted.

Art pottery was first made in the United States by a group of women in Cincinnati who had seen the pottery exhibits at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876. Several groups were making pottery by the 1880s. A pottery was started in 1883 by two men: Matt Morgan, an English political cartoonist, and George Ligowsky, the inventor of the clay pigeon for target shooters. The Matt Morgan Art Pottery Co. of Cincinnati made pieces inspired by Moorish designs and colors. Some of its other wares resembled Rookwood pottery, possibly because some artists worked at both potteries. Matt Morgan Pottery closed in 1884. Matt Morgan pieces are hard to find today, even though almost all are clearly marked with the name of the firm. Important pieces sell for more than $1,000.

Q: I bought a wooden night table at an auction years ago. It’s a 1950s style, but the finish is reddish brown, not blond. The single drawer in the stand is marked “Heywood-Wakefield” within a circle. Also in the circle mark are the initials “HW” and an eagle’s head. Below the circle, the mark reads, “Est. 1826.” How old is the night table, and what is it worth?

A: Heywood-Wakefield Co. of Gardner, Mass., traces its history to 1826, but it didn’t start using the name Heywood-Wakefield until 1921, and it began using the eagle trademark in 1946. So your nightstand dates from the late 1940s or early ’50s. Not all Heywood-Wakefield furniture was blond. The company offered other finishes, including one called “amber.” If your nightstand is in excellent shape with its original finish, it could sell for a few hundred dollars. Heywood-Wakefield closed in 1979, but the brand and designs were resurrected in 1992 by South Beach Furniture Co. of Miami Beach.

Q: I have an 11-1/2-inch Barbie-type doll that actually gets a tan if she’s in sunlight. Her hair color is reversible from blond to brunette. I can’t find any information on it. Can you help?

A: Your doll was made by Ideal and is not one of the Barbie dolls, which were made by Mattel. Ideal made three different dolls that “tanned” when exposed to the sun. “Suntan Tuesday” is 11 1/2 inches tall and has hair that swivels to change from blond to brunette. Her boyfriend, “Suntan Eric,” is 12 inches, and her little sister, “Suntan Dodi,” is 9 inches. The dolls came with stickers that could be put on the dolls before “tanning” and then removed to reveal the lighter skin under the sticker. They were made for Ideal in Hong Kong in 1977 and 1978. Your Suntan Tuesday doll is worth about $40 to $70 with its original box.

Q: I just inherited a collection of Bakelite jewelry. How can I tell which pieces are valuable?

A: Condition, rarity and design determine value. Condition is easiest to figure out. Examine each piece for cracks; discolored or missing hinges, pins, chains, etc.; and repairs, especially glue. It’s a little more difficult to learn to recognize good and bad colors. Bakelite gradually changes color through the years. Colors should be in the yellow-orange, red-cream or muddy-green shades. You should never find blue or clear old Bakelite. Look for unexpected holes on the back of pins; they originally may have been buttons. See if any carving looks hand-done. Watch out for altered pieces, like bangle bracelets that have been given new polka dots. Visit shops and online sites that sell Bakelite jewelry and read books on the subject. You will soon learn what is rare and expensive.

Q: I keep an old tin toy truck stored away in an old Sharps toffee tin. I was going to ask you a question about my truck, but I’ve become more interested in the toffee tin. It’s a cylinder covered in paper painted to look like a dandy. He’s wearing a monocle and carrying a cane. The round tin top is shaped like a hat with a brim. It’s marked “The Happynak Series, British Made.” How old is it, and is it worth saving?

A: Edward Sharp & Sons was founded in Maidstone, Kent, England, in 1911. Its “Sharps Kreemy Toffee” was sold in all sorts of decorative tins until the company closed in 1999, when it became part of Cadbury. Your tin is an early one, perhaps made as early as 1930. Old figural tins are collectible and, in good condition, sell for $50 to $150. Prices are even higher for more popular brands. Keep it away from sticky hands and bright light.

Q: I have an upright cedar chest that was in my grandparents’ house for many years. Inside the lid, it is marked “West Branch Novelty Company, Milton, Pa.” I think it’s mahogany. Can you tell me anything about it?

A: West Branch Novelty Co. was founded in 1893 in Milton. The company started out making bamboo furniture, but by the early 1900s, cedar chests were its most important product. The company made boxes for shrapnel shells during World War I. Furniture production was resumed after the end of the war. The company is no longer in business. Many different styles of cedar chests were made. Some sell for $50 to $100 or more, depending on size and condition.

Tip: Cover the nose of your hammer with a piece of felt to protect the wall when you are putting up picture hooks. If the wall is smooth, some of the new stick-on hooks might work.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Need more information about collectibles? Find it at Kovels.com, our Web site for collectors. Check prices there, too. More than 700,000 are listed, and viewing them is free. You can also sign up to read our weekly Kovels Komments. It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is delivered by e-mail, free, if you register. Kovels.com offers extra collector’s information and lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and much more. You can subscribe to Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles, our monthly newsletter filled with prices, facts and color photos. Kovels.com adds to the information in our newspaper column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Detroit Zoo Guide Book, 250th Birthday, 1701-1951, black-and-white photos, 47 pages, 5 x 7 inches, $10.
  • Black dial telephone, Western Electric, plug-in, 1957, 5 x 8 inches, $50.
  • Hobo Kidney & Bladder Remedy pocket mirror, celluloid, image of boxed bottle, orange ground, Parisian Novelty Co., Chicago, 2 inches, $60.
  • Needlepoint pillow, wirehaired fox terrier, brown-and-white, pink ground, green patch of grass, gray fringe, 1940s, 14 x 14 inches, $85.
  • Ideal “Velvet” doll, Crissy’s Cousin, purple dress, panties and shoes, violet eyes, fully jointed, knob on back turns to lengthen or shorten blond hair, 1970, 15 inches, $150.
  • Cast-iron toilet-tissue dispenser, Victorian style, basket of fruit with Art Nouveau design in green and gold on each side, pedestal base, 1900s, 6 x 5 x 6 inches, $155.
  • Eisenberg compact, lacquered brass case, rhinestone snowflake on lid, 1950s, 3 inches, $160.
  • Lalique vase, etched image of partially draped female supporting a flame, ovoid, marked, 13 1/4 inches, $400.
  • Jackie Kennedy head vase, black dress, white scarf on head, Inarco, 1964, 6 inches, $600.
  • Rococo child’s rocking chair, carved rosewood, floral carved crest, scroll terminals, carved knees and serpentine rail, cabriole legs, horsehair stuffing, 1870s, $1,795.

Kovels’ American Antiques, 1750-1900 by Ralph and Terry Kovel is the book that introduces you to the collected antiques from past centuries. Learn about American antiques, from art pottery and old advertising signs to rare silver. Written to help you recognize and evaluate the valuable items of Grandma’s day. Hundreds of color photographs, marks, makers, dates, factory histories and more. Chapters on pottery, glass, furniture, silver, advertising collectibles, prints, jewelry, pewter, tools and ephemera. An easy-to-use book with current information. Available at your bookstore; online at Kovels.com; by phone at 800-571-1555; or send $24.95 plus $4.95 postage to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

 

© 2010 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.