This Queen Anne period American tiger maple highboy in original finish came from a Virginia estate. Dating to the mid-18th century, the highboy has a $6,500-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

Langston anticipates memorable holiday auction May 31

This Queen Anne period American tiger maple highboy in original finish came from a Virginia estate. Dating to the mid-18th century, the highboy has a $6,500-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

This Queen Anne period American tiger maple highboy in original finish came from a Virginia estate. Dating to the mid-18th century, the highboy has a $6,500-$10,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

WILSON, N.C. – Veteran antique dealer Bobby Langston knows he has outstanding merchandise for his annual Memorial Day Auction. Now that everything is cataloged and ready to sell, he hopes for a strong response from bidders for the Monday, May 31 auction, which will begin at 9:30 a.m. Eastern.

“We have two or three estates with fantastic stuff,” said Langston. “I hope we have a lot of bidders come here or bid online.”

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Langston will sell a large selection of 18th- and 19th-century English, American and French antiques from estates in Goldsboro and Greensboro, N.C., in addition to items from several private collections.

The signature piece of furniture is a Queen Anne period American tiger maple highboy in original finish, which comes from a Virginia estate. Dating to the mid-18th century, the highboy has a $6,500-$10,000 estimate. “It has the original dark finish,” said Langston.

A Queen Anne period American tiger maple and bird’s-eye maple tea table, circa 1750-1760, in as-found condition in a Virginia estate, has a $1,200-$1,750 estimate.

English furniture includes a petite18th-century mahogany broken-arch top secretary, which stands 87 inches tall, 30 inches wide and 22 1/2 inches deep. The top door doubles as a mirror. It carries a $3,000-$5,000 estimate

An American continuous-arm Windsor armchair with a saddle seat has a $600-$900 estimate.

A set of 12 mahogany antique Hepplewhite shield-back chairs has a $3,500-$5,000 estimate.

Eight American banister-back chairs with woven seats from the early 1700s have an estimate of $1,400-$2,000. “You just don’t see them anymore,” said Langston.

A tall case clock in mahogany and with a moon phase dial by Walter H. Durfee, Providence, R.I., is estimated at $15,000-$18,000. Its mahogany cast stands 8 feet 5 inches tall. Another clock that will get a lot of attention is an early 1800s weight-driven banjo clock in the style of Willard. “It’s not signed, but it’s a fantastic clock of that age,” said Langston.

Ceramics in the auction include Staffordshire, Imari, majolica and Delft.

Paintings include a large 19th-century portrait of an English noblewoman. The oil painting, which measures 60 inches by 44 inches, has a $1,500-$2,500 estimate.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Bird’s-eye maple and tiger maple went into the making of this as-found Queen Anne period American tea table, which dates to circa 1750-60. It carries a $1,200-$1,750 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

Bird’s-eye maple and tiger maple went into the making of this as-found Queen Anne period American tea table, which dates to circa 1750-60. It carries a $1,200-$1,750 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.


Though unsigned, this early 1800s weight-driven banjo clock dates to the time of clockmaker Willard Simon. The clock appears to be in working order and has a $2,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

Though unsigned, this early 1800s weight-driven banjo clock dates to the time of clockmaker Willard Simon. The clock appears to be in working order and has a $2,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.


‘R.A. Parker’ is clearly signed on this oil on canvas painting titled ‘A Winter’s Day.’ The painting is 58 1/2 inches by 41 inches.’ It has a $2,000-$3,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

‘R.A. Parker’ is clearly signed on this oil on canvas painting titled ‘A Winter’s Day.’ The painting is 58 1/2 inches by 41 inches.’ It has a $2,000-$3,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.


Bidding is expected to reach $7,500-$15,000 for this 18th-century Georgian mahogany secretary with original top and antique hardware. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

Bidding is expected to reach $7,500-$15,000 for this 18th-century Georgian mahogany secretary with original top and antique hardware. Image courtesy of Bobby Langston Antiques.

Kruse International’s auction license revoked

INDIANAPOLIS (AP and ACNI) – The classic car auction house Kruse International has lost its license after a hearing held yesterday before the Indiana Auctioneer Commission. The commission also suspended owner Dean Kruse’s personal auctioneer’s license for two years.

The commission, which is part of the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency, rejected a settlement proposed by the Indiana attorney general’s office, which would have resulted in a six- to nine-month license revocation, saying it didn’t come down hard enough on Kruse and his company.

The auction house has faced lawsuits saying it violated business agreements with at least 70 people who said they had not been paid for vehicles they consigned to auctions produced by Kruse in 2008 and 2009.

Dean Kruse claimed that all but eight or ten of the consignors in question were paid, although late, and that the actual amount still outstanding is only about $320,000.

Auburn-based Kruse International said the recession hurt his sales and that his company’s cash flow had been impacted by auction buyers who failed to pay for purchases totaling some $7 million. Kruse said he made “poor judgments” on customers and trusted buyers to pay him because of their long history of doing business with his company, some going back 30 years.

Kruse said he had mortgaged his home for $4.5 million and sold personal assets in an attempt to cover auction proceeds owed to his consignors.

Seven years must pass before the business entity Kruse International can apply for a new license. Following the two-year suspension of his personal auctioneer’s license, Dean Kruse will be on probation for three years. He agrees to pay a $35,000 fine within the next 27 months and repay all unpaid consignors within 18 months of regaining his license. Kruse will have to submit quarterly reports through a certified public accountant to report the updated status of monies owed to consignors. By accepting these terms, Kruse avoids permanent revocation of his license.

Kruse International was known as one of the world’s leading collector car auction houses. It was founded in Auburn, Indiana in 1952 by Russell Kruse after his graduation from the Reppert School of Auctioneering. The company began as a local auction company selling real estate, farms and personal property. Russell Kruse, along with his sons Dean, Dennis and Daniel Kruse, held their first collector car auction in Auburn on Labor Day in 1971. After the success of this auction, they were asked by Tom Barrett to conduct a sale in Scottsdale, Arizona, which was the first of the annual sales held there.

In addition to collector cars, the company has auctioned vintage aircraft, collectible tractors, factories, islands, zoos, railroads and three entire towns. The Kruses were the first to sell a car for a documented $1 million in cash – a 1934 Duesenberg Model SJ La Grande long-wheelbase dual-cowl phaeton. The Duesenberg was sold to Tom Monaghan, founder of Domino’s Pizza and then owner of the Detroit Tigers.

The Kruse family is also noted for conducting the $41 million sellout of the fabled William F. Harrah automotive collection. The sale of this 1,000-car collection was dispersed over three auction sessions in 1985, 1986 and 1987. Because of the lucrative divisions that auctioned real estate and oil field equipment, ITT bought Kruse International in 1981, but the family bought it back in 1986. It was purchased in 1999 by online auctioneer eBay with Billpoint for $275 million. The company was purchased back from eBay by Dean Kruse in 2002.

Auction Central News International contributed to this report.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press and Auction Central News International. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The only known copy of Universal’s The Black Cat Style B one-sheet (1934, 27

Collectible Movie Posters: Illustrated Guide With Auction Prices

The only known copy of Universal’s The Black Cat Style B one-sheet (1934, 27

The only known copy of Universal’s The Black Cat Style B one-sheet (1934, 27

DALLAS – Collectible Movie Posters: Illustrated Guide With Auction Prices (Whitman Publishing, $19.99) is something of a dichotomy, and an enjoyable one at that. It is a fun, easy read, but one that the reader must sit with for a while to fully absorb. It is heavy with beautiful and captivating full-page color illustrations, but also flavored with important educational insights. It is accessible to new collectors, but codifies what seasoned enthusiasts know yet sometimes can’t explain.

With one-sheets, lobby cards and other display images from great, near-great and even some less-than-stellar films, the book straddles much of cinema history. It notes the dominance of the early Disney films and the Universal horror classics, and also recognizes the combination of art and business required to promote a motion picture with but a single image.

Readers will find such films as Casablanca, Gilda, The Adventures of Robin Hood and This Gun For Hire, and stars from Mary Pickford to the Marx Brothers all represented in the book’s pages. All of the images are beautifully reproduced, and the production values of the book itself are very appealing.

Among the important notations is the recognition of different images released for the same film. For instance, any piece from the 1934 Universal release The Black Cat, which starred Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, would command attention. There is only one known copy of the “B style” one-sheet still in existence, however, and it sold for $334,600 (including the buyer’s premium) in November 2009.

Editors Jim Halperin and Hector Cantu quickly cut to the chase: with movie posters, as with many collectibles, value boils down to rarity and condition. Movie posters were, of course, never produced to be collected. In fact, just the opposite: they were intended to be disposed of when the film’s run at the local theater was over. As such, it’s still unusual in this collectible category to have a specimen described as an “only-known copy,” such as The Black Cat B style.

“That alone creates value, no matter the condition,” said Halperin, who serves as co-chairman of Dallas-based Heritage Auction Galleries, which deals in movie posters, among many other categories. “When more than one copy exists, then you start looking at condition, and that creates this second level of valuation. Of course, there are collectors who chase posters only because they love the image [or the movie it represents, or both], no matter the rarity or condition of the poster.”

In selecting the posters to feature in the book, price was the main factor, but the co-editors’ research resulted in a few surprises, at least at first. On anyone’s list of the 100 most collectible movie posters, one would automatically expect to see representations from the blockbuster movies, like Bride of Frankenstein and Dracula, Halperin said. “But it was surprising that the list also included posters for lesser-known movies – posters like The Benson Murder Case ($33,460 in November 2008) or The Broadway Melody ($31,070 in July 2009). But if you look a little deeper, you’ll see what attracts collectors. In the case of The Benson Murder Case insert, collectors are attracted by the stunning art deco image. And The Broadway Melody, of course, was Hollywood’s first all-talking musical,” Halperin said.

While one-sheets make up the majority of items spotlighted, other types of images are included as well.

“One sheets were the most common posters, measuring 27 by 41 inches, the ones you saw outside the theater behind a plate of glass. They take seven of the top 10 spots. But we’re seeing more interest in half sheets. They measure 22 by 28 inches, and were typically printed on card stock for theater lobby displays. Two half-sheets, for The Black Cat and Son of Frankenstein, made our top 10 list,” said Cantu, who also edits Heritage Magazine.

Disney animation also ranks in the top 100. Halperin said this is because United Artists really pumped up the quality of Mickey Mouse posters when they took over distribution of the shorts in 1932 following the character’s stay at Columbia Pictures.

Likewise, the Universal monsters era has multiple entries, including some recent record-breakers. Dracula, Frankenstein and others have set numerous records, some of them recently, and all are represented with beautifully reproduced rarities.

The past 15 years has seen remarkable growth in the market for collectible movie posters. Even though prices can fluctuate along with the national economy, the demand for rare, vintage pieces has stayed strong, and Halperin believes it’s possible that in the next few years, half-million or even million dollar sales may be common.

An updated edition of Collectible Movie Posters may be in the cards at some point in the future, especially if present trends continue. Right after the Halperin/Cantu book was released, an insert from Metropolis sold for $47,800; and a Swedish version of the King Kong poster realized $28,680 at a Heritage Auction Galleries event. No doubt the editors took note, as well.

Click here to purchase the 224-page softcover book Collectible Movie Posters through amazon.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


The Style D one-sheet from Universal’s The Bride of Frankenstein (1935, 27

The Style D one-sheet from Universal’s The Bride of Frankenstein (1935, 27


This Style F one-sheet of Universal's Dracula (1931, 27

This Style F one-sheet of Universal’s Dracula (1931, 27


United Artists released Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse cartoon The Mad Doctor in 1933. The 27

United Artists released Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse cartoon The Mad Doctor in 1933. The 27


The list of top movie posters is not confined to just one-sheets. The 14

The list of top movie posters is not confined to just one-sheets. The 14


Collectible Movie Posters: Illustrated Guide With Auction Prices is now available from Whitman Publishing and many booksellers with a suggested retail price of $19.99.

Collectible Movie Posters: Illustrated Guide With Auction Prices is now available from Whitman Publishing and many booksellers with a suggested retail price of $19.99.

The site of the proposed National Jazz Museum is across from the Apollo Theater in Harlem, shown in this photograph. In the background, the Hotel Theresa is visible, as is Blumstein's department store, the first business along 125th Street to employ blacks as salespeople. Photo by Stern, 2006, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

NYC seeks developer for jazz museum in Harlem

The site of the proposed National Jazz Museum is across from the Apollo Theater in Harlem, shown in this photograph. In the background, the Hotel Theresa is visible, as is Blumstein's department store, the first business along 125th Street to employ blacks as salespeople. Photo by Stern, 2006, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

The site of the proposed National Jazz Museum is across from the Apollo Theater in Harlem, shown in this photograph. In the background, the Hotel Theresa is visible, as is Blumstein’s department store, the first business along 125th Street to employ blacks as salespeople. Photo by Stern, 2006, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

NEW YORK (AP) – New York City is seeking a developer to build a new home for the National Jazz Museum at a city-owned lot across the street from Harlem’s Apollo Theater.

The 10,000-square-foot site will also house the ImageNation Sol Cinema, an art-house movie theater.

The city’s Economic Development Corp. issued a request for proposals on Monday seeking a developer for the project.

The site was the former home of Mart 125, a market where vendors rented space. It closed in 2001.

The developer will be responsible for demolishing the existing structure as well as leasing the rest of the building once it’s completed.

Submissions are due July 30.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-05-24-10 1311EDT

 

Rupp Quality Motion of Mansfield, Ohio, manufactured this miniature Corvette, which is powered by a small gas engine. It is expected to sell for $500-$800. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

Harrison Auctions will wave the green flag for its sale May 29

Rupp Quality Motion of Mansfield, Ohio, manufactured this miniature Corvette, which is powered by a small gas engine. It is expected to sell for $500-$800. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

Rupp Quality Motion of Mansfield, Ohio, manufactured this miniature Corvette, which is powered by a small gas engine. It is expected to sell for $500-$800. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

FORT MYERS, Fla. – Memorial Day weekend has long been associated with auto racing, and Harrison Auctions Inc. will feature several sporty toy and pedal cars in its sale Saturday, May 29, which starts at 10 a.m. Eastern. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

First to the line is a Corvette Sting Ray by Rupp Quality Motion of Mansfield, Ohio. The gas-powered convertible is 84 inches long and sports a $500-$800 estimate.

An electric Corvette, which is 60 inches long by 29 inches wide, has a $400-$600 estimate.

Several pedal cards, both vintage and new, will be sold. A vintage pedal car in original white paint has a $200-$400 estimate. Reproductions of a Speedway Pace Car and a pedal airplane will also be sold.

The auction will begin with a selection of antique furniture including display cabinets. Toys, dolls and collectibles, including NASCAR items, will follow.

The 178-lot auction will be conducted at Sam’s Plaza Unit 312, 5100 S. Cleveland Ave. in Fort Myers.

For details call Floyd Harrison at 239-574-6909.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


An electric motor powers this miniature Corvette. The toy sports car is 60 inches long and has a $400-$600 estimate. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

An electric motor powers this miniature Corvette. The toy sports car is 60 inches long and has a $400-$600 estimate. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.


The Century Flyer wagon is 35 inches long and 15 1/2 inches wide. The antique wagon has a $200-$400 estimate. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.
Basic transportation, this vintage pedal car is in its original white paint with red trim. It is expected to sell for $200-$400. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

Basic transportation, this vintage pedal car is in its original white paint with red trim. It is expected to sell for $200-$400. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.


This Speedway Pace Car is a reproduction of a pedal car. It is in excellent condition and carries a $150-$300 estimate. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

This Speedway Pace Car is a reproduction of a pedal car. It is in excellent condition and carries a $150-$300 estimate. Image courtesy of Harrison Auctions Inc.

Ex-astronauts want Ohio museum to get shuttle

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) – More than a dozen former astronauts want NASA to send one of its space shuttles into retirement at an Air Force museum in Ohio.

In a letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden Jr., 18 ex-astronauts say Air Force work was instrumental to making the shuttle program possible. They’re urging that one of the spacecraft be placed on permanent display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton when the shuttle program ends this year.

Signers of the May 11 letter include Kathryn Sullivan, America’s first woman to walk in space, and Charles Duke Jr., a member of the Apollo 16 mission to the moon.

The Smithsonian in Washington is getting the shuttle Discovery. NASA is still deciding where to send its two others, Endeavour and Atlantis.

___

Information from: Dayton Daily News, http://www.daytondailynews.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-05-24-10 0700EDT

 

Shimon Okshteyn (b. 1951 Ukraine) ‘Mona Lisa’ painting and serigraph on paper mounted on canvas composed of four individual colored and painted serigraphs laid down on canvas, with the image of Mona Lisa painted on all four, estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Okshteyn’s Mona Lisa smiles on Gray’s Auctioneers’ art sale May 27

Shimon Okshteyn (b. 1951 Ukraine) ‘Mona Lisa’ painting and serigraph on paper mounted on canvas composed of four individual colored and painted serigraphs laid down on canvas, with the image of Mona Lisa painted on all four, estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Shimon Okshteyn (b. 1951 Ukraine) ‘Mona Lisa’ painting and serigraph on paper mounted on canvas composed of four individual colored and painted serigraphs laid down on canvas, with the image of Mona Lisa painted on all four, estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

CLEVELAND – Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers will offer a rare Shimon Okshteyn oil painting and serigraph Mona Lisa at their 19th Century, Modern and Contemporary Fine Art Auction on Thursday, May 27. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding for the sale, which begins at 1 p.m. Eastern.

Estimated conservatively at $8,000-$10,000, the painting is composed of four individual colored and painted serigraphs on paper laid down on canvas, with the image of Mona Lisa painted on all four. The signature is on the lower right panel in the lower right corner.

Okshteyn’s work is described by Robert Sandelson as “a new kind of pop art, engaging, shocking and baffling.” It is a massively scaled work in which Okshteyn expands upon his signature sensational mimetic representation of an old master painting. The work is 84 inches high by 94 inches wide overall. Each panel is 42 inches high by 47 inches wide.

Shimon Okshteyn immigrated to the United States from the former Soviet Union in 1980. He currently lives and works in New York City. His work is held in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York and the State Russian Museum of Art in St. Petersburg.

This small and select auction of 178 lots also features a dynamic Clement Meadmore (Australian/American, 1929-2005) bronze Cross Current, standing at 13 inches tall.

The Sculpture of Clement Meadmore, published in 1994 by Hudson Hills Press, New York, states: “In a typical sculpture by Clement Meadmore, a single, rectangular volume repeatedly twists and turns upon itself before lunging into space, as if in a mood of aspiration or exhilaration, or simply to release physical forces held in tension.”

Edmond Jean-Baptiste Tschaggeny (Belgian, 1818-1873) is represented by a stunning pastoral scene, oil on canvas featuring a shepherdess, sheep, cattle and a dog stopping for a rest beside a stream. Tschaggeny is a highly regarded animal painter.

Other top works are lot 73, by Oscar Dominguez (Spanish, 1906-1957) Nude Woman with Fruit, ink on paper signed and dated 1935, and lot 120A, Louis Icart (French, 1888-1950) Miss America colored etching, which is signed lower right “Louis Icart.”

Founded by Deborah J. Gray and partner Serena Harragin in 2006, Gray’s Auctioneers holds specialized live auctions every month. For detail contact Serena Harragin at serena@graysauctioneers.com or call 216-458-7695. The company is located at 10717 Detroit Ave., Cleveland.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Edmond Jean-Baptiste Tschaggeny (Belgian, 1818-1873) pastoral scene, oil on canvas, signed lower right, dated 1868, 30 inches high by 44 inches wide, estimate: $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Edmond Jean-Baptiste Tschaggeny (Belgian, 1818-1873) pastoral scene, oil on canvas, signed lower right, dated 1868, 30 inches high by 44 inches wide, estimate: $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.


Clement Meadmore (Australian, 1929-2005), ‘Cross Current,’ bronze, 13 inches high, estimate: $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Clement Meadmore (Australian, 1929-2005), ‘Cross Current,’ bronze, 13 inches high, estimate: $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.


Oscar Dominguez (Spanish, 1906-1957), ‘Nude Woman with Fruit,’ ink on paper, signed and dated lower right: ‘O. Dominguez ’35,’ 12 1/4 inches by 8 3/4 inches, estimate: $5,000-$7,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Oscar Dominguez (Spanish, 1906-1957), ‘Nude Woman with Fruit,’ ink on paper, signed and dated lower right: ‘O. Dominguez ’35,’ 12 1/4 inches by 8 3/4 inches, estimate: $5,000-$7,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.


Louis Icart (French, 1888-1950), ‘Miss America,’ colored etching, signed lower right, 21 1/2 inches by 16 inches, estimate: $2,800-$3,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Louis Icart (French, 1888-1950), ‘Miss America,’ colored etching, signed lower right, 21 1/2 inches by 16 inches, estimate: $2,800-$3,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers.

Signed 1996 ‘Dick Tracy’ sculpture by Crash, silkscreen on metal, artist proof, 28 by 28 1/4 paper size, estimate: $8,250-$9,375. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Universal Live to sell Rare Posters Ltd.’s masterpieces May 27

Signed 1996 ‘Dick Tracy’ sculpture by Crash, silkscreen on metal, artist proof, 28 by 28 1/4 paper size, estimate: $8,250-$9,375. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Signed 1996 ‘Dick Tracy’ sculpture by Crash, silkscreen on metal, artist proof, 28 by 28 1/4 paper size, estimate: $8,250-$9,375. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

NORTHBROOK, Ill. – Universal Live will conduct an auction of great art posters, museum exhibition posters and signed art on Thursday, May 27, at 3 p.m. Central. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Universal Live is auctioning more than 350 items from Rare Posters Ltd., which contains posters and art. Rare Posters Ltd. has been a wholesaler/distributor for more than 20 years. They have tailored one of the most comprehensive collections of fine art, museum and exhibitor posters in the art business.

The auction will feature many great artists with names such as: Picasso, Dali, Andy Warhol, Robert Indiana, Jim Dine, Chagall, Cezanne, Miro, Altman, Lichtenstein, Koons, Calder, Matisse, Van Gogh, Baskin, Rosenquist, Chisto, Rauschenberg, Vasarely, Hockney, Stella, Renoir, Buffet, Cocteau, Cutrone, Peter Max, Dali, Mucha, Larry Rivers, Kostabi, Tapies, Keith Harring, Wesselmann, Braque, Oldenburg, Burton Morris, Gainsborough and many others.

Martin Shape, president of Universal described three unusual pieces of art in this auction as follows:

  • Dick Tracy by Crash, lot 8800117, is numbered 1/3 trial proofs for a print or poster that was never produced and therefore is rare. Crash, whose name was John Matos, worked with Andy Warhol and Patrone. This was meant to be a revival of Pop Art.
  • Alex Katz’s The Striped Shirt, lot 8800051, is a color aquatint done in 1980. Most aquatints are small in size, but this one, a vertical, measures 22 inches by 46 inches, which is almost life-size.
  • Picasso’s Portrait of Maya, lot 8800016, is a printer’s proof depicting Picasso’s granddaughter. The edition was a numbered to 50 but there are only five proofs known.

“It’s a great buying opportunity for entry level collectors, galleries and art buffs. There are several items never auctioned before and this auction offers something for everyone, from the masters to pop art and opening bids for every budget – $75-$7,500,” said Shape.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Van Gogh portrait Mourlot lithograph, 29 1/2 by 21 1/2 paper size, initialed FM (Fernand Mourlot) in pencil, estimate: $1,875-$2,250. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Van Gogh portrait Mourlot lithograph, 29 1/2 by 21 1/2 paper size, initialed FM (Fernand Mourlot) in pencil, estimate: $1,875-$2,250. Image courtesy of Universal Live.


Signed 1980 ‘The Striped Shirt’ by Alex Katz, color aquatint etching, 41 inches by 21 inches paper size, estimate: $5,500-$6,250. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Signed 1980 ‘The Striped Shirt’ by Alex Katz, color aquatint etching, 41 inches by 21 inches paper size, estimate: $5,500-$6,250. Image courtesy of Universal Live.


Picasso, ‘Portrait of Maya,’ lithograph, 1965, unsigned, 34 inches by 24 inches, estimate: $8,250-$9,377. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Picasso, ‘Portrait of Maya,’ lithograph, 1965, unsigned, 34 inches by 24 inches, estimate: $8,250-$9,377. Image courtesy of Universal Live.


Signed Alexander Calder ‘Circus Riders (1975) for Amnesty International,’ offset lithograph, 29 3/4 inches by 23 inches paper size, estimate: $3,125-$3,750. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Signed Alexander Calder ‘Circus Riders (1975) for Amnesty International,’ offset lithograph, 29 3/4 inches by 23 inches paper size, estimate: $3,125-$3,750. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

American Pickers Frank Fritz (left) and Mike Wolfe lifting an early Indian motorbike they bought on the road. Image by Amy Richmond Photography.

American Pickers back for a second season starting June 7

American Pickers Frank Fritz (left) and Mike Wolfe lifting an early Indian motorbike they bought on the road. Image by Amy Richmond Photography.

American Pickers Frank Fritz (left) and Mike Wolfe lifting an early Indian motorbike they bought on the road. Image by Amy Richmond Photography.

NEW YORK – Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz are back for a second season, with new adventures taped during scavenging trips through backroads, junkyards, and filled-to-the-brim barns across America for “rusty gold.” With an average of 3.8 million total viewers per episode in its first season, American Pickers was the No. 1 new cable series of 2010. Season two begins on Monday, June 7 at 9 p.m. Eastern Time on HISTORY™ Channel.

Part sleuths, part antiques experts, and part cultural historians, Wolfe and Fritz visit small towns from coast to coast in search of weird and wonderful Americana. Each treasure hunt leads them to fascinating, quirky characters – everyday people with stories that open a window onto American life.

As professional “pickers,” these childhood buddies comb through memorabilia and artifacts, hoping to find treasures among the trash. Sometimes they make a few bucks; sometimes they walk away with little more than the history of an item.

The new season begins in North Carolina, where the Pickers comb through a collector’s abandoned outbuildings and find a 1950 Studebaker. Mike becomes obsessed with a 1934 pre-Airstream trailer, but can they negotiate a deal? Then, hoping to sell a choice vintage sign, they visit their friend and NASCAR champion Ryan Newman, who has a surprise of his own for the guys.

As their junkyard journeys continue, the Wolfe and Fritz rummage through ramshackle school buses, a burned storage building, forgotten barns, salvage yards, and rust heaps in search of what they call “good junk.” They come across an item they’ve never seen before, place bets on what it actually is, and get a surprising assessment from the appraiser. They encounter a mother and daughter who catch the picking bug and give the guys a run for their money. And with nerves of steel, they try to strike deals with people who are often reluctant to part with their possessions.

Meanwhile, back at the Pickers’ headquarters in Iowa, Danielle Colby Cushman holds down the fort at Wolfe’s storefront, Antique Archaeology. She spends her time chasing leads, talking to sellers and doing research via trade publications and Web sites. Cushman also keeps the boys in line – while they keep her in stitches with their antics.

“We’re caretakers of treasures and the stories behind them,” said Wolfe. Traveling along with the duo vicariously, viewers can expect to meet an assortment of American originals and watch as a patchwork of history unfolds – one treasure at a time.

American Pickers is produced for HISTORY by Cineflix Productions.

Meet the stars of American Pickers:

Mike Wolfe –

A lifelong “picker,” Wolfe has been combing through junk since the age of four. Over the years, he’s earned a reputation as one of the country’s foremost foragers, traveling coast to coast in search of forgotten treasures. Where other people see dilapidated barns and overgrown yards, Wolfe sees potential goldmines packed with rare finds and sensational stories.

Wolfe spends as much time as he can on the road, usually with Frank – his friend of 20 years and constant picking partner. What exactly does he look for? “Anything I can make a buck on,” he said with a laugh. That could be anything from antique baby carriages and vintage jukeboxes to old cars and scrap metal. Wolfe’s clients include interior designers, art directors, photographers and collectors – and he owns Antique Archaeology, a specialty shop that sells antiques, vintage items and more in sleepy Le Claire, Iowa. Visit Mike’s official company website here: www.antiquearcheology.com

Frank Fritz –

Like his childhood friend Mike Wolfe, Frank Fritz started picking early, collecting rocks and beer cans as a kid. He worked for many years as a fire and safety inspector but always had a passion for antiques, junk and anything with an engine. These days, he spends most of his time on the road with Mike, digging for treasure in barns, garages and junkyards across America.

Even-tempered and affable, he has a way with potential sellers and a knack for putting out fires: Wolfe calls him the bearded charmer. Fritz does get a little carried away, however, by anything with an engine, and Wolfe often has to talk him out of buying yet another motorbike for his collection.

With their complementary personalities and shared love of picking, Wolfe and Fritz make the perfect team. Still, since they’re both out to cash in on their finds, some healthy competition always comes into play. Visit Frank’s official company website here: www.frankfritzfinds.com

Danielle Colby Cushman –

While the guys are out picking, Cushman holds down the fort at Antique Archaeology. Wolfe says she’s the glue that holds them all together. A mother of three, Danielle is always working on a new creative project, whether it’s painting, designing clothes or selling vintage-inspired gifts online. She says she’s extremely proud of the “boys” and fortunate to work with such a talented pair.

Click here to read Catherine Saunders-Watson’s interview with Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz

Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933) Wisteria Library Lamp leaded glass and bronze, 1900–1906 27 x 18 inches Organized by The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, New York, image courtesy Flint Institute of Arts.

Glass exhibitions open at Flint Institute of Arts

Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933) Wisteria Library Lamp leaded glass and bronze, 1900–1906 27 x 18 inches Organized by The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, New York, image courtesy Flint Institute of Arts.

Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, 1848–1933) Wisteria Library Lamp leaded glass and bronze, 1900–1906 27 x 18 inches Organized by The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass, New York, image courtesy Flint Institute of Arts.

FLINT, Mich. (AP) – The Flint Institute of Arts is hosting two major glass exhibitions that opened over the weekend.

“Lino Tagliapietra in Retrospect: A Modern Renaissance in Italian Glass” features 160 works by the Italian glassblower; and “Tiffany Lamps: Articles of Utility, Objects of Art” includes 40 leaded-glass lamps.

Both exhibitions open Sunday and run through Aug. 15.

Tagliapietra is revered as a teacher and mentor to many of the world’s finest glass artists and his work is rooted in the Venetian glassmaking tradition. That exhibit is organized by the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Wash.

Louis Comfort Tiffany was an American artist-industrialist. His eclectic works ranged from Gothic-like windows to household furnishings such as lamps, oil paintings and water colors and glass ornaments.

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Online: Flint Institute of Arts: http://www.flintarts.org

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-05-23-10 0400EDT


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, b. 1934-) Mandara blown glass with multiple incalmi, criss-crossed canes, Pilchuck '96 technique; cut, 2006 22 3/4 x 15 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches Courtesy of Lino Tagliapietra, Inc. Photo by Russell Johnson, image courtesy Flint Institute of Arts.

Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, b. 1934-) Mandara blown glass with multiple incalmi, criss-crossed canes, Pilchuck ’96 technique; cut, 2006 22 3/4 x 15 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches Courtesy of Lino Tagliapietra, Inc. Photo by Russell Johnson, image courtesy Flint Institute of Arts.