The Siskiyou Dragon granular crystalline gold specimen weighs 25.26 troy ounces and measures 7½ inches long by 2¼ inches high by 2¼ inches wide. To be auctioned Sept. 12 by Clars, with a $100,000-$150,000 estimate. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Clars to auction naturally formed dragon-shape gold nugget, Sept. 12

The Siskiyou Dragon granular crystalline gold specimen weighs 25.26 troy ounces and measures 7½ inches long by 2¼ inches high by 2¼ inches wide. To be auctioned Sept. 12 by Clars, with a $100,000-$150,000 estimate. Clars Auction Gallery image.

The Siskiyou Dragon granular crystalline gold specimen weighs 25.26 troy ounces and measures 7½ inches long by 2¼ inches high by 2¼ inches wide. To be auctioned Sept. 12 by Clars, with a $100,000-$150,000 estimate. Clars Auction Gallery image.

OAKLAND, Calif. – On Sunday, Sept. 12, 2010, all eyes will be on Clars Auction Gallery in San Francisco’s East Bay as the company offers one of the rarest and most magnificent granular crystalline gold specimens ever mined. Appropriately named the “Siskiyou Dragon” for its county of origin and its naturally created dragon-like form, the specimen weighs an astounding 25.26 troy ounces and measures 7½ inches long by 2¼ inches high by 2¼ inches wide.

The Siskiyou Dragon was discovered in the early 1990s by an excavator operator whose keen eye saved it from the ore crushers. Experts later deemed the rare piece to be a fully intact specimen in pristine condition. The Siskiyou Dragon is one of the largest pieces of granular crystalline gold ever discovered and kept intact. It is expected to attract international attention when it is offered at auction on Sept. 12 with a presale estimate of $100,000 to $150,000. Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

The Siskiyou County California Gold Field has been operational since 1860. Located near the California/Oregon border, this mine has spawned many a millionaire from its finds of not only gold but also silver and platinum. In its heydey during the California Gold Rush, the Siskiyou Gold Fields were guarded ’round the clock because of its fabled wealth of ore.

The Siskiyou Dragon is the highlight of Clars Sept. 11-12 Fine Estates Auction, which also will feature world-class art, rare Continental porcelain from Sevres, Meissen and Royal Vienna; and much more.

For additional information on the Siskiyou Dragon or any other item in Clars September sale, call the gallery tollfree at 1-888-339-7600 or e-mail info@clars.com.

The fully illustrated auction catalog will soon be available to view online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com

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Stone mill at Appalachian Trail Museum. Photo by Robert T. Kinsey, millpictures.com.

Appalachian Trail Museum receives grant for educational programs

Stone mill at Appalachian Trail Museum. Photo by Robert T. Kinsey, millpictures.com.

Stone mill at Appalachian Trail Museum. Photo by Robert T. Kinsey, millpictures.com.

GARDNERS, Pa. – The Appalachian Trail Museum Society has received a grant from the Quimby Family Foundation in Portland, Maine, to extend the educational focus of the recently opened Appalachian Trail Museum.

“The Quimby grant will fund a collaborative effort with Indiana University’s Mathers Museum of World Cultures in Bloomington, Indiana, to develop a small traveling exhibition to educate the public about the culture and bond that exists among long-distance hikers who hike the 2,179 trail that passes through 14 states from Maine to Georgia.” said Terry Harley-Wilson, vice president of the Appalachian Trail Museum Society. “Educational programming designed to spark in teenagers and young adults an interest in hiking and backpacking, by introducing them to the individuals who make the Appalachian Trail an important part of their lives, will be developed and offered to venues that will be hosting the exhibit.”

“The Quimby Family Foundation has been integral to our success in opening the Appalachian Trail Museum on June 5. At the museum, we are honoring the men and women who conceived of the trail, built it and first hiked it from end-to-end. The museum also is a tribute to those who hike and maintain the trail today,” said Larry Luxenberg, president of the Appalachian Trail Museum Society and founder of the museum. “In addition to interesting exhibits, the Appalachian Trail Museum is active with programs that encourage hiking, conservation and physical fitness. The traveling exhibit will be a significant addition to our education outreach efforts.”

Harley-Wilson said the traveling exhibit will open at the Mathers Museum in the spring of 2011 and then will be sent to a number of organizations based in Maine for use within their own programming. The Chewonki Foundation, the Susan L. Curtis Foundation, Unity College, the Trail’s End Festival, Teens-To-Trails, and the L.C. Bates Museum at Good Will Hinckley have expressed an interest in using the exhibit.

“We also plan to include the exhibit at trail-related events such as Trails Days in Damascus, Virginia, and the Appalachian Long Distance Hiker Association’s Annual Gathering, where we will offer a panel/discussion program for participants to consider what it is about the hiker subculture that makes it so unique,” Harley-Wilson said. “Upon the completion of its tour, the exhibit will be incorporated into the Appalachian Trail Museum, perhaps as a featured display as we expand the museum.”

The Quimby Family Foundation also provided funding to scan nearly 13,000 Polaroid photographs representing approximately 18,600 individuals that were taken between 1979 and 2008 at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s headquarters in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Eventually these images will be made available in a searchable online database that will be incorporated into the conservancy’s website (www.appalachiantrail.org).

Located in Pine Grove Furnace State Park and at the midway point of the Appalachian Trail, the museum is across from the Pine Grove General Store on Pennsylvania Route 233. The museum is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily to Labor Day and on weekends from noon to 4 p.m. from Labor Day to Oct. 31 plus Columbus Day.

Inquiries about becoming a museum volunteer or a sponsor or about making a donation may be made at the museum’s website, www.atmuseum.org, and info@atmuseum.org.

About the Appalachian Trail Museum Society:

The Appalachian Trail Museum Society, a 501-C-3 not-for-profit organization formed in 2002, organizes programs, exhibits, volunteers and fundraising nationwide for the Appalachian Trail Museum. The museum opened on June 5, 2010, as a tribute to the thousands of men, women and families who have hiked and maintained the 2,179 mile long hiking trail that passes through 14 states from Maine to Georgia. Located in the Pine Grove Furnace State Park in Gardners, Pa., the museum is conveniently near Carlisle, Gettysburg and Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Additional information is available at www.atmuseum.org.

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Royal Crown Derby and other types of cups and saucers. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Museums, estates give variety to Pook & Pook auction Sept. 9-10

Royal Crown Derby and other types of cups and saucers. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Royal Crown Derby and other types of cups and saucers. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

DOWNINGTOWN, Pa. – Pook & Pook Inc. will begin the fall season with a Variety Auction on Sept. 9-10. The Pennsylvania estates of Bernice Cramer, Naomi David, H. Richard Dietrich Jr. and Gerald Lestz together with items from the Henry Ford Museum and the Gloucester County (N.J.) Historical Society will provide many interesting items. LiveAuctioneers will facilitate Internet live bidding.

A large quantity of toys will be sold on both Thursday afternoon and Friday. Cast-iron vehicles, lithographed tin windup and pull toy vehicles, Schoenhut instruments, figural windup toys and games, trains, model forts, banks, Stieff animals, building blocks and boxed games are just a few highlights of the extensive collection. Large lots of space related robots and guns round out the mix.

Furniture will be offered throughout the sale. A Pennsylvania Chippendale walnut slant-lid desk, two Hepplewhite mahogany sideboards, a Pennsylvania Queen Anne walnut chest on frame, an interesting Moroccan inlaid games table and a Tindale Cabinet Co. specimen chest on frame will be sold Thursday, as well as several Maryland pieces, a Biedermeyer corner cupboard and a high-top painted dry sink. An English breakfast table, painted dower chest, Sheraton secretary, an American chime tall-case clock and Georgian hunt table are some of the furniture highlights to be offered Friday.

Buyers interested in ceramics will have their pick of many lots. Chinese export tableware including a turquoise footed bowl, rose medallion pieces, famille jeune jardinière, garnitures, teapots, celedon plates and serving pieces will be offered. Other Chinese porcelains include cache pots, vases, ginger jars and Blanc de Chine figures. A collection of Blue Onion pattern dinnerware to include service pieces and utensils, Staffordshire figures, flow blue in various patterns, gaudy ironstone, Limoges and queens rose will all attract interest. Majolica, redware and blue decorated stoneware add to the ceramic category.

Approximately 150 painting will be offered on both days. Listed artists include Johann Buchner, Jean Capron, Jenness Cortez, Bela DeTirefort, David Hahn, Alfred Birdsey, G. La Pira, Justin McCarthy, Samuel Pratt, Robert Ranier, James Ross and Edgar Nye. Four watercolor landscapes by Adolphe Valette will be sold as a group. Many other landscapes, interior scenes and portraits will attract interest.

Weaponry will be sold on Friday toward the end of the sale. Pistols, bowie and hunting knives, bayonets and assorted short swords will cross the block.

A Stieff four-piece sterling silver tea service is estimated at $400-$1,200. Groups of Russian silver enamel items include cigarette cases, pendants, spoons and flatware. Other metalware includes brass candlesticks, fireplace equipment, pewter and copper. The myriad of accessory items, from baskets to mantel clocks, from mirrors to dresser boxes, will be available.

Customers previewing the sale at the auction house will have use of a printed catalog in full color.

For details call 610-269-4040 or go to Pook & Pook’s Web site at www.pookandpook.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Pennsylvania Chippendale walnut slant-front desk, circa 1770, 42 inches high by 38 1/4 inches wide. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Pennsylvania Chippendale walnut slant-front desk, circa 1770, 42 inches high by 38 1/4 inches wide. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.


Windsor-style sackback bench. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Windsor-style sackback bench. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.


Jos. Heinrich copper cookware, 23 pieces. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Jos. Heinrich copper cookware, 23 pieces. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.


Eight tin windup toys, the tallest of which is 6 1/2 inches. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Eight tin windup toys, the tallest of which is 6 1/2 inches. Image courtesy of Pook & Pook Inc.

Shepard Fairey posed with the 'HOPE' poster at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston last February. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Trial date set in AP-artist dispute in NYC

Shepard Fairey posed with the 'HOPE' poster at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston last February. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Shepard Fairey posed with the ‘HOPE’ poster at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston last February. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

NEW YORK (AP) – A March trial date was set Monday to decide whether the artist who created the Barack Obama “HOPE” image violated the Associated Press’ copyright when he based the image on one of the news agency’s pictures.

U.S. District Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein said Monday that the selection of eight jurors for a three-week trial will start March 21 in New York.

Artist Shepard Fairey appeared in court with his lawyers Monday but declined to comment afterward. Fairey sued the AP last year, arguing that his artwork during Obama’s 2008 run for the presidency did not violate AP’s copyrights.

The news cooperative countersued, saying the uncredited, uncompensated use of its picture violated copyright laws.

One of Fairey’s lawyers, Geoffrey Stewart, told the judge that Fairey will show at trial how he made the Obama image, calling it a work of art based on one photograph.

“This isn’t like some copyright case that involves hundreds of this and hundreds of that,” he said. “It’s really quite simple.”

An AP lawyer, Michael Williams, told the judge that Fairey’s recent deposition statement that he believed he created the Obama image from a portion of a photograph that included the actor George Clooney with Obama was inconsistent with Fairey’s lawsuit, which said there were two photographs and that a photograph of Obama without Clooney wasn’t used.

Stewart told the judge he disagreed with the AP’s “characterization of the record.”

Earlier this year, it was disclosed in court that Fairey is under criminal investigation after he said he erred about which AP photo he used as a basis for “HOPE.” He acknowledged that he based his artwork on a picture of Obama that did not include Clooney and that he had submitted false images and deleted other images to conceal his actions.

The red, cream and light-blue “HOPE” images show a determined-looking Obama gazing upward, with the caption “HOPE.”

The AP photographs were taken in 2006 when Obama, then a senator, was seated next to Clooney at a press event in Washington.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Vermont historical society hit by burglars

FAIRFAX, Vt. (AP) – Vermont State Police say burglars made off with a butter churn and several pieces of pottery at the Fairfax Historical Society in Fairfax.

The items were taken sometime between Tuesday and Sunday.

Anyone with information is being asked to contact State Police in St. Albans, at (802) 524-5993.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-08-23-10 0601EDT

 

Egon Schiele (1890-1918), Portrait of Wally, 1912, now the legal property of the Leopold Museum after payment of a $19 million legal settlement.

Painting stolen by Nazis back in Austrian museum

Egon Schiele (1890-1918), Portrait of Wally, 1912, now the legal property of the Leopold Museum after payment of a $19 million legal settlement.

Egon Schiele (1890-1918), Portrait of Wally, 1912, now the legal property of the Leopold Museum after payment of a $19 million legal settlement.

VIENNA (AP) – A painting by Austrian expressionist Egon Schiele has been rehung at a Vienna museum after a 12-year possession battle over the artwork stolen by the Nazis.

The painting was returned over the weekend after the Leopold Museum agreed to pay $19 million (euro15 million) as part of the settlement. U.S. authorities had refused to return the painting after it was exhibited in New York because heirs of the owners laid a claim to it.

The Schiele artwork, titled Portrait of Wally, was put on display again Monday. Leopold Museum head Peter Weinhaeupl called it a “symbolic day” for the museum.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-08-23-10 0706EDT

 

Decision looms for billionaire’s LA museum plan

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Art museums in Los Angeles generally have pricey gift shops, haute fast-food cafeterias and – more often than not – billionaire Eli Broad’s name etched prominently on their list of supporters.

Now the property-developer-turned-philanthropist has plans for a freestanding museum in his name, which could be built in an emerging downtown cultural district formed largely with his backing.

A committee of state and local officials will vote Monday on whether to let Broad lease county-owned land on the city’s Grand Avenue for the $80-million to $100-million structure. The project is being cast as a possible boon to downtown Los Angeles’ ongoing cultural rebirth and has the support of LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

The new venue’s 35,000 square feet of gallery space would feature paintings, sculptures and photos from Broad’s 2,000-piece collection, which includes works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Salvador Dali and Joan Miro that are not currently on permanent public display.

“There’s clearly more art than there is gallery space,” said Karen Denne, a spokeswoman for Broad, who was not available for comment. “This creates additional gallery space, an additional public museum so that these works are accessible to as many people as possible.”

The Broad Art Foundation would also coordinate loans of its art works to other institutions, among other activities, from the planned 120,000-square-foot venue.

Denne said the 76-year-old, whose net worth was pegged this year by Forbes magazine at $5.7 billion, is waiting for the Grand Avenue Committee to hold its vote before deciding whether to build the arts venue downtown or in an alternate location in Santa Monica.

Broad has spoken favorably in past interviews about the downtown site beside the Walt Disney Concert Hall and across from the Museum of Contemporary Art – both of which he played a role in having built.

Under the deal to be considered Monday, the Broad Art Foundation would pay $7.7 million over the course of a 99-year-lease for the 2.5-acre parcel that was originally set aside as part of the stalled $3 billion shopping, hotel and condo complex known as the Grand Avenue project. The plan also obliges Broad to finance the museum’s construction and contribute $200 million toward its operation.

Broad has winnowed his choice of architects for the project to the office of Dutch designer Rem Koolhaas and New York-based Diller, Scofidio & Renfro.

Denne said Broad began considering the downtown spot at Villaraigosa’s urging.

“When I heard that Eli Broad was planning to build an art museum to house his world-renowned collection, the first thing I did was encourage him to build his museum in downtown Los Angeles,” the mayor said in a statement. “If sited here, the museum will be an important cornerstone of the Grand Avenue project and play a pivotal role in the cultural and artistic renaissance currently under way.”

Broad, who made his billions as co-founder of developer KB Home and through the sale of insurer SunAmerican, has already done much toward advancing the arts on Grand Avenue.

He was founding chairman of the Arata Isozaki-designed Museum of Contemporary Art in 1979, one of the earliest cultural venues to join the Music Center performing arts complex among the corporate high-rises coming to dominate Bunker Hill.

He pledged up to $15 million as part of a deal in 2008 to shore up the financially troubled museum’s finances and championed the selection of its current director, Jeffrey Deitch, previously a prominent art dealer and gallery owner in New York.

Broad was also instrumental in establishing and selecting architects for other Grand Avenue landmarks: the Frank Gehry-designed Disney Concert Hall; a sleek Los Angeles Unified School District arts campus by Viennese designer Wolf Prix; and Our Lady of Angels Cathedral, by Spanish architect Rafael Moneo.

Off Grand Avenue, he made a $60 million gift to build and support the Renzo Piano-designed Broad Contemporary Art Museum on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s west Los Angeles campus, where some of the contemporary art collection already resides.

Other institutions bearing his name are the Eli and Edith Broad Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, to which he donated $23.2 million, and the Broad Stage at Santa Monica City College, which received $10 million.

“I think he’s one of the major art patrons nationally, not just in Southern California,” said Rochelle Steiner, dean of the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Fine Arts (named for a different Southern California billionaire). “Other cities think about, ‘Who could transform our city?’ Los Angeles has someone who actually is transforming the city.”

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-08-23-10 0419EDT

 

Island time-shifting frozen wheel made by the Man in Black, $30,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

LOST and found: LiveAuctioneers bidders spend $1.5M on TV show relics

Island time-shifting frozen wheel made by the Man in Black, $30,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Island time-shifting frozen wheel made by the Man in Black, $30,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

SANTA MONICA, Calif. – “This show is the new Star Trek when it comes to collecting,” Profiles in History’s owner Joseph Maddalena declared after the headline-grabbing Aug. 21-22 auction of props from the cult TV series LOST.

Officially sanctioned by ABC Television, the network that presented six seasons of LOST, the 1,174-lot auction drew a throng of fans – some dressed as their favorite LOST characters – to the sale venue at Barker Hangar of Santa Monica Municipal Airport. Gawker admission was $42, with a portion going to charities in Hawaii, where the series was filmed. Registered bidders were admitted free, but try as they might, onsite participants found themselves “lost in limbo” trying to compete against the avalanche of enthusiasts from 35 countries who bid online through LiveAuctioneers. As the hammer fell on the final lot, Internet bidders had scooped up 78 percent of the merchandise (808 lots) offered during the two-day event, with online purchases totaling $1,541,970, inclusive of buyer’s premium.

More than 100 bidders at the live sale vied for lot 878, Daniel Faraday’s leather-bound journal with extensive handwritten notes about time-travel experiments. This was a significant item within the storyline, as its contents were what convinced Eloise that Daniel was, indeed, her son from the future and that she must carry out his plan to detonate a hydrogen bomb. Estimated at $1,000-$1,500, the journal sold through LiveAuctioneers for $33,000.

The time-shifting frozen wheel made on the island by the mysterious Man in Black in an unknown early time period for the purpose of harnessing power was seen thoughout the last three seasons of LOST. It was entered in the sale with a $600-$800 estimate and went to a LiveAuctioneers bidder for $30,000.

Other iconic objects acquired by online participants included Desmond Hume’s fail-safe key with Joe Inman’s dog tag, embossed with the Dharma Initiative Swan logo, $13,200 against an estimate of $600-$800; and the Swan station hatch door bearing the cryptic numbers 4, 8, 15, 16, 23 and 42. With expectations of making $1,000-$1,500, the hatch door sold via the Internet for $19,200.

A 96-page final production script for the LOST pilot, signed by two of the show’s creators – J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof – sailed past its $300-$500 estimate to settle at $19,200 online. Another lot comprised of unique production materials was the selection of 140+ pieces of first-season production art from episodes 101-123. It included 50% hand-drawn and 50% photocopied drawings of sets, vehicles and shoot locations including such significant places as the beach plane crash site, the cave set, Sydney Airport (which was actually shot in Honolulu), and Jack’s infirmary cave. Estimated at $400-$600, the grouping of art was bought through LiveAuctioneers for $16,800.

“There was tremendous interest in this auction. The online page views and bidder sign-ups were nonstop in the run-up to the sale,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO Julian Ellison. “Pop culture memorabilia has never been stronger in the auction marketplace than it is now, and when you have a unique auction like this one, where the items are so iconic and have come from a TV series that was followed worldwide, you can be sure the estimates will be left in the dust. Our team at LiveAuctioneers was thrilled to join forces with Profiles in History and ABC Television in making this exciting event the success that it was.”

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View the fully illustrated catalog for Profiles in History’s Aug. 21-22 LOST: The Official Show Auction, complete with prices realized, online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Pilot script for LOST, signed by two of the show's three creators, J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof, $18,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Pilot script for LOST, signed by two of the show’s three creators, J.J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof, $18,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Lot comprised of 140+ pieces of production artwork from LOST episodes 101-123, $16,800 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Lot comprised of 140+ pieces of production artwork from LOST episodes 101-123, $16,800 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Swan station hatch door, $19,200 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Swan station hatch door, $19,200 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Desmond's fail-safe key with Joe Inman dog tag, $13,200 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Desmond’s fail-safe key with Joe Inman dog tag, $13,200 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Daniel Faraday's leather-bound journal containing hand-written notes about time travel, $33,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Daniel Faraday’s leather-bound journal containing hand-written notes about time travel, $33,000 to a LiveAuctioneers bidder. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive.

Rolf Scarlett, ‘Man-Abstracted,’ circa1955, oil on board, 28 inches by 22 inches.

Annual Woodstock Fine Art Auction benefit is Sept. 5

Rolf Scarlett, ‘Man-Abstracted,’ circa1955, oil on board, 28 inches by 22 inches.

Rolf Scarlett, ‘Man-Abstracted,’ circa1955, oil on board, 28 inches by 22 inches.

WOODSTOCK, N.Y. – Experienced auction goers, new collectors and the casually curious will be drawn to the eighth annual Woodstock Fine Art Auction on Sunday, Sept. 5, at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum. The auction, which will begin at 1 p.m. Eastern, is a popular source for quality fine art in the Northeast. The sale features an outstanding selection of regional works, as well as contemporary and historic pieces by internationally recognized artists.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Proceeds from the auction benefit WAAM, one of the oldest and most prestigious organizations of its kind. The James Cox Gallery in Woodstock is cosponsoring the auction.

Previews will begin Aug. 27 and run through auction day.

With over 270 lots in the $100 to $10,000 range, there will be exceptional values for those bidding for the first time and also for the seasoned bidder adding a new gem to an extensive collection.

James Cox, the event’s auctioneer said he knows “from past experience that a big plus for buyers is our policy of no reserves on 90 percent of our auction pieces. It’s an incredible opportunity for the frugal connoisseur.”

Josephine Bloodgood, executive director and museum curator of WAAM added that “the auction’s vetting committee is comprised of proven professionals including respected art dealers, a print expert, a top art appraiser, a museum director and knowledgeable collectors.” Buyers can be assured that the quality of the art offered has been professionally vetted, she said.

Lucile Blanch’s 1935 delightfully sly oil titled Runaway Clowns, a stunning nude by Bernard Karfiol, a bold Picasso-esque portrait by Rolph Scarlett and a major oil of the Colorado Rockies by Woodstock artist Ethel Magafan are some of the standouts in this year’s auction. Other significant pieces include works on paper by well-known artists Romare Bearden, Bernard Buffet, August Renoir, Marino Marini, Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Alice Neel, to name a few.

A special focus this year is the aesthetics of Urban Art. Angel Ortiz, known as LA II, collaborator with Keith Haring during the 1980s heyday of New York’s graffiti art scene, will be represented by several pieces of flat work as well as three-dimensional ceramics. Large form prints by Ernest Trova, Steven Pollack, Rick Pantell and Collette and collage by Richard Smith will add to the flavor of edgy urbanity.

Historically important Woodstock and Regional artists highlighted include: Lucille Blanch, Clarence Bolton, Bolton Brown, John Carroll, Konrad Cramer, Adolf Dehn, Albert Heckman, Robert Henri, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Fletcher Martin, Winold Reiss, Charles Rosen, Miron Sokole and Arnold Wiltz. Rare Woodstock publications such as the Hue & Cry, Plowshare, and Wild Hawk are also included.

The complete catalog and phone and absentee bid forms are available online at www.woodstockart.org and www.jamescoxgalley.com. The auction preview begins Aug. 27 and runs through auction day.

Details are available by e-mailing WAAM at info@woodstockart.org or calling 845-679-6940 or by e-mailing James Cox Gallery at info@jamescoxgallery.com or calling 845-679-7608.

The Woodstock Artists Association & Museum is located at 28 Tinker St. in Woodstock. The WAAM is a not-for-profit membership organization featuring a landmark collection of regional art, contemporary artist gallery and a dynamic education program.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Milton Green, ‘A Little Drink, Marilyn Monroe,’ lithograph, 107/300, 40 inches by 30 inches.

Milton Green, ‘A Little Drink, Marilyn Monroe,’ lithograph, 107/300, 40 inches by 30 inches.


John Streibel, ‘Summer at Fairfield,’ circa 1945, oil on board, 10 inches by 14 inches.

John Streibel, ‘Summer at Fairfield,’ circa 1945, oil on board, 10 inches by 14 inches.


LAII Ortiz, ‘Day-Glo Vase,’ circa 1985, Day-Glo paint and marker on ceramic, 11 inches high by 14 inches diameter.

LAII Ortiz, ‘Day-Glo Vase,’ circa 1985, Day-Glo paint and marker on ceramic, 11 inches high by 14 inches diameter.


Lucille Blanch, ‘Runaway Clowns,’ 1935, oil on canvas, 18 inches by 22 inches.

Lucille Blanch, ‘Runaway Clowns,’ 1935, oil on canvas, 18 inches by 22 inches.

Dec. 6, 1943 issue of Time magazine featured on its cover Major General Claire Lee Chennault, U.S.A.A.F, commander of 14th Air Force in China, together with a winged Burmese tiger. Fair use of copyrighted image used to illustrate this particular issue of Time magazine.

Expansion project begins at Chennault aviation museum

Dec. 6, 1943 issue of Time magazine featured on its cover Major General Claire Lee Chennault, U.S.A.A.F, commander of 14th Air Force in China, together with a winged Burmese tiger. Fair use of copyrighted image used to illustrate this particular issue of Time magazine.

Dec. 6, 1943 issue of Time magazine featured on its cover Major General Claire Lee Chennault, U.S.A.A.F, commander of 14th Air Force in China, together with a winged Burmese tiger. Fair use of copyrighted image used to illustrate this particular issue of Time magazine.

MONROE, La. (AP) – Louisiana’s Chennault Aviation and Military Museum in Monroe has begun what is expected to be the largest expansion project at the museum since its inception nearly a decade ago.

The News-Star reported on Sunday that for much of the past two years, the museum and its supporters have been working toward the construction of an aircraft restoration building at the museum.

With the groundbreaking this past week of the $175,000 building, museum and state officials said they are ready to refocus efforts to fund and build a $5.25 million project to construct a hangar at the museum to house historic aircraft used by Gen. Claire Chennault’s (1893-1958) Flying Tiger.

(The restoration building) is a very important step on taking us to the final phase of work on the hangar,” said Secretary of State Jay Dardenne, whose department oversees the museum. “The going may be slow, but it is going to happen.”

The hangar will be a two-story, 22,100-square-foot building built directly east of the existing museum that would share an expanded parking lot.

The large planes will be on a concrete floor, and the smaller aircraft will be suspended from the metal frames of the ceiling,” said Roy Johns, chairman of the museum’s Friends board. “The ceiling at its highest point will be 47 feet high.”

Besides a P-40 Warhawk on display, two of the aircraft have direct ties to Chennault.

A Beechcraft plane will be a replica of the one flown by Chennault, while a DC-3 will be refurbished to replicate those flown by “Hump” pilots over the Himalayas in Southeast Asia during World War II.

The hangar also will house a 100-seat movie theater, a library and four display areas dedicated to the Flying Tigers, hump pilots who flew transports over dangerous mountains, the 14th Air Force and Chinese memorabilia tied to the nation’s assistance to the Flying Tigers in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Johns, who has worked several years on the hangar concept, has lobbied state and federal officials for the funding.

It’s been real difficult,” Johns said. “We’ve had real good support from our local officials. But it’s going to take more time.”

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