Skinner to present property from Astors’ Beechwood, Oct. 1

Pair of Wedgwood solid blue jasper tea urns and covers, late 18th century, each with applied white foliate and floral designs, impressed marks, height 18 inches, est. $15,000-$25,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Pair of Wedgwood solid blue jasper tea urns and covers, late 18th century, each with applied white foliate and floral designs, impressed marks, height 18 inches, est. $15,000-$25,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Pair of Wedgwood solid blue jasper tea urns and covers, late 18th century, each with applied white foliate and floral designs, impressed marks, height 18 inches, est. $15,000-$25,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
BOSTON – Skinner Inc. will conduct an auction of European furniture and decorative arts on Saturday, Oct. 1,  in its Boston gallery. The sale, which begins at 6 p.m. Eastern, features several significant collections, as well as more than 500 lots of fine silver.

One such collection up for bid is that of Carita and Stuart Kadison, who began collecting Wedgwood in the late 1950s. Their early area of focus was Wedgwood and Bentley and the other fine wares of the 18th century. As time went by they also included Wedgwood majolica and amassed one of the finest collections of Wedgwood majolica in the country. Much of the collection is illustrated in Robin Reilly’s two-volume Wedgwood dictionary. The collection includes more than 230 lots and is highlighted by a pair of Wedgwood solid blue jasper tea urns from the late 18th century. The pair is estimated at $15,000 to $25,000.

From the Astors’ Beechwood mansion in Newport, R.I., comes nearly 100 lots of material from one of the most famous names in American social history. Originally owned by Mr. and Mrs. William B. Astor, the historically rich items offered in the sale reflect the level of detail and decoration Mrs. Astor looked for in decorating her “cottage.” One highlight of the collection is William Parsons Winchester Dana’s The U.S. Frigate Constitution Chased by an English Squadron, July 1812, purchased on the couple’s honeymoon trip. The painting is estimated at $20,000 to $40,000.

Fine Silver offerings, which represent just less than half the total offerings of the sale, include the extensive Sataloff Collection of Chinese export silver. Of note within this varied collection is a large gold-washed Chinese silver model of a scene at a gate. The work is estimated at $8,000-$12,000. Fine silver offerings from various consignors are highlighted by an impressive pair of Tiffany & Co. Renaissance Revival boat-shaped sterling fruit compotes estimated at $7,000-$9,000. The sale is also ripe with fine examples of furniture and decorative arts. Featured examples include a fine pair of early George III carved mahogany library armchairs, circa 1765, estimated at $15,000-$25,000, and a set of 10 Mintons pate-sur-pate decorated plates estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

Previews for the auction will be held on Thursday, Sept. 30, from noon to 8 p.m. and Friday, Oct. 1, from noon to 5:30 p.m. For details visit www.skinnerinc.com or call 508-970-3000.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


‘The U.S. Frigate Constitution Chased by an English Squadron, July 1812’ by William Parsons Winchester Dana (American, 1833-1927), unsigned, oil on canvas, sight size 43 inches x 84 inches, framed, est. $20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
‘The U.S. Frigate Constitution Chased by an English Squadron, July 1812’ by William Parsons Winchester Dana (American, 1833-1927), unsigned, oil on canvas, sight size 43 inches x 84 inches, framed, est. $20,000-$40,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Fine pair of early George III carved mahogany library armchairs, circa 1765, est. $15,000-$25,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Fine pair of early George III carved mahogany library armchairs, circa 1765, est. $15,000-$25,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Set of 10 Mintons plates, England, 1923, cream ground with rim with Classical Revival gilt decoration, each with three blue ground pate-sur-pate roundels depicting the busts of gods or goddesses, diameter 10 1/4 inches, est. $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Set of 10 Mintons plates, England, 1923, cream ground with rim with Classical Revival gilt decoration, each with three blue ground pate-sur-pate roundels depicting the busts of gods or goddesses, diameter 10 1/4 inches, est. $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Luminous pearls light up the jewelry market

These antique platinum brooches are set two large pearls, each over 9 mm, surrounded by diamonds. The dazzling pair sold in Skinner’s Sept. 14 Fine Jewelry sale for $13,035. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

These antique platinum brooches are set two large pearls, each over 9 mm, surrounded by diamonds. The dazzling pair sold in Skinner’s Sept. 14 Fine Jewelry sale for $13,035. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
These antique platinum brooches are set two large pearls, each over 9 mm, surrounded by diamonds. The dazzling pair sold in Skinner’s Sept. 14 Fine Jewelry sale for $13,035. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Lustrous in appearance and smooth to the touch, pearls top collectors’ wish lists because they are perfect for any occasion. Gloria Lieberman, head of Skinner’s jewelry department, sums it up: “Pearls are always correct. When you don’t know what to put on, you put on pearls.”

Pearls transcend politics as well. Both Michelle Obama and Cindy McCain wore pearls when they accompanied their husbands on the 2008 campaign trail. In the past two years, Mrs. Obama has made them a favorite fashion accessory in the first lady’s wardrobe.

Over 500 years ago, pearls were an important part of the treasure found in the Americas by the first explorers. Christopher Columbus discovered an abundant source off the coast of Venezuela in 1498.

From England to Russia, European royalty had a voracious appetite for the seaborne gems. News of an American pearl supply was greeted with enthusiasm back home, in part because it freed jewelers from their previous dependence on imports from Asia.

The most famous American pearls received special titles. “La Peregrina” – discovered off the coast of Panama or Venezuela in the mid-1500s – ended up in the Spanish royal treasury. A suitable match was found and the two pearls were made into earrings for the queen.

This tale is only one of the fascinating historical vignettes related in Tiffany Pearls (Abrams 2006), an excellent reference by John Loring, now design director emeritus of the famous jewelry firm. One illustration is the famous circa 1588 portrait of Elizabeth I of England. Large pearls outline her famous red hair, decorate the royal robes, and hang in multiple ropes around her neck.

In an interview before his retirement, Loring said, “When people see those historic portraits in museums of women covered with pearls, they think they are Oriental pearls, but they’re not – they’re American. Pearls enjoyed enormous popularity with painters because they were really the only gem that a painter could render accurately.”

He continued, “Pearls through much of their history were more highly prized than diamonds, so people took remarkable care of them. Queen Elizabeth II still wears some of the Hanoverian pearls from time to time. The Pope gave them to Catherine de’ Medici when she married the Dauphin who became Henry II, and she then gave them to Mary Queen of Scotts, who sold them to Elizabeth I.”

Leslie Field devotes an entire chapter to England’s royal pearls in her 1987 book on The Queen’s Jewels: The Personal Collection of Elizabeth II. The young Princess Elizabeth wore a pearl necklace – a gift from her father King George VI – when she married Prince Philip in 1947. The monarch has continued to favor pearl jewelry throughout her long reign.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, American women were particularly fond of jewelry set with hundreds of tiny seed pearls. The Peabody family pearls, now in the Peabody Essex Museum in Massachusetts, include a floral necklace, earrings, and multiple brooches made in 1845.

In an 1861 photograph by Matthew Brady, Mary Todd Lincoln is wearing a set of seed pearl jewelry purchased by Abraham Lincoln from Tiffany’s. This image and many others appear in the pearl chapter of Martha Gandy Fales’s definitive reference Jewelry in America, 1600-1900.

“Pearls traditionally were associated with purity and love,” she writes, and then continues, “Sets of seed-pearl jewelry, imported from England or made in America, became fashionable as wedding gifts to brides.”

This country’s fascination with pearls continued into the 20th century. Certainly no grand dame’s outfit was complete without waist-length strands of natural pearls. In 1902, Tiffany sold oil and railroad magnate Henry Morrison Flagler a notable pearl necklace for the then unheard-of price of $2 million, about $40 million in today’s dollars.

Pearls changing hands still make headlines. Designer Calvin Klein purchased pearls for his wife, Kelly, at the 1987 sale of jewels owned by the Duchess of Windsor. Twenty years later the Klein pearl collection sold at Sotheby’s New York for almost $5 million.

The pearls of Anna Thomson Dodge, who married into the auto family, were sold at Bonham’s in December 2008 for $600,000. Created by Cartier circa 1920, the three-strand necklace was composed of 224 pearls.

In March of this year, Skinner’s sold a double strand necklace of 154 semi-baroque pearls with a diamond clasp for $88,875 and a single strand for $71,100. Gloria Lieberman pointed out, “We had some very pretty natural pearls from old families, and the market is very heated for those things. Anything that’s a natural pearl just flies. The value depends on the quality, the size and the luster – how beautiful they are, how they reflect light. A beautiful natural pearl reflects light differently; it has a lot of depth.”

She continued, “One of the things we shouldn’t forget, in the first decades of the 20th century, we begin to see some wonderful cultured pearls. We just had a double strand in a sale we sent off to GIA [Gemological Institute of America] to have them tested to see if they were natural or not, we couldn’t tell. They were really that lovely.”

The perfection of the cultured pearl process is often credited to Japanese entrepreneur Kokochi Mikimoto. Pearls are created when the oyster coats a foreign irritant with layers of lustrous nacre. Pearl production can be encouraged by introducing irritants into the oyster’s insides. Lieberman added, “And of course the longer they left the pearls in the oyster, the thicker the nacre and the more lustrous the pearl.”

Whether natural or cultured, pearl quality and size determine the value. Lieberman says, “We see a lot of natural pearls that are small graduated strands from 3 mm to 7 mm. Once you get into a 4 mm to 9 mm, the price jumps.”

Lieberman has no trouble picking a favorite pearl lot in past auctions. In March 2000, Skinner sold a late 19th-century Tiffany brooch for $60,500 with buyer’s premium. The piece was designed by one of the firm’s most famous artists, Paulding Farnham, who enjoyed mixing pearls and gems of various shades.

“The brooch was made in the Indian style, very maharajah looking. There was a hot pink sapphire in the center, and it had natural colored pearls in different shades and colored diamonds. Paulding designed using nature’s palette,” she said.

Although Tiffany had many of the designer’s drawings for jewelry, the whereabouts of this particular brooch were unknown until it surfaced in the Skinner sale. Tiffany purchased the rediscovered work, and it appeared as the back cover image on the reference Paulding Farnham: Tiffany’s Lost Genius by John Loring (2000).


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Found in varying shades of pink, conch pearls are formed naturally in the shell of the queen conch, which is found in the Florida Keys and Bahamas. A necklace, featuring 19 graduated conch pearls spaced with diamonds, sold in March for $51,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Found in varying shades of pink, conch pearls are formed naturally in the shell of the queen conch, which is found in the Florida Keys and Bahamas. A necklace, featuring 19 graduated conch pearls spaced with diamonds, sold in March for $51,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Designed by Salvador Dali and executed by jeweler Henry Kaston, this 18-karat gold 'Lips' brooch sold for $13,035 earlier this year. Noting that poets dream about ruby lips and teeth like pearls, Dali turned the fantasy into reality. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Designed by Salvador Dali and executed by jeweler Henry Kaston, this 18-karat gold ‘Lips’ brooch sold for $13,035 earlier this year. Noting that poets dream about ruby lips and teeth like pearls, Dali turned the fantasy into reality. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
This antique double-strand natural pearl necklace with diamond clasp came from noted jeweler Black, Starr & Frost and sold in March for $88,875. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
This antique double-strand natural pearl necklace with diamond clasp came from noted jeweler Black, Starr & Frost and sold in March for $88,875. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
American Arts & Crafts metalworker Edward Oakes often used pearls in his jewelry designs. This gold cross by set with vivid green tourmalines and pearls brought a strong $34,075 in 2007. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
American Arts & Crafts metalworker Edward Oakes often used pearls in his jewelry designs. This gold cross by set with vivid green tourmalines and pearls brought a strong $34,075 in 2007. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Once known only from the artist’s drawings, this Tiffany brooch designed by Paulding Farnham in the late 19th century is set with colored pearls and gemstones. Skinner sold the work back to the Tiffany archives in 2000 for $63,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Once known only from the artist’s drawings, this Tiffany brooch designed by Paulding Farnham in the late 19th century is set with colored pearls and gemstones. Skinner sold the work back to the Tiffany archives in 2000 for $63,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Rosseau, Wyeth paintings were on point at Brunk sale, Sept. 11-12

This Rosseau painting, ‘End of a Perfect day, Allen’s Flag and Queen, 1923,’ was acquired by Samuel Allen directly from the artist. It brought $75,000, topping the high side of its $40,000/$60,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

This Rosseau painting, ‘End of a Perfect day, Allen’s Flag and Queen, 1923,’ was acquired by Samuel Allen directly from the artist. It brought $75,000, topping the high side of its $40,000/$60,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
This Rosseau painting, ‘End of a Perfect day, Allen’s Flag and Queen, 1923,’ was acquired by Samuel Allen directly from the artist. It brought $75,000, topping the high side of its $40,000/$60,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
ASHEVILLE, N.C. – “It is more difficult to paint dogs than men,” said Percival Leonard Rosseau (American, 1859-1937). His hard work with nervous hunting dogs paid off Sept. 11-12 at Brunk Auctions.

The first hunting dog painting by Rosseau was A Tripple Point: Bob, Prince and Ned 1924. The oil on canvas featured two dogs, Bob and Ned, that were favorites of railroad industrialist Samuel G. Allen, Rosseau’s benefactor and quail hunting partner. Signed lower right, the painting opened at its $35,000 reserve and sold within estimate to a phone bidder for $46,000 (all selling prices include a 15 percent buyer’s premium).

A few moments later, Rosseau’s End of a Perfect Day, Allen’s Flag and Queen, 1923 did even better. The signed oil on canvas opened at its $40,000 reserve and sold within estimate for $75,000.

The dog in A.B. Frost’s watercolor Summer Woodcock was unnamed, but that detail did not keep bidders from this remarkable painting. Scribners used this original watercolor for its series Shooting Pictures published in 1895. The 14” X 22” watercolor opened at $12,000 and sold to the phones for $55,200. A.B. Frost was noted for his illustrations for authors Joel Chandler Harris and Lewis Carroll and for Life magazine.

The star of the two-day auction emerged four lots later. Unlike Percival Rosseau, Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) had no trouble painting men or women. Two of his lifelong friends, Milton Teel and Maine fisherman Walt Anderson posed for Shore Pine, his 1939 watercolor over pencil on paper. The painting was a gift to the consignor in 1955 and has been in a private collection ever since. The $60,000 opening bid was followed by vigorous telephone, absentee, Internet and floor bidding. Shore Pine sold for $117,300 (est. $60,000/$90,000).

Southern furniture was especially plentiful at the September sale and finished strong. Two full pages in the 336-page catalog were devoted to a very fine Southern desk and bookcase from Charleston, S.C., in the late 18th century. The 70 1/2” X 43 1/4” X 23 1/4” desk bookcase was distinguished by its elaborate inlay and highly figured mahogany veneers. Its feet were fully inlaid, a rarity in extant 18th century Charleston case goods. The desk bookcase opened at its $50,000 reserve and sold within estimate for $86,250. The consignor, York Place, a residential treatment facility for children and adolescents in York, S.C., was founded as an orphanage in Charleston in 1850. The proceeds from the sale of the desk/bookcase will help the nonprofit continue to serve young people in need of psychiatric hospitalization.

Inlays were delicate and elaborate on a single-case construction corner cupboard attributed to Shenandoah County, Va., 1800-1820. Its broken-arch pediment, tympanum, paneled doors, pilasters and skirt were all inlaid. The 93 1/2” X 51” X 23 1/4“walnut and yellow pine cupboard had descended in the Scott family of Virginia and was photographed for Antiques, The Magazine in 1954. The cupboard opened quickly at its $10,000 reserve. It sold to a Southern collector in the gallery for $35,650 (est. $15,000/$25,000).

In the top section of a walnut chest attributed to Rowan County, N.C., are two short drawers and one single deep drawer with false double front. Two long drawers were below. The 1800-1820 chest rested on a frame with shaped skirt, cabriole legs and trefid feet. It opened at $5000 and sold for $19,550 (est. $5000/$10,000).

It was hard to overlook the Herter Brothers inlaid cabinet from the 1870s. At 87 1/4” wide, it commanded the back left of the auction gallery. With original gilt and ebonized surface, a painted and gilt classical figure in the cabinet doors, pierced skirt, boldly carved paw feet and an impressed “Herter Bro’s” signature, the cabinet opened at its $12,000 reserve. Its selling price of $69,000 more than doubled the high estimate.

“European furniture has been particularly strong of late,” said Auctioneer Robert Brunk. The best example of that trend was an 18th century Continental Baroque secretary, believed to be Italian. In heavily figured walnut, burlwood and other fruitwood veneers with a single arched and glazed door in the upper case and three serpentine drawers below, it opened at a modest $1000. But it’s how they finish that counts and that was $18,400 (est. $2000/$4000).

In 2003, an 18th-century table with a micro-mosaic top by Giacomo Raffaelli (1753-1836) sold at Brunk Auctions for a record $400,000. At the September sale, Brunk offered another Raffaelli, a micro-mosaic bird in a tree. “It was an exceptional object,” said Robert Brunk. Signed, dated (1793) and inscribed, the tiny (2-5/8” diameter) framed bird opened at $2000 and sold for $10,350 (est. $3000/$6000).

For the past two years, some of the seemingly lesser Chinese and Japanese lots have attracted bidders willing to pay prices that are far above expectations. Two cases in the September sale validated that trend. A Chinese 48” X 27” textile panel from the 18th or 19th century with an estimate of $400-$800 sold for $9200. The panel was one of 12 Chinese items consigned by the estate of Florence Ueltzen of Fort Mill, S.C., Ueltzen was the owner of Fu-Ming-Fair, a Camp Hill, Pa, retail shop. An 11 1/2” Yuhuchunping cobalt blue porcelain vase from the Chinese, Guangxu period (1875-1908) that was expected to bring $2000/$4000 sold for $25,300.

The two-day, 1473-lot sale grossed $2.33 million including buyer’s premium. For more information, visit www.brunkauctions.com or call 828-254-6846.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Standing 70 1/2 inches and 43 1/4 inches deep, this massive late 18th century Charleston desk and bookcase was recently conserved by David Beckford of Charleston, S.C.  In highly figured mahogany veneers and elaborate inlays, this important piece of Southern furniture sold for $86,250 (est. $60,000/$90,000). Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
Standing 70 1/2 inches and 43 1/4 inches deep, this massive late 18th century Charleston desk and bookcase was recently conserved by David Beckford of Charleston, S.C. In highly figured mahogany veneers and elaborate inlays, this important piece of Southern furniture sold for $86,250 (est. $60,000/$90,000). Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
From a private collection in Tryon, N.C., this 86 1/2-inch X 34 1/2-inch X 22-inch two-part Continental secretary surprised many when it sold for $18,400, over four times its high estimate. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
From a private collection in Tryon, N.C., this 86 1/2-inch X 34 1/2-inch X 22-inch two-part Continental secretary surprised many when it sold for $18,400, over four times its high estimate. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
‘An exceptional object,’ was how Robert Brunk described this tiny micro-mosaic bird in a tree by noted Italian mosaicist Giacomo Raffaelli. It sold for $10,350 (est. $3000/$6000). Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
‘An exceptional object,’ was how Robert Brunk described this tiny micro-mosaic bird in a tree by noted Italian mosaicist Giacomo Raffaelli. It sold for $10,350 (est. $3000/$6000). Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
On the base of this 11 1/2-inch cobalt blue glazed Chinese vase that brought $23,300, is a six-character Guangxu mark. This vase brought $25,300. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
On the base of this 11 1/2-inch cobalt blue glazed Chinese vase that brought $23,300, is a six-character Guangxu mark. This vase brought $25,300. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
One of the last items in the two-day sale, this 48-inch X 27-inch textile panel demanded near universal attention when it rose from a $300 opening bid to $9200. Note the pair of mandarin ducks swimming among lotus blossoms and the honeycomb border. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.
One of the last items in the two-day sale, this 48-inch X 27-inch textile panel demanded near universal attention when it rose from a $300 opening bid to $9200. Note the pair of mandarin ducks swimming among lotus blossoms and the honeycomb border. Image courtesy of Brunk Auctions.

LiveAuctioneers.com to award year of free services in auction-house drawing

NEW YORK – To celebrate its anticipated one-thousandth auction-house client, Internet live-bidding services provider LiveAuctioneers.com has announced details of a month-long promotion that will culminate with the awarding of a grand prize package valued at no less than $16,000.

With 990 auction houses currently on its roster, the Manhattan-based company expects to record its 1,000th auction-house sign-up sometime during the month of October.

“Because it is such a significant milestone for us, we’ve organized a fantastic prize for one of the auction houses that signs up with us between now and October 31st,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO Julian R. Ellison. “All October sign-ups will be entered in a drawing to be held on November 1st at our corporate offices. The winner will receive a full year of unlimited Internet live bidding services at the platinum-plus level, as well as several other premium-level bonus gifts.”

The additional gifts include a custom-created iPhone app from LiveAuctioneers App Technologies, and a custom-designed LiveAuctioneers White Label platform, which enables an auction house to integrate its LiveAuctioneers catalog and Internet live bidding into its own Web site, branded under its own company name. “Factoring in an average usage of LiveAuctioneers’ services at four to five times during a calendar year, the total prize package tops $16,000 in value,” said Ellison.

Ellison explained that there is no limit to the number of auctions the winner will be allowed to conduct through LiveAuctioneers during the one-year period from Nov. 1, 2010 through Oct. 31, 2011. “And at the platinum-plus level, the winner will have access to every imaginable feature and service available through LiveAuctioneers,” said Ellison, “from the creation of an electronic catalog, online ads and editorial support to bidder-console training, audio/video and postsale statistical reports.” (See full list of features online at https://www.liveauctioneers.com/pages/sell)

In order to be entered in the drawing, auction houses must be licensed (if required in their state) and in the business of selling antiques, fine or decorative art, or vintage collectibles. The winner must agree to a two-year commitment, with the first year being free. There is no set number of auctions that the winner would be required to conduct during the second year of the commitment. The winning auction house is responsible for ensuring it has sufficient technology in place to support Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.

The drawing is open to both new customers and returning auction houses who are not currently using LiveAuctioneers for their Internet live bidding. LiveAuctioneers does not require exclusivity of its customers and places no restrictions on auctioneers who may wish to use other Internet live-bidding companies in addition to LiveAuctioneers.

For additional information regarding the drawing, call LiveAuctioneers.com tollfree at 888-600-2437 or e-mail sales@LiveAuctioneers.com. Visit LiveAuctioneers online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com

About LiveAuctioneers.com:

Founded in November 2002, LiveAuctioneers.com provides real-time Internet bidding capability to 990 auction houses worldwide. LiveAuctioneers.com has opened up once-exclusive antiques and fine art sales to the cyber community through online publication of auction catalogs, and Internet live bidding. For further information, log on to www.liveauctioneers.com.

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Gray’s Auctioneers to lead with furniture, decorations Sept. 30

Carved animals and stylized foliage cover this Gothic Revival carved oak cabinet on chest, which was made in the early 1900s. It is 100 inches high, 56 inches wide and 23 inches deep. It has a $1,000-$1,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Carved animals and stylized foliage cover this Gothic Revival carved oak cabinet on chest, which was made in the early 1900s. It is 100 inches high, 56 inches wide and 23 inches deep. It has a $1,000-$1,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Carved animals and stylized foliage cover this Gothic Revival carved oak cabinet on chest, which was made in the early 1900s. It is 100 inches high, 56 inches wide and 23 inches deep. It has a $1,000-$1,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.

CLEVELAND – Gray’s Auctioneers will conduct its Fine Furniture and Decorations Auction on Thursday, Sept. 30 beginning at 1 p.m. Eastern. The auction features 276 lots with a concentration of English and American furniture produced in the 19th and early 20th centuries. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

The sale will open with a stunning and rare Gothic Revival carved oak cabinet on chest. With carved animals and stylized foliage throughout, it features two sets of turned columns and beautifully carved animal motifs on two panel doors. This lot is estimated conservatively at $1,000-$1,500. Other furniture of particular interest include four finely carved mid-20th century pieces by Fundacao that include an Empire-style rosewood and gilt bronze writing table and a pair of Louis XVI-style mahogany marble-top and gilt bronze mounted console tables.

Outstanding among the decorative arts is lot no. 100, an extraordinary Rococo Revival bronze wall-mounted fountain. A beautiful blue-green patina enhances the stylized dolphin, shell and frog motif. It is estimated at $3,000-$5,000.

Among the finest of the rugs to be auctioned is lot no. 205, an early 20th-century wool Farahan Sarouk. Its overall floral pattern is complemented by mounted and standing figures woven in deep reds and soft blues.

Adding a touch of delicacy to the auction is lot no. 103, a striking pair of Continental carved ivory figures dressed in 17th-century fashion.

As Gray’s Auctioneers enters its fourth year, owner Deba Gray anticipates that the fall season will be an exciting one for auctions in general. Fine Furniture and Decorations is Gray’s 37th auction.

Auctions are held live monthly in Gray’s auction showrooms in Cleveland.

For details visit www.graysauctioneers.com or call 215-458-7695.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Made in the 20th century, this Empire-style rosewood and gilt bronze writing table is stamped ‘FUNDACAO, R.E.S.S. and has a $2,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Made in the 20th century, this Empire-style rosewood and gilt bronze writing table is stamped ‘FUNDACAO, R.E.S.S. and has a $2,000-$4,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Designed to mount to a wall, this Rococo Revival bronze fountain is 25 inches high, 34 inches wide and 13 3/4 inches deep. It has a $3,000-$5,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Designed to mount to a wall, this Rococo Revival bronze fountain is 25 inches high, 34 inches wide and 13 3/4 inches deep. It has a $3,000-$5,000 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Dressed in 17th-century fashion is a pair of Continental carved ivory figures that date to the 18th or 19 century. The 7-inch-tall figures have a $1,500-$2,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Dressed in 17th-century fashion is a pair of Continental carved ivory figures that date to the 18th or 19 century. The 7-inch-tall figures have a $1,500-$2,500 estimate. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.

Art show by Stones’ Ronnie Wood opens in Ohio

Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Rolling Stones, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48 by 72 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Rolling Stones, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48 by 72 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Rolling Stones, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 48 by 72 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (AP) – Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood says he’s pleased to see his art on the walls of an Ohio gallery instead of in his crowded studio.

Wood says there, his paintings, pen and pencil drawings and mixed media drawings look “like postage stamps” compared to the display that opened Tuesday at the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown.

The Butler says the exhibition running through Nov. 21 is the first for Wood at a major American museum.

The Vindicator of Youngstown reports the show is dominated by celebrity portraits, including those of Stones band mates Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts.

The opening drew Stones’ fans such as Lena Natale, who said she drove four hours from Gettysburg, Pa., listening to the band’s music all the way.

___

Information from: The Vindicator, http://www.vindy.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-09-22-10 0858EDT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Ali with Stick, 2001, oil on canvas, 48 by 36 inches. Private collection. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Ali with Stick, 2001, oil on canvas, 48 by 36 inches. Private collection. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood signs a completed painting. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood signs a completed painting. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Study of Mick, 2003, oil on canvas, 16 by 12 inches. Private collection. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Study of Mick, 2003, oil on canvas, 16 by 12 inches. Private collection. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Rhino, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 107.25 by 72 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ronnie Wood (British, b. 1947-), Rhino, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 107.25 by 72 inches. Image courtesy of the artist.
Rolling Stones guitarist and painter Ronnie Wood at work in his studio. Image courtesy of the artist.
Rolling Stones guitarist and painter Ronnie Wood at work in his studio. Image courtesy of the artist.

Terre Haute Children’s Museum reaches $5.6M fundraising goal

Artist's rendering of the new Terre Haute Children's Museum to be located at 8th and Wabash Avenue in Terre Haute, Indiana. Image courtesy of the museum.
Artist's rendering of the new Terre Haute Children's Museum to be located at 8th and Wabash Avenue in Terre Haute, Indiana. Image courtesy of the museum.
Artist’s rendering of the new Terre Haute Children’s Museum to be located at 8th and Wabash Avenue in Terre Haute, Indiana. Image courtesy of the museum.

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) – Leaders of the Terre Haute Children’s Museum say it has reached its $5.6 million fundraising goal ahead of activities this weekend opening its new building.

Museum officials on Tuesday celebrated reaching the mark with a $150,000 donation from the Fleshner, Stark, Tanoos and Newlin law firm.

Museum board chairman John Thompson told WTHI-TV that organizers had been working toward the fundraising goal for seven years and hoped to continue building up the museum’s endowment fund.

Thompson says a larger endowment will help bring in new exhibits and continue outreach programs.

Several activities are planned starting Friday as the museum moves into a 26,000 square-foot building that is nearly nine times bigger than the old museum that was closed last month.

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Information from: WTHI-TV, http://www.wthitv.com/

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-09-22-10 0804EDT

 

 

Oregon meteorite generating interest

The largest meteorite ever found in the United States is the 32,000-lb. Willamette Meteorite, which was discovered in Willamette, Oregon. It is shown here on display at the American Museum of Natural History. Photo taken in 2005 by Dante Alighieri, licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation/Creative Commons Non-Commercial ShareAlike 2.0 License.
The largest meteorite ever found in the United States is the 32,000-lb. Willamette Meteorite, which was discovered in Willamette, Oregon. It is shown here on display at the American Museum of Natural History. Photo taken in 2005 by Dante Alighieri, licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation/Creative Commons Non-Commercial ShareAlike 2.0 License.
The largest meteorite ever found in the United States is the 32,000-lb. Willamette Meteorite, which was discovered in Willamette, Oregon. It is shown here on display at the American Museum of Natural History. Photo taken in 2005 by Dante Alighieri, licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation/Creative Commons Non-Commercial ShareAlike 2.0 License.

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – It rattled around in an old Folgers can for 30 years in Paul Albertson’s Lakeview garage before he found out what it really was – an interplanetary space traveler.

Now the thumb-size Fitzwater Pass meteorite that he picked up in 1976 while hunting for agates and jasper is generating interest from scientists worldwide.

Only the sixth meteorite found in Oregon and the second discovered east of the Oregon Cascades, it’s “a small, iron meteorite, and it’s one of the rare types of iron,” said Dick Pugh, a scientist with the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory at Portland State University.

Chemical analysis has determined that the 63.6 gram (about 2 ounces) space rock belongs to the IIIF iron meteorite group, which includes only eight other recognized meteorites across the globe, said Lyn Craig of Fossil, executive director of the nonprofit Libraries of Eastern Oregon. The libraries, with funding help from NASA, have sponsored Pugh to speak to more than four dozen public libraries in 15 eastern Oregon counties over the past year or two.

Albertson, 58, a retired postal worker, got his first fateful glimpse of the burned and cratered little meteorite while rock hunting 20 miles southwest of Lakeview in the Fitzwater Pass area. He remembers that it first appeared to be part of a broken axle from a frontier-era wagon.

When I picked it up, I thought it was a piece of a wagon hub,” he said. “There used to be a wagon trail in that area.”

Albertson took it to a local rock shop and was told it was worthless nickel ore. He tossed it into a coffee can, where it remained with some arrowheads, fossils and pottery shards for the next three decades.

He got an inkling that it might be something more when he attended a lecture on meteorites by Pugh at the Lake County Public Library in 2006. After Pugh had a long look at it, Albertson agreed to provide a slice of less than an ounce to PSU. It was carefully scrutinized by Alex Ruzicka and Melinda Hutson of the meteorite laboratory and Stephen Kissin of Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

They ruled it was indeed a meteorite, and an uncommon one at that.

The delayed discovery is attracting a lot of attention to the rugged high desert and mountains where Albertson found the rock.

We’re looking for more pieces associated with Fitzwater Pass,” Pugh said in a statement. “We don’t know for sure whether this is a single or multiple meteorite fall. There is no way of knowing unless other pieces are found.”

He won’t release a photo of the Fitzwater Pass meteorite until Monday, when a news conference is scheduled at the Lakeview library to unveil the find. Pugh believes other Oregonians probably have unknowingly picked up meteorite chunks and they’re even now languishing “on shelves, in basements, barns and workshops” around the state.

I hope to flush out more in the years to come,” he said.

Earlier this year, another hunk of space rock was officially recognized as the Morrow County meteorite _ also after making its way to Pugh and the meteorite lab when its owner got curious about its origins. It, too, had been found years earlier, but was stashed in a rock garden and then under a barbecue on a deck in Washington state.

The thing about meteorites, Craig said, is they’re rare and not-so-rare at the same time. Some scientists believe at least one meteorite could be found in every square mile in eastern Oregon, she said.

Moreover, there’s money in meteorites.

A 2007 New York City auction dedicated to meteorites attracted buyers from across the United States, Europe and Australia who spent a total of $750,000. A 219-pound piece of space rock found in Siberia and described in the auction catalog as “sexy” brought $122,750, and a mailbox from Georgia that was hit by a meteorite in 1984 commanded $82,750.

“I’m not interested in selling it, even if I could get a million dollars for it,” Albertson said of his meteorite. He wants to keep what’s left of it, about 44.2 grams, intact. “It needs to stay in Lakeview as an attraction for the community,” he said.

Meanwhile, Albertson has been out looking for more meteorites and thinks he’s got some good leads.

I have people telling me about these big fireballs in the sky,” he said. “You have got to listen to that stuff … I’m always looking. Everybody should be looking.”

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Information from: The Oregonian, http://www.oregonlive.com

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-09-22-10 0400EDT

 

Discovery of tomb halts construction in Albania

DURRES, Albania (AP) – A redevelopment project in this Albanian town has been halted after construction work discovered a 6th-century tomb.

The find is of minimal archaeological importance. But officials hail the delay as a landmark decision in this impoverished Balkan country, where rampant construction often obliterates cultural heritage.

Vangjel Stamo of Albania’s archaeological service says recent development in Durres – which is 3,000 year old – has “damaged so much of the archaeology.”

Archaeologists plan a shelter over the tomb, which contained bones, and will dig around it in hope of finding an entire cemetery.

Work will then proceed to build a municipal shopping complex and coffee bar.

Durres is 20 miles (33 kilometers) from the capital, Tirana.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-09-22-10 0853EDT