‘Christmas miracle:’ Chalice stolen 22 years ago returned to priest

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) – The Rev. Jerry Bruggeman of Colorado Springs wept when he saw his golden chalice this month for the first time in 22 years.

Bruggeman was given the chalice, engraved with his name, on the day of his ordination in 1949. He used it for 40 years during the Eucharist until it was stolen from a cabinet of chalices at Corpus Christi Catholic Church on North Cascade Avenue.

The chalice was returned to him this month, and after some refurbishing, it looks nearly as good as new.

“Miracles still happen,” Bruggeman, 87, said.

It is customary for priests to receive a Eucharist chalice on the day of their ordination. The gift can be as special to them as wedding rings are to married couples.

Bruggeman’s family funded the chalice, which is gold-plated silver with a strip of black onyx. On the bottom is engraved a blessing to Bruggeman’s family that ends with, “Rev. Gerald Bruggeman, Ordained May 26, 1949.”

In 1988, someone broke into the church through a side door and stole the chalice, the only item taken, Bruggeman said.

Over the years, Bruggeman has had nightmares about the chalice being melted down for its silver.

Bruggeman retired as priest of Corpus Christi in 1994. Since then he’s celebrated the Eucharist as a guest at various Catholic churches. He also volunteers two days a week at Penrose Hospital, where he blesses and anoints patients and conducts Mass on Sundays.

The events leading to the return of the chalice began Nov. 30, when Larry Resel of Las Animas walked into Prairie Junction antique store in Fowler and bought a chalice for $12.

The store owner told him it had a curious past. A couple in 1997 apparently were hiking in the Manitou Springs hills after attending their son’s wedding and reception, he was told, and noticed a sliver of gold protruding from the ground.

It was the chalice.

The couple displayed the chalice at their home and business for years, Resel was told. That was all that was known.

Resel bought the chalice with the intention of reselling it on eBay. He makes extra money buying Catholic items and auctioning them online.

But the chalice never went up for sale. A couple days later, his mother, Nona Resel, noticed the engraving on the bottom. They decided to try to return the chalice to Bruggeman.

A Google search and a few phone calls led them to the priest. After speaking by phone with Bruggeman, Larry Resel boxed the chalice and shipped it to Bruggeman’s home. Bruggeman couldn’t bring himself to open the package for 10 minutes, he said. When he did, a flood of emotions erupted.

“I always held out hope that someday it would be returned,” he said.

The chalice has also been reunited with its original chalice case, which Bruggeman kept in a closet.

For the past two Sundays, Bruggeman has been arriving at Penrose Hospital to conduct Mass carrying his 61-year-old black chalice case with the chalice inside.

Resel, a Roman Catholic, is overjoyed the chalice is back to its rightful owner.

“It’s amazing it worked its way back to him during the Advent season,” he said.

“This is a Christmas miracle.”

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-12-25-10 0300EST

 

 

 

Financier and philanthropist Roy Neuberger receiving the National Medal of Arts from President George W. Bush in 2007. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

In Memoriam: modern art collector Roy Neuberger, 107

Financier and philanthropist Roy Neuberger receiving the National Medal of Arts from President George W. Bush in 2007. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Financier and philanthropist Roy Neuberger receiving the National Medal of Arts from President George W. Bush in 2007. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NEW YORK (AP) – Roy R. Neuberger, a Wall Street investor who became one of the nation’s top modern art collectors, has died. He was 107.

Neuberger died Friday at his home in Manhattan’s Pierre Hotel, said Rich Chimberg, a spokesman for the Neuberger Berman firm.

Neuberger had survived Wall Street’s three major crises with enough money to build one of the largest private collections of major contemporary masterpieces.

He acquired hundreds of paintings and sculptures by such artists as Milton Avery, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe and others. But he never sold any work by a living artist, believing collectors should buy contemporary art and keep it, while giving the public access.

The works are now scattered at 70 institutions in 24 states – many at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, north of New York City.

At a White House ceremony in 2007, President George W. Bush presented him with a National Medal of Arts.

Neuberger was a consummate New Yorker, living in the city for a century after moving from his native Bridgeport, Conn.

He finished high school but dropped out of college to work for the department store B. Altman & Co. as an upholstery fabric buyer. During his two years there, he developed a taste for both art and business.

To get closer to the European scene he knew from books, Neuberger moved to Paris in 1924 on money inherited from his father. That’s where he decided to start collecting.

In his 1997 autobiography, So Far, So Good: The First 94 Years, he said that “to do so, I had to have capital of considerably more than the inheritance that gave me an annual income of about $2,000. … So I decided to go back to work in earnest.”

He got to Wall Street in the spring of 1929, as a runner for the brokerage firm Halle & Stieglitz.

Betting that the stock market might fall, Neuberger sold short on shares of the most popular stock then, Radio Corp. of America, and came out of the stock market crash losing only 15 percent of his money.

After becoming a stockbroker in 1930, he started his own firm with a partner, surviving the crash of 1987.

In 1996, “the Dow Jones industrial average had climbed to 5,704 and (his wife) Marie and I had had 64 wonderful years together,” he wrote. She died in 1997.

Neuberger published a second memoir, The Passionate Collector, in 2003.

He is survived by his daughter, Ann Neuberger Aceves; sons Roy S. Neuberger and James A. Neuberger; eight grandchildren; and 30 great-grandchildren.

A funeral was planned for Sunday at Manhattan’s Riverside Memorial Chapel.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WS-12-25-10 1541EST

 

Attributed to Samuel Robb, this early cigar store Indian is reported to have been stored in a warehouse for 100 years. Estimate: $25,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Early cigar store Indian to light up Four Seasons auction Jan. 1

Attributed to Samuel Robb, this early cigar store Indian is reported to have been stored in a warehouse for 100 years. Estimate: $25,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Attributed to Samuel Robb, this early cigar store Indian is reported to have been stored in a warehouse for 100 years. Estimate: $25,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

ALPHARETTA, Ga. – Four Seasons Auction Gallery has collected dozens of outstanding items from local and national estates and consignments for its New Year’s Day Auction Extravaganza, which begins at noon, Saturday, Jan. 1. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Topping the lineup is an early cigar store Indian attributed to Samuel Robb. The carved Indian features a “V” feather headdress and original polychrome finish on gesso. The 56-inch-tall figure stands on a 14-inch base. It carries a $25,000-$50,000 estimate.

Vintage automobiles, a restored Army jeep, museum Harley Davidson motorcycles, an early wicker horse-drawn carriage, and garden statuary and fountains are among the big items in the auction.

Superb French, American, English and Continental furniture, a selection of Oriental rugs, bronzes, paintings, fine jewelry and decorative arts will also be offered.

For details visit Four Seasons Auction Gallery website at www.fsagallery.com or phone 404-876-1048.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAucvtioneers.com.

 

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Diamond platinum brooch, retro Knot and Cascade design, 11.01 total carat weight. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Diamond platinum brooch, retro Knot and Cascade design, 11.01 total carat weight. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Restored 1945 Willys Army jeep from National Museum of Patriotism, Atlanta. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Restored 1945 Willys Army jeep from National Museum of Patriotism, Atlanta. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

2000 Harley Davidson Road King Police Special Motorcycle, custom painted with patriotic scenes, originally from the 2000 Summer Olympics and was an Official Escort Model with 6 kilometers on the odometer. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

2000 Harley Davidson Road King Police Special Motorcycle, custom painted with patriotic scenes, originally from the 2000 Summer Olympics and was an Official Escort Model with 6 kilometers on the odometer. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Pair of life-size hand-carved blackamoors, hand-painted, 70 inches tall. Estimate:    $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Pair of life-size hand-carved blackamoors, hand-painted, 70 inches tall. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Four Seasons Auction Gallery.

Teardrop guitar made by John D’Angelico, New York, 1957. The Scott Chinery Collection. Photo copyright Archtop History Inc., from the book ‘Archtop Guitars: The Journey from Cremona to New York’ by Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel.

Metropolitan museum’s ‘Guitar Heroes’ tracks legendary luthiers

Teardrop guitar made by John D’Angelico, New York, 1957. The Scott Chinery Collection. Photo copyright Archtop History Inc., from the book ‘Archtop Guitars: The Journey from Cremona to New York’ by Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel.

Teardrop guitar made by John D’Angelico, New York, 1957. The Scott Chinery Collection. Photo copyright Archtop History Inc., from the book ‘Archtop Guitars: The Journey from Cremona to New York’ by Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel.

NEW YORK – Three New York master luthiers, renowned for their hand-carved stringed instruments—particularly their archtop guitars, which have been sought after by many of the most important guitarists of the last century—will be the subject of Guitar Heroes: Legendary Craftsmen from Italy to New York, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from Feb. 9 through July 4.

Featuring the extraordinary guitars of John D’Angelico, James D’Aquisto and John Monteleone, this unprecedented exhibition of approximately 80 musical instruments will focus on the work of these modern-day master craftsmen and their roots in a long tradition of stringed instrument-making that has thrived for more than 400 years and that was first brought to New York from Italy around the turn of the 20th century.

The work of Italian luthiers, or makers of stringed instruments, has been highly desired since the 16th century, when lute makers in cities such as Venice and violin makers in places like Cremona supplied instruments for many of the most important personages in Europe. In subsequent centuries, makers such as the famed Antonio Stradivari continued this tradition. Stradivari, best known for his violins, built a great variety of stringed instruments, including both mandolins and guitars, one of which will be on loan to the exhibition.

By the end of the 18th century, Naples had become the dominant center for stringed-instrument production on the Italian peninsula, with makers there introducing innovations to both the mandolin and guitar. Later, in the decades around the turn of the 20th century, many skilled luthiers from southern Italy moved to New York as part of the mass immigration of the time. These makers set up workshops throughout the region, building traditional-style violins, guitars, and most importantly, mandolins, which experienced a tremendous popularity in America from the 1890s to the 1920s.

A change in musical tastes by the late 1920s meant that many Italian-American luthiers were suddenly forced out of business, but the young John D’Angelico was among a small group who were able to transition to building archtop guitars, an instrument that combined elements of violin construction (carved top, f-holes) with the guitar, based on the models being produced at the time by the Gibson Guitar Co. The archtop guitar was especially popular with jazz musicians in the days before the electric guitar. D’Angelico quickly built a reputation for his high-quality, beautifully constructed guitars. The tradition was carried forward by his apprentice James D’Aquisto, and continues today with the work of the famed mandolin and guitar maker John Monteleone.

Instruments by these makers have been used by some of the most influential guitar players of the 20th century through the present day, including Chet Atkins, Les Paul, George Benson, Paul Simon, Steve Miller, Mark Knopfler, Jim Hall and Grant Green, among others. Guitar Heroes will present more than 50 works by these makers, many of whom have been owned by some of these guitar greats. The works will be placed against the backdrop of the museum’s extensive collection, which includes masterpieces of Italian and Italian-American construction, showing the place of the modern-day masters in this long tradition.

The exhibition is made possible in part by Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Chilton Jr. and organized by Jayson Kerr Dobney, associate curator and administrator in the Department of Musical Instruments at the Metropolitan Museum.

An app, the Museum’s first, has been conceived to complement and augment the exhibition. Through collaborations with musicians and experts, the app brings to life the guitar makers’ creative process and celebrates the enduring relevance of these instruments. It features museum-commissioned musical performances expressly designed for this exhibition, artist interviews, and rarely seen archival video footage. This dynamic multimedia guide to the exhibition, which has been developed by the Metropolitan Museum’s Digital Media Department, can be downloaded free from iTunes. It will also be available for rental on iTouch devices in the Museum’s galleries ($7, $6 for members, $5 for children under 12).

The Audio Guide program is made possible by Bloomberg.

Many of the app’s multimedia features, including longer excerpts of the performances and commentary—will be available in an extensive Guitar Heroes feature on the Museum’s website at www.metmuseum.org.

A related concert by the John Pizzarelli Quartet will be held in the museum’s Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium on March 31. Tickets are available at www.metmuseum.org/tickets, 212-570-3949, or the box office in the Museum’s Great Hall.

A variety of educational programs will also be offered in conjunction with the exhibition, including gallery talks by Jayson Kerr Dobney; gallery concerts including performances on guitar, mandolin, and other instruments; a Sunday at the Met afternoon of programs on April 10, including a panel discussion and musical performances; and family and teen programs.

The exhibition will also be the subject of the Metropolitan Museum’s Spring 2011 Bulletin, which will be available in the Museum’s bookshops.

 

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Four Seasons guitars. Made by John Monteleone, Islip, N.Y., 2002-2005. Private Collection, USA. Photo copyright Archtop History Inc., from the book ‘Archtop Guitars: The Journey from Cremona to New York’ by Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel.

The Four Seasons guitars. Made by John Monteleone, Islip, N.Y., 2002-2005. Private Collection, USA. Photo copyright Archtop History Inc., from the book ‘Archtop Guitars: The Journey from Cremona to New York’ by Rudy Pensa and Vincent Ricardel.

Lichtenstein, Warhol works stolen from NY home

NEW YORK (AP) — Police are investigating the theft of a collection of Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol artworks from the home of a beef fortune heir.

The culprits also made off with surveillance video footage that might have caught them in the act.

The New York Police Department released images of the art on Thursday, hoping someone might help solve last month’s crime in the trendy Meatpacking District by recognizing works like a well-known Lichtenstein print called Thinking Nude.

Authorities estimate the five-story apartment was burglarized sometime during Thanksgiving week, when owner and art collector Robert Romanoff was away.

Calls to Romanoff’s home went unanswered Friday.

Also taken from the building was a Lichtenstein print called Moonscape, the Carl Fudge oil painting Live Cat, the Warhol prints The Truck and Superman, and a set of eight signed Warhol prints from 1986 called Camouflage. They’re among the artist’s last works before his death the following year.

Authorities estimate the artworks, plus stolen Cartier and Rolex watches and other jewelry, are worth about $750,000.

The Romanoff home is in a neighborhood filled with old warehouses and meatpacking companies now turned into retail and living space, restaurants and boutiques.

Police say the thief drilled a hole through the wall of a hallway sometime between Nov. 24 and 28.

Lichtenstein, who died in 1997, created Thinking Nude in 1994 – one of 40 limited-edition works that are part of his Nudes series based on comic-book illustrations.

A similar print recently sold for about $85,000 at Christie’s, according to the auction house’s website.

Warhol’s Superman print is part of his 1980s Myths series featuring fictional characters with mass-cultural appeal, including Mickey Mouse and Uncle Sam.

Romanoff is heir to a beef company fortune that started as a New York City meat store opened by his immigrant relatives in 1905. He’s now president of the New Jersey-based Nebraska Meat Corp., one of the country’s biggest distributors of smoked meat that for years owned property in the Meatpacking District.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-12-24-10 1449EST

 

 

 

Morphy Auctions sold this rare set of four Agnes Brush Dolls with original tags for $450 in May 2007. The Pooh Bear is 13 inches tall. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers archive.

Growing up with Agnes Brush Pooh plush animals

Morphy Auctions sold this rare set of four Agnes Brush Dolls with original tags for $450 in May 2007. The Pooh Bear is 13 inches tall. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers archive.

Morphy Auctions sold this rare set of four Agnes Brush Dolls with original tags for $450 in May 2007. The Pooh Bear is 13 inches tall. Image courtesy of Morphy Auctions and LiveAuctioneers archive.

STAMFORD, Conn. (AP) – Imagine growing up in a world of Winnie the Poohs, Eeyores, Rabbits, Heffalumps and Tiggers, too.

And imagine not always liking them all that much.

“They tended to take away my mother’s attention,” said Joyce Riemer of Stamford, laughing. “My father did more of the raising.”

But it wasn’t all bad, Riemer said, and as an adult, she now smiles when she talks about the creatures with whom she shared her Queens, N.Y., home as a little girl. And when she talks about her mother’s artistry, there is pride in her voice.

“We’d have Winnie the Poohs all over the house, in boxes and boxes,” she said. “A bunch would be all over the piano, drying.”

About 20 years before the Walt Disney Co. got hold of the licenses that allowed them to reanimate the inhabitants of Hundred Acre Wood, Riemer’s mother, Agnes Brush, was running a small but thriving cottage industry, making the plush animals based on the books from A.A. Milne.

Once a coterie of workers had sewn the dolls together, it would be Brush’s task to paint the details and make the finishing touches. They would then be sent off to bookstores and toy stores across the country.

Brush would often take to a porch outside their home to do her painting, a habit that was documented in a pictorial spread in Life magazine of Feb. 27, 1956. Brush was one of many featured in the magazine’s ode to Pooh. She even made it onto television, appearing with her daughter on broadcaster Nancy Craig’s television talk program Women of Tomorrow in the early 1950s.

Riemer, who said she was only 6 or 7 at the time, can recall watching the live cameras and the behind-the-scenes action.

“She did this work as long as I remember,” said Riemer, adding that it started before she was born in 1945.

Riemer, who was an only child, said she grew up in a creative house. Her father, Granville, was a draftsman. Her mother had started out as a milliner, but traded hats for plush toys when she was hired by Stephen Schlesinger, who had bought the rights to the A.A. Milne characters in the 1930s.

Eventually, Walt Disney would pay for those rights by the early 1960s, at about the same time Brush stopped making the dolls.

One can now find Agnes Brush toys being sold for several hundred to several thousand dollars on various websites. When Riemer was asked about how lucrative the business was, she said her mother “eked it out,” but that it was never a big moneymaker.

When Riemer’s mother died in 1982, she and her husband, Jay, went to the home to clear it of its belongings. While there, they not only found an inventory of dolls that had never made it to bookstore shelves, but also the records of Brush’s transactions, including the sales slips and notes.

“We’d find these nice handwritten notes from the businesses,” Jay Riemer said.

“The original toys were made with care and the people did appreciate that,” Joyce Riemer said. “There were a lot of letters to that effect.”

The couple, who have lived in Stamford since 1976, returned with several bags of toys, as well as supplies and original patterns.

Last year, the two decided to visit the Stamford Museum and Nature Center’s toy exhibit, Dolls, Toys and Teddy Bears, which has enjoyed a return engagement this year.

The two thought the museum might be interested in putting some of their collection on the display, even though they were not in mint condition – a case in point, a Winnie the Pooh doll, the only one that was on display at the Riemer home while their two children grew up, shows off the work of some hungry moths who left a few holes in his distinctive red shirt.

After the exhibit, they got in contact with Rosa Portell, the museum’s curator of collections and exhibitions, who urged them to come back this year.

“What I liked about Agnes Brush work was, first of all, it sprung out of a total home industry,” said Portell. “And, when the family brought their whole collection, I had several to choose from … No two were exactly alike. They all had incredible charm.”

The plush toys are just one of several stories in the exhibit, which ends Sunday, Jan. 9. There is a restored teddy bear whose owner made sure he would not be left behind when the family left Egypt in the early 1940s.

There is a group carefully painted lead figures, that were carefully researched and reconstructed by a Rowayton father and his children. And there is a dollhouse that has been passed down through the generations.

These well-worn and well-loved characters rest alongside some pristine antique dolls.

Portell said she enjoys the mix.

“I was happy to be able to include some toys that had interesting story lines,” Portell said.

Riemer knows well the story behind her mother’s work, and it is one she was happy to share with museum visitors. As to the enduring popularity of Winnie the Pooh and his pals, she thinks the universality of the characters have allowed the stories to linger through the generations.

“I remember I used to call my son Tigger, now that I think about it,” she said. “He was quite bouncy.”

___

Online:

http://www.stamfordmuseum.org/exhibit-spot.html

___

Information from: Stamford Advocate,

http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-12-25-10 0003EST

 

Owls, oak leaves, acorns and ferns are carved on the sides and base of this tall case clock. The 7-1/2-foot-tall clock sold for $14,000. The works are marked ‘Hawina,’ a German trademark.

Kovels – Antiques & Collecting: Week of Dec. 27, 2010

Owls, oak leaves, acorns and ferns are carved on the sides and base of this tall case clock. The 7-1/2-foot-tall clock sold for $14,000. The works are marked ‘Hawina,’ a German trademark.

Owls, oak leaves, acorns and ferns are carved on the sides and base of this tall case clock. The 7-1/2-foot-tall clock sold for $14,000. The works are marked ‘Hawina,’ a German trademark.

Black Forest is a term used to describe the elaborate, realistic wood carvings that were thought to be made in the Black Forest region of Bavaria, Germany. In the 1980s, new research proved that the carvings were done in Switzerland, most by the Trauffer family. It is easy to identify pieces. Bears that play instruments, climb trees, hold benches or beg are part of the legs, seats and stands that make up the furniture. Each bear was carved from a linden or walnut tree trunk. Pieces were not signed. A similar type of carving that featured birds, branches and plants also was made in Switzerland. Clock cases were made to hold Swiss clock movements often marked with a company name. Collectors still call both types of carved pieces Black Forest. A carved, tall-case clock recently sold for $14,000 at Neal Auction Co. in New Orleans. The clock movement was marked “Hawina,” a trademark of a German clock company owned by Hans Winterhalder and his family. The company was in business from the 18th century until 1937. The elaborately carved case with owls and branches is not by the carvers of the bear furniture, although it is collected as Black Forest.

Q: I own a cash register that belonged to my great-grandfather. He used it in his produce store in New York City in the late 1930s. It’s in perfect working order; even the customer count works. It must weigh close to 200 pounds and seems to be made out of solid brass. Just under the number display is a fancy plate with the serial number 935158416. Can you tell me its age and value?

A: The first commercially successful cash register was invented in 1878 by James Ritty, a saloon owner in Dayton, Ohio. Ritty sold his cash register business and patents to National Manufacturing Co. In 1884, John H. Patterson bought National Manufacturing and its patents and renamed the company National Cash Register. The serial number on your cash register, 935158, indicates it was made in January 1911. The model number is 416. It is one of the 400-class registers, which are often found today. National Cash Register was the world’s largest manufacturer of cash registers. The name was changed to NCR Corp. in 1974. Today most businesses have replaced cash registers with computers. NCR now makes the modern equivalent of a cash register — point-of-sale workstations — as well as ATMs, software and other products and services.

Q: I inherited more than 40 Royal Doulton figurines from my mother. They are in excellent condition. I’m concerned that future generations may not appreciate the collection, and my husband and I have no children to leave them to. Should we sell them now while there is still a market for them? Also, are we better off selling them individually or as a collection?

A: Old and scarce Royal Doulton figurines sell for good prices, but common newer ones sell for less than half their issue price. Kovels’ Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide 2011 lists prices for Royal Doulton figurines that sold last year. The highest price was $2,415 for the figurine Young Widow, HN 1399. Several figurines sold for hundreds of dollars, and many sold for under $100. The lowest price was $12. Royal Doulton figurines were introduced in 1913. More than 4,000 HN numbers have been used since then to classify the figurines. The figurines have been made in China since 2005. Sort through your figures, then decide which ones you might want to sell.

Q: I would like to know something about the maker of my wood-burning stove. It’s marked “Monarch Wood Stove, Made in West Bend, Wis., Malleable Iron Range Co.”

A: Malleable Iron Range Co. was founded in St. Louis in 1896 by Silas McClure and A.C. Terrell. “Monarch” is a trademark. The company moved to Beaver Dam, Wis., in 1902. It made coal- and wood-burning stoves. Gas burners were added to some models in 1905. Later the company made electric stoves, refrigerators and water heaters. The Malleable Iron Range Co. went bankrupt in 1985.

Q: I’m looking for information on a vase, or what my mother thinks is an old spittoon. “Sarna Brass” is written on the bottom. I haven’t been able to find a single bit of information about this company.

A: “Sarna Brass” is a trademark owned by S.S. Sarna Inc. of Manhasset, N.Y. The business was started by Sajan Singh Sarna in 1920. Sarna was born in Rawalpindi in British India (now part of Pakistan). He came to the western United States to go to college and study dairy manufacturing. He found that people were interested in buying handcrafts from India, so he started an import business in about 1920. Brass, textiles and other items were among the products he sold. In 1933, with the Depression in full swing, he moved to New York and began selling goods imported from Japan. In 1938, after having a dream about a bell, he went to Indonesia to buy bells, which he sold to department stores in the United States. The bells, each with a “story” tag attached, were popular during the 1960s. His company became known as the Bells of Sarna. Sajan Singh Sarna died in the 1970s. The company is now called S.S. Sarna Inc. and sells a variety of gift items. The value of your vase or spittoon is about $50 to $75.

Tip: Be careful when burning candles in glass candlesticks. If the candle burns too low, the hot wax and flame may break the glass.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Need more information about collectibles? Find it at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. Check prices there, too. More than 700,000 are listed, and viewing them is free. You also can sign up to read our weekly Kovels Komments. It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is delivered by e-mail, free, if you register. Kovels.com offers extra collector’s information and lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and much more. You can subscribe to Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles, our monthly newsletter filled with prices, facts and color photos. Kovels.com adds to the information in our newspaper column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Souvenir hand mirror, “Battleship Tennessee, Jamestown Exposition 1907,” hand-tinted celluloid, wire handle, 3 1/2 inches, $95.
  • Bakelite soldier pin, red envelope hat, red jacket with sleeve stripes, brown buttons, caramel pants, 1950s, 3 x 2 1/4 inches, $180.
  • Salesman’s sample Servel Refrigerator, hard plastic, removable door, back opens to view wiring, 12 die-cut laminated advertising cards, 1950s, 2 x 4 x 7 inches, $190.
  • Hamilton Beach soda fountain milkshake mixer, green porcelain enamel over cast metal, stainless-steel cup, Model 33, 1940s, 18 1/4 inches, $190.
  • Packard hood ornament, chrome-plated, pelican with raised wing, 1943, 9 1/2 x 19 inches, $285.
  • Chest of drawers, mahogany and pine, five cock-beaded drawers, inset brass escutcheons, shaped bracket feet, circa 1760, 28 x 45 inches, $410.
  • Baccarat Dolphin candlesticks, frosted shafts, drip pans with pendant drops, marked, 13 inches, pair, $1,035.
  • Mexico City Red Devils official baseball player’s jersey, No. 7, white flannel, felt patch with red devil and “Campeons 56-57” on left shoulder, 1956, $1,220.
  • Lenci Spanish Flamenco Dancer doll, brown googly bedroom eyes, open-close mouth, teeth, black wig, hoop earrings, ruffled red felt dress, 1920s, 24 inches, $2,300.
  • Rookwood vase, cylindrical, pinecones, green needles, mottled blue to orange to green matte glaze, signed, E. Lincoln, No. 784A shape, 1924, 16 inches, $2,585.

New! A quick, easy guide to identifying the valuable costume jewelry from the 1950s on. Kovels’ Buyer’s Guide to Costume Jewelry, Part Two is a report on the most popular styles, makers and designers of costume jewelry. The information makes you an informed buyer and may get you a great buy. Photos, marks, histories and bibliography. The guide features the most wanted costume jewelry made in Europe and the United States. Special report, 2010, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches, 36 pages. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or send $19.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2010 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 

Talavera charger (blue and white). Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Holiday spirit drives sales at West Palm Beach Antiques Festival

Talavera charger (blue and white). Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Talavera charger (blue and white). Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – West Palm Beach Antiques Festival owners Kay and Bill Puchstein reported over 400 dealers set up at the Dec. 3-5 edition of the event with all outside dealer spaces sold out to take advantage of the Chamber of Commerce weather. Attendance exceeded the previous month and visitors were in a holiday buying mood, said the promoters.

Dealers gladly accommodated the holiday shoppers with wide selections of tempting gift ideas like Steiff animals, silver items, vintage linens and mid century modern furniture leading the way.

In gearing up for the 2011 season the Puchsteins have installed free wi-fi computer access to aid dealers in searching for information for customers, and a new series of television ads aimed at attracting a younger audience has premiered in South Florida touting marbles, postcards, vintage handbags and modernism furniture and accessories dating from the 1930s to the 1960s. Everyone attending the show will appreciate the wide selection of estate jewelry and silver and investment quality art, said the Pucksteins.

One of the dealers who specializes in investment quality art is Michael Perez of Ellen & Michael Perez Art and Antiques. Michael was raised in New England surrounded by antiques and art, and Ellen has an art education. The business seemed to be a natural for them. They specialize in Asian art, American folk art, American and European art and tribal art. Michael has an affinity for sculptured objects in those categories and has begun some of his own works in the field.

The Perez’s typically display several hundred items in their booth at the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival including a display case of exquisite smalls. The inventory ranges in price from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars and all of it is guaranteed to be interesting according to Michael. In fact he says “so many interesting things” is the most frequently heard comment in his booth during a Festival weekend.

The Festival is now on Facebook under West Palm Beach Antiques Festival and anyone is welcome to become a fan. The Puchsteins plan on posting photos of merchandise unloading during setup so fans can get a sneak preview of what to expect at each show.

The January edition of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival will celebrate the New Year Dec. 31 through January 2. Festival hours are Friday noon-5 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Early Buyer’s admission is Friday 9 a.m.-noon and the $25 admission is good for all three days. Adult daily admission $7, seniors $6. Anyone 12 and under is admitted free. There is no charge for parking at the fairgrounds.

The West Palm Beach Antiques Festival is held at the South Florida Fairgrounds located off Southern Boulevard in West Palm Beach, 1 1/2 miles west of the Florida Turnpike and 1 mile east of U.S. 441/SR7. For more information contact the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival at (941) 697-7475, e-mail info@wpbaf.com or visit the website at www.wpbaf.com.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Modernist bronze of woman. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Modernist bronze of woman. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Large Japanese Bizen Foo dog, brown ceramic. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Large Japanese Bizen Foo dog, brown ceramic. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Spanish colonial stirrup cup, silver over incised gourd. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Spanish colonial stirrup cup, silver over incised gourd. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

African Lobi stool. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

African Lobi stool. Image courtesy of West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Remington’s popular portable typewriter known as the Remie Scout Model sold at auction for $50 in April. It has a red and blue body housed in wooden case. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery and LiveAuctioneers archive.

Manual typewriter is key to group of old-schoolers

Remington’s popular portable typewriter known as the Remie Scout Model sold at auction for $50 in April. It has a red and blue body housed in wooden case. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery and LiveAuctioneers archive.

Remington’s popular portable typewriter known as the Remie Scout Model sold at auction for $50 in April. It has a red and blue body housed in wooden case. Image courtesy of Austin Auction Gallery and LiveAuctioneers archive.

PHILADELPHIA – In an age of multitasking tech gadgets whose march toward obsolescence begins the minute they roll off the assembly line, a group is celebrating a mechanical one-trick pony built to last for decades: the manual typewriter.

A local business owner and enthusiast of everything analog has put out a call for typewriter enthusiasts to bring their working Underwoods and Olivettis to a city pub Saturday for what has been dubbed “Type-In: A Pleasant Afternoon of Manual Typewriting.”

“Against a backdrop of ringtones and whiny hard drives, the analog typewriter, which puts thoughts onto paper in a single step and waits silently while you’re thinking, gains charm by the minute,” said Type-In organizer Michael McGettigan.

“When someone hears you clicking away, they know you aren’t playing ‘Call of Duty,’ or watching a kitten fall off a pillow on YouTube or checking your schedule,” he said. “You are typewriting.”

The Type-In took place at Bridgewater’s Pub in Philadelphia’s historic 30th Street Station. One person who RSVP’d, planned to travel from Virginia with his trusty manual in tow.

Participants at the type-in were to receive typing paper, carbon paper — remember that? — and envelopes to compose a holiday letter to mail after the event. All were encouraged to bring along a spare typewriter or two to swap or sell.

Also planned was a typing competition using a passage from author Paul Auster’s ode to his vintage Olympia, “The Story of My Typewriter,” and a technician will be on hand to discuss the basics of typewriter maintenance.

What makes manual typewriters so special to aficionados?

First, McGettigan said, typewriters are gloriously incapable of multitasking. They do one thing and one thing only: They type.

Second, they weren’t made with planned obsolescence in mind — unlike the frustratingly brief shelf life of the average laptop. With a little routine maintenance, typewriters will continue to happily clack for decades and even outlive their owners.

“The closest comparison I can make is with playing vinyl records; it’s a little more fussy, there are imperfections, and most of the time, most people, including me, play MP3s,” he said. “Or maybe it’s like acoustic guitar versus electric — harder, but takes more thought, stronger hands, and is very satisfying.”

McGettigan, who owns two bicycle shops, said typewriters and bikes both attract people with an appreciation for things that are well-crafted and human-powered. Biking events and bike shops bring together a community of like-minded cyclists, so McGettigan said he created the Type-In because typewriter fans have no similar means to meet up.

“The best part about a typewriter is when you’re done and you pull that typed page out, it feels like you’ve really accomplished something,” said 16-year-old Matt Cidoni of East Brunswick, N.J., a musician, high school junior, and owner of several typewriters, including a 1926 Royal 10 and a 1959 Smith-Corona Skyriter.

His “Adventures in Typewriterdom,” is what’s known as a typecast blog: Each entry is first typed on paper, then scanned into place.

“I’m not by any means a technophobe. The Internet is a wonderful thing — it’s where I found out so much great information about typewriters,” said Cidoni, who planned to make the 60-mile trip south for the Type-In. “But there’s a whole generation who are still into writing the good way. There are thousands of typewriters still in use and there always will be people who want to preserve them.”

___

Online:

Type-In: http://www.phillytyper.com

Adventures in Typewriterdom: http://typewritersite.blogspot.com

 

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

 

 

 

National Museum of Play buys earliest known Monopoly game

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) – The Strong National Museum of Play has splurged $146,500 on the oldest known version of Monopoly handmade by inventor Charles Darrow.

The children’s museum in Rochester revealed Tuesday it was the winning bidder at Sotheby’s last week for the table-size board game created around 1933 with pen-and-ink and gouache on a circular piece of oilcloth. It contains 200-plus pieces, including playing cards, hotels and bank notes.

Darrow, an unemployed heating engineer in Philadelphia, produced 5,000 copies of the real-estate trading game and sold them through a Philadelphia department store. Parker Brothers bought the rights in 1935.

The game was part of the Forbes Collection of Antique Toys, which Sotheby’s sold last week. The game had a $60,000-$80,000 estimate.

The National Museum of Play boasts the world’s most comprehensive collection of games, toys and play-related objects.

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-21-10 2029GMT