Hardy painting leads hunt at Gray’s Auctioneers’ Jan. 25 sale

Heywood Hardy (British, 1842-1933), ‘A Hunting Morning,’ oil on canvas, 20 inches by 30 inches. Estimate: $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Heywood Hardy (British, 1842-1933), ‘A Hunting Morning,’ oil on canvas, 20 inches by 30 inches. Estimate: $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Heywood Hardy (British, 1842-1933), ‘A Hunting Morning,’ oil on canvas, 20 inches by 30 inches. Estimate: $12,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.

CLEVELAND – Gray’s Auctioneers kicks off 2011 with an eclectic Furniture, Paintings and Decorative Arts Auction on Jan. 25. This auction features paintings and drawings from the 17th century to the 20th century, furniture from Charles II to Mid-Century Modern, antique rugs, and many delightful decorative lots including a collection of Chinese and Japanese bronzes and porcelains.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding for the auction, which begins at 1 p.m. Eastern.

Notable items include lot 28, an evocative oil painting, A Hunting Morning, by renowned British sporting artist Heywood Hardy (1842-1933). Capturing the excitement of gathering for the meet this painting is very similar to Hardy’s The First of November, which sold at Christies in London in 2010 for £34,850 ($55,300). Gray’s has conservatively estimated the Hardy at $12,000-$18,000.

Lot 6 is a beautiful, gilt-framed 19th-century oil of Venice, the city of canals, at sunrise by American/Italian artist Nicholas Briganti (1861-1944). Briganti’s views of Venice and its waterways are among his most venerated works. Clearly inspired by the city, he captures the transformative light of sunrise, bathing the lagoon and sky with a majestic glow. This stunning work is estimated at $2,000-$4,000.

Two important drawings offered are lots 29 and 30. Lot 29 is an allegorical scene by Johann Evangelist Holzer (Germany, 1709-1740). This drawing is one of his largest in existence. Primarily known as a fresco painter, few of his works survive. Holzer’s last and largest works are frescos for Münsterschwarzach Abbey. He died when he was 31 on his way to Bavaria where he had been commissioned by Clemens August of Bavaria to paint frescos in the Hofkirche of Clemenswerth.

Lot 30 is a study of birds of prey, unsigned but attributed to the 17th-century Dutch master draughtsman and painter of animals, Melchior de Hondecoeter. His life-like depictions of birds were much in demand by the European nobility. He was patronized by William III (William of Orange), King of England, and his masterpieces are in the Hague, the Wallace Collection, Belton House and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg to name a few. Gray’s has conservatively estimated this magnificent charcoal drawing on paper at $2,000-$4,000.

Also included in this auction is a wonderful selection of decorations including reverse-painted lamps, a Sevres urn, a Tiffany mantel clock set with candelabra and a large Meissen mythological figural group depicting Neptune and Salacia, signed with blue crossed swords. The only thing Neptune is missing is his trident. In very good condition with no chips, nicks or scratches, the estimate is $3,000-$5,000.

Among the collection of Chinese artifacts is Lot 186, a Chinese bronze censor, with silver inlay and wooden lid. This signed piece has an estimate of $100-$150, but presale bidding has been active.

Lot 116 is a 17th-century Charles II carved oak court cupboard. It has a carved vine and flower motif on the upper part of the cabinet, flanking the cupboard doors, within turned columns and above two larger paneled cabinet doors. This fine antique cupboard has extensive 20th-century restorations and as such the estimate is $2,000-$4,000.

Lots 214-217 are a fine collection of Mid-Century Modern custom designed furniture, made from exotic Hawaiian hardwoods. Lot 215A is a vintage Curtis Jeré, copper and brass wall sculpture depicting a fairground Ferris wheel, big tent and stalls. Curtis Jeré is the compound nom de plume of ’60 s artists Curtis Freiler and Jerry Fels. This vintage sculpture is estimated at $150-$250.

Rounding out the auction are a collection of antique rugs, runners and carpets, very reasonably estimated. Most notable is Lot 231, a colorful, geometrically patterned Kazak Caucasian wool rug measuring 8 feet 8 inches by 4 feet 4 inches and estimated at $2,800-$3,000.

Gray’s always has something for every collector. This instance is lot 193A, a Nepalese yak tail ceremonial baton. Somewhat reminiscent of a wig worn in the 1980s by the incomparable Tina Turner, this ceremonial yak tail baton commands an estimate of $80-$120.

In addition to live online bidding provided by LiveAuctioneers.com, there will be telephone bidding and absentee bidding offered directly through Gray’s Auctioneers.

The showrooms will be open for preview Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday by appointment. Gray’s Auctioneers is the only licensed, bonded and insured auction house in Cleveland holding monthly live auctions, and offering complimentary valuations every Friday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Deborah J. Gray, auctioneer, opened her eponymous auction house in 2007 with her partner, Serena Harragin, and together they have transformed an abandoned building that once housed a Citroen dealership into a driving force in the vibrant Cleveland Fine Art and Antiques auction market.

For details visit Gray’s website at www.graysauctioneers.com or to request a printed catalog call 215-458-7695.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Nicholas Briganti (Italian/American, 1861-1944), ‘Venetian Canal,’ oil on canvas, 17 inches x 30 inches. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Nicholas Briganti (Italian/American, 1861-1944), ‘Venetian Canal,’ oil on canvas, 17 inches x 30 inches. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Meissen mythological figural group depicting Neptune and Salacia, signed with blue crossed swords, 15 inches x 12 1/2 inches x 9 1/2 inches. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Meissen mythological figural group depicting Neptune and Salacia, signed with blue crossed swords, 15 inches x 12 1/2 inches x 9 1/2 inches. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Curtis Jeré American Fairground copper and brass wall sculpture, signed lower right, 22 inches high x 55 inches wide x 7 inches deep. Estimate: $150-$250. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Curtis Jeré American Fairground copper and brass wall sculpture, signed lower right, 22 inches high x 55 inches wide x 7 inches deep. Estimate: $150-$250. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Charles II-style carved oak court cupboard, 17th century, 69 inches high x 66 inches wide x 23 inches deep. Condition: 20th century modifications, hinges and lock. $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Charles II-style carved oak court cupboard, 17th century, 69 inches high x 66 inches wide x 23 inches deep. Condition: 20th century modifications, hinges and lock. $2,000-$4,000. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Chinese bronze censor, 9 1/2 inches high, together with a porcelain vase (not pictured). Estimate: $100-$150. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.
Chinese bronze censor, 9 1/2 inches high, together with a porcelain vase (not pictured). Estimate: $100-$150. Image courtesy of Gray’s Auctioneers.

Skinner paintings auction Jan. 28 to feature works by Frieseke, Wyeth

John Morgan (British, 1823-1886), ‘Kinder at Play.’ Estimate $35,000-55,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

John Morgan (British, 1823-1886), ‘Kinder at Play.’ Estimate $35,000-55,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
John Morgan (British, 1823-1886), ‘Kinder at Play.’ Estimate $35,000-55,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
BOSTON – Skinner Inc.’s quarterly American & European Paintings & Prints sale will take place on Friday, Jan. 28, at noon in the Boston gallery.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding for the 571-lot auction.

Many of the key highlights are fresh to the market, some not seen for decades, and one not previously know. Olive Trees, Cagnes by Frederick Carl Frieseke is being included in the Frederick Carl Frieseke Catalogue Raisonné and was recently purchased at a New Hampshire yard sale. The work from this leading American Impressionist is estimated at $50,000 to $70,000.

According to Robin Starr, director of Skinner’s American and European Paintings Department, “The theme of this sale is fresh material. In fact, most of the highlighted lots have come from private collections.”

Another American artist highlight is N.C. Wyeth’s And They Did Their Trading from the Top of Battlemented Wallst. Well-known and well-documented, the piece was consigned by the children of a man who acquired it as a trade for service. It has been in the family for more than 50 years and is estimated at $300,000 to $500,000. Other works of note by American painters include Winter Farm by Aldro Thompson Hibbard, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000; A Grey Day on the Hudson by Worthington (Thomas) Whittredge, estimated at $20,000 to $30,000; Solar Imp by Helen Frankenthaler, estimated at $3,000 to $5,000; Chance Meeting by Martin Lewis, estimated at $7,000 to $9,000; and White Sands by Edward Weston, estimated at $1,200 to $1,800, and coming to Skinner by family descent from the collection of Austin Lamont, together with approximately 20 other works of photography from this collection.

William Louis Sonntag’s The Falls at Sunset will also be offered. The landscape, which likely dates from later in his career when he moved toward more intimate scenes, smaller canvas sizes and a more limited range in color palette, is estimated at $6,000 to $8,000. Also to be featured is John F. Francis’ Elaborate Still Life with Melons and Fruit on a Marble Slab. This work was one of a number of paintings from a New England estate. Francis, one of the most accomplished still life painters of the 19th century was known as “the master of luncheon and dessert pictures.” In this piece, one of his most elaborate, Francis employs some of his favorite motifs, the rough-cut watermelon, various fruits opened or quartered, and a fruit basket draped with a fringed napkin. The work is estimated at $80,000 to $120,000.

Marvin Cone’s Old Timer is also up for bid and estimated at $100,000 to $150,000. Acquired by Mr. and Mrs. Reginald B. Figge, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Naples, Fla., then held in their private collection and descended through the family, Old Timer was one of three submissions to the Directions in American Painting exhibit held Oct. 23 to Dec. 14, 1941 at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, though another was ultimately selected.

European works that are expected to draw significant interest include several coming from local private collections. These include a John Morgan, entitled Kinder at Play, estimated at $35,000 to $55,000; Lesende Frau by Mihály Munkácsy, estimated at $70,000 to $90,000; Christ Disputing with the Doctors: a sketch by Rembrandt van Rijn, estimated at $3,500 to $5,500; Gustav Klimt’s Brustbild eines Mädchens im Profil nach links/A Study for Musiksalon des Palais Dumba, alternatively entitled Backfisch, Bild, estimated at $50,000 to $70,000; and Tanger by Victor Eeckhout, a painter of Orientalist subject matter and genre scenes whose paintings were inspired by Tangier, where the painting at hand was probably created. Tanger is estimated at $70,000 to $90,000.

Two Italian works are also being featured and come from private New England collections. Torre de Leandro/A View of Salacak and Kiz Kulesi [Leander’s Tower], Istanbul, Turkey by Fausto Zonaro was a gift to Georg Ruckmann of Lübeck, Germany, from a doctor that fled to Turkey before World War I. Ruckmann was an administrator of a hospital in Lübeck. The painting then descended in the family. The piece is estimated at $20,000 to $40,000. Senza Titolo by Tancredi Parmeggiani, a patron of Guggenheim who provided him with studio space and exhibited his work in her palazzo. The work is estimated at $10,000 to $15,000.

Previews for the auction will be held on Wed, Jan. 26 from noon to 5 p.m., on Thursday, Jan. 27 from noon to 8 p.m. Fri, Jan. 28 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The Thursday evening preview will feature a reception and gallery walk beginning at 5:30 p.m. RSVP to 617-350-5400.

For more information, visit www.skinnerinc.com or call 508-970-3000.

 

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


N.C.
N.C. (Newell Convers) Wyeth (American, 1882-1945), ‘And They Did Their Trading from the Top of Battlemented Walls,’ 1905. Wyeth completed this painting in 1905 as a commission for the ‘Saturday Evening Post’ Nov. 11, 1905, issue. Estimate $300,000-500,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
John F. Francis (American, 1808-1886), elaborate still life with melons and fruit on a marble slab. Estimate $80,000-120,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
John F. Francis (American, 1808-1886), elaborate still life with melons and fruit on a marble slab. Estimate $80,000-120,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Victor Eeckhout (Belgian, 1821-1879), ‘Tanger,’ Estimate $70,000-90,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Victor Eeckhout (Belgian, 1821-1879), ‘Tanger,’ Estimate $70,000-90,000. Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Frederick Carl Frieseke (American, 1874-1939), ‘Olive Trees, Cagnes.’ Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.
Frederick Carl Frieseke (American, 1874-1939), ‘Olive Trees, Cagnes.’ Image courtesy of Skinner Inc.

Clars to sell 200 Persian, Oriental rugs from Hazara Gallery, Jan. 23

This desirable Serapi carpet, late 19th century, is expected to achieve $18,000 to $25,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.
This desirable Serapi carpet, late 19th century, is expected to achieve $18,000 to $25,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.
This desirable Serapi carpet, late 19th century, is expected to achieve $18,000 to $25,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

OAKLAND, Calif. – On Sunday, Jan. 23, Clars Auction Gallery will host an important on-site “retirement” auction of the contents of the highly respected Hazara Rug Gallery. Founded in 1970 by Mohammad Zavvar, whose heritage is Hazara, Zavvar and his gallery have earned international recognition as the destination and supplier of the finest Persian, Oriental, Caucasian rugs plus tribal weavings and textiles. His clients have spanned the globe.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding for the sale, which will be the fifth installment of this series of auctions and will feature over 200 lots.

Among some of the highlights will be a late 19th-century antique Sultanabad Mahal carpet estimated at $8,000 to $12,000. An important late-19th-century antique Serapi carpet is expected to achieve $18,000 to $25,000 and a Persian Bijar carpet, late 19th century as well, is expected to sell for $7,000 to $10,000.

The auction will begin at 1p.m. Pacific. Bidding for this sale is available onsite at Hazara Gallery, 6042 College Ave. in Oakland.

Preview for this sale will be held Friday and Saturday, Jan. 21-22, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and 10 a.m. day of auction.

For more information visit www.clars.com or call (510) 655-3511 or (510) 499-4151. Email: info@hazaragallery.com

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This Sultanabad Mahal carpet, late 19th century is estimated to sell for $8,000 to $12,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.
This Sultanabad Mahal carpet, late 19th century is estimated to sell for $8,000 to $12,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.
This Persian Bijar carpet, late 19th century, is expected to sell for $7,000 to $10,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.
This Persian Bijar carpet, late 19th century, is expected to sell for $7,000 to $10,000. Image courtesy of Clars Auction Gallery.

Strapped N.J. Historical Society criticized for selling prized holdings

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) – The New Jersey Historical Society has sold one of its prized possessions – an incredibly rare, hand-colored map of the United States from 1784 – because the Newark institution is hard up for cash.

But in the museum world, some experts are calling the sale unethical because museums are not supposed to sell their treasures to raise money.

The Abel Buell map, which brought in almost $2.1 million at the Christie’s auction, was described by a cartography expert as “one of the most coveted of all American maps.”

It is the first map of the United States published in America, the first that features an American flag and the first map copyrighted in America, according to the Christie’s catalog. Even so, the society sold this piece of history last month, one of several dozen items from its collection it has sold or plans to sell. It will use the proceeds to pay off its $2.6 million debt.

Some critics say the sale of the map, held by the society since 1862 and described by Christie’s as pristine, is a violation of the code of ethics by which museums live. That code says pieces of a museum, library or historical society’s collections may only be sold to purchase additional items, not to pay for ordinary expenses like heat or debt service.

“It’s horrifying,” said Stanley Katz, director of the Princeton University Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies.

“They are not violating any law, but they are violating the moral duty of a public institution to preserve its collection,” Katz said. “There is no argument for selling this map. It’s a major map, for a society whose strength is in the early period. It’s indefensible.”

At two Christie’s auctions set for next week in Manhattan, another 20 items from the historical society’s collection will be on the block, including a 120-piece dinner service used by a New Jersey governor to entertain President Martin Van Buren and a portrait of George Washington attributed to New Jersey artist Charles B. Lawrence.

These lots, expected to fetch several thousand dollars each, are not in the same range as the Buell map, which one Christie official described as “spectacular.”

According to the catalog, the historical society can expect to reap anywhere from $86,000 to $146,000 from the upcoming three sales.

The historical society board determined the items to be auctioned are not critical to the evolving mission of the society, which will focus more on educational and research and library services and less on producing “large scale museum exhibitions,” board president John Zinn said.

“All of these things were acquired many years ago and have limited connection to New Jersey history,” Zinn said.

Zinn said the society must retire its debt in order to continue operating.

The historical society has been hurt by recent state budget cuts. It received $290,900 and $293,310 in state funds last year and 2009, but it received no grant for this fiscal year.

But selling pieces of a permanent collection – or de-accessioning, in the parlance of the museum world – to pay for operations violates the ethics code of the American Association of Museums. A museum is permitted to de-accession only to provide funds for the acquisition of other items or for the direct care of collections, according to that accrediting body.

There is sympathy for the historical society and other institutions that have been harmed by the ongoing economic turmoil. Marc Mappen, retired executive director of the New Jersey Historical Commission, compared the situation to medical triage.

“You have to establish priorities, and you have to consider the survival of your institution,” Mappen said. “Things are so bad for museums right now, funds are low and fund-raising so difficult,” he said. “I think there is some understanding that they have to do this to survive.”

Mappen conceded that selling off items that have been donated to the institution could hurt future donations. “But if you go under, nobody’s going to give you anything either.”

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Information from: The Star-Ledger, http://www.nj.com/starledger

 

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-01-13-11 1131EST

 

 

 

JFK library opens 1st online presidential archive

Caroline Kennedy, pictured with her father, President John F. Kennedy, in August 1963, is helping to present the first online digitized U.S. presidential archive. Image by White House photographer Cecil W. Stoughton, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Caroline Kennedy, pictured with her father, President John F. Kennedy, in August 1963, is helping to present the first online digitized U.S. presidential archive. Image by White House photographer Cecil W. Stoughton, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Caroline Kennedy, pictured with her father, President John F. Kennedy, in August 1963, is helping to present the first online digitized U.S. presidential archive. Image by White House photographer Cecil W. Stoughton, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WASHINGTON (AP) – Caroline Kennedy is helping to present the first online digitized U.S. presidential archive, which includes President John F. Kennedy’s most important papers, photographs and recordings.

On Thursday, Caroline Kennedy, sole surviving member of Kennedy’s immediate family, visited the National Archives and said online access to her father’s official records, personal correspondence, telephone conversations and speeches would give a new generation access to the historical record.

The Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston has been working for four years on the $10 million project. Archivists have digitized more than 200,000 pages, 1,200 recordings and 300 museum artifacts, plus film and hundreds of photographs.

Library Director Tom Putnam says it is a resource for young students and the most serious scholars.

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Online:

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum:

http://www.jfklibrary.org/

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-01-13-11 1242EST


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Caroline Kennedy, pictured with her father, President John F. Kennedy, in August 1963, is helping to present the first online digitized U.S. presidential archive. Image by White House photographer Cecil W. Stoughton, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Caroline Kennedy, pictured with her father, President John F. Kennedy, in August 1963, is helping to present the first online digitized U.S. presidential archive. Image by White House photographer Cecil W. Stoughton, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Negro Leagues baseball barnstorms at Muskegon Museum of Art

‘Josh Gibson,’ 2006 oil on canvas original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.

‘Josh Gibson,’ 2006 oil on canvas original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
‘Josh Gibson,’ 2006 oil on canvas original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
MUSKEGON, Mich. (AP) – Artist and author Kadir Nelson’s paintings of Negro Leagues baseball players are going on display at the Muskegon Museum of Art.

A nationally touring exhibition We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball opened Thursday and runs through March 13. Nelson’s paintings were compiled in his book with the same title.

Nelson spent over a decade researching, writing and illustrating the history of Negro League baseball, from its beginnings in the 1920s through its decline after Jackie Robinson crossed over to the majors in 1947.

We Are the Ship tells the story of gifted athletes and determined owners; of racial discrimination and international sportsmanship; of fortunes won and lost; of triumphs and defeats on and off the field. It is a mirror for the social and political history of black America in the first half of the 20th century. Most of all, it is a story of the hundreds of unsung heroes of the Negro Leagues who overcame segregation, hatred, terrible conditions and low pay to do the one thing they loved most: play ball.

The exhibition features 33 paintings from Nelson’s book and 13 preliminary sketches. Negro Leagues memorabilia from Muskegon-area collections also will be on display.

Special events are planned in conjunction with the exhibition. Details are on the Muskegon Museum of Art’s website.

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Online:

Muskegon Museum of Art: http://www.muskegonartmuseum.org

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-CS-01-13-11 0401EST


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


‘Josh Gibson,’ 2006 oil on canvas original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
‘Josh Gibson,’ 2006 oil on canvas original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
‘Safe at Home,’ 2005 oil on canvas Collection of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
‘Safe at Home,’ 2005 oil on canvas Collection of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum original painting by Kadir Nelson for ‘We Are the Ship: The Story of Negro League Baseball.’ Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
Artist Kadir Nelson at work in his studio. Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.
Artist Kadir Nelson at work in his studio. Image courtesy of Muskegon Museum of Art.