Gladys Knight’s gowns to sparkle at Leslie Hindman auction April 11

Nolan Miller silk chiffon and sequin flame evening gown worn in a performance of ‘Love on the Rocks’ with Tom Jones. No label. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Nolan Miller silk chiffon and sequin flame evening gown worn in a performance of ‘Love on the Rocks’ with Tom Jones. No label. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Nolan Miller silk chiffon and sequin flame evening gown worn in a performance of ‘Love on the Rocks’ with Tom Jones. No label. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

CHICAGO – During a special evening session of the house’s Vintage Couture and Accessories auction on Monday, April 11, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers will offer a collection of garments owned by Gladys Knight, a seven-time Grammy Award winner known to her fans as “the Empress of Soul.” LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

Knight, who began her illustrious career as lead vocalist of Gladys Knight & The Pips, wore the 57 dazzling outfits throughout her storied career at performances and award ceremonies. Her collection depicts the evolution of her personal style across more than four decades.

Gladys Knight was born in Atlanta on May 28, 1944. Her first taste of stardom came at the age of 7, when she won Ted Mack’s Original Amateur Hour contest. The following year, she, her brother Merald, sister Brenda, and cousins William and Eleanor Guest formed a group called “The Pips,” after another cousin, James “Pip” Woods. By 1960 The Pips began touring, eventually signing with Motown Records and opening for Diana Ross and The Supremes.

Gladys Knight & The Pips count among their hit singles I Heard It Through the Grapevine, Friendship Train and If I Were Your Woman. In 1973 the group left Motown to sign with Buddah Records, landing a major hit with Grammy-winner Midnight Train to Georgia. After The Pips retired in 1988, Knight embarked on an enormously successful solo career. She has received worldwide acclaim for her singles, which have topped the album charts.

Knight’s sister, Brenda Knight, said, “My sister has always been very compassionate and interested in helping others, but the demands of her career and her commitment to her fans mean that there just isn’t time to share some of these wonderful memories. She and I have both dreamed of using this collection to make a difference, and hope it will bring special, incredible memories to her fans too.”

Ensembles from designers such as Bob Mackie, Tony Chase and Oleg Cassini cover appearances made by Knight in recent years to as early as the 1970s. The magnificently brilliant colors, textures and materials make it clear that each gown is not just something Gladys wore, but a way of heightening the experience of a performance.

“These dresses are as exciting as any we’ve handled from a prominent collection,” said Auctioneer Leslie Hindman. “It’s an honor to be handling a part of music history.”

The auction’s exhibition is free and open to the public Wednesday, April 6, through Monday, April 11. The sale will begin at 7 p.m. April 11.

Leslie Hindman’s, entire fully illustrated catalog is available at our website www.lesliehindman.com, on www.liveauctioneers.com and a printed catalog is available by calling 312-280-1212. For more information, please contact Abigail Rutherford at 312-334-4234 or abigail@lesliehindman.com.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Tony Chase custom evening gown with rhinestone buttons, worn on the cover of both ‘Soul Survivors, The Best of Gladys Knight and the Pips 1973-1988’ and ‘The Best of Gladys Knight & The Pips’ albums. Labeled: Tony Chase. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Tony Chase custom evening gown with rhinestone buttons, worn on the cover of both ‘Soul Survivors, The Best of Gladys Knight and the Pips 1973-1988’ and ‘The Best of Gladys Knight & The Pips’ albums. Labeled: Tony Chase. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Saks Fifth Avenue gold and red sequin and beaded evening gown. Labeled: Saks Fifth Avenue. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate $600-$800. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Saks Fifth Avenue gold and red sequin and beaded evening gown. Labeled: Saks Fifth Avenue. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate $600-$800. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Giorgio of Beverly Hills silver beaded and black chiffon evening gown. Labeled: Giorgio. Property from the Collection of Gladys Knight, Las Vegas, Nevada. Estimate: $400-$600. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Hermès black alligator sac mallette bag, 1960s, with gold hardware, key sheath, red velvet lining, 14 inches x 9 inches x 5 inches. Stamped: Hermès. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.
Hermès black alligator sac mallette bag, 1960s, with gold hardware, key sheath, red velvet lining, 14 inches x 9 inches x 5 inches. Stamped: Hermès. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Wills and Kate Royal Wedding stamps available soon

The British Royal Mail's new stamps featuring the official engagement portraits taken by world-renowned photographer Mario Testino.
The British Royal Mail's new stamps featuring the official engagement portraits taken by world-renowned photographer Mario Testino.
The British Royal Mail’s new stamps featuring the official engagement portraits taken by world-renowned photographer Mario Testino.

LONDON (AP) – Britain’s Royal Mail is celebrating Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding with a new set of stamps that feature their official engagement portraits.

Two pictures of the couple taken by fashion and celebrity photographer Mario Testino will be printed on the set of commemorative stamps, which can be ordered beginning April 7.

The Royal Mail said Tuesday the collectibles have been approved by William and will be released on April 21, the birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.

William has been featured on stamps twice before – to mark the Queen Mother’s 100th birthday on August 4, 2000, and three years later to mark his 21st birthday.

Meanwhile, Transport for London said Tuesday that William and his bride-to-be will also grace special commemorative transit cards.

____

Online: www.royalmail.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-29-11 1038GMT

 

Kamelot’s Garden and Architectural Antique Auction in bloom April 9

Antique bronze fountain having acorn finial top, circa 1890. Estimate: $2,500-$3,500. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.

Antique bronze fountain having acorn finial top, circa 1890. Estimate: $2,500-$3,500. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Antique bronze fountain having acorn finial top, circa 1890. Estimate: $2,500-$3,500. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
PHILADELPHIA – Kamelot Auction House will conduct its sixth annual Garden and Architectural Antique Auction, one of the most important garden-themed antiques markets in the nation, on Saturday, April 9. Doors open at 8 a.m. and bidding begins at 10 a.m. The public is invited to preview the items on April 6-8.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

“Our annual Garden and Architectural Antique Auction has become a springtime tradition in Philadelphia and is an established source for both professional and individual buyers across the country,” said Jeff Kamal, president and CEO of Kamelot Auction House. “The sale offers residential gardeners an opportunity to furnish their outdoor living areas with flair and originality, and offers professional designers and seasoned auction-goers rare and very special garden antiques.”

This annual auction event also promises a well-honed selection of statuary, fountains, urns and planters and other decorative arts for the outdoors, as well as antique, vintage and modern garden furniture, stained and leaded glass, iron gates and balcony panels, lighting, fireplace elements and garden sculptures. This year’s event also includes a majestic nineteenth century French carved marble fountain attributed to Pierre Victor Sappey incorporating a classical figure of a young male with serpent, to a very fine exceptionally detailed American Victorian cast-iron James Bebe twig bench circa 1870, as well as the following:

  • Baroque-style carved garden fountain having two seated putti with grape clusters circa 1940;
  • Two door zinc watering cabinet circa 1920;
  • A Georgian life sized antique carved marble bust of gentleman with classical draped gown circa 1840;
  • Signed cast iron garden benches in the grape pattern circa 1920;
  • An American Victorian cast iron Labrador retriever, generally attributed to Putnam, Vermont, with remains of old paint circa 1880;
  • A pair of vintage French wrought iron garden gates having overall scroll and ball decoration circa 1920.

The catalog for the Garden and Architecture Antique Auction including photo galleries and detailed descriptions of every lot can be viewed at www.kamelotauctions.com. For more information about this sale, or to inquire about how to participate in an upcoming event, call 215-438-6990.

Kamelot Auctions is located in an historic Atwater Kent Building, 4700 Wissahickon Ave., Suite 107, in Northwestern Philadelphia.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Large scale American Edith Baretto Parsons signed bronze fountain figure ‘Fish Baby,’ circa 1920. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Large scale American Edith Baretto Parsons signed bronze fountain figure ‘Fish Baby,’ circa 1920. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Exceptionally fine pair of Italian Grand Tour bronze standing deer, each signed ‘S.A.B. de Angelis & Fils, Naples 1907.’ Estimate: $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Exceptionally fine pair of Italian Grand Tour bronze standing deer, each signed ‘S.A.B. de Angelis & Fils, Naples 1907.’ Estimate: $7,000-$9,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Antique French terra-cotta garden figure of a beautiful young girl in draped gown with flaming torch, circa 1860. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Antique French terra-cotta garden figure of a beautiful young girl in draped gown with flaming torch, circa 1860. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Fine antique carved marble garden bench with scrolling acanthus leaf decoration, circa 1880. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Fine antique carved marble garden bench with scrolling acanthus leaf decoration, circa 1880. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Pair of bronze Regency-style torchieres having x-form stands supporting leaded glass globes with flame finials, circa 1900. Estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Pair of bronze Regency-style torchieres having x-form stands supporting leaded glass globes with flame finials, circa 1900. Estimate: $2,000-$3,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Nineteenth-century Italian carved marble figural fountain. Estimate: $2,500-$4,500. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Nineteenth-century Italian carved marble figural fountain. Estimate: $2,500-$4,500. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Important 19th-century French carved marble fountain attributed to Pierre Victor Sappey, with classical young male and serpent figures. Estimate: $7,000- $9,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Important 19th-century French carved marble fountain attributed to Pierre Victor Sappey, with classical young male and serpent figures. Estimate: $7,000- $9,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Exceptional carved marble satyr figure, signed ‘Prof. Andreini Firenze,’ dated 1907. Estimate: $8,000- $12,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
Exceptional carved marble satyr figure, signed ‘Prof. Andreini Firenze,’ dated 1907. Estimate: $8,000- $12,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
American Victorian cast-iron garden fountain labeled ‘Devensy & Hitzeroth, Market Street Philadelphia,’ circa 1870. Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.
American Victorian cast-iron garden fountain labeled ‘Devensy & Hitzeroth, Market Street Philadelphia,’ circa 1870. Estimate: $3,000-$6,000. Image courtesy of Kamelot Auctions.

Shapiro offers Russian art with iron-clad provenance at April 16 sale

Vyacheslav Kalinin (Russian, born 1939), ‘Devushka iz 'Pleyboya,’ (Girl from Playboy Magazine), 1986, oil on canvas, 55 1/8 inches x 39 3/8 inches, signed and dated lower left; signed, titled, and dated on the verso in Cyrillic. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.

Vyacheslav Kalinin (Russian, born 1939), ‘Devushka iz 'Pleyboya,’ (Girl from Playboy Magazine), 1986, oil on canvas, 55 1/8 inches x 39 3/8 inches, signed and dated lower left; signed, titled, and dated on the verso in Cyrillic. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Vyacheslav Kalinin (Russian, born 1939), ‘Devushka iz ‘Pleyboya,’ (Girl from Playboy Magazine), 1986, oil on canvas, 55 1/8 inches x 39 3/8 inches, signed and dated lower left; signed, titled, and dated on the verso in Cyrillic. Estimate $20,000-$30,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
NEW YORK – Gene Shapiro Auctions LLC will conduct their Spring Auction of Russian Art on Saturday, April 16, during Russian Art Week. Both the auction and a week of preview exhibition starting on April 9 will take place at the company’s location at 506 E. 74th St. on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding. The auction will begin at 10 a.m. Eastern.

Company founder Gene Shapiro, is upbeat about both the quality and quantity of works that his eponymous firm will be offering, “With rising commodity prices and prominent buying by Russian buyers in the news, many private American collectors decided that now was the time to sell works that have been in their collections for years. As a result, we were able to obtain a lot of great consignments for this auction.”

Indeed, on offer at Gene Shapiro will be more than 400 lots of paintings, bronzes, icons, enamel, silver, porcelain, rare books and maps, swords and militaria, posters, and works on paper, most of which are fresh to the market.

“We wanted to have something for everybody in this auction – from collectors of antique icons, to rare books, to buyers of Imperial Russian porcelain,” said Shapiro. “We were helped greatly in this regard by several significant consignments from American families whose grandparents were buying and importing artworks from Russia in the 1930s.”

One of these collections came from the family of Dr. Adolphus Rumreich, who served as the physician at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow from 1935-1938. While there, he and his wife, Edna Irene Hall Rumreich, assembled a sizeable collection of Russian pre-revolutionary art and books then being sold by the Soviet government. They often accompanied American Ambassador to the Soviet Union Joseph Davies and his wife, Marjorie Merriweather Post, prominent American collectors of Russian artworks of the 20th century, when they visited Torgsin and other Soviet agencies that sold antiques to foreign dignitaries.

Another American collection including important sets of Imperial porcelain and early 19th- and 18th-century icons was consigned by a family whose grandfather was a diplomat in the Italian Embassy to the Soviet Union during the 1930s, and who was actively acquiring Russian works of art during his time in Moscow.

Among the rare and exceptional works of art from these collections are a rare 18th-century icon depicting the lives and works of Saint Nikolai Chudotvorets and Saint Christopher with elaborate basmany oklad (est. $5,000-$6,000); a collection of 82 pieces of Imperial porcelain from the Babigon Service, with both Nicholas I and Nicholas II hallmarks (est. $30,000-$40,000); a finely painted 19th-century porcelain tea service by the Popov Factory (est. $8,000-$12,000); volumes II and IV from Nikolai Kutepov’s Tsarskaya Okhota Na Rusi (est. $4,000-$6,000 each), and an intricately carved wooden presentation dish from the K. Sholtz Workshop in Moscow made in 1902 (est. $4,000-$6,000).

Gene Shapiro is also excited to offer for the first time at auction an exquisite collection of superbly preserved examples of Imperial headgear, most from the Life-Guards regiments at the height of the Russian empire’s splendor. Highlights from this collection include an extremely rare Russian Imperial Nicholas I era parade “misiurka” helmet of his Imperial Majesty’s own Caucasian-Mountains Life-Guards Half-Squadron konvoi escort (est. $30,000-$40,000), as well as a rare Russian Imperial cap of a bombardier regiment’s officer from 1775, during the reign of Catherine the Great (est. $20,000-25,000).

A rare oil on canvas by Gustav Klucis, with expertise from the Tretyakov Museum, depicting a seated abstract nude, is estimated at $200,000-$300,000. Two paintings by the important Russian émigré artist Abraham Manievich from a private American collection, one of a town view (est. $20,000-$25,000) and the other an oil on canvas of a winter scene ($15,000-$20,000) are prominently featured and highly accomplished works by the artist. Likewise, a 1948 portrait by the important futurist artist David Burliuk with characteristic bravura brushwork and vibrant palette goes on the block with an estimate of $30,000-$40,000. Other works in the sale include paintings by well-known Russian painters such as Vladimir Aralov, Eugene and Leonid Berman, Mikhail Guzhavin, Stepan Kolesnikoff, Alexei Korzukhin, Alexander Makovsky, Konstantin Makovsky, Sacha Moldovan, Pavel Naumov, Vassili Polenov, Jean Pougny, Sergei Soudeikine, Feodor Sychkov, Pavel Tchelitchew, Alexandra Venetsianova, Ilya Zankowski, and Richard Karlovich Zommer.

Contemporary artworks by the well-known names of Russian contemporary art also play a significant role in the auction. From the family of a private American collector who was purchasing works in the 1980s and 1990s, comes a large-scale oil on canvas by Leonid Purygin (1951-1996) depicting the artist crossing the Atlantic Ocean to visit the Metropolitan Museum in New York (est. $30,000-$40,000). From the same collection, is another large work by Vyacheslav Kalinin, Girl from Playboy, which was exhibited at the retrospective exhibition of the artist at Nakhamkin Fine Arts in the 1980s and illustrated in the catalog accompanying the exhibition (est. $20,000-$30,000). Other works in the auction by prominent Russian contemporary artists include those by artists including Alexander Arefiev, Vagrich Bakhchanyan, Grisha Bruskin, Eduard Gorokhovsky, Ilya Kabakov, Vasily Kafanov, Valery Koshlyakov, Dmitry Krasnopevtsev, Lev Meshberg, Vyacheslav Mikhailov, Evgeny Mikhnov-Voitenko, Tatiana Nazarenko, Natalia Nesterova, Shimon Okshteyn, Boris Orlov, Dmitry Plavinsky, Alexander Roitburd, Mikhail Roginsky, Vladimir Shagin, Leonid Sokov, Boris Sveshnikov, Nikolai Vechtomov, and Anatoly Zverev.

There will be several choice lots of European, American and Latin American works such as a rare Lynn Chadwick bronze from the Elektra series, a striking op-art piece from the prominent Colombian artist Omar Rayo, and an early assemblage of paint tubes by the French-American conceptualist Arman. Other non-Russian artists in the auction include works by Gonzalo Ariza, Christian Berard, Narcisse Diaz de la Pena, Chaim Gross, Jean Jansem, Paul Lemagny, Reuvin Rubin, Arthur Szyk, Victor Vasarely, and Alexander Helwig Wyant.

All of the works in the April 16 sale will be exhibited for a full week before the auction at Gene Shapiro Auctions LLC’s location on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, 506 E. 74th St., New York, NY 10021. For details call 212-717-7500.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Volume IV of Nikolai Kutepov’s four-volume set chronicling  the Imperial Hunt in Russia from the late 18th to 19th centuries. The leather-bound book published in 1911 carries a $4,000-$6,000 estimate. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Volume IV of Nikolai Kutepov’s four-volume set chronicling the Imperial Hunt in Russia from the late 18th to 19th centuries. The leather-bound book published in 1911 carries a $4,000-$6,000 estimate. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Abraham Manievich (Russian 1881-1942), ‘Quiet Autumn Day,’ oil on board, with another, unfinished, painting of a busy street scene on the verso, 22 3/8 x 26 1/2 inches, signed lower right. Estimate: $20,000-25,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Abraham Manievich (Russian 1881-1942), ‘Quiet Autumn Day,’ oil on board, with another, unfinished, painting of a busy street scene on the verso, 22 3/8 x 26 1/2 inches, signed lower right. Estimate: $20,000-25,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Arthur Szyk (Polish American, 1894-1951), ‘Hitler Caught,’ 1942, gouache and pencil on paper, 13 3/4 x 13 3/8 inches. Estimate: $6,500-8,500. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Arthur Szyk (Polish American, 1894-1951), ‘Hitler Caught,’ 1942, gouache and pencil on paper, 13 3/4 x 13 3/8 inches. Estimate: $6,500-8,500. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Lynn Chadwick (British, 1914-2003), ‘Sitting Elektra IV,’ 1968, bronze and polished bronze, artist's cast, edition of four, 24 1/4 inches high. Estimate: $40,000-60,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Lynn Chadwick (British, 1914-2003), ‘Sitting Elektra IV,’ 1968, bronze and polished bronze, artist’s cast, edition of four, 24 1/4 inches high. Estimate: $40,000-60,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Omar Rayo (Colombian, 1928-2010), ‘Ibawabi,’ 1975, acrylic on canvas, 26 x 26 inches), $15,000-20,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Omar Rayo (Colombian, 1928-2010), ‘Ibawabi,’ 1975, acrylic on canvas, 26 x 26 inches), $15,000-20,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Russian porcelain tea service,  28 pieces total, Popov Manufactory, 19th century, $8,000-10,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Russian porcelain tea service, 28 pieces total, Popov Manufactory, 19th century, $8,000-10,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Russian gilt silver and onyx charka, 17th century. Estimate: $6,000-8,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.
Russian gilt silver and onyx charka, 17th century. Estimate: $6,000-8,000. Gene Shapiro Auctions image.

Delta Blues Museum breaks ground on Muddy Waters wing

This autographed publicity photo of blues legend Muddy Waters sold for $1,400 in June. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Profiles in History.
This autographed publicity photo of blues legend Muddy Waters sold for $1,400 in June. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Profiles in History.
This autographed publicity photo of blues legend Muddy Waters sold for $1,400 in June. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Profiles in History.

CLARKSDALE, Miss. (AP) – Construction has started on a $1.4 million addition at the Delta Blues Museum to honor Muddy Waters.

Ground was broken this past week.

Museum director Shelley Ritter says the two-story wing will include the remains of the cabin from Stovall Farms where Waters grew up.

Ritter says other new exhibits in the wing would feature the history of Clarksdale’s blues culture as told by the musicians and the music they created.

Waters was born in Rolling Fork in 1915. He was raised in Clarksdale after his mother died. In 1943, he moved to Chicago where his musical career took off. Waters died in 1983.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-29-11 1007GMT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This autographed publicity photo of blues legend Muddy Waters sold for $1,400 in June. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Profiles in History.
This autographed publicity photo of blues legend Muddy Waters sold for $1,400 in June. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Profiles in History.

Vivid World War II posters stir up deep emotions 70 years later

Dec. 7, 1941, was the day Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, plunging the United States into World War II. The Office of War Information issued this poster in 1942. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dec. 7, 1941, was the day Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, plunging the United States into World War II. The Office of War Information issued this poster in 1942. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Dec. 7, 1941, was the day Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, plunging the United States into World War II. The Office of War Information issued this poster in 1942. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
CINCINNATI (AP) – The war has long been over. GIs who fought it are a vanishing breed.

Somehow, 346 flimsy World War II propaganda posters that sat in a box for 66 years still look brand new.

“They’ve never seen the light of day,” said Vernon Rader. The posters from the 86-year-old retired Procter & Gamble art director’s recently downsized collection are on display, for sale and up for auction at Humler & Nolan auction house in Cincinnati.

“These posters were folded before they left the printing plant, laid flat in a box and never displayed,” Rader added. “That’s why their colors look so vivid.”

The word “vivid” also describes the posters’ graphic images and messages. They contain:

Warnings about loose lips sinking ships. A sailor’s lifeless body washes up on shore as a ship sinks on the horizon on a poster declaring: “a careless word . . . A NEEDLESS LOSS.”

Subtle sales pitches to buy war bonds. A Renoir-esque rendering of a farmer in a field of wheat near the words: “Our Good Earth . . . Keep It Ours, BUY WAR BONDS.”

Recycling hints. The mantra “use it up – wear it out – make it do” headlines a scene of a woman patching a pair of pants.

Reminders of revenge. A huge fist shakes above “Avenge December 7” as the words loom over the outline of the battleship USS Arizona exploding at Pearl Harbor.

Demonic depictions of the enemy, which in today’s sensitive light appear politically incorrect. Beneath the words, “Factory FIRES help the JAPS,” a burning plant sends up fiendish flames bearing a strong resemblance to the face of Japan’s vile Prime Minister Hideki Tojo.

Scenes of war’s aftermath. A sailor leans on his crutches to say: “Take it from me, brother – WE’VE STILL GOT A BIG JOB TO DO!” The sailor has but one leg.

“The government made these posters to be hung in public places,” Rader said. “I remember seeing them in post offices and barber shops and on factory bulletin boards in my little home town in North Carolina before I went off to war.”

Rader, of Mount Auburn, served during World War II in the Army’s Transportation Corps. He saw action during “20 overseas crossings.” He made it back in one piece, enrolled in the University of Cincinnati’s industrial design department and spent 40 years at P&G.

He came across the posters early in his career with the hometown industrial giant. A salesman, Rader recalled, came into his office and “noticed the stuff I had collected on my shelves.”

The salesman told the art director he knew someone “back East” with a huge collection of old World War II posters. Was he interested?

Rader was. A deal was struck. The posters, all 346 of them, arrived in one box. Rader initially offered to pay $30. But when he saw how much postage the guy had spent to ship the box, he wrote a check for $45.

“That was good money for those kind of posters in the early ’60s,” Rader said.

Today, these posters are garnering even better money.

“World War II posters in good shape can be priced from $200 to $3,000,” said Carol Leadenham, an archivist at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. The institution possesses 100,000 propaganda posters, the largest holding of its kind in the world.

“Finding these kind of posters in good condition is not common,” she said. “Finding this many posters in good condition is rare.”

Fifty years ago, when Rader bought 346 posters for $45, “not many people were collecting these old things,” Leadenham noted.

“Museums were throwing them out. They were printed on thin, cheap paper, a cut above newsprint. They weren’t designed to last more than a month and then they were supposed to be thrown away, replaced by the next poster. Many institutions considered these works to be beneath them.”

One institution’s trash, however, is the Hoover’s treasure. “We’ve been holding onto paper ephemera since 1919,” Leadenham said.

Most of Rader’s 346 posters were produced by the Office of War Information. All of them were printed between 1942 and 1945.

“The office commissioned many of the most famous commercial artists of the day,” Leadenham said. Names on the posters have lost much of their fame, except for Norman Rockwell.

“These posters were designed to have an effect on people,” Leadenham said, “to make them do something – Buy War Bonds! – or think bad thoughts about the enemy or remember our values.”

The Office of War Information placed its posters into five categories, the five Ns: The nature of our Allies. The nature of our enemy. The need to work. The need to sacrifice. The need to fight.

All five categories are represented in the holdings of the Hoover Institution and Rader’s collection.

Both have Rockwell’s famous Four Freedoms – “Freedom of Speech,” “Freedom of Worship,” “Freedom from Fear” and, the much-parodied Thanksgiving dinner table scene accompanying “Freedom from Want.” A set of four, original, 28-by-40-inch posters can be had on eBay for $3,000.

At Humler & Nolan’s June 4 auction, other Rockwells are estimated to fetch as much as $1,800 each.

Examples from the Office of War Information’s “This is the Enemy” series cross the line of political correctness.

One dark-toned and dark-themed “This is the Enemy” poster features a Nazi’s hand clutching a dagger stabbing a Bible. Others feature Japanese soldiers “whose features make them look like bugs,” Leadenham said.

“You have to put these posters into context,” she added.

“This is not to say the images are nice. But you have to understand what was going on back then. We were at war. American troops were being tortured. And killed. These posters reflected emotions the country felt.”

Rader recalled the emotions the posters stirred in him.

“They got you worked up,” he said. “Those posters reminded you what we were fighting for. They made you want to buy war bonds.”

He paused.

“I wonder why we don’t have posters like this today,” he said. “They might help us pay for those wars we are waging overseas.”

___

Information from: The Cincinnati Enquirer,

http://www.enquirer.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-ES-03-26-11 1704EDT

 

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Dec. 7, 1941, was the day Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, plunging the United States into World War II. The Office of War Information issued this poster in 1942. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.v
Dec. 7, 1941, was the day Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, plunging the United States into World War II. The Office of War Information issued this poster in 1942. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Anton Otto Fischer created this poster for the U.S. Office of War Information in 1943. It warned against the inadvertent disclosure of war-related information. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Anton Otto Fischer created this poster for the U.S. Office of War Information in 1943. It warned against the inadvertent disclosure of war-related information. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

EBay to buy GSI Commerce for $2.4 billion

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Online marketplace operator EBay said Monday that it will pay $2.4 billion for GSI Commerce, which operates websites for retailers like Toys R Us and Bath & Body Works.

EBay Inc., which runs its namesake site where users buy and sell items through auctions and fixed-price “Buy it Now” formats as well as online payments service PayPal, hopes the acquisition will bolster its ability to connect buyers and sellers around the world. It could also help it become more of a threat to Amazon.com Inc.

GSI runs websites, packs and ships products and offers interactive marketing services to a variety of retailers. It has long-term contracts with 180 retailers, including Radio Shack, Ace Hardware and American Eagle Outfitters.

Shares of GSI, which is based in King of Prussia, Pa., surged 51 percent, or $9.82, to $29.20.

EBay has been working on improving its eBay.com website by doing things such as revamping its home page, cutting upfront listing fees it charges sellers and bolstering its search engine. In an interview, eBay CEO John Donahoe said the GSI deal fits in with his company’s efforts to help retailers grow.

“Commerce is at an inflection point where the lines between online and offline commerce are blurring,” he said. “We see retailers of all sizes, merchants of all sizes, looking for partners that can help them grow their businesses.”

Lots of businesses need help doing things like generating demand for products, running their websites, delivering goods to customers and growing their mobile sales, Donahoe said. GSI does this for large companies, and eBay and PayPal do this for small- and medium-sized companies, he said, which makes the acquisition a natural fit.

The purchase might also help eBay compete with Seattle-based Amazon, which, in addition to selling many items directly, allows merchants to sell their products through its site and offers product fulfillment services, too.

EBay is already involved with GSI through PayPal, which was integrated with GSI customers’ sites last year, Donahoe said. He hopes that the purchase will also result in some of the companies GSI works with selling their goods on eBay.com.

Forrester Research analyst Brian Walker said the acquisition is a good move for eBay since it adds diversity to its business and gives the company access to larger merchants and merchant services that have traditionally shied away from selling on its site.

“It makes them a solution for large, regular-price retailers and consumer brands who would not see eBay or PayPal as solutions,” he said.

The price seems high, he said, but it reflects the growing importance of the Web and mobile commerce.

San Jose-based eBay said it will pay $29.25 per share, a 51 percent premium to GSI’s closing stock price on Friday. The $2.4 billion total is the second-largest amount eBay has paid for another company thus far – in 2005 eBay paid at least $2.6 billion for Internet calling and messaging service Skype, which it has since sold.

As part of the acquisition, eBay plans to sell GSI’s licensed sports merchandise business and 70 percent of shopping sites RueLaLa.com and ShopRunner.com.

EBay hopes to complete the deal in the third quarter. It says its 2011 net income per share will be 30 cents to 34 cents lower than its earlier outlook. In January, it had forecast earnings of $1.56 to $1.61 per share. Its adjusted earnings won’t be affected. The company had forecast adjusted earnings of $1.90 to $1.95 per share in January.

The company expects the acquisition of GSI to add to its earnings per share in 2012.

Shares of eBay fell $1.36, or 4.3 percent, to $30.34.

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AP Technology Writer Barbara Ortutay in New York contributed to this report.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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