View of the main gate at former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. August 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Britain contributes to Auschwitz preservation fund

View of the main gate at former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. August 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

View of the main gate at former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. August 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

WARSAW (AFP) – Britain will contribute 2.1 million pounds (2.4 million euros, 3.4 million dollars) to help preserve the site of Nazi German death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the British embassy in Poland said Thursday.

“I am determined that the government should take an active approach to preserving the memory of the Holocaust,” British Foreign Secretary William Hague was quoted as saying in an embassy statement. “Auschwitz-Birkenau is a searing reminder of the horrific consequences of intolerance and hatred. It should never been forgotten,” he added.

The camp was set up by Germany in occupied Poland during World War II. Over the decades since the conflict ended, 95 percent of the annual costs of preserving the site – now around five million euros – has met by the Polish state and revenues from publications and guided tours.

In 2009, Poland launched a 120-million-euro appeal, aiming to create an endowment that would ensure the site’s long-term future.

Auschwitz-Birkenau is the most notorious, and enduring, symbol of the Holocaust, Nazi Germany’s wartime campaign of genocide against Europe’s Jews.

A year after invading Poland in 1939, the Nazis opened what was to become a vast complex on the edge of the southern town of Oswiecim – “Auschwitz” in German. They later expanded it to the nearby village of Brzezinka, or Birkenau. Of the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust, one million were murdered at the site, mostly in its notorious gas chambers, along with tens of thousands of others including Poles and Soviet prisoners of war.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


View of the main gate at former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. August 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

View of the main gate at former Nazi death camp of Birkenau. August 2006 photo by Angelo Celedon, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Huguette Clark (right) circa 1917 in Butte, Mont., with her sister Andrée (left) and her father William A. Clark. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

In Memoriam: Mining heiress Huguette Clark, 104

Huguette Clark (right) circa 1917 in Butte, Mont., with her sister Andrée (left) and her father William A. Clark. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Huguette Clark (right) circa 1917 in Butte, Mont., with her sister Andrée (left) and her father William A. Clark. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NEW YORK (AP) – Huguette Clark, a 104-year-old heiress to a Montana copper fortune who once lived in the largest apartment on New York City’s Fifth Avenue, died Tuesday at a Manhattan hospital, as prosecutors were looking into her care and how her finances were being handled.

The reclusive Clark spent the last two decades of her life in New York City hospitals.

“Madame Clark’s passing is a sad event for all those who have loved and respected her over the years,” her attorney, Wallace Bock, said in a statement released by his attorney, Robert J. Anello. “She died as she wanted, with dignity and privacy, and we intend to continue to respect her request for privacy.”

The Manhattan district attorney’s office has been looking into how her affairs were managed, people familiar with the probe have said. Bock and Clark’s accountant, Irving Kamsler, were in charge of a fortune estimated at a half-billion dollars.

No criminal charges have been filed against either Bock or Kamsler. Both have denied any wrongdoing in their dealings with Clark; their lawyers declined to comment Tuesday on the investigation.

“During her life and in her passing she always wanted to maintain her privacy, and we are going to continue that request,” said Elizabeth Crotty, who represents Kamsler.

Distant relatives said they never saw Clark and feared she may not have understood decisions the two men made for her.

Clark inherited the riches amassed by her father in Montana’s mining industry. William A. Clark was one of America’s wealthiest men and built railroads across the country, founding Las Vegas in the process. Nevada’s Clark County is named for him.

Huguette Clark was born in 1906, when her 67-year-old father was a U.S. senator representing Montana and was married to a 28-year-old Michigan woman named Anna Eugenia La Chapelle. He died in 1925.

At 22, she married a poor bank clerk studying law, but they parted ways after only nine months.

As of last year, Clark still owned a 42-room, multifloor apartment at 907 Fifth Ave.; a Connecticut castle surrounded by 52 acres of land; and a Santa Barbara, Calif., mansion built on a 23-acre bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

Beginning in the 1960s, after her mother died, Clark rarely left her Fifth Avenue home overlooking Central Park. She was rarely seen by building staff, who delivered whatever she needed.

She moved into a hospital in the 1980s.

Clark shunned most visitors and left decisions in the hands of Bock – from bidding on vintage dolls at auction to settling disputes among her nurses.

But Clark “has always been a strong-willed individual with firm convictions about how her life should be led and who should be privy to her affairs,” Bock said in an affidavit filed in court last year.

The Manhattan district attorney’s office also prosecuted the case involving Brooke Astor, another heiress whose son was convicted of colluding with her attorney to steal millions of dollars from her.

In September, three of Clark’s relatives – she was a great-aunt or great-great-aunt to each – asked a Manhattan judge to appoint a guardian for her.

Citing news reports and other information, the relatives accused the attorney and accountant of exercising “improper influence” over Clark and limiting family member’s contact with her.

The relatives – Ian Devine and Carla Hall Friedman, of New York, and Karine Albert McCall, of Washington, D.C. – said Clark was at risk of personal and financial harm” from Wallace and Bock.

In addition, the relatives said, the men falsely claimed she did not want to see them.

But state Supreme Court Justice Laura Visitacion-Lewis rebuffed the request for a guardian, writing that the relatives relied on hearsay and “speculative assertions” that Huguette Clark was incapacitated.

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Associated Press writer Jennifer Peltz contributed to this report.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-25-11 0142GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Huguette Clark (right) circa 1917 in Butte, Mont., with her sister Andrée (left) and her father William A. Clark. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Huguette Clark (right) circa 1917 in Butte, Mont., with her sister Andrée (left) and her father William A. Clark. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg addresses the e-G8 gathering of Internet bosses in Paris. AFP image.

VIDEO: Facebook founder says Internet will further empower people

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg addresses the e-G8 gathering of Internet bosses in Paris. AFP image.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg addresses the e-G8 gathering of Internet bosses in Paris. AFP image.

PARIS – Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg says social networking is “quite primitive” compared to the exciting possibilities that lie ahead. Zuckerberg told the e-G8 gathering of Internet bosses in Paris that his global social networking site cannot take credit for enabling the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, in which protestors coordinated their efforts online.

“Facebook was neither necessary nor sufficient for any of those things to happen,” the 27-year-old New Yorker said.

Video copyright AFP.


ADDITIONAL VIDEO OF NOTE


LeRoy Neiman is famous for his sporting paintings, like this portrait of racing great Dan Gurney. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Clark’s Fine Art & Auctioneers Inc.

LeRoy and Janet Neiman give $5M to Chicago art school

LeRoy Neiman is famous for his sporting paintings, like this portrait of racing great Dan Gurney. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Clark’s Fine Art & Auctioneers Inc.

LeRoy Neiman is famous for his sporting paintings, like this portrait of racing great Dan Gurney. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Clark’s Fine Art & Auctioneers Inc.

CHICAGO (AP) – Artist LeRoy Neiman and his wife are giving $5 million to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for a new student center.

Neiman and Janet Byrne Neiman both attended the school.

In a news release, the school says the money will help fund what will be called the LeRoy Neiman Center. The Neimans will also donate a 56-foot-long, 8-foot-tall mural called Summertime Along the Indiana Dunes that Neiman created with the help of his wife. The painting will be displayed at the student center.

Neiman is best known for his Salvador Dali mustache and his colorful paintings of prominent sporting figures such as Muhammad Ali. He was the official artist at five Olympiads.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-25-11 1103GMT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


LeRoy Neiman is famous for his sporting paintings, like this portrait of racing great Dan Gurney. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Clark’s Fine Art & Auctioneers Inc.

LeRoy Neiman is famous for his sporting paintings, like this portrait of racing great Dan Gurney. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Clark’s Fine Art & Auctioneers Inc.

Selection of hand-painted porcelain potpourris. Morton Kuehnert image.

Morton Kuehnert launches online-only Encore! sales May 30

Selection of hand-painted porcelain potpourris. Morton Kuehnert image.

Selection of hand-painted porcelain potpourris. Morton Kuehnert image.

HOUSTON – Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers is launching an online-only Encore! auction on Memorial Day, May 30, to be run exclusively through www.LiveAuctioneers.com. A total of 126 lots will be offered.

The auction will commence at 1 p.m. Central Time and will include lots from European shipments, family estates, personal collections and local businesses. Opening bids on each of the lots will be below the low estimate.

Highlights include lot 54, a grouping of 22 pieces of furniture and decorative items that could prove to be a bonanza for anyone wanting to furnish a new or vacation home, or just add some fresh pieces to their existing décor. The selection includes a painted-iron outdoor set, tray tables, three wicker bar stools, two tufted leather chairs, two upholstered benches, four upholstered armchairs, two sofas, a side table, floor lamp and miscellaneous cushions and pillows. The presale estimate is $100-$150.

Lot 30, a beautiful Louis XV style-chest-on-chest, is estimated at $300-400; while lot 36, a trio of hand-painted porcelain pieces by makers Capodimonte, Ovington Bros. and Royal Vienna, is estimated at $75-$150.

Lot 22 is an Indian Kilim rug measuring 5 ft. by 7 ft. 9 inches. It is expected to make $75-$150. Another attractive textile, lot 3 is a delicate vintage hand-made Japanese silk gown and robe, size 4, estimated at $100-$200.

Lot 27, a 14K white gold sapphire and diamond ring, size 6¾, is estimated at $1,500-$2,500.

For additional information on any item in the auction, contact specialist Marlene Weyand at Morton Kuehnert Auctioneers & Appraisers by calling 713-827-7835, ext. 230 or e-mail mweyand@mortonkuehnert.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Louis XV-style chest-on-chest. Morton Kuehnert image.

Louis XV-style chest-on-chest. Morton Kuehnert image.

Indian Kilim rug. Morton Kuehnert image.

Indian Kilim rug. Morton Kuehnert image.

Sapphire and diamond ring. Morton Kuehnert image.

Sapphire and diamond ring. Morton Kuehnert image.

Historian, author David McCullough in 2007. Photo by Brett Weinstein. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5

David McCullough’s new book: ‘The Greater Journey’

Historian, author David McCullough in 2007. Photo by Brett Weinstein. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5

Historian, author David McCullough in 2007. Photo by Brett Weinstein. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5

WASHINGTON (AP) – It’s hard to keep up with David McCullough at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery.

“I think it’s one of the real treasures of the capital city, really of the country,” says the 77-year-old historian during a recent afternoon interview, excited as a school boy as he walks quickly along hallways, up and down stairs, from room to room.

“Here’s the painting I wanted to show you,” he says, stopping in front of an oil portrait by Abraham Archibald Anderson of a pensive, bow-tied Thomas Edison.

“This has a nice story. Edison came to the World’s Fair in Paris in 1889. That was the fair that introduced the Eiffel Tower to the world. He had some 400 of his inventions on display and was a sensation. The crowds followed him everywhere. The electric light was already transforming Paris, let alone the world. So he hid to get away from the paparazzi and the crowds. He stayed with a friend of his (Anderson), and Anderson painted this portrait of him while he was in the studio.”

He points out George Catlin’s sketches of American Indians, and a bronze bust of Abraham Lincoln by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. George Healy is a special passion. McCullough marvels over Healy’s portraits of fiery eyed South Carolina senator John C. Calhoun; a semi-casual Union general William Tecumseh Sherman, coat unbuttoned, hat in hand; a youthful take of Lincoln, painted in Illinois the year before he was elected president; a confident Confederate general Pierre G.T. Beauregard, straight-backed and arms folded.

“He painted this at the time of the attack on Fort Sumter. It ran only a short while after he had painted Lincoln in Illinois,” McCullough says of Healy. “The guy is like Forrest Gump. He keeps showing up wherever history is going on.”

The artists he discusses share two vital qualities, McCullough says. They all spent at least some time in Paris and they all are in the same business as he is. They are historians, documenting the people, the customs and the conflicts of a given era.

McCullough believes that artists share the glory of the presidents and military leaders he has celebrated, and he honors the creative spirit in his new book The Greater Journey. It’s a new telling of a classic American experience – living in Paris – inspired by the most dreary of American experiences, the traffic jam. McCullough was stuck a few years ago in Washington’s Sheridan Circle, where he had little better to do than stare at the equestrian statue of the circle’s namesake, Union general Philip Sheridan.

“I was looking over at him and wondering how many people who drive around this circle every day had any idea who he was,” McCullough says as he drinks from a cup of lemonade in the museum’s courtyard. “And at the same time I was thinking about that, Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue was playing on the radio.

“And I thought, ‘Who is the more important person in American history. Who is the more important expression of who we are?’” he says. “And Rhapsody in Blue started me thinking about Gershwin’s An American in Paris. I grew up in Pittsburgh. (American in Paris star) Gene Kelly grew up in Pittsburgh. And it all sort of connects.”

McCullough won a Pulitzer Prize a decade ago for his biography of John Adams and his new book is meant to validate Adams’ belief that his generation should study war and politics so that the grandchildren can pursue the fine arts. The Greater Journey begins decades after the Revolutionary War has been won, in the 1830s. McCullough ends in the early 20th century and doesn’t bother with the stories he reasons that readers already know: Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin in the 1780s; Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald in the 1920s.

Instead, he tells of novelist James Fenimore Cooper befriending painter and future inventor Samuel Morse, Catlin arriving with an entourage of Iowa Indians, the parallel lives of painters Mary Cassatt and John Singer Sargent, who stayed and worked in Paris around the same time but hardly knew each other.

He frames the narrative, in part, around visits by author and lecturer Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. He is first seen as a medical student eager for distance from his Puritan father, then 50 years later, as a widower and international celebrity, paying an unannounced visit to Louis Pasteur so he could “look in his face and take his hand, nothing more.” Midway through the book, McCullough devotes a long section to the German siege of Paris in 1870-71 and quotes extensively from rarely seen journals by the U.S. ambassador to France, Elihu Washburne.

“That’s one of the biggest pleasures – that I learned so much. I love it when I’m learning something. That for me is the pull of the work,” he says. “I had a terrific time with every book I’ve written, but this is the best time I’ve ever had. I’ve had more pure joy in writing this book. Structurally, the form is my own creation. I cast it with my own characters. There’s no obligatory group I had to write about, no narrative chronology I had to follow.”

McCullough is a million-selling author, a two-time Pulitzer-winning biographer of presidents Adams and Harry Truman, and perhaps the most recognized historian alive today, with his white hair, jowls and fatherly baritone. But as a boy, and as a young man, he wanted to paint. At age 10, he was dazzled when his art teacher, Miss Mavis Bridgewater, demonstrated the two-point perspective on the blackboard. In college, Yale University, he worked at being a portrait artist.

If artists are really historians, then historians, ideally, are artists, he says. He sees himself as a kind of painter, “drawn to the human subject,” he once wrote, “to people and their stories.”

Paris, of course, is part of the landscape. He remembers visiting the city for the first time, in 1961, arriving in winter late at night, taking a long walk in the rain with his wife, Rosalee. For The Greater Journey, he flew over at least once a year, staying for two weeks. Just as he once re-enacted the morning walks of Truman in Washington, he wanted to make sure he had a firsthand sense of events in Paris.

“I would go over to see how much I got wrong – by walking the walk, soaking it up, timing my walk from an apartment to the artist’s studio,” he says.

McCullough was a writer and editor at the United States Information Agency when he first landed in Paris. He soon joined the history magazine American Heritage and while there worked on his first book, The Johnstown Flood. Released in 1968, Johnstown told of the 1889 disaster, the Hurricane Katrina of its day, that overwhelmed the town of Johnstown, Pa., and killed more than 2,000 people. He followed with a story of success, The Great Bridge, published in 1972 and still regarded as the definitive account of the building of the Brooklyn Bridge.

“I feel in some way I’m coming back full circle. The Brooklyn Bridge is a great creation. It is a work of art, an American emblem, just as those pieces of sculpture by Saint-Gaudens are emblems,” he says, adding that publishers had wanted to write about the Chicago Fire or other disasters.

McCullough says he loves the 19th century because of all the extraordinary changes – the telegraph, the telephone, the steam engine, the electric light. His latest book, though, comes during a 21st-century revolution. The Greater Journey is the first full-length McCullough release since 2005, before the Kindle, Nook or other e-book devices. The new market could test even an author as beloved as McCullough. The announced first printing is big, around 500,000 copies, but less than half the 1.25 million for 1776, which came out well before Borders was shuttering stores around the country. And McCullough’s editor, Bob Bender at Simon & Schuster, doesn’t expect The Greater Journey to be a major e-book seller.

“My guess is that e-book sales will be small,” Bender says. “This is the kind of book people will want to keep on their shelves. If we can toot our own horn a bit, it’s a beautiful book, and the images are better seen on paper. This book really makes the case for the physical book.”

McCullough doesn’t deny that he “lives in a different time.” He writes letters, not emails, and uses a manual typewriter. He doesn’t know a thing about computers, and although he was a longtime commentator for the PBS show The American Experience, he doesn’t bother with TV. He had no idea that his publisher had set up a website about his book, www.davidmccullough.com.

He recently purchased a home in an old American city, Boston, and is far more tuned in to the 18th and 19th centuries, not just to the major historical events but to individual stories, to the art and the literature. Asked when he would have preferred to live, he mentions the 1880s in Paris, around the time the Eiffel Tower was built.

McCullough may have a go at the 20th century for his next book: He’s interested in 1913, the year before World War I began, when the United States enacted the federal income tax and the towering Woolworth Building in New York opened. But he has not committed himself to a subject, or even to a schedule. He might even take a break and turn full time to an old passion.

“I’m not 52 anymore,” he says. “I’d like to paint for a year; might just do that. I love it, do it all the time.”

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-25-11 1254GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Historian, author David McCullough in 2007. Photo by Brett Weinstein. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5

Historian, author David McCullough in 2007. Photo by Brett Weinstein. Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5

The 1959 commemorative Abraham Lincoln stamp is based on George Healy’s portrait. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The 1959 commemorative Abraham Lincoln stamp is based on George Healy’s portrait. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Karol Wight. Image courtesy of the Corning Museum of Glass.

Karol Wight named director of Corning Museum of Glass

Karol Wight. Image courtesy of the Corning Museum of Glass.

Karol Wight. Image courtesy of the Corning Museum of Glass.

CORNING, N.Y. – Karol Wight, senior curator of antiquities at the Getty Villa and internationally renowned specialist in Roman glass, has been  named the next executive director of the Corning Museum of Glass, the world’s foremost museum dedicated to the art, history, and science of glass. Wight will succeed David Whitehouse, who has been executive director of the Museum since 1999.

Currently head of the Department of Antiquities of the J. Paul Getty Museum, located at the Getty Villa in Malibu, Calif., Wight will assume her new post on Aug. 15. At the Corning museum, she will oversee its 45,000-object collection – the world’s most important glass collection including the finest examples of glassmaking across centuries and cultures – as well as its studio, library, programming and publications.

Whitehouse will continue his research and contributions to the museum by serving as senior scholar. The two collaborated in 2007 as co-curators of the major exhibition “Reflecting Antiquity: Modern Glass Inspired by Ancient Rome,” which was presented at the Corning Museum and the Getty Villa. Wight will be joining a management team led by president Marie McKee, who will continue to oversee Museum administration and help to define institutional strategy.

“As one of the foremost experts in the field, Karol brings experienced leadership, a keen curatorial eye, and deep knowledge of the artistry and history of glass to her new position,” said McKee. “We have been working with Karol over the past few months to plan this transition, and we are confident that she will build on the strong foundation of David’s remarkable legacy as the Museum looks ahead to a period of growth.”

In her 26-year tenure at the Getty, Wight, 52, grew from a graduate intern to become the senior curator of antiquities at the Getty Villa, the Getty Museum’s site dedicated to the study and display of its antiquities collection. She has organized numerous exhibitions exploring glass from antiquity and its enduring impact, and has published widely on the topic. Her book on ancient glassmaking techniques, Molten Color, Glassmaking in Antiquity, was published by the Getty this May.

Wight helped to oversee a $275 million renovation, expansion and reinstallation at the Villa and was instrumental in helping to create a revised acquisitions policy to ensure responsible collections development for antiquities at the Getty Museum. She has taken a key role in facilitating a successful restitution program with Italy that encompasses cultural exchanges of works of art, exhibition development, conferences and conservation projects. She received her Ph.D. from the art history department at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is a member of several international associations for the study of glass.

“I have been studying the ancient Roman glass collections at the Corning Museum since I began my dissertation research in the late 1980s, and have known the talented staff there for years,” said Wight. “I was drawn to this position not only because of the museum’s exceptional collections, but also because of its innovative public programs, on site and in the field, that help bring the art of glass to life. The museum has created a truly dynamic and engaging experience for visitors, and I look forward to working closely with my new colleagues to continue sharing the wonders of glass with the world. After the Getty, Corning has always been my second museum home.”

During his 27 years at the museum, Whitehouse has contributed to significant institutional advancement, growing its collections by more than 40 percent and leading a renovation and expansion, completed in 2000. In his role as curator of ancient and Islamic glass, he has published 15 volumes and organized nine exhibitions.

Under his leadership, the museum established the Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass, one of the finest glassmaking schools in the world. Whitehouse joined the museum in 1984 as chief curator, was named deputy director of collections in 1987, was promoted to deputy director in 1988, and became director in 1992. He was appointed to his current position as executive director in 1999.

 

Rare Pre-Columbian Colima dog with corn. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Artemis Gallery’s June 4 sale a virtual time capsule of antiquities

Rare Pre-Columbian Colima dog with corn. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Rare Pre-Columbian Colima dog with corn. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

ERIE, Colo. – Artemis Gallery Ancient Art, will conduct another exciting live auction of antiquities, Pre-Columbian and ethnographic art on Saturday June 4, 2011 through LiveAuctioneers.com.

Presented in two sessions, this fully vetted, online-only auction features 250+ lots of authentic antiquities and art from around the world. The first session starts at 8 a.m. Pacific Time (11 a.m. Eastern) with Classical antiquities from Greece, Italy, Rome, Egypt, the Middle East and the Far East. After a short break, the second session will commence, with the focus being on art from the ancient Americas – Mexico, Central/Latin America and South America – as well as ethnographic art from Africa and New Guinea.

Auction items have been consigned by prominent dealers in the United States, Canada and Europe, as well as private collectors.

The Classical lots encompass pottery, bronze, glass, faience, wood, stone, silver and gold from the Egyptian through Roman periods, plus selected examples from India, China and Thailand.

Featured Classical lots include: an Egyptian steatite pectoral with heart scarab, an Egyptian composite faience Ushabti-Psamtek, and a Romano-Egyptian plaster head of a man (ex Sotheby’s).

Greek items include an Attic white figure Lekythos and an exceptional Apulian Hydria. From India comes a Pala stone stele of Parvati.

The Pre-Columbian and Ethnographic Session is a varied offering of polychrome, pottery, stone, metal and wood artifacts and figures, and includes examples ranging in date from 1,000 BC through the early 20th century. Featured lots include a giant published, carved Mayan cylinder, a Chupicuaro female figure (ex Sotheby’s), and a rare Pre-Columbian Colima dog with corn. A Chokwe/Lwena wood stool was previously auctioned at Christie’s.

Artemis Gallery Live holds online-only auctions of antiquities, artifacts, ancient and ethnographic art from around the world. All items have been legally acquired, are legal to sell and have been vetted for authenticity.

After registering, bidders may participate in real time or leave absentee bids up to 30 minutes before either session begins. For additional information, call 720-890-7700 or 720-936-4282.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid live or absentee at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Egyptian steatite pectoral with heart scarab. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Egyptian steatite pectoral with heart scarab. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Egyptian composite faience Ushabti - Psamtek. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Egyptian composite faience Ushabti – Psamtek. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Romano-Egyptian plaster head of a man, ex Sotheby's. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Romano-Egyptian plaster head of a man, ex Sotheby’s. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Chupicuaro female figure, ex Sotheby's. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Chupicuaro female figure, ex Sotheby’s. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Chokwe/Lwena wood stool, ex Christie's. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Chokwe/Lwena wood stool, ex Christie’s. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Greek Attic white figure Lekythos. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Greek Attic white figure Lekythos. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Giant published, carved Mayan cylinder. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

Giant published, carved Mayan cylinder. Image courtesy of Artemis Gallery.

This elaborately carved wall box with drawers, circa 1930s, 18 inches tall by 12 inches wide, was offered by Florida dealer Larry Roberts. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

W. Palm Beach Antiques Festival at capacity for May event

This elaborately carved wall box with drawers, circa 1930s, 18 inches tall by 12 inches wide, was offered by Florida dealer Larry Roberts. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

This elaborately carved wall box with drawers, circa 1930s, 18 inches tall by 12 inches wide, was offered by Florida dealer Larry Roberts. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – West Palm Beach Antiques Festival owners Kay and Bill Puchstein reported another sold out house for the May 6-8 event with Florida dealers having an especially good weekend. It is no longer necessary to leave the State to find rare and outstanding antiques, said the promoters. The Friday event had some rain but by Saturday and Sunday it was long gone and sunny Florida put on its best display for the record crowds on hand to enjoy it.

Len Bartkowiak of Fort Meyers, a dealer in specialty smalls, reported selling over $100,000 worth of ivory on Friday to get the weekend off to good start with other dealers following the lead.

Greg Biaggi takes a minimalist approach to the festival, bringing only a small number of artfully restored pieces to each event. This time he sold a 1948 5-cent Coca-Cola machine for $6,800 and two slot machines, leaving him with only a 1953 10-cent Coke vending machine left in his inventory. Larry Roberts, a Micanopy, Fla. dealer, offered a hanging wall box with drawers acquired over 30 years ago at Brimfield for $875. James Holmes of Wellington, Fla., had a child-size period Hepplewhite chest with an old refinish and and a good price of $795, and he had good movement on many of his Modernism pieces.

Other Florida dealers reporting good outings included Elizabeth Bartholomew of Juno Beach, who was selected Dealer of the Month for her inventory of hand-woven Oriental clothing and accessories; Pete Hahn of Wilton Manors, who always has a great selection of books and decorator items at every show; and Deborah Gentile of Boca Raton with her stacks of vintage suitcases along with a fine display of linens and fabrics.

The summer season kicks off the two-day summer shows with the July 2-3 event. The format for the entire summer season will be the two-day affair, Saturday and Sunday, instead of the normal three-day event during the regular season. Summer show dates will be July 2-3, Aug. 6-7, Sept. 3-4 and Oct. 1-2. The summer shows have with a full day of setup for dealers on Fridays, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.

The Puchsteins have lowered booth rent for the summer season. The popular early buyers admission feature will be continued in the summer. Early admission starts at 9 a.m. on Saturday before the regular show opening time of 10 a.m.

West Palm Beach Antiques Festival is held the first full weekend of every month at the South Florida Fairgrounds located off Southern Boulevard in West Palm Beach, FL, 1 1/2 miles west of the Florida Turnpike and 1 mile east of U.S. 441/SR7.

The next show is June 3-5 with over 300 dealers in attendance. Festival hours are Friday noon-5 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Early buyer admission is Friday 9 a.m.-noon, and the early admission fee of $25 is good for all three days. Adult daily admission is $7, seniors $6, children 12 and under are admitted free. There is no charge for parking at the fairgrounds.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


This elaborately carved wall box with drawers, circa 1930s, 18 inches tall by 12 inches wide, was offered by Florida dealer Larry Roberts. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

This elaborately carved wall box with drawers, circa 1930s, 18 inches tall by 12 inches wide, was offered by Florida dealer Larry Roberts. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Bob Franks of Delray Beach, Fla., shows off an outstanding pair of French side chairs, priced $1,900 for both, among his other decorator pieces and accessories. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Bob Franks of Delray Beach, Fla., shows off an outstanding pair of French side chairs, priced $1,900 for both, among his other decorator pieces and accessories. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Greg Biaggi of Jupiter, Fla., sold the 1949 5-cent Coca-Cola vending machine (right) priced at $6,800. All he had left on Sunday afternoon was the 10-cent Coke machine from 1953 priced at $5,800. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

Greg Biaggi of Jupiter, Fla., sold the 1949 5-cent Coca-Cola vending machine (right) priced at $6,800. All he had left on Sunday afternoon was the 10-cent Coke machine from 1953 priced at $5,800. Image courtesy of the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival.

PAAM’s Hawthorne Gallery. Image courtesy of Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

Cape Cod museum to host small business computer seminars

PAAM’s Hawthorne Gallery. Image courtesy of Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

PAAM’s Hawthorne Gallery. Image courtesy of Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

PROVINCETOWN, Mass. – Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM) is planning a new summer series of evening computer seminars with tech guru David Cox, to be held at the Museum School. The series includes social networking in business, how to create a website, iPhoto and photo stitching, e-marketing, the ins and outs of the iPad, and how to get one’s business on YouTube. The seminars are aimed both at individuals and small business owners.

The seminars run on Wednesday evenings June through August. Participants do not have to own a computer, nor are there any prerequisites. The seminars can be taken as a full series or a la carte. A recent student of Cox wrote, “What makes David an amazing teacher more than anything is his seemingly never-ending amount of patience. When you’re working with older adults, sometimes it takes them a few tries before they get it. David truly works with you and never makes you feel like an idiot. What sets David apart from every other computer teacher is that he is more than just a good teacher, he’s an amazing communicator.”

David A. Cox is an Apple Certified Product Professional and offers private lessons to seniors, as well as consulting services to small businesses, and anyone wanting to know how to use their computer better. He teaches public and online seminars weekly and has over 50 Mac Tutorial Videos on YouTube, attracting over 50,000 hits. In February of 2011, David was hired to become the head Technology Writer for the popular online magazine OneNewEngland.com. David also produces and co-hosts “Tech Talk America,” a consumer friendly radio podcast which is broadcast internationally via iTunes and can be downloaded for free.

Of teaching, Cox says, “Everyone when they were young had that one teacher that just stood out. It wasn’t necessarily because they taught a subject matter that they cared about, but because the teacher showed an interest in their students and how to the engage a classroom. Teaching is not a monologue, it’s about having a dialogue with your students so that they can receive the maximum benefit. I love teaching technology to people because there is nothing more rewarding than to see someone’s face light up when they finally ‘get it.’ Or when they discover something they never thought was possible in fact is possible.”

The Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed Museum School at PAAM is committed to year-round programming, taking advantage of the talented artist-teachers who live here and students who are excited to learn from them.

Full course descriptions and registration information are available at www.paam.org or by calling 508-487-1750.

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