Articulated human skeleton, as used in study of physiology. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

New answers in mystery of restaurant’s skeleton

Articulated human skeleton, as used in study of physiology. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Articulated human skeleton, as used in study of physiology. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

SELMA, Ala. (AP) – For decades, people have been piecing together the legend of Mortimer, a 7-foot-tall human skeleton on display in a Selma restaurant. Now, it appears Mortimer himself was actually pieced together.

Long believed to the remains of an unusually tall man, Mortimer has sat on a wooden barrel for years and served as resident conversation piece for the Restaurant on Grumbles Alley. His larger-than-life legacy took a hit last week when it was discovered that Mortimer was more than a foot shorter than long believed.

The stories about Mortimer vary, with one version claiming him to be a Native American and another pinning him down as a Confederate officer who fled the area instead of sticking around to fight off Union soldiers. Several of the legends have a farmer digging up Mortimer on his property and then turning him over to a physician as payment for an outstanding medical bill.

It appears now that not only did Mortimer spend a stint as a medical specimen in a physician’s office, but that he might actually have been created in that setting, a la Frankenstein. The belief now is that Mortimer is an antique medical skeleton, meaning he is likely a composite of different people’s remains.

“We’re all going to be a little disappointed because he was a legend. But it is what it is,” said Dianne Smitherman, who owns the restaurant. “People are going to have their rumors (about him). That’s fine. He’s still a legend around here.”

In addition to his height falling short, the measuring tape betrayed Mortimer’s legend in another way. An examination by nurse midwide JoEllen Roberson showed his skull and feet were not in proportion to the rest of his body. She sent her work, along with photos of the skeleton, to experts at the Centre for Fortean Zoology and University of Copenhagen, which was potentially interested in further research if the skeleton had been abnormally tall.

They agreed that the skeleton wasn’t proportional. But since Mortimer did not quite measure up to the myth, the university wasn’t in providing additional research.

“That’s the end of it,” said Roberson, who traveled to the restaurant to pick up a toe bone for DNA analysis while visiting her home state earlier this month.

But not so fast. John Sumners, a Montgomery pediatrician, still isn’t ready to give up his theory that Mortimer could be his great-great-great-grandfather.

His great-great-great-grandfather, John Ellis Sumners, was rumored to be 6-foot-6. The elder Sumners, who worked as a minister and who served as a judge and a state legislator in his life, was traveling through the Selma area to visit a church when he became ill and died in 1856. He was buried, and as the family story goes, his body was exhumed and studied by a physician because of his unusual height.

“We know when he died. We just don’t know where the heck he is,” Sumners said. “If it is him, we would like to give him a proper burial, right next to his wife if we can.”

Sumners’ curiosity is unaffected by Mortimer’s present-day height. After all, he believes it is entirely conceivable that the skeletal remains could have shrunk because the vertebrae eventually dry out. Also, he believes it is possible that his ancestor may have been tall, but not quite 6-foot-6.

“If he was 6’3”, he would looked like a giant back then, because we were not very tall back then,” said Sumners, who said he would be willing to pay for the DNA analysis.

And there is another question to be answered besides Mortimer’s identity. What will Roberson do with Mortimer’s toe?

The small toe bone, which Roberson drove to Selma to pick up for DNA analysis, is still in her possession. Unable to send it off as planned for research, she is also not legally permitted to mail it back to the restaurant because of laws regarding the transportation of human remains.

For now, the toe bone is in good company — it is sitting snuggly in an urn that holds the remains of one of Roberson’s friends.

“I don’t know what else to do with it,” Roberson said in a telephone interview this week.

Not that it matter to Mortimerl. Currently he is dressed up in a do-rag and sunglasses for his “summer look,” according to longtime server Tenesa Howell.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-30-11 1558GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Articulated human skeleton, as used in study of physiology. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Articulated human skeleton, as used in study of physiology. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

 

Dan Morphy, CEO of Morphy Auctions, will be on the road with his team of experts during the month of July, with stops planned at several antique shows. Morphy Auctions image.

Morphy Auctions’ team of experts hitting the show circuit in July

Dan Morphy, CEO of Morphy Auctions, will be on the road with his team of experts during the month of July, with stops planned at several antique shows. Morphy Auctions image.

Dan Morphy, CEO of Morphy Auctions, will be on the road with his team of experts during the month of July, with stops planned at several antique shows. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – Dan Morphy, CEO of Morphy Auctions, and several of his on-staff experts will be visiting antique shows this month, with stops in Portland, Seattle, Allentown, Pa., and Anaheim, California.

Morphy and his team have issued an open invitation to collectors who may have an interest in obtaining a free evaluation of their collection and information on how to consign to a future auction. Visits can be arranged to collectors’ homes or wherever else their articles may be kept.

“There is no obligation whatsoever, and all visits are kept strictly confidential,” said Morphy.

Morphy’s July event schedule includes the following stops:

8, 9 & 10 – Meet Dan Morphy and Brian Estepp at the Portland Expo Antiques & Collectibles Show in Portland, Oregon

15 & 16 – Meet Brian Estepp at the Seattle Marble Show in Seattle, Washington

16 & 17 – Meet Mike Landis at the Allentown Paper Show in Allentown, Pennsylvania

28, 29 & 30 – Meet Dan Morphy at the UFDC Doll Convention in Anaheim, California

Morphy’s is known for its high-profile auctions of toys, banks, antique advertising, mechanical/coin-op and gambling machines; fine and decorative art; clocks and Americana. The company holds the world auction record for the highest-grossing one-day auction of a single-owner toy collection: $7.7 million achieved with the 2007 sale of the Stephen and Marilyn Steckbeck collection of antique mechanical banks. All Morphy sales feature Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

To make an appointment to meet with the Morphy team while they are on the road in July, e-mail dan@morphyauctions.com.

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North Carolina paint-decorated blanket chest, 1840s: $80,500. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Million-dollar auction a first for Leland Little

North Carolina paint-decorated blanket chest, 1840s: $80,500. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

North Carolina paint-decorated blanket chest, 1840s: $80,500. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

HILLSBOROUGH. N.C. – An auction June 18 garnered $1.15 million from an international audience and a packed house at the Leland Little Auction & Estates Sales gallery. Over 1000 bidders registered through LiveAuctioneers, with a sell through rate of 24 percent for online bidders. More than 1,300 bidders were preregistered as telephone or absentee bidders. More than 200 bidders energized the house with traditional floor bidding.

This milestone auction was led by a North Carolina paint decorated blanket chest, which sold for $80,500 (prices include the 15 percent buyer’s premium). This regional treasure will find its new home in a public collection. Another top lot was a three-piece cloisonne scholars set, which blew past its estimate with fervent bidding between phone bidders and brought $57,500. This 19th-century beauty will be returned to China.

The remainder of the 700-lot catalog auction saw strength from beginning to end, from category to category. The quality of the fine art offerings, both American and Continental, were reflected in the bidding activity on sale day. The Red Bridge, by Grandma Moses achieved $24,150. Other top lots include Edouard Cortes’ Porte St. Denis, which sold for $23,000; Carlo Grubacs’ View of Venice, which achieved $23,000; and a pair of portraits attributed to Sheldon Peck, which sold for $12,650.

This sale offered an impressive array of Silver offerings. Top lots include a Whiting sterling silver tea and coffee service, which hammered for $10,637; a set of 12 sterling dinner plates by Baldwin & Miller, which sold for $7,475; an S. Kirk & Son Repousse sterling silver service, which sold for $7,187; and a set of eight Tiffany & Co. sterling master salts, which brought $4,370.

Asian lots elicited much excitement in the sale with many lots sailing past their estimates. Strong sellers include a Chinese Famille Rose porcelain peach charger, which soared to $7,187; a pair of Chinese throne chairs, which sold for $6,900; a Chinese porcelain “chicken” bowl, which hammered for $4,830; and a watercolor on paper by Bunsai Loki, which brought $11,500. Also strong were Chinese Yixing teapots, all exceeding their estimates.

American furniture offerings brought strong bidding throughout the sale. Top sellers included an important Philadelphia, Pennsylvania armchair which achieved $20,700; a North Carolina inlaid sugar chest on stand, which brought $8,625; and a North Carolina child’s chest of drawers, which rose to $4,140.

Estate jewelry was led by a natural blue sapphire pendant, which sailed to $19,550; a platinum and Royal Asscher cut diamond ring, which sold for $6,612; a French Art Deco 14kt gold and sapphire compact, which brought $3,220; and a diamond and gold link necklace, which achieved $8,337.

The quality of the Modern offerings at this sale confirmed the impressive growth of the department. A new to market George Nakashima Minguren I table rose to $16,100. Other exciting lots include the five-piece Seaforms set by Dale Chihuly, which brought $12,075, and a Howard Thomas oil on Masonite painting entitled Festival 41, which sold for $5,290.

The decorative category was led by a bronze figural by Adrien-Etienne Gaudez which sailed to $10,062. Other strong lots include a Tiffany Favrile Fabrique glass table lamp which achieved $11,500; a Steinway “M” grand piano, which brought $4,600; a Chelsea “Hans Sloane” botanical platter, which sold for $6,612; and a 17th–18th century Continental two-light brass candelabrum, possibly German, which hammered for $3,220.

Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.’s two-day fall catalog auction will be held on Sept. 16 and 17. To learn more about Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd. please visit their new website at www.LLAUCTIONS.com or call at 919-644-1243.

altClick here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Three-piece cloisonne scholars set, 19th century: $57,500. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Three-piece cloisonne scholars set, 19th century: $57,500. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Oil on canvas by Carlo Grubacs (Italian, 1802-1878), ‘View of Venice’: $23,000. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Oil on canvas by Carlo Grubacs (Italian, 1802-1878), ‘View of Venice’: $23,000. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Dale Chihuly five-piece glass Seaforms set: $12,075. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Dale Chihuly five-piece glass Seaforms set: $12,075. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Art Deco platinum diamond clip: $3,220. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Art Deco platinum diamond clip: $3,220. Image courtesy of Leland Little Auction & Estate Sales Ltd.

Indiana museum’s natural history exhibits earn $50K at auction

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) – The city of Fort Wayne has raised more than $50,000 by auctioning off exhibits from a closed natural history museum.

The News-Sentinel reports the city auctioned off about 300 lots from the Jack Diehm Museum of Natural History. The museum featured animals posed in their native habitats, but closed earlier this year because of poor attendance. The big catch during Tuesday’s auction was a polar bear that sold for $7,500.

Officials hope to renovate the building adjacent to the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo and turn it into a pavilion available for rent. City parks director Al Moll says he’s pleased with the results of the auction.

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Information from: The News-Sentinel, http://www.news-sentinel.com/ns

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-30-11 0804GMT

Romanian man sentenced in Internet auction scam

CHICAGO (AP) – A federal judge has sentenced a Romanian man to four years in prison in connection with a plan to hide money obtained through an international fraud scheme.

Federal prosecutors say 33-year-old Adrian Ghighina of Bucharest, Romania, was sentenced Wednesday after pleading guilty in February to wire fraud and conspiracy.

Court records show Ghighina was involved in a complex Internet fraud conspiracy that created fraudulent online auctions for expensive items. Those who responded were directed to send payments for non-existent items to accounts Ghighina controlled.

Victims never received their items.

Prosecutors say Ghighina admits moving from city to city opening new bank accounts in which to deposit his ill-gotten gains. He opened accounts in Illinois, Washington D.C., Florida, New York and Arizona.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-30-11 0804GMT

 

NH court upholds auctioneer’s sanction

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) – The New Hampshire Supreme Court is upholding the reprimand of an auctioneer who put in a fake bid to help a colleague drive up the price of a painting.

Brian French of Warner, who has been an auctioneer for 35 years, challenged the authority of the New Hampshire Board of Auctioneers to punish him.

The board reprimanded French and put him on probation for a year. It concluded that French had bid $9,500 on a nautical painting at a 2009 auction to help auctioneer Stephen Bennett meet the reserve price of $10,000. No one bid higher, and French claimed that, as a result, it rendered his act harmless.

The board suspended Bennett’s license for 90 days and placed him on probation for two years.

French’s lawyer did not immediately return calls seeking comment.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-30-11 1502GMT

Luke Syson to head Met’s Euro. Sculpture & Dec. Arts dept

NEW YORK – Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, announced today that Luke Syson will become the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Curator in Charge of the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, effective in January 2012. Currently at the National Gallery, London, Mr. Syson holds the dual positions of Curator of Italian Paintings before 1500 and Head of Research. As curator, he most recently organized the upcoming major exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan, which will open in November. As Head of Research, he has led the effort to focus and enhance the gallery’s scholarly research program through the creation of research and study partnerships and other initiatives.

He will succeed Ian Wardropper, who will become director of The Frick Collection in New York in October. James David Draper, the Metropolitan Museum’s Henry R. Kravis Curator, will then serve as interim head of the department until January.

“I am enormously pleased to announce the appointment of Luke Syson,” said Campbell. “His scholarship and experience are far reaching, and his work embraces sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts. I have known Luke and have had the utmost respect for his work for many years. I look forward to working with him here at the Met as he applies his broad perspective to our distinguished European sculpture and decorative arts collection.”

Luke Syson received his BA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, where he also studied for three years in the PhD program, with a focus on ruler portraiture in 15th-century Milan, Ferrara, and Mantua. From 1991 to 2002, Mr. Syson was Curator of Medals at the British Museum in London, where he was the intellectual coordinator and co-curator of Enlightenment: Discovering the World in the Eighteenth Century, a new permanent gallery that opened in 2003 in the former King’s Library. In 2002-2003, he served as a Senior Curator on the planning team for the V&A’s Medieval and Renaissance Galleries. He began work at the National Gallery, London, in 2003 as Curator of Italian Painting, 1460-1500. Between 2003 and 2009, he was responsible for directing the re-hanging of the Early Italian paintings in the gallery’s Sainsbury Wing, and for the temporary display of Renaissance sculptural reliefs from the V&A. He also served as curator of the exhibition Renaissance Siena: Art for a City (2007-2008), and co-curator of both Renaissance Faces: Van Eyck to Titian (2008-2009) and Pisanello: Painter to the Renaissance Court (2001-2002).

Besides contributing to catalogues of the exhibitions cited above and others, Mr. Syson has written on a broad range of subjects for scholarly journals including The Burlington Magazine and the National Gallery Technical Bulletin. He was also the co-author, with Dora Thornton, of Objects of Virtue: Art in Renaissance Italy (London and Los Angeles, 2001), which examines the multiple meanings and values of fine and decorative arts in 15th- and early 16th-century Italy

Visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art online at www.metmuseum.org.

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F. Tate’s A Closer Point of ruffed grouse and spaniels measures 16 x 24-1/8 inches and is estimated at $20,000/$30,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Brunk plans exceptional July 16-17 Sporting Arts auction

F. Tate’s A Closer Point of ruffed grouse and spaniels measures 16 x 24-1/8 inches and is estimated at $20,000/$30,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

F. Tate’s A Closer Point of ruffed grouse and spaniels measures 16 x 24-1/8 inches and is estimated at $20,000/$30,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Brunk Auctions’ July 16-17, 2011 Sporting Arts auction, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers, will lead off with a remarkable collection from a prominent North Carolina family. It took years for the family to accumulate the sale’s premier wildlife paintings. Most had decorated their walls for decades. Then a cache of 18th-century maps and other sporting watercolors was discovered in metal storage containers. The containers had not been opened in years.

The Brunks added to the family lots with an impressive array of sporting bronzes, rifles and revolvers from private and institutional collections.

“This superb collection signals the opening of sporting arts season at Brunk Auctions,” said auctioneer Andrew Brunk. “For July we have an eclectic sale with something for everyone, from big game to fishing to wing shooting, with estimates from $300 to $30,000.” Brunk also stressed his commitment to the sporting arts: “This July and each July thereafter, hunters and collectors can expect that we will offer for sale the best in sporting antiques.”

Among the sale’s highlights:

Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (England, New York: 1819-1905) was America’s first important sporting artist. Trained as a lithographer in England, Tait was largely a self-taught artist before immigrating to the United States in 1850. He specialized in landscapes and wildlife paintings that were realistic, detailed and colorful. Three of his late-19th-century paintings are featured in the sale: A Close Point (est. $20,000/$30,000), Prairie Shooting (est. $12,000/$18,000) and A Covey ofGrouse (est. $12,000/$18,000).

Ogden Minton Pleissner (Vermont/New York, 1905-1983) loved nature, wing shooting and fishing, subjects he painted in oil and watercolor. Beginning in the mid 1920s he traveled to the Western United States in the summer and throughout New England and the South the rest of the year. The End of the Day, Duck Shooting depicts two weary duck hunters unloading their flat boat on the shore at sunset. The 16” x 20” oil on canvas in its original fame is estimated at $20,000/$30,000.

A.B. Frost (1851-1928) was called the most American of American artists. He became famous as a cartoonist for Life magazine and illustrator of books by Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain and Joel Chandler Harris. Frost was also an avid sportsman. His hunting and shooting paintings of marshes and woodlands in the Eastern United States are richly detailed and dramatic. In the July sale is Frost’s The Bull Moose (30” x 20”), a woodland scene with a recently shot moose and a hunter with rifle. It is signed “A. B. Frost/1899” lower right and estimated at $12,000/$18,000.

Noted Western illustrator and sculptor Frederic Remington (1861-1909) did most of his artworks in pen and ink, and ink wash. His ink Mare and Colt is signed lower left and is estimated at $6000/$9000.

The North Carolina family collected a large number of sporting watercolors by Boris Riab (Russian/French, 1898-1975) whose specialty was watercolors of hunting dogs and birds. Riab’s dogs included pointers, spaniels, Labradors and setters; his favorite birds were woodcocks, teal, pheasants, ducks, partridge, doves and snipe. Pre-sale estimates for the Riabs range from $300 to $1,200.

Also in abundance are paintings by Boris O’Klein (Russian/French, 1893-1985). O’Klein is best known for Dirty Dogs of Pairs, a humorous lineup of dogs waiting to urinate on a scrawny tree. All of the O’Klein paintings in the sale feature the mishaps of a comical hunter, his hunting dog and the ducks he is trying to bag. The O’Kleins will sell in lots of two with a pre-sale estimate of $500/$1000.

Speaking of ducks, three early original works of art for the federal duck stamp program are in the sale. The first stamp ever issued is the 1934 Ding Darling (American 1876-1962) with a depiction of mallards in flight. Darling conceived the idea of using duck stamps to raise money for the purchase of wetlands. Darling’s original art work for the first stamp and the early stamp itself are estimated at $1500/$2500. Also in the sale is Frank Benson’s canvasback art work for the 1935 stamp and Joseph Knap’s pen and ink drawing for the 1937 greater scaups stamp. The Benson is estimated at $2000/$4000 and the Knap $1000/$1500.

The finest sporting bronze in the sale is Valet de chasse Louis XV et sa harde by Pierre-Jules Mêne (French, 1810-1879). The 27” x 29” x 16½” bronze depicts one of King Louis XV’s royal huntsmen on horseback, a horn slung around his chest, with five hunting dogs on sloping ground. The original was first commissioned by Napoleon III in 1869. This variation is a late-19th- or early 20th-century casting and is estimated at $15,000/$20,000.

“The market for fine antique and sporting firearms is strong,” said auctioneer Bob Brunk. There are over 100 antique firearms and edged weapons in the sale, including Winchester rifles, Colt revolvers and Sharps carbines. One of the featured rifles is a Guilford County longrifle by William Lamb, one of the early members of a longrifle school operating in that area of North Carolina. With coin silver inlay and a twisted daisy star patch box, the 1830-1840 rifle carries a pre-sale estimate of $4000/$8000.

For information on any item in the sale, call 828-254-6846.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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altView the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


J.N. “Ding” Darling's design for the first federal duck stamp in 1934 is especially significant to conservation. After he had guided the funding for the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act through Congress, Darling sketched his concept of a suitable image for the first federal duck stamp. That image, matted and framed with a 1934 duck stamp, is estimated at $1,500/$2,500. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

J.N. “Ding” Darling’s design for the first federal duck stamp in 1934 is especially significant to conservation. After he had guided the funding for the Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp Act through Congress, Darling sketched his concept of a suitable image for the first federal duck stamp. That image, matted and framed with a 1934 duck stamp, is estimated at $1,500/$2,500. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Lot 77: Buyers have a chance to purchase lots from a definitive collection of sporting watercolors by French/Russian artist Boris Riab (1898-1975). Pre-sale estimates for the 38 Riab lots range from $300 to $1,200. This English springer spaniel with woodcock estimated to bring $300/$600. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Lot 77: Buyers have a chance to purchase lots from a definitive collection of sporting watercolors by French/Russian artist Boris Riab (1898-1975). Pre-sale estimates for the 38 Riab lots range from $300 to $1,200. This English springer spaniel with woodcock estimated to bring $300/$600. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

The hunters in Ogden Minton Pleissner’s The End of the Day, Duck Shooting look weary but were successful. The 16 x 20 inch oil on canvas in its original fame is estimated at $20,000/$30,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

The hunters in Ogden Minton Pleissner’s The End of the Day, Duck Shooting look weary but were successful. The 16 x 20 inch oil on canvas in its original fame is estimated at $20,000/$30,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

At 30 x 20 inches, A.B. Frost’s The Bull Moose is one of the largest paintings in the sale. The noted illustrator and sportsman signed and dated (1899) his painting that is now estimated at $12,000/$18,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

At 30 x 20 inches, A.B. Frost’s The Bull Moose is one of the largest paintings in the sale. The noted illustrator and sportsman signed and dated (1899) his painting that is now estimated at $12,000/$18,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Pierre-Jules Mêne was a member of the Animaliers, a 19th century French group of artists that used animals as the primary subject of their art. Valet de chasse Louis XV et sa harde is one of his most popular bronzes (est. $15,000/$20,000). Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Pierre-Jules Mêne was a member of the Animaliers, a 19th century French group of artists that used animals as the primary subject of their art. Valet de chasse Louis XV et sa harde is one of his most popular bronzes (est. $15,000/$20,000). Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

 Mare and Colt by Frederic Remington in ink wash measures 9 x 8-7/8 inches and is estimated to sell for $6,000/$9,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Mare and Colt by Frederic Remington in ink wash measures 9 x 8-7/8 inches and is estimated to sell for $6,000/$9,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

A disobedient, but happy spaniel foils the plans of his comical master in this watercolor by Boris O’Klein. There are over 20 original works of art by O’Klein in the sale. They will be sold in lots of two; the presale estimate for each pair is $500 to $1,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

A disobedient, but happy spaniel foils the plans of his comical master in this watercolor by Boris O’Klein. There are over 20 original works of art by O’Klein in the sale. They will be sold in lots of two; the presale estimate for each pair is $500 to $1,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

The Guilford County School of riflemaking was active from 1795 to 1902 and became the largest in North Carolina and the South. Their longrifles were known locally as 'Jamestown Rifles.' Willam Lamb (born 1806) crafted this elaborate long rifle between 1830 and 1840. It carries a pre-sale estimate of $4,000/$8,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

The Guilford County School of riflemaking was active from 1795 to 1902 and became the largest in North Carolina and the South. Their longrifles were known locally as ‘Jamestown Rifles.’ Willam Lamb (born 1806) crafted this elaborate long rifle between 1830 and 1840. It carries a pre-sale estimate of $4,000/$8,000. Image courtesy Brunk Auctions.

Gemini Program, circa1965, signed ‘space capsule’ color lithograph signed by Gus Grissom, Frank Borman, Charles Conrad, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, James Lovell, John Young, Edward White, Wally Schirra, Robert Gordon and Dave Scott. Estimate: $7,500 -$10,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Goldbergs’ space auction has the right stuff, July 10

Gemini Program, circa1965, signed ‘space capsule’ color lithograph signed by Gus Grissom, Frank Borman, Charles Conrad, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, James Lovell, John Young, Edward White, Wally Schirra, Robert Gordon and Dave Scott. Estimate: $7,500 -$10,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Gemini Program, circa1965, signed ‘space capsule’ color lithograph signed by Gus Grissom, Frank Borman, Charles Conrad, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, James Lovell, John Young, Edward White, Wally Schirra, Robert Gordon and Dave Scott. Estimate: $7,500 -$10,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

LOS ANGELES – Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers will present more than 700 lots of space memorabilia at an auction Sunday, July 10, at 10 a.m. Pacific. Highlighting the out-of-this-world collection are remnants trimmed from the U.S. flag before it was placed on the moon by the crew of Apollo 11. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

The pieces of the Apollo 11 lunar flag are mounted on a presentation photo of the flag on the lunar surface and signed by Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon. Refer to the Goldbergs’ auction catalog at www.liveauctioneers.com for the interesting background on this unique relic. It is expected to sell for more than $100,000.

Also carrying high expectations is a Collier Trophy, the prestigious aeronautical/astronautical award presented annually by the National Aeronautical Association. In the auction is one of the Collier Trophies presented to the Mercury Seven astronauts. It and other items come from the Donald “Deke” Slayton estate collection.

Also from the collection are Slayton’s printed “Mercury Program Training Notes” and a scarce gold Robbins medallion, carried in space by astronauts to be given only to wives and family members.

The Goldbergs’ auction Saturday, July 9, at 10 a.m. Eastern will featured more than 100 items signed by U.S. presidents. Fifty-three of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence will also be represented in the 1,000-lot auction.

For details go the Goldbergs’ website www.goldbergcoins.com or phone 800-978-2646.

altView the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Mercury Program, 1962, Collier Trophy presented to Maj. Donald ‘Deke’ Slayton, 14 inches high. Estimate: $15,000-$20,000. Lot includes framed photograph of presentation ceremony with President John F. Kennedy. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Mercury Program, 1962, Collier Trophy presented to Maj. Donald ‘Deke’ Slayton, 14 inches high. Estimate: $15,000-$20,000. Lot includes framed photograph of presentation ceremony with President John F. Kennedy. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Scarce ASTP (Apollo Soyuz Test Project), 1975, flown in space 10kt gold Robbins medallion on a gold bezel and hung on a 14kt chain. Estimate: $20,000-25,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Scarce ASTP (Apollo Soyuz Test Project), 1975, flown in space 10kt gold Robbins medallion on a gold bezel and hung on a 14kt chain. Estimate: $20,000-25,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Unflown remnants of the U.S. flag that was taken to the moon on the Apollo 11 mission in 1969 and left on the lunar surface. The remnants are attached to a presentation plaque and signed by Neil Armstrong. Estimate: $100,000-$150,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Unflown remnants of the U.S. flag that was taken to the moon on the Apollo 11 mission in 1969 and left on the lunar surface. The remnants are attached to a presentation plaque and signed by Neil Armstrong. Estimate: $100,000-$150,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Deke Slayton's ‘Mercury Program Training Notes, 1959, three-ring binder containing several hundred pages of handouts and handwritten notes given to and written by Slayton during his Mercury Program training, water damaged but restorable. Estimate: $25,000-$35,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Deke Slayton’s ‘Mercury Program Training Notes, 1959, three-ring binder containing several hundred pages of handouts and handwritten notes given to and written by Slayton during his Mercury Program training, water damaged but restorable. Estimate: $25,000-$35,000. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Mercury Seven autographed photo signed by Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard and Deke Slayton, matted and framed to 23 x19 inches, hung in Slayton’s library. Estimate: $2,500-$3,500. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.

Mercury Seven autographed photo signed by Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard and Deke Slayton, matted and framed to 23 x19 inches, hung in Slayton’s library. Estimate: $2,500-$3,500. Image courtesy of Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers.