Gallery Report: August 2011

A Britains “picture pack” counter display box with hinged front cover, containing 33 figures, sold for $6,000 at a sale of Rare Military & Civilian Figures held May 21-22 by Old Toy Soldier Auctions in Pittsburgh. Also, a Timpo boxed Hopalong Cassidy set, one of only a few known, realized $5,040; a Timpo Big Game Hunter hit $2,650; a 25-piece Britains set #2112 of the U.S. Marine Band in summer dress brought $1,320; and a Britains set #2099, Venezuelan cadets with officer, rose to $900. Prices include a 20 percent buyer’s premium.

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Grounds of Ohr-O'keefe Museum of Art. Image by Woodlot. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Ohr-O’Keefe museum reportedly in dire straits

Grounds of Ohr-O'keefe Museum of Art. Image by Woodlot. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Grounds of Ohr-O’keefe Museum of Art. Image by Woodlot. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

BILOXI, Miss. (AP) – The Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art is living on the edge financially, less than a year after it opened.

It’s not bringing in nearly enough money to operate, no matter who offers the figures. And the president of the Board of Trustees said this week the prospect of getting major financial support from the city of Biloxi looks dim.

Ohr President Larry Clark said, “We have exhausted grants that were available and the revenue is not enough to cover the cost of operating the museum.”

He said his board members have unofficially polled most of Biloxi’s City Council in the past several weeks and found “the city is in a pretty severe economic bind themselves.”

“They’re interested, but at this point they don’t have the revenue,” Clark said. “So we’re pretty much out of money.

“We’re going to have to ask them to help us or we won’t be able to stay open.”

When asked how much the museum needs, he said, “It’s a moving target. To be honest, I don’t know exactly what the number is. It would take a fairly substantial commitment.”

Those associated with the world-class museum, which opened in the fall after three of five buildings designed by renowned architect Frank Gehry were completed, said $400,000 may not be enough.

Clark and Vice President Chevis Swetman both said the museum has cut staffing and hours of operation in recent weeks and worked hard to get insurance costs down.

Electricity alone is more than $8,000 a month.

Clark pointed out Biloxi has opened two large new buildings of its own that will cost money to operate and maintain—the Biloxi Welcome Center and the civic center—not to mention a library that will open Monday.

“Yes, it couldn’t be a worse time for the Ohr to need money,” he said.

Jerry O’Keefe, the Biloxi businessman who secured the architect for the museum and helped kick it up a notch in the art world, has come to the rescue before. The museum bears his name.

This week, he asked members of his family with the O’Keefe Foundation to give the museum $100,000, and they voted Thursday to do so.

“I’m still deeply involved,” he said. “We’re going to initially put up $100,000 for the operations. It will get us along. I don’t know how far that will go yet. It depends on a lot of things. I’m not privy to all the internal workings of the museum. But I know that will help.”

And in the meantime, he said, he and others have been working with Biloxi to get money the city promised when the museum opened. Biloxi helped with operation expenses before Katrina, but not since.

O’Keefe said he has put in more than $2 million over the years, mostly for construction. This is the first time he has been confronted with operational needs, he said.

“It’s been tight for months. We need the city’s support to survive.”

The Ohr-O’Keefe Museum began on the coast 20 years ago as a satellite of the Mississippi Museum of Art in Jackson. It is dedicated to Biloxi artist George Ohr (1857-1918), an innovative potter whose work was better known in New York and Chicago.

It has evolved from a perch in the city library to a campus of its own with $35 million in buildings. Three of the five buildings are paid for and the museum has money in the bank to just about pay for the remaining two—the center for ceramics and the silver pods that will house Ohr’s work.

The museum opened with two galleries and a welcome center.

The budget for operations was $1.9 million, in anticipation the city would provide money on a monthly basis. The fact that it hasn’t has been part of ongoing negotiations between the two entities.

The amounts discussed in the past have been in the range of $10,000 a month.

At this point, that wouldn’t make a dent in the need Director Denny Mecham estimated to be $250,000 to $300,000.

Mecham said by February, with no money from the city, they saw problems with the operations budget and began cutting. She said they got it down to about $1.24 million.

On the upside, the museum has brought in $515,000 from January to June with admissions ($54,000), sales in the museum store ($115,400), grants, rental space during off hours and major fundraising events.

Salaries alone run $450,000 a year for 10 full-time and a handful of part-time workers, who function without standard health insurance or retirement benefits.

Swetman said there are dehumidifiers required to protect artwork and a certain level of staffing the museum must have in the art galleries.

He said the museum is using volunteers in every capacity possible, but at some point there must be a paid employee responsible.

To make ends meet during the first six months, the museum used its $200,000 reserves, doubled its paid memberships and got grants.

Mecham said the $100,000 from O’Keefe might hold them until the fall, when Swetman said a gala is expected to bring in another $100,000.

There’s no money for promotions. The museum now closes Sundays and Mondays and opens an hour later each day.

“You can’t show a shortfall of $250,000 and not feel desperate,” she said.

“We believe we can bring in $1 million in income this year, but we need more than that.”

The numbers separated out don’t really tell the whole story, she said. “It’s not as if we’re not making any money. But we’re not making enough money without help.”

Biloxi Councilwoman Lucy Denton said the city may be able to help with the cost of insurance, janitorial service, security and maintaining the landscaping when it arrives, but as for giving the museum money, the city’s not in a position to do that.

“We’ve had to cut way back—put capital projects on hold,” she said.

Councilman Ed Gemmill said the museum board members came to the council recently with a scare about not being able to meet an insurance deadline, but was able to work out that issue.

Gemmill said he knows the museum is looking for money.

He said the city is just beginning the budget process and when it gets through with city department budgets, he expects to see the Ohr-O’Keefe on the front row, waiting.

Mecham said it would be very difficult to think about closing, especially with the existing financial obligations, but it’s something that must be considered.

“Nobody wants to say the words, actually. It’s too chilling,” she said.

She praised a board that has been dedicated and raised close to $40 million over the years. Katrina took some of that money.

Swetman said he will personally talk with each member of the City Council and is also seeking money from large contributors.

It’s difficult to convince people of the need, he said.

Mecham said there are huge investments in the buildings, $5 million in state bond money, $6 million from HUD committed to finish the center for ceramics and $3 million from the Knight Foundation for the pods.

Mecham said if the museum closed, that money likely would have to be returned.

All the buildings are essentially paid for, Clark said.

And there would be a substantial cost in closing the museum, he said. Art would have to be returned all over the country, among other things. The buildings would have to be maintained. And the irony is if the museum defaulted, it would likely go back to the city.

At this point, laying off staff to help ease the money crunch wouldn’t help much, Clark said.

The museum reduced the full-time staff by one this month.

When asked how close they are to closing, he paused and said, “We’re close. We have to have help very, very soon.”

___

Information from: The Sun Herald, http://www.sunherald.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-27-11 0802GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Grounds of Ohr-O'keefe Museum of Art. Image by Woodlot. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Grounds of Ohr-O’keefe Museum of Art. Image by Woodlot. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Old Port in Portland, Maine. Image by PhillipC. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Portland sells controversial sculpture for $100

Old Port in Portland, Maine. Image by PhillipC. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Old Port in Portland, Maine. Image by PhillipC. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) – The city of Portland has sold a piece of public art that created a public outcry for $100.

The city paid $135,000 in 2006 for the landscape sculpture called Tracing the Fore, located on Fore Street in the city’s Old Port. The sculpture consists of rolling steel “waves” designed to evoke the flowing waters of the Fore River.

The sculpture features metal waves seeded with tall grass. The idea was that the grass would sweep over the waves, representing the Fore River, which flows into Casco Bay. Critics quickly took aim, and it didn’t help when weeds sprouted. One critic described the work as “metal shards” rising from “a weed-infested park.”

The City Council voted in February against spending $30,000 to $50,000 to move the work from Boothby Square to a new location. That meant the creation of Boston artist Shauna Gillies-Smith would be removed altogether.

The city opted to remove the sculpture from its art collection and sell it after some nearby property owners called it dangerous, out of place and ugly.

The only bidder was a Portland company called PWM Land, which offered $100.

PWM Land manager Scott Cohen tells the Portland Press Herald that the piece will be moved to a sculpture garden in another part of the city.

___

Information from: Portland Press Herald, http://www.pressherald.com

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-26-11 2017GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Old Port in Portland, Maine. Image by PhillipC. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Old Port in Portland, Maine. Image by PhillipC. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Gilbert 'Magu' Lujan signed limited edition (#91/100) lithograph ‘Me and My Compadre,’ 21x 28 inches, circa 1989. Image courtesy of LiveAurctioneers.com Archive and Santa Monica Auctions.

In Memoriam: Gilbert ‘Magu’ Lujan, Chicano artist, 70

Gilbert 'Magu' Lujan signed limited edition (#91/100) lithograph ‘Me and My Compadre,’ 21x 28 inches, circa 1989. Image courtesy of LiveAurctioneers.com Archive and Santa Monica Auctions.

Gilbert ‘Magu’ Lujan signed limited edition (#91/100) lithograph ‘Me and My Compadre,’ 21x 28 inches, circa 1989. Image courtesy of LiveAurctioneers.com Archive and Santa Monica Auctions.

ARCADIA, Calif. (AP) – His colorful expressive works, reflecting everything from cartoonish-looking characters to Aztec warriors, would come to cover everything from the walls of subways to those of major museums during a long career that put Gilbert “Magu” Lujan at the forefront of the Chicano Art Movement.

Lujan died Sunday at Methodist Hospital of Southern California. He was 70 and had suffered from cancer, said his son Naiche Starhawk Lujan.

“Los Angeles has, sadly, lost a cultural icon,” Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Tuesday.

Lujan’s style—colorful, often humorous and just as often political—sprung from the sidewalks, freeway overpasses and low-rider cars of largely Hispanic East Los Angeles in the 1970s. Like the work of such contemporaries as Carlos Almaraz, Frank Romero and Beto de la Rocha, his murals and other creations have come to define Chicano art.

Perhaps best known as a painter, Lujan also worked in a variety of media including sculpture, prints and even whimsical assemblages of sticks and twigs. He painted on canvases, parking structures and low-rider cars.

“Magu’s work always just seemed to mirror him. It was fun, it was funny, it was smart and it was really accessible,” said Father Bill Moore, an abstract artist who for years had a studio just down the street from Lujan’s in the city of Pomona’s Arts Colony.

One of his best-known, and most widely seen, creations is Hooray for Hollywood, which graces the subway station at the famous intersection of Hollywood and Vine. It includes a “yellow brick road” directing people from the plaza to the train platform, as well as benches sculpted in the form of low-riders and support pillars that look like palm trees.

Other works have been exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, the Houston Museum of Fine Art and numerous galleries.

Although Lujan’s work always reflected his barrio roots, it came to transcend all genres, said prominent Chicano author Luis J. Rodriguez.

“He was always true to the barrio, he was always true to the culture he came out of,” said Rodriguez, a longtime friend. “But he needs to be recognized as a great artist from any genre. In any community.”

While his work could be light, colorful and whimsical, it just as often contained powerful messages directed at the culture.

“Everything I do is about humans,” he once told the website Latinopia.com. “So I make the car a human being, but for me making them these cartoon characters is a subterfuge for something else. This way I could deal with racism in a different way, to counter a lot of these anti-Mexican feelings by hiding behind whimsy, color, innocence, folky.”

Lujan was born in the California town of French Camp in 1940 and grew up in East Los Angeles.

After serving in the Air Force, he earned a degree in ceramic sculpture from California State University, Long Beach, and a master’s in fine art at the University of California, Irvine. It was there that he joined with Almaraz, Romero and de la Rocha as “Los Four” for a groundbreaking exhibition of Chicano art in the early 1970s.

In the late 1970s, he taught at Fresno City College and served as chairman of the school’s La Raza Studies Department.

In addition to his son, Lujan is survived by his other children Risa Liviana, Otono Amarillo, Joasia and Michelle; his mother, Josefina; brothers Richard, Robert, Phillip, Ronnie and Mark; and several grandchildren.

___

Online: http://magulandia.com/

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-27-11 0129GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Gilbert 'Magu' Lujan signed limited edition (#91/100) lithograph ‘Me and My Compadre,’ 21x 28 inches, circa 1989. Image courtesy of LiveAurctioneers.com Archive and Santa Monica Auctions.

Gilbert ‘Magu’ Lujan signed limited edition (#91/100) lithograph ‘Me and My Compadre,’ 21x 28 inches, circa 1989. Image courtesy of LiveAurctioneers.com Archive and Santa Monica Auctions.

Aleksander Gierymski painted ‘Jewish Woman Selling Oranges’ around 1880-1881. It was plundered from the National Museum in Warsaw during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Poland gets back painting plundered in World War II

Aleksander Gierymski painted ‘Jewish Woman Selling Oranges’  around 1880-1881. It was plundered from the National Museum in Warsaw during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Aleksander Gierymski painted ‘Jewish Woman Selling Oranges’ around 1880-1881. It was plundered from the National Museum in Warsaw during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

WARSAW, Poland (AP) – A valuable 19th-century Polish painting that went missing during World War II has been returned to Poland after being removed from an auction in Germany, the culture minister said Wednesday.

Aleksander Gierymski’s Jewish Woman Selling Oranges was unveiled to reporters by Culture Minister Bogdan Zdrojewski, who said the painting was returned to Poland after many months of on-and-off negotiations with lawyers representing a German person.

The German, who had the painting for more than 30 years, has requested anonymity, Zdrojewski said.

“During those long months, my main thought was to have this picture returned to Poland, Zdrojewski said.

The work, sometimes referred to as the “Orange Vendor,” was painted around 1880 and is one of several works Gierymski produced showing Jewish life in one of the city’s poor districts.

The oil-on-canvas painting shows an old woman knitting as she holds two baskets, one filled with oranges. She has shrunken cheeks that give her an impoverished look, and is set against a foggy Warsaw skyline.

The painting has been returned to its original home in the National Museum in Warsaw where it will undergo many months of renovation, museum director Agnieszka Morawinska said.

She described it as a “priceless masterpiece” thate pleased the painter, rarely content with his own work.

Its return is a “very special day and a true gift for the museum,” she said.

The picture went missing from the National Museum in 1944, five years into Nazi Germany’s occupation of Poland during the war. It was among a huge number of cultural artifacts stolen or plundered by German and Soviet forces during their joint wartime occupation of Poland. Poland’s government is making efforts to find and bring the works of art back.

The work resurfaced last November among items offered for sale at a small auction house near Hamburg, Germany. Poland’s chief insurer, PZU SA, supplied an undisclosed sum of money for a compensation that was agreed on in negotiations with the German who had it.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-07-27-11 1116GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Aleksander Gierymski painted ‘Jewish Woman Selling Oranges’  around 1880-1881. It was plundered from the National Museum in Warsaw during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Aleksander Gierymski painted ‘Jewish Woman Selling Oranges’ around 1880-1881. It was plundered from the National Museum in Warsaw during World War II. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Paul George, ‘Two Ships of Gloucester,’ oil, image size: 36 x 48 inches, framed. Estimate: $12,000-$24,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Auction to aid North Shore Arts Association, Aug. 6

Paul George, ‘Two Ships of Gloucester,’ oil, image size: 36 x 48 inches, framed. Estimate: $12,000-$24,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Paul George, ‘Two Ships of Gloucester,’ oil, image size: 36 x 48 inches, framed. Estimate: $12,000-$24,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

EAST GLOUCESTER, Mass. – Artwork from the region’s finest artists will be available to all bidders at the North Shore Arts Association 2011 Live Art Auction. The live auction, which this year features an online option for bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com, will be held Saturday Aug. 6, beginning at 7 p.m. Eastern.

To kick-off the annual event, a special Gala Preview Party open to the public will be held Friday evening, July 29. Both events will take place at the NSAA waterfront gallery at 11 Pirates Lane in East Gloucester.

Auction artwork will also be available for previewing daily July 29 through Aug. 6 during regular NSAA hours (Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday noon- 5 p.m.), or online at www.nsarts.org.

Selected through a juried process to ensure quality, nearly 100 distinctive works of art representing a wide range of artists, genres and mediums will be available for auction. Art lovers and potential bidders will have an opportunity to meet many of the artists and review their artwork at a Gala Preview Party, with live music, hors d’oeuvres from Passports Restaurant, and open wine bar, on Friday, July 29, from 5:30-8 p.m. The Gala Preview Party will allow guests to learn about the artists and, in some cases, the stories behind the pieces up for auction.

The live NSAA Art Auction will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6, from 7-9 p.m. with Beverly, Mass.-based Kaminski Auctioneers. Doors open at 6 p.m.

New this year, and perhaps for the first time at a regional art auction, live online bidding will be available. Those who cannot attend the auction in person may watch the proceedings on their home computers or personal electronic devices and make bids in real time while the auction is happening. To create an account and register for the NSAA Art Auction in order to participate in online bidding, go to www.LiveAuctioneers.com/browse/seller/NSAA .

“The new elements of this year’s NSAA Art Auction are designed to enhance the bidding experience for art lovers as well as broaden the audience to help raise important funds to support NSAA programs,” said Art Auction Chair Monica Lawton. “We have stepped into the 21st century with online bidding, but maintain the opportunity to make real, personal connections with the artists and increase appreciation of their work at the Gala Preview Party.”

Several well-known North Shore artists whose works are found in many private art collections will provide artwork for the 2011 NSAA Art Auction, including Paul George, Ken Knowles, Don Mosher, Charles Movalli, Dale Ratcliff and Jeff Weaver.

Gala tickets are $20; auction tickets are $15; tickets for both events are $30. Proceeds will benefit NSAA, a nonprofit cultural organization that has been connecting art and the North Shore community for nearly 90 years.

The NSAA 2011 Art Auction is sponsored by Cape Ann Savings Trust & Financial Services and supported by Cape Pond Ice, Kaminski Auctions and Passports Restaurant.

With its origins inspired by the great landscape and harbor painters of the mid-1800s through the 20th century, NSAA was formed by a group of prominent artists and Cape Ann residents. Its purpose was to bring together comprehensive and representative exhibitions of painting and sculpture, and to persuade other artists to come to the North Shore in an effort to further American art. Incorporated as a nonprofit institution in 1922, the NSAA opened its doors to the public on July 14, 1923, with the largest collection of art ever shown at one time in Gloucester.

Today, NSAA plays a vital role in supporting and promulgating the work of more than 500 members, while promoting arts education and appreciation in the community. Open daily May through October, NSAA presents juried and nonjuried gallery exhibitions of paintings and sculpture as well as classes and workshops for children, youth and adults, lectures, concerts and other special events. For more information, visit www.nsarts.org or call 978-283-1857.

altView the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Betty Lou Schlemm, ‘Essex Boatyard,’ oil, image size: 20 x 24 inches, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Betty Lou Schlemm, ‘Essex Boatyard,’ oil, image size: 20 x 24 inches, framed. Estimate: $1,500-$1,800. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Ken Knowles, ‘Stage Fort Park,’ oil, image size: 30 x 40 inches, framed. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Ken Knowles, ‘Stage Fort Park,’ oil, image size: 30 x 40 inches, framed. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Robert Gruppe, ‘Old Netter,’ oil, image size: 30 x 25 inches, framed. Estimate: $16,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Robert Gruppe, ‘Old Netter,’ oil, image size: 30 x 25 inches, framed. Estimate: $16,000-$18,000. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Ronalee Crocker, ‘Nantucket Basket With Pears,’ oil, image size: 16 x 20 inches, framed. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association. Estimate: $6,800-$13,600. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

Ronalee Crocker, ‘Nantucket Basket With Pears,’ oil, image size: 16 x 20 inches, framed. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association. Estimate: $6,800-$13,600. Image courtesy of North Shore Art Association.

This embroidered silk dragon robe displaying nine golden dragons flying amid swirling clouds and flaming pearls, above crashing waves and mountain tops, sold for $26,325 inclusive of premium on July 3. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Michaan’s Auctions.

Michaan’s Auctions experiencing banner year

This embroidered silk dragon robe displaying nine golden dragons flying amid swirling clouds and flaming pearls, above crashing waves and mountain tops, sold for $26,325 inclusive of premium on July 3. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Michaan’s Auctions.

This embroidered silk dragon robe displaying nine golden dragons flying amid swirling clouds and flaming pearls, above crashing waves and mountain tops, sold for $26,325 inclusive of premium on July 3. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Michaan’s Auctions.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – 2011 is proving to be a dramatically successful year for Michaan’s Auctions. The auction house has seen a 50 percent sales growth since the beginning of the year, the most substantial jump the company has seen since its inception in 2002.

Numerous factors have aided in Michaan’s recent boom, but the success of the Asian Art Department is perhaps the most significant player in the company’s rapid development. Although the market for Asian items has been steadily rising, the hard work of Michaan’s Asian Department brought two record-breaking sales to the auction saleroom floor, with the most recent taking in more than $1.9 million.

The Jewelry Department has also seen a sales surge over the last two years. During this time, the department has been fairly consistent in topping their sales figures in monthly estate auctions.

Also noteworthy are the Annex warehouse sales totals, which have doubled their profits over the last three years.

Years of laying groundwork have paved the way for success. Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Scott Bradley reflected on what has brought Michaan’s Auctions to where it is today.

“For years it was about getting known, getting the word out. Our exposure on Eye on the Bay (local TV program) played an important role in that. We have also built a strong reputation with our clients …  our relationships with our consignors are based on service and trust. All of this has led to getting better and more property, two of the most important factors in this business. What it comes down to is that our reputation is now bringing us results.”

If anyone knows what it takes to make it in the auction business it is Bradley. He got his start 33 years ago at Sotheby’s, Los Angeles. doing preview work while still in high school. Bradley came to have an appreciation for art, which led to a love affair with the business. He then climbed the ranks from the warehouse, to gallery director to vice president of operations to his current position. Not one to rest on his laurels, Bradley is extending Michaan’s Auctions reach to include the Reno/Tahoe area with representative Sue Paffrath securing property as an on-site generalist and appraiser.

For more information visit the auction house’s website at www.michaans.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This embroidered silk dragon robe displaying nine golden dragons flying amid swirling clouds and flaming pearls, above crashing waves and mountain tops, sold for $26,325 inclusive of premium on July 3. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Michaan’s Auctions.

This embroidered silk dragon robe displaying nine golden dragons flying amid swirling clouds and flaming pearls, above crashing waves and mountain tops, sold for $26,325 inclusive of premium on July 3. Image courtesy LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Michaan’s Auctions.

The former Myers home, now the first building that Textile Museum visitors enter, is a classical Georgian structure set in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Textile museum moving to George Washington University

The former Myers home, now the first building that Textile Museum visitors enter, is a classical Georgian structure set in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

The former Myers home, now the first building that Textile Museum visitors enter, is a classical Georgian structure set in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

WASHINGTON (AP) – Washington’s Textile Museum, with its collection of objects from clothing to quilts and rugs, is moving to the campus of nearby George Washington University.

Officials at the university and museum announced the move Tuesday. The plan is for the collection to be part of a new museum expected to open at the university’s Foggy Bottom campus in 2014.

Washington’s Textile Museum was established in 1925 by rug and textile collector George Hewitt Myers and is currently housed in two historic buildings in the city’s Kalorama neighborhood, one of them Myers’ 1913 home. The collection includes some 18,000 pieces dating back as far as 3000 B.C., including a Navajo chief’s blanket, a headband from Peru and carpet from 17th-century India. a rug and textile collector and connoisseur — and is still housed in the very building his family called home. Myers’ original collection started in the 1890s included 275 rugs and 60 related textiles.

The indigenous cultures of America and pre-Colombian textiles are represented as are textiles from Asia and the Islamic world. Materials include the expected like wool, silk, cotton and linen, but also things like bark fiber and peacock feathers.

“It’s hard to say what’s my favorite piece,” said Sumru Krody, one of two staff curators, who specializes in Islamic textiles and Egyptian and Roman textiles that date from 200 B.C. to 500 A.D. “It’s like asking which one is your favorite child.”

Textile Museum spokeswoman Katy Clune says the collection will stay at its current location into 2013. The museum, which receives 25,000 to 35,000 visitors annually, plans eventually to sell its buildings and put the money from the sale into the textile museum’s endowment, Clune said.

The move will give the museum slightly more space. The current facility has 27,000 square feet of exhibition and storage space while the new museum is expected to have a total of 35,000 square feet, though it will also house other exhibits. The school also plans to build a 20,000-sqare-foot conservation center on the university’s campus in Loudoun County.

George Washington University president Steven Knapp called the collection extraordinary and “one of the world’s best specialized collections.” He said students, particularly those in the school’s history, anthropology and museum studies programs, will eventually get a chance to interact with the collection as part of classes, lectures and seminars.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

AP-WF-07-26-11 2158GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The former Myers home, now the first building that Textile Museum visitors enter, is a classical Georgian structure set in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

The former Myers home, now the first building that Textile Museum visitors enter, is a classical Georgian structure set in the Kalorama neighborhood of Washington. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

The museum and library complex has been moved to higher ground about 100 yards from the original site. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Czech-Slovak museum moves to higher ground

The museum and library complex has been moved to higher ground about 100 yards from the original site. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The museum and library complex has been moved to higher ground about 100 yards from the original site. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (AP) – Crews are expected to finally complete the move of the flood-damaged National Czech and Slovak Museum this week.

Rain has repeatedly delayed efforts to move the building, which began in June. But spokeswoman Diana Baculis told The Gazette newspaper that the 1,700-ton museum is now at the right height needed to slide into pace on a new foundation at its new location on higher ground.

The museum, which opened in 1995 on the banks of the Cedar River, was flooded in 2008. Many of its contents were heavily damaged or destroyed in the flood.

The building should begin sliding on steel rails and into final position on Wednesday.

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AP-WF-07-26-11 0903GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The museum and library complex has been moved to higher ground about 100 yards from the original site. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The museum and library complex has been moved to higher ground about 100 yards from the original site. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Exterior of the B. Free Franklin post office in Philadelphia, Pa. Aug. 2008 photo by Ben Franske, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

Post office in Ben Franklin’s house may close

Exterior of the B. Free Franklin post office in Philadelphia, Pa. Aug. 2008 photo by Ben Franske, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

Exterior of the B. Free Franklin post office in Philadelphia, Pa. Aug. 2008 photo by Ben Franske, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A post office in a building that Benjamin Franklin once owned is on the Postal Service’s list of branches that could close.

The post office in Philadelphia’s historic Old City neighborhood is the only one in the country that doesn’t fly a U.S. flag. That’s because there wasn’t one in 1775, when Franklin founded what has evolved into today’s Postal Service.

There’s also a postal museum upstairs from the so-called B. Free Franklin Post Office, located in a house once owned by Franklin. It opened as a U.S. post office in 1975, the 200th anniversary of Franklin’s appointment by the Continental Congress as the country’s first postmaster general.

The only Colonial-themed post office operated by the Postal Service, it also is a tourist attraction that hand-cancels stamps with the B. Free Franklin postmark that Franklin used.

In all, 203 post offices in Pennsylvania are on the list of branches being reviewed for possible closure.

The financially troubled Postal Service said Tuesday that it is considering whether to close 3,653 offices, branches and stations nationwide — more than 1 in 10 of its retail outlets.

After an office is placed on the list of potential closures, the community served by that office will have 60 days to file their comments. If an office is to be closed, appeals will be heard by the independent Postal Regulatory Commission.

On the Net:

Post offices being studied for closure: http://about.usps.com/news/electronic-press-kits/expandedaccess/statelist.htm

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Exterior of the B. Free Franklin post office in Philadelphia, Pa. Aug. 2008 photo by Ben Franske, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

Exterior of the B. Free Franklin post office in Philadelphia, Pa. Aug. 2008 photo by Ben Franske, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.