The Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Vladsinger, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Philadelphia philanthropist Ruth Perelman dies at 90

The Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Vladsinger, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Photo by Vladsinger, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Ruth Perelman, who along with her philanthropist husband was a major donor to institutions in the city of Philadelphia, has died. She was 90.

Perelman died Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Her husband, Raymond Perelman, told The Associated Press that the couple had been married for 70 years after they met in Greensboro, N.C., where she was going to college and he was running a plant for his father.

In May, the University of Pennsylvania announced that the School of Medicine would be named after the couple following their donation of $225 million. The Ivy League university described the gift as the largest in its history.

The Perelmans have also given millions to other Philadelphia institutions such as the Kimmel Center and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Exhibit on Ky. stringed instrument makers to run through Sept. 1

MAYSVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Kentuckians who are seen as masters in making fiddles, banjos, dulcimers and other stringed instruments are being featured in an exhibit at the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center in Maysville.

“Made to be Played: Traditional Art of Kentucky Luthiers” will be on display through Sept. 1. It was first shown in 2007 in Berea and has been on tour around the state since then.

The Kentucky Arts Council says the exhibit is the result of years of research and fieldwork by the Kentucky Folklife Program.

For more information about the museum, visit its website at www.kentuckygatewaymuseumcenter.org .

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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The Right Honourable The Lord George Gordon Byron (English, 1788-1824), poet and politician, in an 1824 portrait by Thomas Philipps (1770-1845).

NJ museum’s Lord Byron letter turns out to be fake

The Right Honourable The Lord George Gordon Byron (English, 1788-1824), poet and politician, in an 1824 portrait by Thomas Philipps (1770-1845).

The Right Honourable The Lord George Gordon Byron (English, 1788-1824), poet and politician, in an 1824 portrait by Thomas Philipps (1770-1845).

MORRISTOWN, N.J. (AP) – It turns out a nearly 200-year-old letter donated to a New Jersey museum wasn’t written by English Romantic poet Lord Byron.

The National Historical Park in Morristown received the letter more than 50 years ago from a banker and collector.

The letter’s authenticity came into doubt when Drew University began planning a large Byron exhibit. The park’s chief of cultural resources Jude Pfister offered the letter.

The Star-Ledger of Newark reports the university shared the letter with an expert at the New York Public Library. She found problems with the salutation, signature and content.

The letter appears to have been written 50 years after Byron’s death in 1824. The author remains a mystery.

The museum is considering an exhibit on forged documents.

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Information from: The Star-Ledger, http://www.nj.com/starledger

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Google buys approximately 1,000 IBM patents

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NEW YORK (AP) – Google Inc. has bought about 1,000 pending and issued patents from IBM Corp. in its quest to shore up its defenses against suits by other technology companies, according to documents filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Google and IBM spokesmen wouldn’t comment Friday on the purchase.

The patent transfers were recorded two weeks ago and cover a range of technologies, many of which have little to do with Google’s Internet search and advertising business. One covers ways of automatically adjusting a clock, another deals with surface treatments for electrical contacts.

But even patents that have little do with Google’s business can be useful ammunition in the hyper-litigious technology world.

If it’s sued over patents by a company whose business relies on technologies covered by Google’s patents, Google can file a retaliatory lawsuit.

Phone makers that use Google Inc.’s Android software are being sued by Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp. As a young company, Google has few patents of its own to counter with.

Kent Walker, Google’s general counsel, wrote in a blog post in April that the explosion in patent litigation threatens to stifle innovation.

“But as things stand today, one of a company’s best defenses against this kind of litigation is (ironically) to have a formidable patent portfolio, as this helps maintain your freedom to develop new products and services,” Walker wrote.

In July, Google participated in an auction for a collection of 6,000 patents from Nortel, a bankrupt Canadian maker of telecommunications equipment. It was outbid by a consortium including Apple that paid $4.5 billion.

In the past year, Google has also bought patents from Verizon Communications Inc. and Motorola Inc.

The patent sale was first reported by the blog SEO by the Sea, which follows Google.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Police: Oregon man stole more than 400 library books

MEDFORD, Ore. (AP) – An Eagle Point, Ore., man has been accused of stealing nearly 400 books from local libraries and apparently had no plans to sell them.

Christopher Storrer, who listed “home” as his graduate school on a social-media website, has been banned from all Rogue Valley libraries while he awaits trial.

The Medford Mail Tribune reports Storrer’s reading tastes tended toward political philosophy. Among the titles were works by Stephen Hawking, Michael Focault and Umberto Eco.

Jackson County Deputy District Attorney Allan Smith called Storrer’s home library “a fairly eclectic collection.”

Storrer removed the library bar codes from the books, curbing their worth on the auction market.

The 24-year-old was indicted on theft, robbery and criminal-mischief charges.

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Information from: Mail Tribune, http://www.mailtribune.com/

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Tuthankamen's burial mask, on display in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo in 2003. Photo by Bjorn Christian Torrissen, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Metropolitan Museum to send 19 Tut artifacts to Egypt

Tuthankamen's famous burial mask, on display in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Dec. 7, 2003 photo by Bjorn Christian Torrissen, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Tuthankamen’s famous burial mask, on display in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Dec. 7, 2003 photo by Bjorn Christian Torrissen, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

CAIRO (AP) – Nineteen artifacts taken from the tomb of the famed boy-pharaoh Tutankhamun will be returned to Egypt next week after more than half a century at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Egypt’s antiquities authority said Saturday.

The trove includes a miniature bronze dog and a sphinx-shaped bracelet ornament, the Supreme Council of Antiquities said in a statement.

The move, scheduled for Tuesday, is the result of an agreement between the two institutions last year to return the objects to Egypt.

At the time, then-antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said the objects would become part of the permanent King Tut collection at the new Grand Egyptian Museum, which is under construction near the Giza pyramids and is scheduled to open in 2012.

Hawass, once the most public face of Egyptian archaeology, was fired earlier this month after intense criticism of his close ties to ex-President Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted in February in a popular uprising.

The antiquities authority said the pieces were sent to New York in 1948 when the Metropolitan Museum closed its expedition house in Egypt.

The decision to repatriate the objects came after an extensive examination of the validity of their origin.

“Because of precise legislation relating to that excavation, these objects were never meant to have left Egypt, and therefore should rightfully belong to the government of Egypt,” Director Thomas Campbell said in a statement on the Metropolitan Museum website.

Museum representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

British archaeologist Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, when it was common practice for archaeologists to keep some or all of their own findings.

Some of the pieces in this collection were handed down through a niece of Carter and his estate in Luxor, which he left entirely to the Metropolitan Museum.

King Tut is one of history’s most famous pharaohs because archaeologists found his tomb full of glittering wealth of the rich 18th Dynasty (1569-1315 B.C.) This year, DNA tests and CT scans on Tut’s 3,300-year-old mummy confirmed that the pharaoh died of a broken leg complicated by malaria at the age of 19.

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Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Sotheby's New York headquarters at 1334 York Avenue. Jan. 24, 2009 photo by Jim Henderson.

Art handlers picket Sotheby’s over contract dispute

Sotheby's New York headquarters at 1334 York Avenue. Jan. 24, 2009 photo by Jim Henderson.

Sotheby’s New York headquarters at 1334 York Avenue. Jan. 24, 2009 photo by Jim Henderson.

NEW YORK (AP and ACNI) — Art handlers and Sotheby’s auction house in New York are in a dispute over a new contract. Members of Teamsters Local 814 picketed outside the company’s York Avenue headquarters in Manhattan throughout the weekend and on Monday, carrying signs that said “Stop the War on Workers” and “Locked Out – Sotheby’s – Teamsters Local 814 No Dispute With Any Other Employer.”

According to the Wall Street Jourrnal, Sotheby’s notified its 43 art handlers on Friday that they couldn’t return to work, and hired temporary non-union workers to replace them.

The art handlers were sent letters informing them that they would be locked out beginning on Monday, Aug. 1, 2011. Their contract with Sotheby’s expired in July.

In a statement, Sotheby’s Executive Vice President and Worldwide Director of Press and Corporate Affairs Diana Phillips said: “This is not an outcome Sotheby’s wanted. We have been negotiating in good faith since May and had offered a contract with attractive terms which unfortunately [the art handlers] did not accept.”

The lockout is said to have come as a surprise both to workers and officials of their union, who had been of the belief that negotiations would be ongoing. In an article appearing in the Aug. 2, 2011 online issue of Crain’s New York Business, Teamsters Local 814 President Jason Ide was quoted as saying: “We’ve exchanged our proposals, but we’re not even into the heart of bargaining. Clearly somebody over there made a decision they’d rather bargain with us outside, walking the picket line.”

The union says the company wants to offer buyouts and replace some of the unionized art handlers with nonunion labor.

The two sides are set to meet next week.

In 2010, Sotheby’s sales increased by 74 percent. Its major upcoming auctions include a contemporary art sale on Sept. 22.

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Information from: The Wall Street Journal, http://www.wsj.com

Auction Central News International contributed to this Associated Press report.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Sotheby's New York headquarters at 1334 York Avenue. Jan. 24, 2009 photo by Jim Henderson.

Sotheby’s New York headquarters at 1334 York Avenue. Jan. 24, 2009 photo by Jim Henderson.

Columnar form vase with Gold Aurene interior, signed ‘Lundberg Studios 1994 021120,’ Estimate: $700-$900. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Tiffany lamp top attraction at Michaan’s sale Aug. 12

Columnar form vase with Gold Aurene interior, signed ‘Lundberg Studios 1994 021120,’ Estimate: $700-$900. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Columnar form vase with Gold Aurene interior, signed ‘Lundberg Studios 1994 021120,’ Estimate: $700-$900. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Michaan’s Auctions’ 20th Century Decorative Arts Auction will be held on Friday, Aug. 12. Important Art Nouveau, modernist and contemporary items will be offered, including a selection of significant works by Tiffany Studios. Particularly worth noting is a Tiffany Tulip Lamp, beautifully fashioned with richly colored blooms of red, purple and fuchsia tones. It carries a $100,000-$125,000 estimate.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Also being offered is a rare Bernhard Pankok etagere, circa 1900 ($10,000-$15,000). Created during a period when Pankok was first beginning to find substantial recognition for his furnishings, this wonderful and scarce piece is a fine example of his craftsmanship and style.

From yet another prominent artist is an exquisite lidded ceramic box estimated at $8,000-$10,000. The modern Kitaoji Rosanjin box holds a distinguished provenance, once being held at the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo as well as the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco.

An exceptional group of glass from the Lundberg Glass Collection is also up for sale. The Lundberg Studios pieces are exclusively from the private collection of Steven Lundberg and should generate strong collector interest.

The aforementioned items will be auctioned on Aug. 12 at Michaan’s Auctions main gallery at 2751 Todd St., Alameda, CA 94501 with bidding to commence at 10 a.m. Pacific. Previews will be held Aug. 5-7, the morning of the sale and by appointment.

For details visit Michaan’s website at www.michaans.com or phone 510-740-0220.

altView the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Columnar form vase with Gold Aurene interior, signed ‘Lundberg Studios 1994 021120,’ Estimate: $700-$900. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Columnar form vase with Gold Aurene interior, signed ‘Lundberg Studios 1994 021120,’ Estimate: $700-$900. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Tiffany Studios tulip lamp mounted on a decorated mushroom base, base signed Tiffany Studios New York #363. Estimate: $100,000-$125,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Tiffany Studios tulip lamp mounted on a decorated mushroom base, base signed Tiffany Studios New York #363. Estimate: $100,000-$125,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Pankok etagere, circa 1900. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Pankok etagere, circa 1900. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Kitaoji Rosanjin ceramic box. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

Kitaoji Rosanjin ceramic box. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s Auctions.

The Baths of Trajan and the grounds over the Domus Aurea, Rome, Italy. Image by Ryan Freisling, coutesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Archaeologists find Apollo mosaic in Rome cellar

The Baths of Trajan and the grounds over the Domus Aurea, Rome, Italy. Image by Ryan Freisling, coutesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The Baths of Trajan and the grounds over the Domus Aurea, Rome, Italy. Image by Ryan Freisling, coutesy of Wikimedia Commons.

ROME (AFP) –- Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-oldmosaic in Rome depicting the Greek god Apollo surrounded by his muses in a cellar once used as a park tool shed near the Colosseum, officials said on Friday.

“This is a very important discovery. The mosaic is in perfect condition and it can be dated exactly to between A.D. 64 and 109,” Umberto Broccoli, head of the culture department of the Rome city council, told reporters on a visit.

Excavations are being done in an underground gallery of the ancient Trajan Baths, a vast structure near the ruins of Nero’s palace, the Domus Aurea.

The parts of the mosaic uncovered so far are made with various shades of bronze-colored tesserae and show columns, Apollo and one of the muses.

A series of unique frescoes have already been found in the cellar space, including a cityscape and a group of men pressing grapes to make wine.

Archaeologists believe there are more mosaics to be uncovered and have said they need an extra 680,000 euros ($978,000) to finish the excavation.

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The Chelsea Hotel (Hotel Chelsea) in New York City, 2009 photo by Historystuff2, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Future uncertain for NYC’s Chelsea Hotel

The Chelsea Hotel (Hotel Chelsea) in New York City, 2009 photo by Historystuff2, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

The Chelsea Hotel (Hotel Chelsea) in New York City, 2009 photo by Historystuff2, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

NEW YORK (AFP) – The famed Chelsea Hotel — muse, home and party space to generations of New York musicians and writers — faced an uncertain future Monday as the doors apparently closed on guests.

An employee at the legendary hotel confirmed a New York Times article reporting that rooms would no longer be available for short-term stays while renovations take place.

“We are not taking reservations,” the employee said, declining to give his name. The hotel’s website was still processing reservations, however. The employee did not know how long the suspension would last and there was no immediate reply from a spokesman for the hotel.

The Chelsea has been in turmoil since going on the market, with the probable buyer expected to be developer Joseph Chetrit, according to the Times. The deal, worth $80 million, had not gone through by the end of the weekend, the report said.

Large-scale renovations are expected to take a year, during which the 100 permanent residents who live in apartments will be allowed to stay. Chetrit is reported to plan to keep the Chelsea as a hotel, although this is not confirmed.

The 12-floor building with the neon sign “Hotel Chelsea” is a landmark in Manhattan thanks to its long list of famous residents. Playwright Arthur Miller and singers Janis Joplin and Patti Smith were among those living there. Poet Dylan Thomas died there, as did Nancy, the girlfriend of Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious.

Andy Warhol made a film called Chelsea Girls, while Leonard Cohen immortalized the place in a song about his brief encounter there with Joplin, singing, “I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel.”

In his classic song Sara, Bob Dylan sang about how he was, “Staying up for days in the Chelsea Hotel, writing Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands for you.”

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Chelsea Hotel (Hotel Chelsea) in New York City, 2009 photo by Historystuff2, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

The Chelsea Hotel (Hotel Chelsea) in New York City, 2009 photo by Historystuff2, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.