Guy Carleton Wiggins (American, 1883-1962), ‘New York Library in Storm,’ signed lower left, 12 x 16 in. sight, 20 x 16 in. in signed Fredrix NY frame. Est. $5,000-$10,000. Nest Egg Auctions photo.

Nest Egg Auctions to host gala New Year’s Auction, Jan. 7

Guy Carleton Wiggins (American, 1883-1962), ‘New York Library in Storm,’ signed lower left, 12 x 16 in. sight, 20 x 16 in. in signed Fredrix NY frame. Est. $5,000-$10,000. Nest Egg Auctions photo.

Guy Carleton Wiggins (American, 1883-1962), ‘New York Library in Storm,’ signed lower left, 12 x 16 in. sight, 20 x 16 in. in signed Fredrix NY frame. Est. $5,000-$10,000. Nest Egg Auctions photo.

MERIDEN, Conn. – The Brechlins are home for the holidays and will celebrate as the Connecticut family’s Nest Egg Auctions presents its annual Gala Holiday New Year’s Auction on Saturday, Jan. 7. The sale will begin at 2 p.m. Eastern time, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers.com.

Those attending the 209-lot auction will be offered festive hospitality, with complimentary food and drink; and live music.

“Everyone comes to our New Year’s auction,” said auctioneer Ryan Brechlin. “Hey, free shrimp!”

Along with the food and entertainment, guests will be able to enjoy previewing an outstanding lineup of antiques and collectibles on display prior to the auction.

Ryan Brechlin will oversee the event together with his sister Jennifer Brechlin and their mother Mary Ellen Brechlin. All three family members work full time for the second-generation auction house. Present in spirit will be the family patriarch, Carl Brechlin, who died in 2008.

The Jan. 7 auction will be Nest Egg’s first sale of 2012. What better way to ring in the New Year than with a late-19th-century Tiffany & Co. grandfather clock that stands an impressive 100 inches tall and has all the bells and whistles expected of a fine Tiffany timepiece.

“It has a good German movement [Winterhalder & Hofmeier] and a beautifully carved mahogany case,” said Ryan Brechlin. “It’s enormous. People who want a Tiffany clock like them big.”

With a sun and moon dial, eight bells and Westminster chimes – all in running condition – the clock is estimated at $3,000-$5,000.

Another large mechanical marvel in the sale is a Model 92 National cash register, which was custom made for a New York department store, Barton & Hoysradt, around 1902. The register is fully functional and includes all keys and its original instruction book. The entire piece – register and attached cabinet – measures approximately 19 1/2 inches by 26 inches by 36 inches and has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate.

“It’s a cool piece, one of the biggest registers National made. The drawers all integrated to the different departments in the store,” said Brechlin.

Another choice mechanical device in the auction is a Mills Novelty Co. American War Eagle nickel slot machine from the mid-1930s. From an Old Saybrook, Conn., estate, the classic one-arm bandit in working order is expected to make $1,000-$2,000.

The auction’s high point may come with the introduction of a Guy Carleton Wiggins (American, 1883-1962) oil-on-board painting of the New York Library in a winter storm. The artwork executed in quintessential Wiggins style carries a $5,000-$10,000 estimate.

“It has everything you want in a Guy Wiggins painting – New York in winter, snow and American Flags,” said Brechlin. “This one has two flags.”

Brechlin noted that the 12-inch by 16-inch Wiggins painting is from the Alfred Cheney Johnston Collection. Johnston was a famed New York City-based photographer known for his portraits of Ziegfeld Follies showgirls as well as of 1920s/1930s actresses. The final 65 lots of the auction consist exclusively of Johnston photos of this type.

“This will be the last of the Alfred Cheney Johnston estate photographs, which we’ve spread over three auctions during the past year. Because they’re the last offering, I’m hoping people will go a little crazy for them,” said Bechlin.

Some of Johnston’s beautiful subjects were noted silent film stars. These particular images will be sold individually. Many other lots include multiple images. Estimates range from several hundred to several thousand dollars.

While the subject matter was risqué for its time, Johnston’s work was technically and artistically superb, and is highly collectible today. The enlargements, many 10 inches by 13 inches, are in excellent condition.

An especially desirable collector’s item in the sale is an Art Deco porcelain figure of a woman made by Lenci of Torino, Italy. The sultry blonde, wearing a short dress and carrying a basket of flowers, stands 9½ inches high. With minor damage, it has a $500-$1,000 estimate.

“Lenci was a small Italian pottery and their best pieces are highly sought after,” said Brechlin. “We sold a Lenci piece earlier in the year for around $13,000.”

A line from the popular 1934 hit Winter Wonderland – “Gone away is the bluebird” – comes to mind when considering a taxidermied passenger pigeon displayed in a period display case. The trophy, an example of a wild species that was hunted to extinction by 1914, is the size of a typical pigeon. The custom-crafted glass and wood case measures approximately 12 inches by 13 inches by 19 inches.

“We’ve done well with some taxidermy,” says Bechlin, who hopes to make $3,000-$5,000 with this former museum piece.

Three scarce Arts & Crafts Movement books on papermaking by Dard Hunter, a one-time associate of Elbert Hubbard, will be sold. One, published in 1927 and dealing with primitive papermaking, is number 83 of an edition limited to 200 copies. It has a $1,000-$2,000 estimate.

The Literature of Papermaking 1390-1800 by Dard Hunter, published in 1925, is numbered 76 of 160 and signed by the author. The illustrated volume is hand printed in type of Hunter’s own design on handmade paper. It carries a $500-$1,000 estimate.

Hunter’s Papermaking in Indo-China, a limited edition published in 1947, exhibits similar handcraftsmanship and also has a $500-$1,000 estimate.

For additional information on Nest Egg Auctions’ Gala Holiday New Year’s Auction, call 203-630-1400 or toll-free 800-448-0692; or e-mail ryan@nesteggauctions.com. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Guy Carleton Wiggins (American, 1883-1962), ‘New York Library in Storm,’ signed lower left, 12 x 16 in. sight, 20 x 16 in. in signed Fredrix NY frame. Est. $5,000-$10,000. Nest Egg Auctions photo.

 

Guy Carleton Wiggins (American, 1883-1962), ‘New York Library in Storm,’ signed lower left, 12 x 16 in. sight, 20 x 16 in. in signed Fredrix NY frame. Est. $5,000-$10,000. Nest Egg Auctions photo.

The battleship USS IOWA firing its 16-inch guns during a firepower demonstration in August 1984. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Battleship USS Iowa nearing final voyage

The battleship USS IOWA firing its 16-inch guns during a firepower demonstration in August 1984. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The battleship USS IOWA firing its 16-inch guns during a firepower demonstration in August 1984. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

RICHMOND, Calif. (AP) – The final voyage of the USS Iowa is near.

The last surviving World War II battleship without a home is docked at the Port of Richmond, where it is being prepared for its journey to the Port of Los Angeles for a new mission as a museum and memorial to Navy might.

The San Francisco Chronicle says it will be towed beneath to Golden Gate Bridge and into the Pacific for its last voyage to Los Angeles in February or March.

The Pacific Battleship Center raised $8 million to rescue the 68-year-old ship from the Ghost Fleet in Suisun Bay.

The 800-foot Iowa, commissioned in 1943, served in World War II and the Korean War. It last sailed in 1990.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-22-11 1353GMT

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The battleship USS IOWA firing its 16-inch guns during a firepower demonstration in August 1984. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The battleship USS IOWA firing its 16-inch guns during a firepower demonstration in August 1984. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Ruins at Pella, where thousands of ancient gold coins were found in 2003. Image by Brian Donovan, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Gold fever spreads in debt-ridden Greece

Ruins at Pella, where thousands of ancient gold coins were found in 2003. Image by Brian Donovan, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Ruins at Pella, where thousands of ancient gold coins were found in 2003. Image by Brian Donovan, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

GREVENA, Greece (AP) – Not all Greek myths are ancient.

In rural towns and villages, where millennia-old pottery shards and broken classical masonry are sometimes found, shepherds and farmers have similar tales to tell.

They cite the buried golden sow with its seven golden piglets (which made a poor farmer rich), the coin hoards guarded by dragons from the times of Alexander the Great or the Byzantine emperors, the gold plunder squirreled away by long-dead Turkish pashas or fleeing Nazi officers. All it takes, they say, is a lucky thrust of a shovel.

Legends like that have taken on a new life in debt-crippled Greece.

As two years of austerity take a harsh toll—with shrinking salaries, rising taxes and record unemployment for many—more and more Greeks are finding solace in tales of buried riches, mostly from the past two centuries of the Mediterranean nation’s turbulent history.

“It used to be just a couple of groups of people who all knew each other, now everybody has got worked up,” self-described amateur gold hunter George told The Associated Press. “They bring maps, pass on tips, but as usual nobody finds anything. The crisis has spurred many people to seek a windfall.”

He asked not to be further identified as what he does is illegal.

The 40-year-old said at least 10 attempts have been made to dig up buried gold over the past few months around Grevena, a farm town of 10,000 in western Macedonia, some 250 miles northwest of Athens, the capital. The region saw heavy fighting between occupying German troops and resistance fighters during World War II.

“They even dug through a huge rock mass, believing they would find buried sovereigns parachuted in by the British to the resistance fighting the Germans,” he said.

A 49-foot tunnel into a hill just outside Grevena, which still contained a pick and a mask, testifies to the fruitless efforts of five men arrested by police a few days ago.

Authorities said the men, all in their 40s, used farm and construction tools, a generator and hand carts to dig the tunnel, whose entrance they camouflaged with an old rug.

“They said an old man showed them the spot, claiming there was treasure there, but did not specify exactly what they were seeking,” Grevena police chief Theophilos Soultis told the AP.

Even in central Thessaloniki, Greece’s second-largest city, urban legend has it that construction work on the site of an old Turkish house unearthed chests of gold coins—prompting truckers driving its soil away to a landfill to sieve through their loads first.

Their labor was to no avail.

Maps of purported treasure spots sell for thousands of euros—but more often than not they are artificially weathered fakes.

One of these maps inspired seven people to sink a 36-foot well into the ground near an abandoned quarry at Pentalofo, 16 miles north of Thessaloniki. Despite taking the precaution of working only after dark, they were arrested and face up to five years in prison if convicted of carrying out an illegal excavation.

“We get lots of people searching in our area, because the Germans worked the quarry during the war and many believe they left gold behind,” said local deputy mayor Giorgos Lazaridis who oversaw work to fill in the hole.

“There are lots of rumors, some say that gold sovereigns have been found, but nothing can be confirmed,” he said, adding that one group obtained a legal permit to dig years ago but found nothing.

A similar project is under way in the hills of Varvara, in the Halkidiki peninsula 70 miles east of Thessaloniki. After two false starts, the treasure hunters launched operations again, working off a new tip.

“They’re looking for gold that is supposed to be enough to pay off Greece’s national debt” of more than $457 billion, said municipal official Stergios Goutsios, who is monitoring the dig. “They claim it weighs tons and was hidden by a band fighting the Turks in 1860-70, when they were trapped in an ambush.”

Such legitimate hunts, which require a slew of official permits, have been carried out all over Greece in recent years, overseen by state archaeologists and police.

“Anyone who thinks they have information on buried treasure has the right to look for it, provided they obey the law,” said Giorgos Dimitrainas, an assistant professor of law at the University of Thrace. “Their share of the finds is determined by ministerial decision.”

But Greek law contains pitfalls for the unwary, even in the rare cases when they strike it rich. In 2003, legitimate treasure seekers unearthed thousands of ancient coins buried near the town of Pella, some 60 miles west of Thessaloniki. State officials ruled however that the group had no claim on the treasure as their permit stipulated that they could look for gold, not antiquities.

For Greece’s treasure seekers, even that should not be a sufficient deterrent.

“People who look for gold are maniacs, they never give up until they find something,” said another self-described former treasure hunter, 34-year-old Panagiotis. “It’s like gambling.”

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-22-11 0826GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ruins at Pella, where thousands of ancient gold coins were found in 2003. Image by Brian Donovan, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Ruins at Pella, where thousands of ancient gold coins were found in 2003. Image by Brian Donovan, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Expected for reach or exceed the $100,000-$200,000 estimate is this Chinese hanging scroll watercolor painted by Zhang Daqian (1899-1983) in 1936. It measures 44 inches x 19.8 inches. Image courtesy of 888 Auctions.

888 Auctions to sell Zhang Daqian watercolor Jan. 12

Expected for reach or exceed the $100,000-$200,000 estimate is this Chinese hanging scroll watercolor painted by Zhang Daqian (1899-1983) in 1936. It measures 44 inches x 19.8 inches. Image courtesy of 888 Auctions.

Expected for reach or exceed the $100,000-$200,000 estimate is this Chinese hanging scroll watercolor painted by Zhang Daqian (1899-1983) in 1936. It measures 44 inches x 19.8 inches. Image courtesy of 888 Auctions.

RICHMOND HILL, Ontario – After a successful year, 888 Auctions is prepared to usher in the new year with its first sale, Chinese Paintings and Asian Works of Art on Thursday, Jan. 12. Composed of over 550 lots, the auction will showcase an enticing collection of Asian art and antiques including paintings, porcelains, bronze cast Buddhist deities, fine furniture, ivory, jade and shoushan carvings. Items have been meticulously selected for their fine artistic merits, historical value and exceptional provenance.

Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

With the skyrocketing value of Chinese paintings, buyers will be excited to hear the inclusion of two outstanding watercolor paintings. Lot 37, a Li Kuchan (1899-1893) Chinese watercolor features two birds, signed and inscribed with two seals. It carries an estimate high of $20,000. However, the next lot figures to garner the most interest in the auction. It should not be a surprise if Lot 38, a Zhang Daqian (1899-1983) Chinese watercolor painting titled Wuxia Mountain Clear Autumn surpasses its $100,000-$200,000 estimate. This artwork boasts exceptional provenance.

Lot 208 will be the highlighted lot from the collection of jade carvings—a fine Chinese carved white jade mountain, which is estimated at $12,000-$15,000. The white translucent stone features a landscape scene with an Immortal and attendant resting atop a rockery in deep relief.

Dynastic porcelains continue to remain a staple at 888 Auctions. Lot 447 is a rare Chinese square hu-shaped vase covered with clear evidence of a rare type of enameling called gutoncai. The vase also features a band of auspicious bats atop peaches. The six-character Qianlong mark on the base shows evidence of flaked gilt gold. Standing 17.2 inches tall, this majestic vase is expected to surpass its high estimate of $60,000.

For details visit www.888auctions.com or call 905-763-7201.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOT OF NOTE


From a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware set in the Acorn pattern, eight emerald-enameled salts with spoons, and [center] a pair of tongs. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Stephenson’s brings out the good silver for its Jan. 1 auction

From a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware set in the Acorn pattern, eight emerald-enameled salts with spoons, and [center] a pair of tongs. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

From a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware set in the Acorn pattern, eight emerald-enameled salts with spoons, and [center] a pair of tongs. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

SOUTHAMPTON, Pa. – An array of 18th-century Britannia standard silver and one of the most extensive Georg Jensen flatware services to see the auction block in many years will headline Stephenson’s New Year’s Day Antiques & Decorative Arts sale.

The suburban Philadelphia auctioneers specialize in estate antiques and art. Often, they are called upon to assess and auction the contents of grand residences on Philadelphia’s “Main Line.” That’s where the New Year’s silver trove was sourced – from the home of a prosperous family that owned a yarn goods company during the early to mid 20th century.

The Jensen sterling flatware set consists of more than 200 pieces in the coveted Acorn pattern and includes numerous serving and accessory pieces, most notably an octet of emerald-enameled salts with individual spoons. The service has remained in the same family since 1941.

“An estimate of $20,000 for a service of this quality and size would not be the least bit unreasonable, especially when factoring in the considerable cachet of the Georg Jensen name,” said Stephenson’s owner, Cindy Stephenson.

The Philadelphia estate also produced a sizable selection of antique English silver, including tea caddies by Anthony Nelme (circa 1720) and Edward Gibbons (circa 1726). Two matching Thomas Ash Britannia standard Queen Anne tea caddies date to 1711 and were purchased by a member of the Philadelphia family in 1944 from New York’s Parke-Bernet Galleries. A third Queen Anne caddy in the collection was crafted by Ash around 1708.

Other English sterling highlights from the estate include a 1780 William Cafe dish cross with pierced center for a spirit lamp, an 1821 dish cross by William Plummer and a pair of Britannia standard silver casters made by Thomas Bamford around 1720.

“This collection of silver was obviously a family treasure. Over the years the pieces were appraised multiple times. We have documents for several appraisals conducted by Freeman’s in the 1970s,” said Stephenson.

The New Year’s Day silver offering continues with fine sterling from additional consignors. Key pieces include a J. Lewis American coin silver clamshell serving spoon, a vegetable bowl, and a Wallace Grand Baroque flatware service for 12 that is expected to realize at least $2,500 at auction.

Several prized furniture designs by Japanese-American architect and master craftsman George Nakashima came to Stephenson’s from a Philadelphia-area estate. All had been purchased new in 1954. A walnut living room suite of quintessential Nakashima style will be apportioned into three auction lots: an armless sofa, armchair with footstool, and sidechair.

A special highlight of the sale is a collection of 16 beautiful duck decoys carved and signed by D.W. “Davey” Nichol (1890-1977) of Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada. Inspired by members of his family who were accomplished carvers, Nichol began creating decoys in the 1950s, purely for his personal collection. After his talent was discovered by other collectors, Nichol could barely keep up with the demand for his elegant, hand-carved and painted waterfowl. During the second half of the 20th century, Nichol’s decoys won many prizes and were displayed in prestigious exhibitions, including at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont.

“We feel privileged that we were chosen to sell this collection, which came from a Montgomery County (metro Philadelphia) estate,” said Stephenson. “It very easily could have gone to an auction house that specializes in decoys.”

The Jan. 1 auction is brimming with a variety of antiques, art and jewelry from upscale estates. Selected highlights from the sale’s many different categories include a Steinway & Sons walnut Model B grand piano, a McClellan saddle, a chic pearl and diamond bracelet, and an exquisite sterling powder jar with guilloche lavender enameling and a hand-painted courting scene on its lid.

Stephenson’s Jan. 1 auction will commence at 11 a.m. Eastern time and will be held at the company’s gallery located at 1005 Industrial Blvd., Southampton, PA 18966. Inspection is on Thursday, Dec. 29 from 3-6 p.m.; Friday, Dec. 30 from 12 noon to 2 p.m.; and on auction day, Sunday, Jan. 1 from 10 a.m. till the start of the sale.

On Tuesday, Dec. 27, commencing at 5 p.m., Stephenson’s will host an open house preview and lecture by Janet Drucker, America’s foremost authority on the subject of Georg Jensen silver and author of the book Georg Jensen: A Tradition of Splendid Silver. Drucker’s PowerPoint presentation will focus on Jensen flatware and the classic Acorn pattern.

All forms of bidding will be available, including live in the gallery, absentee, by phone or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

For additional information on any lot in the sale, call Cindy Stephenson at 215-322-6182 or e-mail info@stephensonsauction.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


From a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware set in the Acorn pattern, eight emerald-enameled salts with spoons, and [center] a pair of tongs. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

From a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware set in the Acorn pattern, eight emerald-enameled salts with spoons, and [center] a pair of tongs. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

A formidable array of early 18th-century English sterling silver tea caddies. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

A formidable array of early 18th-century English sterling silver tea caddies. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

A selection of forks and knives from a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware service, Acorn pattern, numbering more than 200 pieces, including serving and accessory pieces. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

A selection of forks and knives from a Georg Jensen sterling silver flatware service, Acorn pattern, numbering more than 200 pieces, including serving and accessory pieces. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

From a Philadelphia-area estate, a quadruple-strand pearl and diamond bracelet. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

From a Philadelphia-area estate, a quadruple-strand pearl and diamond bracelet. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

(Left) 1821 dish cross by William Plummer and (right) 1780 William Cafe dish cross with pierced center for spirit lamp. Both were purchased from James Robinson Inc., New York, in 1945. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

(Left) 1821 dish cross by William Plummer and (right) 1780 William Cafe dish cross with pierced center for spirit lamp. Both were purchased from James Robinson Inc., New York, in 1945. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Nakashima 1954 walnut sofa from a living room suite to be auctioned in three lots. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Nakashima 1954 walnut sofa from a living room suite to be auctioned in three lots. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Collection of 16 hand-carved and painted duck decoys by D.W. “Davey” Nichol (1890-1977) of Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Collection of 16 hand-carved and painted duck decoys by D.W. “Davey” Nichol (1890-1977) of Smiths Falls, Ontario, Canada. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Steinway & Sons walnut Model B grand piano. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Steinway & Sons walnut Model B grand piano. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

A beautifully proportioned mid-20th-century Mexican silver coffee pot stamped P Lopez G on the bottom, weighs 45.5 ozt. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

A beautifully proportioned mid-20th-century Mexican silver coffee pot stamped P Lopez G on the bottom, weighs 45.5 ozt. Stephenson’s Auctioneers image.

Original cel used in the production of a Dr. Seuss cartoon, believed to be produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, 10 1/2 inches x 12 1/2 inches. Estimate: $100-$160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Fresh cast to star in Universal Live animation art sale Dec. 27

Original cel used in the production of a Dr. Seuss cartoon, believed to be produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, 10 1/2 inches x 12 1/2 inches. Estimate: $100-$160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Original cel used in the production of a Dr. Seuss cartoon, believed to be produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, 10 1/2 inches x 12 1/2 inches. Estimate: $100-$160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

NORTHBROOK, Ill. – Animation art—the second half of a dealer’s large collection—will comprise Universal Live’s entire auction Tuesday, Dec. 27, which will begin at 6 p.m. Central. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Universal Live President Martin Shape said that of the 338 lots to be sold, “at least 50 percent of them are new characters” since the suburban Chicago auction company sold the first half of the collection on Dec. 11.

Many of the lots are original production animation cels, some dating as early as the 1940s. Others are serigraph cels produced as limited editions. There are also original paintings of comic characters by Dick Duerrstein, who was creative director of Disney’s Consumer Product Division before devoting his career totally to creating artwork.

“This sale is unusual because it is focused totally on animation art,” said Shape. “They’re some of the rarest cels available—not common at all.”

Beloved Hanna-Barbara characters making appearances in the auction include The Jetsons, Yogi Bear, Quickdraw McGraw, Huckleberry Hound and Scooby Doo.

Shape said the oldest cel in the auction is from a 1944 Bugs Bunny cartoon. Other famous comic characters represented range from Batman to Tarzan.

Nearly all of the artworks in the sale come with certificates of authenticity. Conditions are described in the catalog as being very good to excellent.

For details about the Universal Live animation art auction call 847-412-1802 or e-mail sales@universallive.com. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


‘Rosie the Robot’ original production animation model cel from the Hanna Barbara television series ‘The Jetsons,’ signed by Bob Singer, dated June 20, 1962, 10 1/2 inches  x 12 1/2 inches. Estimate: $500-$770. Image courtesy of Universal Live

‘Rosie the Robot’ original production animation model cel from the Hanna Barbara television series ‘The Jetsons,’ signed by Bob Singer, dated June 20, 1962, 10 1/2 inches x 12 1/2 inches. Estimate: $500-$770. Image courtesy of Universal Live

Original animation cel used in the production of the 1990s television series ‘Taz-Mania,’ image 11 1/2 inches x 8 1/2 inches. Estimate: $100-$160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Original animation cel used in the production of the 1990s television series ‘Taz-Mania,’ image 11 1/2 inches x 8 1/2 inches. Estimate: $100-$160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Yogi Bear & Boo Boo limited edition animation serigraph cel, ‘The Jellystone Open,’ image 13 inches x 9 inches. Estimate: $150-$230. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Yogi Bear & Boo Boo limited edition animation serigraph cel, ‘The Jellystone Open,’ image 13 inches x 9 inches. Estimate: $150-$230. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Pink Panther original animation cel used in the production of ‘The Pink Panther Show,’ 1970s, image 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches. Estimate: $250-$380. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Pink Panther original animation cel used in the production of ‘The Pink Panther Show,’ 1970s, image 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches. Estimate: $250-$380. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Original painting by Dick Duerrstein, ‘Doctor Bugs Nose Best,’ acrylic paint on stretched canvas, signed by the artist, lower left, and on the verso, direct from the artist. Estimate: $750-$1,160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Original painting by Dick Duerrstein, ‘Doctor Bugs Nose Best,’ acrylic paint on stretched canvas, signed by the artist, lower left, and on the verso, direct from the artist. Estimate: $750-$1,160. Image courtesy of Universal Live.

Highly detailed work shows off C215’s painting. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

Reading the Streets: ‘When Smoke Gets in Your Eyes’

Highly detailed work shows off C215’s painting. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

Highly detailed work shows off C215’s painting. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

SAN FRANCISCO – Through Jan. 17, the San Francisco art gallery Shooting Gallery is hosting the Parisian artist Christian Guémy, also known as C215. The show, “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes,” focuses on the iconography of smoking ads and images.

The exhibiton includes portraits of painters George Braque and David Hockney, street artist Indigo, and photographers Jeremy Gibbs and Jon Cartwright – all painted on recycled objects including cardboard, vintage advertising papers and antique burned canvases. The pieces explore the way smoking advertising has manipulated the public.

An artist that just started painting six years ago, C215’s stencil technique is beyond compare. He doesn’t use the stencil for speed or to reproduce an image again and again, but rather manipulates it to create finely detailed work. This show displays that highly developed sense of intricacy.

“Christian Guemy makes work because he’s compelled to make it, and that is a quality I most love to see in artists,” commented Jennifer Goff, Press & Media Relations at the Shooting Gallery, in an email.

Inside, and out, C215 specializes in portraits. The faces C215 creates on the streets, peppering the world from Barcelona to San Francisco, will eventually degrade, as all street art does, and as humans do. But his legacy, taking the stencil art form to new heights is certainly not so erasable.

The Shooting Gallery is located at 839 Larkin St. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, noon-7 p.m.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Highly detailed work shows off C215’s painting. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

Highly detailed work shows off C215’s painting. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

C215 manipulates vintage cigarette advertising. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

C215 manipulates vintage cigarette advertising. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

A Lucky Strike lady. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

A Lucky Strike lady. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

C215’s stencils are beyond compare. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

C215’s stencils are beyond compare. Painting by C215, photo courtesy of the Shooting Gallery.

Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), Beaker, 1908–17, silver gilt, plique-à-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Russian enamels bequeathed to Walters Art Museum

Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), Beaker, 1908–17, silver gilt, plique-à-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), Beaker, 1908–17, silver gilt, plique-à-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

BALTIMORE (AP) – Hundreds of Russian enamels collected over decades by a Washington arts patron have been given to the Walters Art Museum, which said Tuesday that the gift reaffirms its position as a leading center for the study of Russian art.

More than 260 enamels from the 17th through the early 20th centuries are in the collection amassed by Jean M. Riddell, who died last year at the age of 100. The private collection was internationally recognized as the finest of its kind in the United States and also includes important additions to the museum’s holdings of Faberge works, the museum said.

William Johnston, senior curator emeritus at the Walters, said the Baltimore museum is now a major repository of Russian enamels.

“I think you could say it’s one of the major collections,” said Johnston.

The two collections complement each other because the Walters’ existing collection is primarily from the 17th and 18th centuries, while the Riddell collection focuses on the 19th century, particularly more than 40 works by highly regarded enamelist Fedor Ruckert, Johnston said.

Enamels, made by fusing powdered glass onto metal in a kiln, are one of Russia’s most well-known art forms. Enamels can be created in a variety of colors and works can take many forms. Producers included Faberge, which was known for its elaborate egg-shaped artworks incorporating enamel as well as jewels.

Riddell became interested in Russian enamels in 1966 when she inherited several from her husband. She began seriously collecting about 1970, buying through dealers in New York, and through agents at auctions as well as traveling to Europe, Johnston said.

“Even as an old lady, she would put them in her shopping bag and go on to the next place,” Johnston said.

Many of the pieces sold for under $10,000 during the 1970s, but the market for enamels soared in the 1990s as Russia became wealthy, discouraging many collectors, the curator said.

Walters Director Gary Vikan said the late arts patron believed that due to the museum’s existing holdings of Russian art and its commitment to past exhibitions in the field the Walters “would make a great home for her collection.”

Highlights include a filigree enamel tankard inspired by a 17th-century Turkish prototype from the Kremlin Armory and a beaker with a design outlined in metal and filled with colored enamels without a backing, creating a stained glass effect. Twelve pieces are currently on display and the museum said it is developing an exhibition that will open in the spring of 2015 and later go on tour.

Johnston said the Riddell works are mainly from Moscow, which was undergoing a revival of tradition Russian enamel making in the 19th century. The most distinctive method used filigree in which twisted wires rather than flat strips of metal were attached to a silver base to separate the various colored enamels.

“It was characteristic of Moscow enamels in the 17th century, so that’s why they revived it,” Johnston said. “The wire protrudes above the surface and it has a decorative effect.”

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or distributed.

AP-WF-12-20-11 2317GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), Beaker, 1908–17, silver gilt, plique-à-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), Beaker, 1908–17, silver gilt, plique-à-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), tankard, 1888–96, silver gilt, filigree and plique-á-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Firm of Pavel Ovchinnikov, Russian (Moscow), tankard, 1888–96, silver gilt, filigree and plique-á-jour enamel, Bequest of Mrs. Jean M. Riddell, 2010, The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Missouri man gives back $4,000 found in chair at auction

WASHINGTON, Mo. (AP) – An eastern Missouri man says he simply did the right thing when he found nearly $4,000 inside a chair at an auction—and gave it back.

The Washington Missourian reports that Ted Beede attended a living estate auction on Dec. 13 in search of items for his consignment shop in Dutzow, Mo., about 50 miles southwest of St. Louis.

He lifted a cushion and found, as he called it, “all the dead presidents.”

Beede scooped up the bills and pulled aside the auctioneer. The money was given to the Franklin County public administrator, who is taking care of the property owner’s estate.

Beede eventually paid $5 for the chair. When he went to get his receipt, he was given a $200 reward for his honesty.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or distributed.

AP-WF-12-21-11 1005GMT

 

 

 

 

Canyon de Chelly in Arizona. Doug Dolde image. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Navajo Nation seeks return of exhumed remains

Canyon de Chelly in Arizona. Doug Dolde image. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Canyon de Chelly in Arizona. Doug Dolde image. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – Archaeologists curious about American Indian cultures dug up human remains and associated funerary objects at Canyon de Chelly decades ago, while some remains were taken for protection from erosion in the canyon with towering red, sandstone walls.

Whatever the reason, the Navajo Nation wants hundreds of sets of human remains that were exhumed from the national monument on their reservation to be returned for proper burial, contending the tribe is the rightful owner of them. The Navajo Nation, whose members live on the country’s largest American Indian reservation, contend in a lawsuit filed last week that despite their demands for the remains, the National Park Service has unrightfully held them in a collection in Tucson.

Since 1931, the federal agency has been charged with preserving the thousands of artifacts and ruins within the national monument near Chinle. But the land revered by Navajos as sacred remains tribally owned.

Canyon de Chelly Superintendent Tom Clark said the Park Service’s goal is to repatriate the items, but it first must determine whether any other tribes have cultural affiliation to them under a 1990 federal law known as the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Clark said that law appears to conflict with the property rights of the Navajo Nation.

“Until we see how this plays out, we would not proceed to aggravate the situation,” he said Tuesday. “But we’ll see how it actually plays out and determine from there. Obviously other tribes are interested in it, too.”

Canyon de Chelly has been inhabited for thousands of years, with artifacts and cliff dwellings lining the canyon walls dating from the 4th to 14th centuries. Clark said Zuni Pueblo, the Hopi Tribe, Apaches, Utes or other tribes could have rightful claims to the remains.

The Navajo Nation–which calls the canyon “tsegi” or “within the rock”—believe that digging up human remains causes illness to the living, including arthritis and depression, and damages the environment. The tribe said it never agreed to let the Park Service or any other entity carry off remains or cultural objects located on the monument because that would have contradicted traditional Navajo laws and violated the rights of tribal members.

“Since at least 1868, this has been the heart of Navajo country, and nothing in the act that created the national monument changed that,” said Alan Downer, director of the tribe’s Historic Preservation Department. “So for the Park Service to say, ‘we dug it up, put it in our collection and, therefore, it’s ours’ is wrong.”

The tribe further argues that the remains were taken before Congress outlined a process for museums and federal agencies to inventory their collections, consult with tribes regarding cultural affiliation and return remains to the appropriate tribe. Congress has allowed the Park Service to hold the objects and remains only temporarily to preserve and protect them at most, the tribe said.

The most recent excavation in Canyon de Chelly took place in 1988 when the tribe agreed to let the Park Service remove remains from an eroding arroyo under the condition that they be reburied soon after, Downer said. Instead, they ended up in the Park Service’s collection, he said. Other excavation work was done as early as the 1890s.

The Park Service met with tribes in June and showed them its collection. Downer said some of the pottery clearly is Navajo as are remains recovered from Massacre Cave, where 115 Navajos were killed in a bloody encounter with the Spanish in 1805.

“When you get to precontact times, it’s very difficult to say ‘this is unquestionably ancestral to this contemporary tribe,’” Downer said.

Clark said the Park Service doesn’t claim ultimate ownership of the remains or objects but must follow the mandate of Congress.

“We all want to have the remains repatriated, that’s what all the tribes and the Park Service have all stated,” he said. “That is our goal. I guess the disagreement is in the process to get there.”

The Navajo Nation is asking a judge to declare that the remains are the property of the tribe and order the Park Service to immediately return them. Should the court determine that federal laws transferred the title of human remains and cultural objects from the tribe to the Park Service, the Navajo Nation wants those laws declared void.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or distributed.

AP-WF-12-20-11 2226GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Canyon de Chelly in Arizona. Doug Dolde image. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Canyon de Chelly in Arizona. Doug Dolde image. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.