Movie poster for 'The Seven Year Itch,' which inspired the 'Forever Marilyn' statue in Chicago. Fair use of copyrighted image under terms of US Copyright law. Copyright 1955, 20th Century Fox Film Corp., all rights reserved.

Marilyn Monroe statue to leave Chicago

Movie poster for 'The Seven Year Itch,' which inspired the 'Forever Marilyn' statue in Chicago. Fair use of copyrighted image under terms of US Copyright law. Copyright 1955, 20th Century Fox Film Corp., all rights reserved.

Movie poster for ‘The Seven Year Itch,’ which inspired the ‘Forever Marilyn’ statue in Chicago. Fair use of copyrighted image under terms of US Copyright law. Copyright 1955, 20th Century Fox Film Corp., all rights reserved.

CHICAGO (AP) – Chicagoans only have a few more days left to take a peek up Marilyn Monroe’s skirt.

The 25-foot-tall statue of the iconic actress is slated to leave its spot along Chicago’s Magnificent Mile.

The bronze and stainless steel sculpture depicts Monroe in her famous pose from the film “The Seven Year Itch.” In the film, a draft catches Monroe’s dress as she passes over a subway grate.

As soon as the sculpture was unveiled in July, people began positioning themselves under the movie star’s dress to catch a subway-level view and snap pictures.

Artist Seward Johnson says he’s enjoyed seeing how people have reacted to the sculpture, which is slated to be removed on Monday.

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Historic NH resort putting items up for auction

The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

DIXVILLE NOTCH, N.H. (AP) – It’s closed for renovations, but the stately northern New Hampshire resort where the first-in-the-nation presidential primary ballots have been cast for 50 years is auctioning off bedroom sets, antiques, dining equipment — and a 96-chair ski lift.

A big auction is being held Saturday, May 12, at the Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch.

The nearly 150-year-old resort was sold last year to two businessmen for $2.3 million who plan to reopen it in 2013. They have commissioned North Country Auctions to liquidate the contents.

Among the items up for auction are 300-plus complete bedroom sets, kitchen and baking equipment — and a biomass plant.

A preview will be on Thursday, May 10 and Friday, May 11. The sale will start at 7:30 a.m. on May 12.

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Balsams Grand Resort Hotel in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Lady Gaga performing during her Monster Ball Tour stop, March 4, 2010, at the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle, England. Photo by Bobby Charlton of Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, England, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Lady Gaga teacup hits $50,000 and rising in Japan benefit auction

Lady Gaga performing during her Monster Ball Tour stop, March 4, 2010, at the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle, England. Photo by Bobby Charlton of Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, England, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Lady Gaga performing during her Monster Ball Tour stop, March 4, 2010, at the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle, England. Photo by Bobby Charlton of Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, England, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

TOKYO (AFP) — Fans bidding in a charity online auction to buy a teacup used once by pop diva Lady Gaga had offered more than four million yen ($50,000) by Tuesday, with five days left before the hammer falls.

The china cup and saucer set was used by the star at a press conference in Tokyo three months after the massive tsunami of March last year swamped a large stretch of coastline.

Lady Gaga told reporters at the time that she would auction the cup, marked with her lipstick and bearing the Japanese message “We pray for Japan” along with the star’s autograph.

All the money raised will be used to help young Japanese artists who want to study in the United States.

The cup was put on “Yahoo! Japan Auctions” at midday Monday, with the starting price of one yen. The auction is set to finish at 1400 GMT Sunday.

By Tuesday morning, more than 500 bids had been placed, with the top offer at more than 4.1 million yen. The auction can be followed at http://page3.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/c323847712

The quake-tsunami catastrophe killed some 19,000 people on Japan’s northeast coast and sparked the world’s worst nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, leading to a plunge in visitors to the country.

The entertainer visited Japan twice after the disaster and called on tourists from around the world to follow suit.

She is due back in Japan next week as part of an Asian tour.

On the Net:

Lady Gaga teacup: http://page3.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/c323847712

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Lady Gaga performing during her Monster Ball Tour stop, March 4, 2010, at the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle, England. Photo by Bobby Charlton of Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, England, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Lady Gaga performing during her Monster Ball Tour stop, March 4, 2010, at the Metro Radio Arena in Newcastle, England. Photo by Bobby Charlton of Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, England, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Unofficial Flag of Vincennes, Indiana, which notes the city's establishment date of 1732, it's initial 'V' and a French fleur-de-lis reflecting its early settlement by French Canadians. During the 1779 Battle of Vincennes, Lieutenant Colonel George R. Clark created a successful plan to capture the French forts that the British occupied after Louisiana was ceded. The USS Vincennes AEGIS cruiser would be named in honor of this battle.

Indiana Military Museum moving to Vincennes site

 Unofficial Flag of Vincennes, Indiana, which notes the city's establishment date of 1732, it's initial 'V' and a French fleur-de-lis reflecting its early settlement by French Canadians. During the 1779 Battle of Vincennes, Lieutenant Colonel George R. Clark created a successful plan to capture the French forts that the British occupied after Louisiana was ceded. The USS Vincennes AEGIS cruiser would be named in honor of this battle.

Unofficial Flag of Vincennes, Indiana, which notes the city’s establishment date of 1732, it’s initial ‘V’ and a French fleur-de-lis reflecting its early settlement by French Canadians. During the 1779 Battle of Vincennes, Lieutenant Colonel George R. Clark created a successful plan to capture the French forts that the British occupied after Louisiana was ceded. The USS Vincennes AEGIS cruiser would be named in honor of this battle.

VINCENNES, Ind. (AP) – The Indiana Military Museum is moving from its site outside Vincennes in southwestern Indiana to a location a couple of blocks from the city’s downtown.

The Vincennes Sun-Commercial reports that museum founder Jim Osborne hopes to have the museum ready for visitors sometime this summer.

The new site is at the former Blackford Glass Factory. Plans include construction of a multi-million dollar, 59,000-square-foot museum. Osborne said donations are still needed to complete the move and pay for upgrades to the facility like a new heating and air system as well as a near 2,200 foot long fence to surround and protect the property.

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Information from: Vincennes Sun-Commercial, http://www.vincennes.com

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


 Unofficial Flag of Vincennes, Indiana, which notes the city's establishment date of 1732, it's initial 'V' and a French fleur-de-lis reflecting its early settlement by French Canadians. During the 1779 Battle of Vincennes, Lieutenant Colonel George R. Clark created a successful plan to capture the French forts that the British occupied after Louisiana was ceded. The USS Vincennes AEGIS cruiser would be named in honor of this battle.

Unofficial Flag of Vincennes, Indiana, which notes the city’s establishment date of 1732, it’s initial ‘V’ and a French fleur-de-lis reflecting its early settlement by French Canadians. During the 1779 Battle of Vincennes, Lieutenant Colonel George R. Clark created a successful plan to capture the French forts that the British occupied after Louisiana was ceded. The USS Vincennes AEGIS cruiser would be named in honor of this battle.

Jacob Lawrence, Bar and Grill, 1941, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Bequest of Henry Ward Ranger through the National Academy of Design. Image courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Smithsonian looks at 20th century in black art

Jacob Lawrence, Bar and Grill, 1941, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Bequest of Henry Ward Ranger through the National Academy of Design. Image courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Jacob Lawrence, Bar and Grill, 1941, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Bequest of Henry Ward Ranger through the National Academy of Design. Image courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum.

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Smithsonian American Art Museum is retracing the tremendous changes the 20th century brought to African Americans through a new exhibit in Washington.

“African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond” features works from 43 black artists. It includes paintings, sculpture, prints and photographs exploring the struggle for equality, the power of music and images of rural and urban life.

The museum brought together 100 works from its collection of African American art. More than half are being exhibited by the museum for the first time, including paintings by Benny Andrews and Jacob Lawrence and photographs by Gordon Parks and Marilyn Nance.

The exhibit is in Washington until September. Then it travels to Williamsburg, Va.; Orlando, Fla.; Salem, Mass.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; and Sacramento, Calif.

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Online: http://americanart.si.edu

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The new Barnes Foundation, Logan Square, Philadelphia, looking east from the grounds of the neighboring Rodin Museum. Photo taken April 2, 2012 by TypoBoy. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The fine art of the Barnes Foundation move

The new Barnes Foundation, Logan Square, Philadelphia, looking east from the grounds of the neighboring Rodin Museum. Photo taken April 2, 2012 by TypoBoy. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The new Barnes Foundation, Logan Square, Philadelphia, looking east from the grounds of the neighboring Rodin Museum. Photo taken April 2, 2012 by TypoBoy. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — It has come down to this: Beth Lillis, 27, project coordinator for the Barnes Foundation, no time for breakfast, an iced coffee barely touched, carrying a cardboard box of light fixtures over the gravel outside the construction trailer and in through the thousand-pound brass-and-glass doors to the first gallery, where, at last, the Brooklyn-fashioned lamps are being hung, to illuminate, among other eye-poppers in their new home, Cezanne’s Card Players at their usual table.

It is a moment both thrilling in purpose (barely three weeks before the building opens to the public May 19, they’re literally waiting to turn on the lights) and mundane in practicality — the fixtures are but one more detail in an ambitious, audacious project where it seems that no detail has gone unexamined, undiscussed, unrevised, unperfected.

(“Prefer only one intermediate stitch per cushion,” project architect Philip Ryan wrote in red marker inside a little wavy red-marker cloud, another of his countless micro-instructions, this one on a shop drawing pinned to a wall of the trailer.)

“Those chandeliers going into the gallery is a big deal,” allows Bill McDowell, 54, the open-collared, sometimes hard-hatted project executive for the Barnes Foundation’s new Benjamin Franklin Parkway campus, who seems impossibly relaxed for a man who has until Tuesday to turn the building over to its staff.

Despite his demeanor, “it’s tense,” he says. “Every day is tense. I’ve never worked on a project of such good quality. These are all unique details.”

They are down to the last thousand or so of the 5,000 items on the Barnes punchlist. McDowell and staff have been waiting months for these hanging gallery fixtures to be finished. Cross that one off.

Lillis, who had a baby in the middle of coordinating the big move from suburban Merion to the Parkway, took three months off and returned 10 months ago, she said, to “twice as much responsibility on both ends.” But she’s unfazed by a job that inspires awe at its scope and envy of its venue. “My husband said this morning: ‘Oh you’re going to hang out in the gallery today. What a shame,'” she said with a smile.

The men in Cezanne’s The Card Players also seem unflustered in their new surroundings, still directly beneath the artist’s Bathers in a room that looks a lot like their home back in Merion, the scissor lift and the hard-hat guys hanging the light fixtures notwithstanding.

McDowell says the burlap wall covering is a slightly lighter color than the original (the burlap company that supplied Merion is no longer in business). About 98 percent of the 800 paintings had been hung by midweek last week, but a fair number of the 2,500 objects also moved from Merion — metalwork, chairs, chests, other furniture, African sculpture, redware, jewelry – still await final placement, said a besieged but cordial Andrew Stewart, director of public relations. Stewart is juggling media requests from down the street, across the country, and beyond, trying to find time to write news releases, like the one with details of the 1st and Fresh/Marc Vetri food-service operation in the building.

On this day, art handler/collections assistant Tim Gierschick, 35, is working from a series of photographs taken of the Merion galleries, making fraction-of-an-inch adjustments to the paintings and objects on the walls. Meticulous measurements were taken to ensure all art and objects are hung with the same eccentric placement favored by their collector, Dr. Albert C. Barnes, but Gierschick says it is only the eye that can make the final adjustments.

“We have copious measurements we can refer back to,” he said, glancing down at a photograph of a wall of Renoirs in Gallery 13, with black marker notes to move one painting down slightly, shift another corner up. (“Too high?”)

“You can always have new factors,” he said. “We’re working with historic objects. Not everything is square. The eye is kind of the last factor. You can level a wall to perfection, but it still might not look right.”

McDowell says the degree of attention to detail applied to the job by architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien (known around the job site as “Tod and Billie”) is astonishing, and unprecedented in his experience. The couches for the court outside the galleries, delivered last week, have fabric on their bolsters that was woven in Senegal by special order. The wood floor is fashioned of ipe – a durable tropical hardwood – recovered from an abandoned section of the Coney Island boardwalk, in a herringbone pattern inspired by a church in Santiago, Chile, that Tod and Billie were visiting on an unrelated mission. They immediately sent word to change the straight running-board pattern (now found only in the elevator).

The reused Coney Island boards, part of a series of environmentally conscious steps that will lead to a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for the building (hybrid cars get special parking spots), came in a variety of shades much broader than originally envisioned. But the architects decided to leave the variation, which gives the floor the character of a much older structure. “We’d prefer not to wait 300 years for the character to come out,” McDowell said.

Outside, where window washers clambered like spiders up and down the building’s sides, and the letters E and F in THE BARNES FOUNDATION lettering on the facade at 20th and Callowhill still had duct tape stuck to them, engineer Dennis McGeady was keeping things cool. Wearing Dickies work pants with a hole blown through one leg from his motorcycle exhaust pipe, he had one main thing on his mind.

“Temperature controls,” said McGeady, who was previously assistant chief engineer at the Philadelphia Museum of Art a few blocks away. “They’re within parameters, but not as steady as I’d like.” He rides his motorcycle 14 miles to work each morning and, to release stress, “on the way home I take a longer way.”

Inside, the head of security was inspecting those half-ton doors, which last week had the brass decorative insert installed on the left door but not the right. The insert, a geometric circle-and-rectangle pattern, was inspired by African design, in keeping with Barnes’ admiration for African art.

Building a home for art with as much glass and as many windows as this one is pretty much unheard of in the modern era, McDowell said. It invites complicated security and aesthetic concerns. But it also is intended to evoke the lovely estate feel of Merion, even as it provides better lighting; no longer will there be a glare on Cezanne’s Bathers.

The details go on and on. The color of the seats in the auditorium is “cognac.” The leather upholstery on the couches was changed from horizontal and vertical stitching with buttons to no buttons and only vertical seams. The limestone inside and out is from the Negev, quarried by Israelis, chiseled by Palestinians.

McDowell said he was concerned about how that would work, but the Israelis and the Palestinians got along great. (If only the stay-in-Merion and the move-to-the-Parkway Barnes factions could work out their differences as easily.)

In any case, the red maples lining the entrance walk were found after an exhaustive search of nurseries up and down the East Coast to find 18 of near-identical height and shape. They serenely looked lovely on this day, as workers finished caulking and lining the reflecting pools nearby.

McDowell says he thinks often of Barnes, the founder whose trust-indenture demands – that everything stay as he left it – were upended to bring the city to this moment.

In the last days at Merion, “he just seemed to be present. You can’t help but think, ‘What would he think of this?’ I think he’d like it. When he built the Barnes, it was a modern building; he employed modern technologies. He was desirous of new technologies.”

Even with everything still to be addressed – the stuck gate outside the gift shop, the wire plate covers still not in, lobby computers, and other technology awaiting installation, couches wrapped in plastic, Norwegian tapestries still being lifted from their wooden crates – McDowell says he is awed when he enters the old-Barnes galleries that the new-Barnes building houses, an inner sanctum open to only the high priests of construction, but soon to the world.

“I usually lower my voice,” he says. “I don’t know why.”

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Online: http://bit.ly/IhO0n4

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Information from: The Philadelphia Inquirer, http://www.philly.com

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


The new Barnes Foundation, Logan Square, Philadelphia, looking east from the grounds of the neighboring Rodin Museum. Photo taken April 2, 2012 by TypoBoy. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The new Barnes Foundation, Logan Square, Philadelphia, looking east from the grounds of the neighboring Rodin Museum. Photo taken April 2, 2012 by TypoBoy. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The original Barnes Foundation building in Merion (suburban Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The original Barnes Foundation building in Merion (suburban Philadelphia), Pa. April 9, 2010 photo by Dmadeo, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Computer-generated image of the new 1 World Trade Center, with 7 World Trade Center shown nearby to the right. Fair use of copyrighted image under terms of United States Copyright Law. Image copyright Silverstein Properties.

World Trade Center becomes highest NY tower

Computer-generated image of the new 1 World Trade Center, with 7 World Trade Center shown nearby to the right. Fair use of copyrighted image under terms of United States Copyright Law. Image copyright Silverstein Properties.

Computer-generated image of the new 1 World Trade Center, with 7 World Trade Center shown nearby to the right. Fair use of copyrighted image under terms of United States Copyright Law. Image copyright Silverstein Properties.

NEW YORK — New York’s skyline got a new king Tuesday after the still unfinished World Trade Center tower, built to replace the destroyed Twin Towers, crept above the venerable Empire State Building.

Workers gently maneuvered a steel column into its base atop the skyscraper’s skeletal current top, bringing the total height just beyond the 1,250 feet (381 meters) of the Empire State Building’s observation deck.

Coming on the eve of the anniversary of the killing by US forces of Osama bin Laden, mastermind of the al-Qaeda attack that demolished the former World Trade Center, the moment was marked by a celebration of technical prowess and flag-waving patriotism.

Scott Rechler, vice chairman at the Port Authority, which owns the site, told a press conference that the “the most complex construction project in our history” had been “an act of passion and an act of patriotic duty.”

One World Trade Center, already a gleaming, angular landmark on the city’s skyline, will get still taller as construction winds up late next year, finally reaching 1,776 feet (541.3 meters) and 104 floors.

Not only will that dwarf the 1930s masterpiece of the Empire State Building, but it will be higher than the old Twin Towers, which both collapsed during the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, in which almost 3,000 people died.

Port Authority executive director Patrick Foye joked the building was so tall that “if you really crane your neck, you can see Alaska” and that, once completed, “Asia may come into view.”

Although the mammoth construction work to resurrect the Ground Zero area is at last nearing fruition, the project has been plagued by billions of dollars in cost overruns, as well as delays, bickering over designs, and worries over whether the office space will be profitable.

Just over half of the units have been rented, including a major deal with publishing giant Conde Nast.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg stressed the positive, underlining the city’s relationship with ambitious architecture.

“The New York City skyline is, once again, stretching to new heights,” Bloomberg said. “The latest progress at the World Trade Center is a testament to New Yorkers’ strength and resolve — and to our belief in a city that is always reaching upward.”

“Today our city has a new tallest building and a new sense of how bright our future is,” Bloomberg said.

Some experts quibble over which New York tower is on top, since the new listing giving One World Trade Center that honor discounts the Empire State Building’s needle-like antenna. When the WTC reaches its full official height, the figure of 1,776 feet will include a broadcasting antenna.

But there’s no contest about which building is the tallest in the world. That’s the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, measuring 2,717 feet (828.1 meters).

The old Twin Towers will always haunt the shiny replacement. Deep pools commemorating the dead have been built at the exact locations of each tower’s old footprint.

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A movement known as the 'Stuckists' believes the Turner Prize should revert to its former status as an award for figurative painting. The first Stuckist demonstration against the Turner Prize was held at the Tate Britain, on Nov. 28, 2000. Protesters dressed as clowns to reflect their position that the Turner Prize is an 'ongoing national joke,' claiming 'the only artist who wouldn't be in danger of winning the Turner Prize is Turner.' Left to right: Red M & M costume: Ella Guru. Blue mask: Rachel Jordan. Brown hat/red nose: Elsa Dax. Brown shirt: Fanny. Straw hat: Philip Absolon. Silver tinsel: Katherine Gardner. Bunny ears: Michelle England. Cat woman: Charlotte Gavin. Dark glasses: Remy Noe. Blue tinsel: Susan Finlay. Black mask: Margaret Walsh. Flat cap: Matthew Robinson. http://www.stuckism.com/clown2000.html. Copyright Ella Guru, stuckism.com. http://www.stuckism.com/guru/index.html Released under GFDL, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

‘Spartacus’ among nominees for Turner art prize

A movement known as the 'Stuckists' believes the Turner Prize should revert to its former status as an award for figurative painting. The first Stuckist demonstration against the Turner Prize was held at the Tate Britain, on Nov. 28, 2000. Protesters dressed as clowns to reflect their position that the Turner Prize is an 'ongoing national joke,' claiming 'the only artist who wouldn't be in danger of winning the Turner Prize is Turner.' Left to right: Red M & M costume: Ella Guru. Blue mask: Rachel Jordan. Brown hat/red nose: Elsa Dax. Brown shirt: Fanny. Straw hat: Philip Absolon. Silver tinsel: Katherine Gardner. Bunny ears: Michelle England. Cat woman: Charlotte Gavin. Dark glasses: Remy Noe. Blue tinsel: Susan Finlay. Black mask: Margaret Walsh. Flat cap: Matthew Robinson. http://www.stuckism.com/clown2000.html. Copyright Ella Guru, stuckism.com. http://www.stuckism.com/guru/index.html Released under GFDL, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

A movement known as the ‘Stuckists’ believes the Turner Prize should revert to its former status as an award for figurative painting. The first Stuckist demonstration against the Turner Prize was held at the Tate Britain, on Nov. 28, 2000. Protesters dressed as clowns to reflect their position that the Turner Prize is an ‘ongoing national joke,’ claiming ‘the only artist who wouldn’t be in danger of winning the Turner Prize is Turner.’ Left to right: Red M & M costume: Ella Guru. Blue mask: Rachel Jordan. Brown hat/red nose: Elsa Dax. Brown shirt: Fanny. Straw hat: Philip Absolon. Silver tinsel: Katherine Gardner. Bunny ears: Michelle England. Cat woman: Charlotte Gavin. Dark glasses: Remy Noe. Blue tinsel: Susan Finlay. Black mask: Margaret Walsh. Flat cap: Matthew Robinson. http://www.stuckism.com/clown2000.html. Copyright Ella Guru, stuckism.com. http://www.stuckism.com/guru/index.html Released under GFDL, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

LONDON — An artist who renamed herself Spartacus and a man who draws a city inhabited by figures made of human excrement were Tuesday shortlisted for top British contemporary art award the Turner Prize.

Spartacus Chetwynd, a performance artist previously called Lali, and Paul Noble, creator of fictional city Nobson Newtown, are among four artists nominated for the prize, which is known for backing challenging conceptual art.

Also listed are Elizabeth Price, who makes sci-fi-inspired videos including one dramatising the undersea existence of a sunken ship filled with luxury cars, and Luke Fowler, who has made three films about psychiatrist RD Laing.

The prize, awarded by the Tate gallery to British artists under 50, rewards work shown over the past year. Its winner will be announced on December 3 after an exhibition of all four artists at Tate Britain, which starts on October 20.

The winner will receive £25,000 ($40,500, 30,600 euros), while the other shortlisted artists get £5,000 each.

Chetwynd, 38 — who says she lives in a nudist colony — creates an “atmosphere of joyful improvisation” in her paintings, performances and installations, the gallery said.

Noble, 48, who has been creating drawings of the twisted imaginary city with residents made of human excrement for 15 years, was nominated for a show bringing together the “painstakingly detailed and engrossing drawings” at London’s Gagosian gallery.

“Undercutting the precise, technical drawing is a dark satirical narrative which unfolds in the micro-cosmos of these monumental works,” the gallery said in a statement.

Price, 45 — who like Chetwynd and Noble is from London — was listed for her trilogy of video installations, shown at BALTIC in Gateshead, northeast England.

Her latest work West Hinder uses motion graphics and synthetic voices to evoke a container ship of luxury cars corroding in the North Sea.

The BALTIC gallery describes the work as “a repressed psychic force, emanating from the deep.”

Fowler, 34, from Glasgow, is an artist, filmmaker and musician who last year made All Divided Selves, about RD Laing, who died in 1989. It uses archive footage to delve into the meaning of psychiatry and the pain of mental illness.

The prize — named for JMW Turner, the 18th- and 19th-century British painter who was controversial in his own day — has often sparked a furor.

Tracey Emin’s My Bed, a stained bed surrounded with detritus, drew criticism from the then-culture minister as a “shock” nominee in 1999 but attracted an average of 2,000 visitors per day.

Since 2000 the Turner show has often attracted protests from traditionalist art activist group the Stuckists, who want a return to figurative painting.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A movement known as the 'Stuckists' believes the Turner Prize should revert to its former status as an award for figurative painting. The first Stuckist demonstration against the Turner Prize was held at the Tate Britain, on Nov. 28, 2000. Protesters dressed as clowns to reflect their position that the Turner Prize is an 'ongoing national joke,' claiming 'the only artist who wouldn't be in danger of winning the Turner Prize is Turner.' Left to right: Red M & M costume: Ella Guru. Blue mask: Rachel Jordan. Brown hat/red nose: Elsa Dax. Brown shirt: Fanny. Straw hat: Philip Absolon. Silver tinsel: Katherine Gardner. Bunny ears: Michelle England. Cat woman: Charlotte Gavin. Dark glasses: Remy Noe. Blue tinsel: Susan Finlay. Black mask: Margaret Walsh. Flat cap: Matthew Robinson. http://www.stuckism.com/clown2000.html. Copyright Ella Guru, stuckism.com. http://www.stuckism.com/guru/index.html Released under GFDL, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

A movement known as the ‘Stuckists’ believes the Turner Prize should revert to its former status as an award for figurative painting. The first Stuckist demonstration against the Turner Prize was held at the Tate Britain, on Nov. 28, 2000. Protesters dressed as clowns to reflect their position that the Turner Prize is an ‘ongoing national joke,’ claiming ‘the only artist who wouldn’t be in danger of winning the Turner Prize is Turner.’ Left to right: Red M & M costume: Ella Guru. Blue mask: Rachel Jordan. Brown hat/red nose: Elsa Dax. Brown shirt: Fanny. Straw hat: Philip Absolon. Silver tinsel: Katherine Gardner. Bunny ears: Michelle England. Cat woman: Charlotte Gavin. Dark glasses: Remy Noe. Blue tinsel: Susan Finlay. Black mask: Margaret Walsh. Flat cap: Matthew Robinson. http://www.stuckism.com/clown2000.html. Copyright Ella Guru, stuckism.com. http://www.stuckism.com/guru/index.html Released under GFDL, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.