The USS Texas, which saw duty in both World Wars, was launched in 1912. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Leak shuts down Battleship Texas indefinitely

The USS Texas, which saw duty in both World Wars, was launched in 1912. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The USS Texas, which saw duty in both World Wars, was launched in 1912. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

HOUSTON — The 100-year-old Battleship Texas museum is closed indefinitely after several leaks flooded the vessel that fought in World Wars I and II.

Ship manager Andy Smith said Monday nearly 2,000 gallons of water per minute are flowing into the ship from several leaks that have sprung on the port and starboard sides of the vessel. He says the museum will be closed for at least the rest of this week.

The battleship first closed earlier this month when a leak sprang in areas of the ship that still had oil from when the USS Texas was in active service. Before repairing the leak, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the ship’s caretaker, removed the oil.

The museum reopened Saturday, but the new leaks sprang up almost immediately afterward.

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Copyright 2012, The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The USS Texas, which saw duty in both World Wars, was launched in 1912. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The USS Texas, which saw duty in both World Wars, was launched in 1912. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

2011 Anniversary Silver set box + 5 ounces silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

Portion of Blue Moon Coins’ July 3 sale to benefit charities

2011 Anniversary Silver set box + 5 ounces silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

2011 Anniversary Silver set box + 5 ounces silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Blue Moon Coins will conduct an auction on Tuesday, July 3, in which the entire net proceeds of a major consignor will be donated to charitible organizations in Portland, Ore. The 273-lot auction will begin at 10 a.m. PDT and Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Net proceeds of designated lots will be donated to the following healthcare and higher education organizations:

  • Providence Portland Medical Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Providence Portland Medical Center, raises funds to support the medical center’s programs and services and seeks to provide healthcare to the poor and vulnerable;
  • University of Portland, an independent Catholic University committed to creating service-oriented leaders in the arts, sciences, and humanities through educational programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels;
  • Clark College Foundation, the fund-raising arm of Clark College whose mission is to create affordable job training for local citizens and a skilled labor force to serve Portland Metro businesses.

Winning bidders on designated lots will be participating in the missions of these charitable organizations (lots from this consignor are listed in the auctioneer’s catalog with an asterisk).

Back, due to popular demand, is Blue Moon Coins’ custom-designed 2011 American Silver Eagle Anniversary set.

The auction will also feature an unsigned antique painting depicting American Indians, a man’s Rolex watch in 18-karat gold and an 1890s sterling silver water pitcher.

For details email Aaron Scott at aaron@bluemooncoins.com or Ken Vilkin at ken@bluemooncoins.com or phone 888-553-2646 (COIN).

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


2011 Anniversary Silver set box + 5 ounces silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

2011 Anniversary Silver set box + 5 ounces silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

2011 Anniversary set box with NGC MS70 (five) one-ounce silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

 

2011 Anniversary set box with NGC MS70 (five) one-ounce silver. Blue Moon Coins image.

Anniversary Silver Eagles rare NGC MS70 Red Label early releases, one piece. Blue Moon Coins image.

Anniversary Silver Eagles rare NGC MS70 Red Label early releases, one piece. Blue Moon Coins image.

Antique unsigned rare Indian painting. Blue Moon Coins image.

Antique unsigned rare Indian painting. Blue Moon Coins image.

Rolex 18-karat gold day-date man's watch. Blue Moon Coins image.

Rolex 18-karat gold day-date man’s watch. Blue Moon Coins image.

Antique 1890s sterling grape water pitcher. Blue Moon Coins image.

Antique 1890s sterling grape water pitcher. Blue Moon Coins image.

The traditional method of making apple butter includes the use of large copper kettles over an open fire, as seen in this image. The kettle shown here is similar to six antique copper kettles that were stolen from a Darlington, Pa., church and taken to a scrap metal dealer.

Two charged re: Pa. church’s stolen copper kettles

The traditional method of making apple butter includes the use of large copper kettles over an open fire, as seen in this image. The kettle shown here is similar to six antique copper kettles that were stolen from a Darlington, Pa., church and taken to a scrap metal dealer.

The traditional method of making apple butter includes the use of large copper kettles over an open fire, as seen in this image. The kettle shown here is similar to six antique copper kettles that were stolen from a Darlington, Pa., church and taken to a scrap metal dealer.

DARLINGTON, Pa. (AP) – Police have charged two men in connection with six copper kettles stolen from a 210-year-old southwestern Pennsylvania church.

The Beaver County Times reports Tuesday that 30-year-old Christopher Mulroy is charged with stealing the kettles from the First United Presbyterian Church of Darlington sometime overnight June 7-8. His friend, 22-year-old Daniel Wickline is charged with receiving stolen property because police say he drove Mulroy to a scrap metal dealer with the kettles.

The theft attracted media attention because the antique kettles have been used for decades to churn apple butter each October at the church about 30 miles northwest of Pittsburgh.

The suspects, both from New Galilee, Pa., don’t have listed telephones.

Church officials feared the thefts might harm their tradition, but say others have donated replacement kettles. Instead, the church is considering starting a prison outreach in response.

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Information from: Beaver County Times, http://www.timesonline.com/

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The traditional method of making apple butter includes the use of large copper kettles over an open fire, as seen in this image. The kettle shown here is similar to six antique copper kettles that were stolen from a Darlington, Pa., church and taken to a scrap metal dealer.

The traditional method of making apple butter includes the use of large copper kettles over an open fire, as seen in this image. The kettle shown here is similar to six antique copper kettles that were stolen from a Darlington, Pa., church and taken to a scrap metal dealer.

Front entrance to Old Main, the main administrative building at Penn State. Photo by George Chriss, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Artist replaces Sandusky image on Penn State mural

Front entrance to Old Main, the main administrative building at Penn State. Photo by George Chriss, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Front entrance to Old Main, the main administrative building at Penn State. Photo by George Chriss, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) — The depiction of Jerry Sandusky on a well-known mural across the street from the Penn State campus has been replaced by an image of a poet and activist draped with a blue ribbon — a symbol for awareness of child sexual abuse.

It was artist Michael Pilato’s latest step in erasing the image of the disgraced former assistant football coach following Sandusky’s conviction last week on 45 counts at his child sex abuse trial.

Sandusky was removed from the mural days after his arrest in November. But Pilato returned to the work on Sunday, painting in Dora McQuaid, a Penn State graduate who is poet and advocate for domestic and sexual violence victims and issues. The blue ribbon was added on Monday.

Also replacing Sandusky were two red handprints — one belonging to Ann Van Kuren, one of the 12 jurors who convicted Sandusky and the other belonging to a sexual abuse victim.

Meanwhile, as Sandusky insisted through a lawyer Monday that he was not guilty, Van Kuren said she hoped the verdict would help his accusers heal.

Van Kuren said the jury found compelling the testimony of the eight victims who took the witness stand, and they weighed the accounts and evidence diligently before finding Sandusky guilty last week of sexually abusing 10 boys over 15 years. She expressed empathy for the young men who offered emotional and explicit testimony.

“I really feel for the victims and any other victims that are out there that haven’t come forward and told their” stories, Van Kuren told The Associated Press. “I’m hoping that this trial, with this verdict, will help them heal.”

The sweeping sex abuse case rocked the Penn State community and the resulting scandal led to the ousters of Sandusky’s former boss — Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno — and the university’s president. It also forced a re-examination of the role that college administrators played in reporting abuse allegations.

Sandusky, 68, is under observation at the Centre County jail, where he is being kept away from other inmates pending a psychological review that will help determine the next step toward his sentencing in about three months.

“He’s defiant and wants the truth to be told. He wants people to know that he’s not guilty,” said defense lawyer Karl Rominger, who visited his incarcerated client Monday.

Also Monday, Judge John Cleland ordered county probation officers to evaluate whether Sandusky is a sexual predator, a finding that could factor into his prison placement. Such orders are pro forma in sex abuse cases. Sex offenders are required to undergo treatment while in prison, so Sandusky, if deemed a predator, would likely be sent to a facility with such a program.

Rominger told the AP that Sandusky said he’s not suicidal and that he wants to get the separate psychological examination done so that he can receive visits from his friends and family.

The state investigation into Sandusky didn’t begin until after the ex-coach was barred from a high school in 2009 when a mother complained about him. At the time, Gov. Tom Corbett was the state attorney general. Charges were filed in November 2011.

Investigators took into account Sandusky’s status as a celebrated assistant coach in building the case, Corbett said Monday when asked in Harrisburg why charges weren’t filed after the first accuser came forward.

“If it’s one-on-one and now put the celebrity status in, put (that) Jerry Sandusky is loved by everybody… how can anybody say there must be something wrong,” Corbett said. “You’d better corroborate it, and that’s what they started doing. They started pulling strings and gathering and gathering and gathering, and that’s my experience. You build those cases, as well as you can.”

Sandusky has repeatedly maintained his innocence. He will likely die in prison given mandatory minimum sentencing requirements.

The conviction is only just the start of possibly years of legal proceedings over the case. Besides appeals, there remains an active investigation into Sandusky by the state attorney general’s office as well as a federal investigation.

Corbett said Penn State trustees are still awaiting the results of an internal investigation by former FBI director Louis Freeh into the school’s handling of the Sandusky case.

The university could also face a wave of new civil lawsuits. An hour after the verdict Friday night, Penn State said in a statement it was inviting victims to “participate in a program to facilitate the resolution of claims against the university arising out of Mr. Sandusky’s conduct.” The school said it sought to address victims’ concerns privately, expeditiously and fairly.

Asked to clarify Monday, school spokesman Dave LaTorre said the university won’t discuss details about litigation or how much money might be set aside for potential settlements, and declined further comment.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Front entrance to Old Main, the main administrative building at Penn State. Photo by George Chriss, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Front entrance to Old Main, the main administrative building at Penn State. Photo by George Chriss, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

1930s photo of Les Paul (right) and fellow musician Sunny Joe Wolverton with a selection of instruments that includes Paul's two famed L5 guitars. Photo courtesy of the Waukesha County Museum.

Waukesha museum acquires 16 new Les Paul artifacts

1930s photo of Les Paul (right) and fellow musician Sunny Joe Wolverton with a selection of instruments that includes Paul's two famed L5 guitars. Photo courtesy of the Waukesha County Museum.

1930s photo of Les Paul (right) and fellow musician Sunny Joe Wolverton with a selection of instruments that includes Paul’s two famed L5 guitars. Photo courtesy of the Waukesha County Museum.

WAUKESHA, Wis. – Through the generosity of several benefactors extending all the way to the West Coast, the Waukesha County Museum has acquired 16 priceless artifacts from a recent auction. Twenty benefactors contributed toward a pool of money to acquire pieces from the auction for the museum’s Les Paul Experience exhibit, which is set to open on June 9, 2013.

“Several items are priceless and are critical to telling Les’ story in his hometown,” said museum President & CEO, Kirsten Lee Villegas. “The Waukesha County Museum Les Paul Experience will be the only public venue where people can view them.”

“When the museum asked me to help with the fundraising effort for this urgent situation, I felt compelled to jump in,” said Jim Lindenberg, owner of the Milwaukee Wave and Lindy Enterprises. “The chance to secure one-of-a-kind artifacts for the museum’s Les Paul exhibit was a once-in-alifetime opportunity that was too important to pass up. The Les Paul purchases will be a major boon for the Waukesha County Museum, Waukesha County, and the state of Wisconsin.”

With Lindenberg leading the charge, he and museum staff began a time-sensitive campaign to secure a significant pool of funds prior to the auction to acquire and then donate artifacts to the museum. In addition to Lindenberg, other early supporters included local business owners and philanthropists Anthony and Andrea Bryant as well as Hall of Fame rock star Chad Smith, drummer for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Chad’s nephews graduated from Waukesha South High School, and he is donating some items in the Smith family name. The total of funds raised was in the six figures by the time the auction occurred on June 8 and 9.

“We needed to honor Les’ legacy and bring these artifacts home…to Waukesha where they belong,” said Chad Smith.

The benefactors were winning bidders on 16 artifacts. One of the treasured items acquired is a rare 1927 Gibson L5 acoustic guitar which was a star item in the auction and was shown on the cover of the auction catalog. This is one of the two L5s purchased in 1933 by Les Paul, then going by the name Rhubarb Red, at the Gibson guitar company in Kalamazoo, Mich., with his friend and band mate Sunny Joe Wolverton. Paul discusses the trip and purchasing this guitar extensively in his autobiography. He later gave this guitar to a friend, Dave Moran, who requested the guitar be returned to Paul upon his death.

Both Gibson L5 guitars were sold at the auction.

Anyone can still contribute toward the fund by calling the museum or donating through the museum’s website. “We are still seeking funds to support some of the acquired artifacts as well as for potential future acquisitions,” said Villegas. For any donation of $2,500 or more, the museum is offering 2 concert tickets and backstage passes to the Red Hot Chili Peppers concert at the Bradley Center in Milwaukee on Nov. 1, 2012.

“We feel fortunate that with Jim’s leadership we found an initial group of supporters that understood how important it was to ensure these artifacts were preserved for generations in Les’ hometown,” said Villegas.

The museum’s newly acquired Gibson L5 will be placed on exhibit this July and August as part of the museum’s current “Behind the Vaults: Treasures from the County Museum Collection” exhibit, which runs through August 11, 2012. For more than 100 years the Waukesha County Museum has dedicated itself to preserving and sharing the county’s cultural heritage. Encompassed in this current exhibit is a sampling of the more than 18,000 objects, 250,000 images, millions of archival materials, and innumerable stories that make up Waukesha County and its museum. The exhibit gives viewers a behind the scenes look into how museums work and the value they hold in safeguarding a community’s collective memory over time.

For more information, contact 262-521-2859 or visit the museum’s website at www.waukeshacountymuseum.org.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


1930s photo of Les Paul (right) and fellow musician Sunny Joe Wolverton with a selection of instruments that includes Paul's two famed L5 guitars. Photo courtesy of the Waukesha County Museum.

1930s photo of Les Paul (right) and fellow musician Sunny Joe Wolverton with a selection of instruments that includes Paul’s two famed L5 guitars. Photo courtesy of the Waukesha County Museum.

FBI mugshot of Chicago Outfit mobster Frank Calabrese Sr. (b. 1937), a k a 'Frankie Beeze,' taken on Dec. 6, 1990.

Reputed mobster’s jewels, valuables up for auction

FBI mugshot of Chicago Outfit mobster Frank Calabrese Sr. (b. 1937), a k a 'Frankie Beeze,' taken on Dec. 6, 1990.

FBI mugshot of Chicago Outfit mobster Frank Calabrese Sr. (b. 1937), a k a ‘Frankie Beeze,’ taken on Dec. 6, 1990.

CHICAGO (AP) – Jewelry collectors who don’t mind if their gems have a rather shady past will soon get the chance to bid on a stash of valuables linked to reputed mobster Frank Calabrese Sr.

Agents found a hoard of jewelry in a secret compartment behind a family portrait in Calabrese’s suburban Chicago home during a raid two years ago.

Now, the Chicago Sun-Times reports an online auction July 10-24 will sell the items, including more than 250 loose diamonds, earrings, engagement rings, luxury watches and other jewelry.

“He’s got lots of diamonds,” said Bob Sheehan, owner of the Gaston & Sheehan, which will hold the online public auction July 10-24.

Calabrese is currently behind bars. He was one of several reputed mobsters convicted in 2009 in a racketeering conspiracy that included 18 decades-old murders. He was blamed for 13, sentenced to life in prison and ordered to pay more than $24 million. The auction proceeds will go toward that restitution.

During his trial, Calabrese bragged that he made millions on the street and was known among his family for stashing valuables. It isn’t clear where Calabrese got all of the jewelry. Defense attorney Joseph Lopez described Calabrese — who accepted items in lieu of cash while doing business as a loan shark — as “a collector.”

Next month’s auction is the second sale of items from Calabrese’s home. Last year, Gaston & Sheehan sold more than 100 rare $500 and $1,000 bills from Calabrese’s stash. According to court records, that sale brought in $245,860.

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Tooled gold leaf adorns many pages of the ‘Fasciculus Temporum’ manuscript. PBA Galleries image.

Rare 15th C. manuscript sells for $102,000 at PBA Galleries

Tooled gold leaf adorns many  pages of the ‘Fasciculus Temporum’ manuscript. PBA Galleries image.

Tooled gold leaf adorns many pages of the ‘Fasciculus Temporum’ manuscript. PBA Galleries image.

SAN FRANCISCO – A rare 15th century manuscript of Werner Rolewinck’s world history, Fasciculus temporum, sold for $102,000 at PBA Galleries’ June 21 auction of rare books and manuscripts, within the range of the $100,000-$150,000 estimate. The strong price demonstrates the vigor of the antiquarian market, as rare and important material continues to climb in value.

Rolewinck’s Fasciculus temporum was a significant work in its day, a history of the world with dual parallel timelines dating both from creation and the birth of Christ. The manuscript version that sold at PBA Galleries dates from around 1471, preceding the first printing of 1474 by Arnold ther Hoernen in Cologne. There are only 13 known manuscript examples extant, and six of those were produced after the printed version came out—and the copy at PBA Galleries was the only one known to be in private hands.

Rolewinck’s history was important, not the least for its being immensely popular it its day. It went through 30 editions before 1500 and was the best-selling 15th century book by a contemporary author. Indeed, the Fasciculus was apparently the second publication of any living author, seeming to be predated only by Robertus Valturius’ De re militari (1472).

Besides being rare and important, the Fasciculus manuscript has another characteristic that lends to its great desirability and value, that of beauty. It is a striking example of the craft of the medieval scribe, calligrapher and illuminator. The manuscript comprises 30 vellum leaves, in Latin, handwritten in brown and red ink, with numerous roundels in red. There are three miniature paintings in colors (of Joseph, Mary and the baby Jesus in the manger; Christ nailed to the cross; and a resurrected Christ, a nimbus of tooled gold leaf surrounding his head, holding a gold leaf orb that is also delicately tooled), and a large, elaborate initial in red and blue leading off the text, with several smaller initials in red or blue. Of further note is the large size of the manuscript, done in “Grand Format,” dwarfing the printed versions. This allows fuller utilization of the elaborate roundel format, with an elegance and beauty not available in the printed version. This grand format is a characteristic of the prepublication manuscripts only. Post-1474 manuscripts typically followed the smaller format of the printed book. The printed examples did have a series of small woodcut illustrations, markedly different from the three beautifully executed miniature paintings in this manuscript. The manuscript is elegantly bound in 17th century paneled calf with gilt tooling.

For the full catalog description of the Fasciculus temporum, go to www.pbagalleries.com and click the catalogs link on the toolbar.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The ‘Fasciculus Temporum’ manuscript is bound in 17th century paneled calf with gilt tooling. PBA Galleries image.

The ‘Fasciculus Temporum’ manuscript is bound in 17th century paneled calf with gilt tooling. PBA Galleries image.

Pages of the 'Fasciculus Temporum' manuscript measure 17 1/4 by 11 1/2 inches. PBA Galleries image.

Pages of the ‘Fasciculus Temporum’ manuscript measure 17 1/4 by 11 1/2 inches. PBA Galleries image.

Rare Eames ESU200 storage unit. Kamelot Auctions image.

Rare Eames design spikes June auction at Kamelot

Rare Eames ESU200 storage unit. Kamelot Auctions image.

Rare Eames ESU200 storage unit. Kamelot Auctions image.

PHILADELPHIA — Buyers at Kamelot Auctions’ June 8 Town & Country Estate Sale competed for top-quality pieces from a trove of twentieth century and antique designer furniture, lighting and garden antiques. Additionally, interest was strong for good sterling silver and fine and decorative art. LiveAuctioneers.com provided the Internet live bidding for the sale.

A highly specialized collector from New York state cast the final bid for a rare, circa-1952 Eames ESU-series storage unit having two compartments with sliding doors, open shelving and 11 drawers. It sold for $8,250. Three more lots from the same Eames series grossed over $14,000.

The strong form of a Ruhlmann-style burled walnut and inlaid desk captured the imagination of a local Art Deco buyer, who bought it for $3,600, while $4,300 was enough to secure a French Deco dining table with eight matching chairs. A Teplitz Art Nouveau amphora lamp went to a New York City buyer for $4,600, more than ten times the low estimate.

The charm and classical elegance of a rare lacquered Jansen sideboard earned $4,200; while three lots of silver-on-bronze figural groups including one signed ‘Christofle et Cie’ grossed over $8,000. There were some excellent garden antiques, as well. Lot 589A, a pair of Victorian lily-of-the-valley iron chairs was purchased by a well-known Philadelphia real estate developer for $4,800. A charming carousel horse attributed to Herschell-Spillman sold to a collector in Massachusetts for $6,600.

The June 8 sale at Philadelphia’s Kamelot Auctions exhibited many such successful results throughout the day-long run of over 800 lots. The next three sales at Kamelot will take place in September, October and November of 2012. For more information, visit kamelotauctions.com or call 215-438-6990.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Antique Herschell-Spillman carousel horse. Kamelot Auctions image.

Antique Herschell-Spillman carousel horse. Kamelot Auctions image.

Pair of antique garden chairs. Kamelot Auctions image.

Pair of antique garden chairs. Kamelot Auctions image.

Rare Jansen sideboard. Kamelot Auctions image.

Rare Jansen sideboard. Kamelot Auctions image.

Teplitz lamp. Kamelot Auctions image.

Teplitz lamp. Kamelot Auctions image.

French Art Deco dining set. Kamelot Auctions image.

French Art Deco dining set. Kamelot Auctions image.

Burled Ruhlmann-style desk. Kamelot Auctions image.

Burled Ruhlmann-style desk. Kamelot Auctions image.

Signed Christofle figural group. Kamelot Auctions image.

Signed Christofle figural group. Kamelot Auctions image.

Michael Heizer's sculpture 'Levitated Mass' as seen from within the trench. Image by Marjobani. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

L.A. museum unveils Michael Heizer’s ‘Levitated Mass’

Michael Heizer's sculpture 'Levitated Mass' as seen from within the trench. Image by Marjobani. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Michael Heizer’s sculpture ‘Levitated Mass’ as seen from within the trench. Image by Marjobani. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

LOS ANGELES (AP) – The rock was the star as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art pulled the covers off artist Michael Heizer’s latest creation—a 340-ton boulder positioned to appear as though it’s floating in midair.

About a thousand people showed up under sunny skies in Los Angeles as the gigantic work titled Levitated Mass was unveiled Sunday on LACMA’s backyard, where it is intended to remain forever.

Its centerpiece is the two-story-tall chunk of granite that was hauled 105 miles from a Riverside rock quarry earlier this year. Since then, the rock has been carefully positioned above a 465-foot-long trench that museum visitors can stroll.

From the trench, the rock appears to be hovering overhead.

The 67-year-old Heizer, who rarely appears in public, was on hand for the ribbon-cutting ceremony and led the first procession under the big rock. Along the way he waved and shook hands with museum officials and art enthusiasts.

Also Sunday, the museum opened “Michael Heizer: Actual Size,” an exhibition of more than a dozen gigantic photographs showing other works by the artist.

Heizer may be best known for Double Negative, a 1,500-foot-long land sculpture cut into a desert mesa in southern Nevada.

Heizer has planned for more than 40 years to create Levitated Mass, but had to locate the perfect rock. He finally found one in a quarry on the outskirts of Riverside about seven years ago.

It took dozens of people and a specially built trailer to haul it over the surface streets of 22 cities.

The trip lasted nearly two weeks, with the rock traveling only at night and rarely faster than 5 mph. Thousands of people turned out to cheer it on.

To thank those who put up with road closures and other delays, the museum is granting free admission for a week to people who live in areas traversed by the rock.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-24-12 2233GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Michael Heizer's sculpture 'Levitated Mass' as seen from within the trench. Image by Marjobani. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Michael Heizer’s sculpture ‘Levitated Mass’ as seen from within the trench. Image by Marjobani. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

The Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862 is depicted in a Currier & Ives lithograph. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Civil War’s Seven Days Battles costly to soldiers from N.Y.

The Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862 is depicted in a Currier & Ives lithograph. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862 is depicted in a Currier & Ives lithograph. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. (AP) – This week marks the 150th anniversary of the first in a series of Civil War battles during which New York regiments would suffer thousands of casualties.

According to historians at the New York State Military Museum in Saratoga Springs, the first of the Seven Days Battles occurred on June 25, 1862 when New York’s Excelsior Brigade spearheaded an attack against Confederate forces outside Richmond, Va.

The brigade, composed of four regiments from New York City and several upstate counties, fought troops recently placed under the command of Gen. Robert E. Lee.

After the last battle was fought at Malvern Hill on July 1, the Union Army had suffered nearly 16,000 casualties, including some 4,000 from dozens of New York units.

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NYS Military Museum: http://dmna.ny.gov/historic/index.htm

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-25-12 0704GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862 is depicted in a Currier & Ives lithograph. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862 is depicted in a Currier & Ives lithograph. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.