The Charles Stanley Reinhart (1844-1896) watercolor, circa 1890, titled 'Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War.' Gardiner (1599–1663) was a noted English settler and soldier.

Woods yield clues to 1637 Pequot Indian-British battle

The Charles Stanley Reinhart (1844-1896) watercolor, circa 1890, titled 'Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War.' Gardiner (1599–1663) was a noted English settler and soldier.

The Charles Stanley Reinhart (1844-1896) watercolor, circa 1890, titled ‘Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War.’ Gardiner (1599–1663) was a noted English settler and soldier.

MYSTIC, Conn. (AP) – Most local residents are familiar with the massacre and burning of the Pequot Indian fort in 1637 by English forces and their Native American allies.

What is lesser known is that as the surviving 75 British soldiers and 200 allies retreated toward ships on the Thames River, they had to fight off fierce attacks from 300 Pequots and at one point may have burned a smaller Indian village they came across.

Now Kevin McBride, the director of research at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center, with help from 20 college students from across the country, is spending the summer in Pequot Woods retracing the steps that Capt. John Mason and his men took during that retreat.

“This is a real window into that time period,” McBride said recently as his search team worked deep in the woods off a trail that leads to Mystic Meadow Lane.

So far the team has found musketballs, gun parts, bent arrow points, gun flints, tools, buttons and other artifacts that have helped them map the soldiers’ steps. Using metal detectors, team members meticulously examine grids that are 10 meters square before moving on to adjacent areas. They have also been digging test pits, hoping to find evidence of the destroyed village.

“Right where we’re standing they were fighting off repeated Pequot attacks,” said McBride, whose team uses historic documents and descriptions of the battle to gather clues about where to search.

“I’m not sure whether we’re getting good or we’re lucky, but I don’t care,” said McBride, who heads the University of Connecticut’s Field School in Battlefield Archaeology. “The challenge is putting yourself into the head of a 17th-century English commander as well as the Pequots.”

So far McBride and his team have completed a mile of the search and have two more to go, as the retreat stopped short of the Thames. They plan to continue their work through the fall.

Two student researchers using metal detectors that can probe 20 inches deep recently got a hit on a metal object. After a few minutes of digging and screening soil, they found an irregularly shaped iron object encrusted in dirt. Turning it in his fingers, McBride placed it a sealed plastic bag.

“It’s definitely worth an x-ray,” he said. “This is the fun part of the discovery. You never know what you’ll find out here.”

In another area, researchers dug test pits to search for evidence of the destroyed village such as pottery, stone tools and English trade goods.

“The village would be an incredible find,” McBride said, showing off a stone spear point from one of the test holes that he estimated was made between the years 1000 and 1600.

The project is being funded with a $60,000 grant from the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program along with continued support and funding from the Mashantucket museum.

With funding from both groups, McBride and his team completed an archaeological study of the Mystic Fort off Pequot Avenue two years ago and mapped a location in Old Mystic where the English and their allies camped before the massacre.

The result of the studies has been documented in 400-page reports for the park service.

“We’ve learned more about the Pequot War and the colonists in the past four years than in the previous 25,” McBride said. “The archaeology and the historic narrative coming together begin to tell you the story.”

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Information from: The Day, http://www.theday.com

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-23-12 1504GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Charles Stanley Reinhart (1844-1896) watercolor, circa 1890, titled 'Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War.' Gardiner (1599–1663) was a noted English settler and soldier.

The Charles Stanley Reinhart (1844-1896) watercolor, circa 1890, titled ‘Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War.’ Gardiner (1599–1663) was a noted English settler and soldier.

This vintage Emerson three-speed fan can push a lot of air with its 12-inch blades. Image courtesy LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Rich Penn Auctions.

Ohio man donates vintage fans to keep neighbors cool

 This vintage Emerson three-speed fan can push a lot of air with its 12-inch blades. Image courtesy LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Rich Penn Auctions.

This vintage Emerson three-speed fan can push a lot of air with its 12-inch blades. Image courtesy LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Rich Penn Auctions.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – A central Ohio man has donated hundreds of fans from his collection to help neighbors in need keep cool despite high temperatures.

Bill Galloway, of Columbus, began collecting fans in 1999 and amassed about 1,000 of them, packing the items into his garage. When spring arrived with unseasonably high temperatures, he decided there were others who needed the working fans more than he did.

“It’s very simple,” Galloway told WCMH-TV. “I said, ‘Are you going to use this? No, you’re not.’ So out (the fans) went.”

Since the spring, Galloway has donated about 600 fans—all in working order—to his church’s food pantry so they could be distributed to people who could use them. The recipients are warned to keep the fans away from children because they don’t have modern safety features.

Food pantry volunteer Phyllis Taylor said as soon as one load of fans was distributed, Galloway would bring more.

“They would disappear and the next day there would be another table full of fans,” Taylor said. “I’ve seen him shed a tear over some of the stories that he’s heard and people with the thanks that they give him.”

Galloway, 70, said he has kept about 300 fans for himself, including one that dates to 1912 and still operates.

___

Information from: WCMH-TV, http://www.nbc4i.com

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-21-12 1448GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


 This vintage Emerson three-speed fan can push a lot of air with its 12-inch blades. Image courtesy LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Rich Penn Auctions.

This vintage Emerson three-speed fan can push a lot of air with its 12-inch blades. Image courtesy LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Rich Penn Auctions.

Crax Boy firecracker pack with imagery similar to that of vintage Whitman’s Sampler chocolate boxes, $3,025. Morphy Auctions image.

Vintage fireworks collection pops at Morphy’s, earns $438K

Crax Boy firecracker pack with imagery similar to that of vintage Whitman’s Sampler chocolate boxes, $3,025. Morphy Auctions image.

Crax Boy firecracker pack with imagery similar to that of vintage Whitman’s Sampler chocolate boxes, $3,025. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy Auctions’ June 22-23 auction was devoted exclusively to things that go bang in the night – the antique and vintage fireworks collection of Pennsylvanian George Moyer. The 40-year assemblage of rare antique and vintage firecracker packs and labels; salutes, sparklers and other pyrotechnical rarities went out with a flourish during the two-day sale that realized $438,000. LiveAuctioneers.com provided the Internet live bidding capability for the sale. All prices quoted are inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium.

The Moyer collection had been widely publicized in the mainstream media, both in the USA and abroad. Feature articles appeared in The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Washington Times and Forbes.com, and there was coverage on at least two television networks. “This level of media attention might not have seemed so unusual had it been a collection of Picassos, said Morphy Auctions CEO Dan Morphy, “but we’re talking about firecrackers – ephemeral objects that cost as little as one cent when they were first marketed.”

Morphy’s “one cent” comment was in reference to what collectors call “penny packs,” which were manufactured to provide cheap thrills for financially challenged Fourth of July celebrants. In particular, these auction lots proved a pennywise investment for Moyer.

“There were over 40 packs in the sale that sold for individual prices of $1,000 or more, and several were penny packs,” said Morphy. “Not a bad return on George’s money.” Moyer started his collection at age 10, picking up wrappers that his older friends discarded after removing the crackers.

The top lot of the sale was a rare salesman’s display board containing 20 sample sparklers, caps, and firecracker packs. It finished at the midpoint of its estimate range, at $7,200. A second salesman’s display board containing 12 fireworks samples from the R.F. Company of Rochester, N.Y., was considered historically significant because it presented an especially diverse overview of the firm’s product range, including elusive pinwheels and “bombs.” Against an estimate of $1,000-$2,500, the assortment sold for $4,800.

The appeal of firecracker packs, with their vividly colored labels and fantasy themes, crosses over into many other collecting genres. Packs with depictions of athletes, soldiers, sci-fi and pop culture icons; Native Americans, clowns, cowboys, and Christmas characters are pursued by a wide range of collectors who do not specifically pursue fireworks.

A Balfour’s 40-piece pack of “supercharged flashlight crackers” with a depiction of early, open-wheel Indy-style racers competing on a racetrack no doubt received a boost from automotive collectors. The pack raced past the checkered flag with a winning bid of $3,900.

A packet of 32 Tally Ho! Firecrackers adorned with a vibrant image of riders on horseback, flanked by hunting dogs in full stride, finished at $3,300; while a Greyhound pack emblazoned with the image of a sleek hound bolting across the countryside more than doubled its high estimate to reach $2,280. Manufactured by Tung Fong, a 24-pack of Jackass Brand Firecrackers from the company’s “Lucky Series” advertised its product as being “the cracker with a kick.” Possibly the only extant example, the lot was entered with a $500-$1,000 estimate but was bid to $2,700.

Another pack that may be the only known example of its type was the one advertising “Crax Boy Loudest Flashlight Crackers.” Executed in appealing primary colors, the label featured a knock-off character nearly identical to the Whitman’s Sampler candy messenger boy. But instead of chocolates, Crax Boy delivers packets of fireworks. Estimated at $500-$1,000, the Crax Boy pack was bid to $3,025.

The pack that Moyer said he found hardest to part with was the one called “Marine,” with a depiction of US Marines in a battlefield. “I had a sentimental attachment to it because I, myself, served in the Marine Corps,” he said. The pack of 70 crackers – possibly a unique survivor – achieved $3,000.

Other top lots included: Merry-Go-Round, $3,000; Mercury, $2,280; Evergreen, $1,920; and China Goo Boy [probably an aberration of “Good Boy”] – $2,400. The image of a Native-American brave adorned the label on a pack of Three Feathers crackers, which sold for $1,440.

After the sale, George Moyer remarked that he had found it “very gratifying” that so many fellow collectors took the time to speak with him at the auction. “I had a great time meeting everyone and signed many, many auction catalogs, copies of the fireworks book I wrote, and fireworks posters. It made all those years of collecting worthwhile.”

To contact Morphy Auctions, call 717-335-3435. Visit the company’s website at www.morphyauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Crax Boy firecracker pack with imagery similar to that of vintage Whitman’s Sampler chocolate boxes, $3,025. Morphy Auctions image.

Crax Boy firecracker pack with imagery similar to that of vintage Whitman’s Sampler chocolate boxes, $3,025. Morphy Auctions image.

Top lot of the sale: salesman’s sample board containing 20 sample sparklers, caps and firecracker packs, $7,200. Morphy Auctions image.

Top lot of the sale: salesman’s sample board containing 20 sample sparklers, caps and firecracker packs, $7,200. Morphy Auctions image.

24-pack of Jackass Brand Firecrackers, ‘the cracker with a kick,’ $2,700. Morphy Auctions image.

24-pack of Jackass Brand Firecrackers, ‘the cracker with a kick,’ $2,700. Morphy Auctions image.

24-pack of Jackass Brand Firecrackers, ‘the cracker with a kick,’ $2,700. Morphy Auctions image.

24-pack of Jackass Brand Firecrackers, ‘the cracker with a kick,’ $2,700. Morphy Auctions image.

China Goo Boy [probably an aberration of Good Boy] Firecrackers, $2,400. Morphy Auctions image.

China Goo Boy [probably an aberration of Good Boy] Firecrackers, $2,400. Morphy Auctions image.

Mercury Firecrackers 16-pack manufactured by Hing Cheong Yeung Hong, Portuguese Macau, $2,280. Morphy Auctions image.

Mercury Firecrackers 16-pack manufactured by Hing Cheong Yeung Hong, Portuguese Macau, $2,280. Morphy Auctions image.

Balfour’s Firecrackers 40-pack manufactured by Balfour Guthrie & Co. Ltd., San Francisco, $3,900. Morphy Auctions image.

Balfour’s Firecrackers 40-pack manufactured by Balfour Guthrie & Co. Ltd., San Francisco, $3,900. Morphy Auctions image.

Tally Ho! Firecrackers 32-pack, manufactured by To Yiu, $3,300. Morphy Auctions image.

Tally Ho! Firecrackers 32-pack, manufactured by To Yiu, $3,300. Morphy Auctions image.

Greyhound Firecrackers, $2,280. Morphy Auctions image.

Greyhound Firecrackers, $2,280. Morphy Auctions image.

Police arrest 2 in Huntington, W.Va., museum break-in

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) – Two Beckley, W.Va., men have been arrested and charged with breaking into the Huntington Museum of Art in an attempt to steal silver antiquities.

Huntington Police Chief W.H. Holbrook says in a statement that 24-year-old Deon Staunton and 23-year-old Remington Wright were arrested Thursday and charged with breaking and entering.

Police disrupted a break-in at the museum on April 14. They traced a U-haul found at the museum that night to Wright. Holbrook said detectives also talked to a local pawnshop owner who said Wright had approached him before the break-in to arrange the sale of silver antiquities for money.

Wright and Staunton are being held in the Southern Regional Jail. It was not immediately clear whether they had attorneys.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-06-22-12 0802GMT

 

 

 

 

The top seller at Clars’ June 17 auction was this small Chinese Guan-type arrow vase that earned a staggering $104,950. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Strong Asian prices account for one-third of Clars’ June total

The top seller at Clars’ June 17 auction was this small Chinese Guan-type arrow vase that earned a staggering $104,950.  Clars Auction Gallery image.

The top seller at Clars’ June 17 auction was this small Chinese Guan-type arrow vase that earned a staggering $104,950. Clars Auction Gallery image.

OAKLAND, Calif. – Clars’ June 16-17 Fine Art and Antiques Sale grossed just under $1 million with Asian antiques accounting for almost one-third of overall sales earning $350,000 on the 200 lots offered in this category. The fine art, furnishings and jewelry categories also performed strongly contributing to Clars second highest grossing June sale in their history.

Turning to the impressive Asian prices, a small Chinese Guan-type arrow vase sold for a staggering $104,950 followed by a Chinese mother-of-pearl inlaid wood four-panel screen, late Qing/Republic period that earned $65,175. A framed Chinese ink and color painting on paper entitled Autumn Landscape and attributed to Huang Junbi (Chinese, 1898-1991) sold for over 10 times it’s high estimate going for $50,363. Coming in fourth place in this category was a Chinese wooden day bed constructed of Vietnamese huanghuali, which sold for $13,035. Rounding out the category was a large Thai bronze figure of the Buddha, Ayutthaya period, which sold for $11,850.

The fine art category brought strong prices as well. Clars’ past few sales have seen works by Elizabeth Catlett garner impressive prices and the June sale was no exception. Topping the art category was a bronze by Catlett (American, 1915-2012) titled Naima, which was estimated to sell for $12,000 on the high side. This work solidly surpassed estimate selling for $18,960. A framed gouache and watercolor on paper titled Le Port d’Ostende Avec Vue Sur le Premier Quai de Commerce et la Gare Maritime, 1926, by Leon Spilliaert (Belgian, 1881-1946) sold for $15,405. Furthering the European works offered, a lot of four framed oils on panel, classical genre scenes, European School, sold for high estimate at $11,258. From America, the framed oil on canvas titled Two Young Girls Playing in the Poppy Fields by Aloysius C. O’Kelly (1853-1920) also sold within estimate for $10,665.

The decoratives and furnishings category was highlighted by Steinway and Sons, New York grand pianos. The top seller in this category was a Model A Long grand piano, circa 1924, which doubled its estimate selling for $14,220 followed by the second Steinway offering, which was a 1915 parlor grand piano with ebony finish, Model O. Also doubling its estimate, this piano sold for $8,295. An antique Turkoman carpet, circa 1900, deaccessioned by the Honolulu Museum of Art, sold for over 10 times its high estimate at $8,888. A George III secretary bookcase, circa 1780, also sold very well for $2,370. Rounding out the decoratives and furnishings category were investment quality sterling offerings. Earning top dollar in sterling was an American flatware service for 12 by International in the Royal Danish pattern, which sold for $3,851.

Clars estate and antique jewelry offerings are always exceptional. In June, a Beaux Arts era diamond pendant/brooch combination sold for $5,629. Earning the same money was a diamond necklace set with 270 round full cut diamonds weighing approximately 10.33 carats. A lady’s diamond solitaire engagement ring followed close behind selling for $5,333.

For complete prices realized for Clars’ June 16-17 Antiques and Fine art auction, visit www.clars.com; phone 510-428-0100 or email: info@clars.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The top seller at Clars’ June 17 auction was this small Chinese Guan-type arrow vase that earned a staggering $104,950.  Clars Auction Gallery image.

The top seller at Clars’ June 17 auction was this small Chinese Guan-type arrow vase that earned a staggering $104,950. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This framed Chinese ink and color painting on paper titled ‘Autumn Landscape’ and attributed to Huang Junbi (Chinese, 1898-1991) sold for over 10 times its high estimate at $50,363. Clars Auction Gallery image.

 

This framed Chinese ink and color painting on paper titled ‘Autumn Landscape’ and attributed to Huang Junbi (Chinese, 1898-1991) sold for over 10 times its high estimate at $50,363. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Topping the fine art category was this bronze by Elizabeth Catlett (American, 1915-2012) titled ‘Naima.’ Estimated to sell for $12,000 on the high side, this work solidly surpassed that estimate selling for $18,960. Clars Auction Gallery image.

Topping the fine art category was this bronze by Elizabeth Catlett (American, 1915-2012) titled ‘Naima.’ Estimated to sell for $12,000 on the high side, this work solidly surpassed that estimate selling for $18,960. Clars Auction Gallery image.

The decoratives and furnishings category was highlighted by this Steinway & Sons, New York, Model A Long grand piano, circa 1924, which doubled its estimate selling for $14,220. Clars Auction Gallery image.

The decoratives and furnishings category was highlighted by this Steinway & Sons, New York, Model A Long grand piano, circa 1924, which doubled its estimate selling for $14,220. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This antique Turkoman carpet, circa 1900, deaccessioned by the Honolulu Museum of Art sold for over 10 times its high estimate at $8,888. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This antique Turkoman carpet, circa 1900, deaccessioned by the Honolulu Museum of Art sold for over 10 times its high estimate at $8,888. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This Beaux Arts era diamond pendant/brooch combination accented with European cut diamonds sold for $5,629. Clars Auction Gallery image.

This Beaux Arts era diamond pendant/brooch combination accented with European cut diamonds sold for $5,629. Clars Auction Gallery image.

A surveillance camera captured these images of the thief in the gallery. Image used with expressed permission of Venus Over Manhattan gallery.

Dali painting stolen in brazen daytime New York heist

A surveillance camera captured these images of the suspect in the gallery. Image used with expressed permission of Venus Over Manhattan gallery.

A surveillance camera captured these images of the suspect in the gallery. Image used with expressed permission of Venus Over Manhattan gallery.

NEW YORK (AFP) – An audacious thief posing as an art lover snatched a Salvador Dali watercolor and ink painting worth an estimated $150,000 from a New York private art gallery this week, police said Friday.

The man walked into the Venus Over Manhattan art gallery on Madison Avenue on Tuesday afternoon, posing as a “potential customer.”

“He removed the painting and he fled,” a police spokeswoman told AFP.

Video surveillance cameras showed the man, in his mid-30s to mid-40s, wearing a black and white shirt and jeans, casually walking out with the painting sticking out of a shopping bag.

Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dali’s 1949 “Cartel des Don Juan Tenorio” was on display as part of the gallery’s debut exhibition, which opened in May.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Salvador Dali (Spanish, 1904-1989), 'Cartes de Don Juan Tesorio.' Image used with expressed permission of Venus Over Manhattan gallery.

Salvador Dali (Spanish, 1904-1989), ‘Cartes de Don Juan Tesorio.’ Image used with expressed permission of Venus Over Manhattan gallery.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Diary of an artist-in-residence: Report from Verbier #1

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

VERBIER, Switzerland – The town of Verbier nestles on the slopes of the Swiss Alps and is a place of outstanding natural beauty. The 3-D residency is offered to artists who can produce monumental work that will work with the stunning landscape.

To my great pleasure I was invited to participate this year.

The journey to Verbier is a surprising one. The ‘double decker’ trains run along the edge of Lake Geneva, which seems as large as an inland sea, the landscape slowly rising behind the lake as the journey progresses until you are dwarfed by the scale of the mountains.

I arrive, perfectly on time as you would expect in Switzerland, to be collected by Kerry Jane. She is working for the 3-D foundation as a writer and is a bright and vivacious woman who engages me in wonderfully relaxed conversation as we begin to climb the winding road that leads up, and up, to Verbier. What is amazing about the relaxed nature of her conversation and graceful driving style is that the road is a terrifying switchback of tortured curves that flirt with precipitous drops and hazards without any respite. I therefore arrive cool and calm in a living picture postcard that is Verbier. The slopes above me are dotted with chalets and twisting tracks that are quintessentially Swiss. For those of you who remember the cartoon ‘Heidi,’ this is the real life version!

I am introduced to the organizer and founder member of the residency, Kiki Thompson, who’s easygoing manner immediately makes me feel comfortable. She introduces me to the other artists involved. Onyedika Chuke, a tall, striking young man working out of New York, is so charismatic I almost take a step back as he greets me with a warm handshake. Then there is Julien Marolf, a Swiss artist, who has a mischievous but very friendly look and a reassuringly firm handshake. Elly Cho is a video artist originally from Korea who is bubbly and makes a great show of welcoming me to the enormous ‘tent’ that will serve as our studio for the next month. Sabine Zaalene is the enigmatic performance/ installation artist who is not around but will appear, no doubt unexpectedly, some time soon. Sabine confirms my expectation and appears the next day. She is quiet and friendly and I imagine will disappear again without warning.

My materials are on site, my crate of tools from England has been delivered, and I feel excited about starting work. Kiki says to me, ‘I will take you up the mountain to see where you would like to put your sculpture!’ What a treat, a gift for an artist to have such an offer.

But tomorrow is my workshop with the local Swiss school, a group of seven-year-old children. They speak no English and my schoolboy French is barely dusted off after 30 years of non use…. tomorrow could be interesting!

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

Courtesy of Jonathan Wright.

‘Popeye’ by Vincent Rega, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

Reading the Streets: Long Island City Kleaners Shop hosts ‘4 of a Kind’

  ‘Popeye’ by Vincent Rega, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

‘Popeye’ by Vincent Rega, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. – The small but well-edited gallery imbedded within the Long Island City Kleaners Shop, is playing host to “4 of a Kind,” featuring work from REGA, EVOKER, MikeDie and ChrisRWK from RobotsWillKill.com. The show opened the first Saturday in June and will run through August.

The L.I.C.K. gallery demonstrates that it doesn’t take a lot of space to showcase the arts; it’s the audience that matters most. And the audience shopping for the exclusive clothing the shop sells definitely appreciates the art created by the Robots Will Kill group. It’s a pleasure to see a gallery owner be as creative with his space to further the art scene he believes in as the artists are with their work.

In addition to clothing, the shop also distributes the incredibly hard to come by zine Surface Area created by Robots Will Kill and designed to highlight urban art and stickers. The first issue, with art by Evoker, Michael Banks and Amara Por Dios, sold out quickly on its website but you can still pick up copies at select retailers. An inexpensive, accessible zine offers a slightly more permanent outlet for artists to gain exposure to a wider audience and it draws together some of the upcoming artists out there in one place for readers interested in the urban arts scene. Let’s hope it becomes more accessible in successive printings.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


  ‘Popeye’ by Vincent Rega, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

‘Popeye’ by Vincent Rega, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

‘Open the Door’ by Chris of RWK, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

‘Open the Door’ by Chris of RWK, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

‘Rooster #1&2’ by Evoker, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

‘Rooster #1&2’ by Evoker, Long Island City. Photo by Kelsey Savage.

Groundbreaking ceremony attendees included representatives from the Smithsonian Institution, National Postal Museum's Council of Philatelists, U.S. Postal Service and Clark Construction. Front row (left to right): Karen Bertha, Glen Hopkins, Daniel Piazza, Stephen Kearney, Charles Shreve, Donald Sundman, Albert Horvath, Allen Kane, Richard Kurin, Cheryl Ganz, Wade Saadi; Back row (some partial view): Bruce Kendall, Vince King, Gordon Eubanks, Trish Kaufmann, Robert Rose, Roger Brody, Omar Rodriguez, Steven Rod, Janet Klug, David Straight, May Day Taylor, Robert Odenweller, Mary Ann Bowman, Michael Aldrich, Sonny Hagendorf, James Kloetzel, David Herendeen, Liz Hisey, John Hotchner; Back row (partial or hidden view): Ian Gibson-Smith, Tom Lera, Marv Murray

Postal museum breaks ground for Wm. H. Gross Stamp Gallery

Groundbreaking ceremony attendees included representatives from the Smithsonian Institution, National Postal Museum's Council of Philatelists, U.S. Postal Service and Clark Construction. Front row (left to right): Karen Bertha, Glen Hopkins, Daniel Piazza, Stephen Kearney, Charles Shreve, Donald Sundman, Albert Horvath, Allen Kane, Richard Kurin, Cheryl Ganz, Wade Saadi; Back row (some partial view): Bruce Kendall, Vince King, Gordon Eubanks, Trish Kaufmann, Robert Rose, Roger Brody, Omar Rodriguez, Steven Rod, Janet Klug, David Straight, May Day Taylor, Robert Odenweller, Mary Ann Bowman, Michael Aldrich, Sonny Hagendorf, James Kloetzel, David Herendeen, Liz Hisey, John Hotchner; Back row (partial or hidden view): Ian Gibson-Smith, Tom Lera, Marv Murray

Groundbreaking ceremony attendees included representatives from the Smithsonian Institution, National Postal Museum’s Council of Philatelists, U.S. Postal Service and Clark Construction. Front row (left to right): Karen Bertha, Glen Hopkins, Daniel Piazza, Stephen Kearney, Charles Shreve, Donald Sundman, Albert Horvath, Allen Kane, Richard Kurin, Cheryl Ganz, Wade Saadi; Back row (some partial view): Bruce Kendall, Vince King, Gordon Eubanks, Trish Kaufmann, Robert Rose, Roger Brody, Omar Rodriguez, Steven Rod, Janet Klug, David Straight, May Day Taylor, Robert Odenweller, Mary Ann Bowman, Michael Aldrich, Sonny Hagendorf, James Kloetzel, David Herendeen, Liz Hisey, John Hotchner; Back row (partial or hidden view): Ian Gibson-Smith, Tom Lera, Marv Murray

WASHINGTON – The Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum has begun construction of the William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. When completed, the gallery will be the world’s premier museum gallery dedicated to philately. Scheduled to open in September 2013, the gallery will enable the museum to reach its full potential by dramatically increasing the collection’s visibility, advancing its educational mission and reinvigorating public interest in philately.

A construction project to perform infrastructure renovation for the new gallery was awarded to Clark Construction Group LLC, one of the largest general contractors in the United States. Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Clark was selected by the Smithsonian Institution on the strength of its technical and cost proposals in a two-step, full and open competition. The project, which will convert the site of the former Capital City Brewery restaurant in the Postal Square building into the new gallery, includes heating, ventilation, air conditioning, electrical, sprinkler and security upgrades, as well as windows with stamp graphics, new restrooms, elevators and stairs. Mezzanine renovations, providing new space for the museum’s educational programs, are part of the project as well.

Named after its primary benefactor, the William H. Gross Stamp Gallery will provide an experience available nowhere else and will offer something for everyone, from casual visitors to experienced collectors. As visitors move through six thematic areas, stunning displays and interactive moments will reveal the stories that unfold from the museum’s unparalleled collection. Distributed throughout the thematic areas will be hundreds of pullout frames containing more than 20,000 objects, providing ample opportunities to view noteworthy stamps that have never been on public display.

A glowing wall of windows featuring reproductions of 54 historic U.S. stamps will provide a backdrop to the 12,000 square feet of exhibits and continually remind visitors that the history of stamps is intertwined with the history of America.

Several other new museum projects will complement the gallery and further enrich visitors’ experience:

* “Windows Into America,” the spectacular wall of windows featuring stamp art, will announce to people outside what wonders await them within the museum.

* The main historic postal lobby will be transformed into a welcome center that orients visitors and prepares them to get the most out of their visit.

* Within the historic lobby, a social network center featuring eight touch-screen kiosks will enable visitors to personalize their museum experience and share feedback with other visitors.

* An adjoining postmaster’s suite will present rotating, high-caliber philatelic exhibitions on topics of special interest.

* New education spaces, including a learning loft above the stamp gallery and an education innovation center, will provide students, educators and families with diverse programming that incorporates the newest media.

The National Postal Museum is devoted to presenting the colorful and engaging history of the nation’s mail service and showcasing one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of stamps and philatelic material in the world. It is located at 2 Massachusetts Avenue N.E., Washington, D.C., across from Union Station. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (closed Dec. 25).

For more information about the Smithsonian, call (202) 633-1000 or visit the museum website at www.postalmuseum.si.ed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Groundbreaking ceremony attendees included representatives from the Smithsonian Institution, National Postal Museum's Council of Philatelists, U.S. Postal Service and Clark Construction. Front row (left to right): Karen Bertha, Glen Hopkins, Daniel Piazza, Stephen Kearney, Charles Shreve, Donald Sundman, Albert Horvath, Allen Kane, Richard Kurin, Cheryl Ganz, Wade Saadi; Back row (some partial view): Bruce Kendall, Vince King, Gordon Eubanks, Trish Kaufmann, Robert Rose, Roger Brody, Omar Rodriguez, Steven Rod, Janet Klug, David Straight, May Day Taylor, Robert Odenweller, Mary Ann Bowman, Michael Aldrich, Sonny Hagendorf, James Kloetzel, David Herendeen, Liz Hisey, John Hotchner; Back row (partial or hidden view): Ian Gibson-Smith, Tom Lera, Marv Murray

Groundbreaking ceremony attendees included representatives from the Smithsonian Institution, National Postal Museum’s Council of Philatelists, U.S. Postal Service and Clark Construction. Front row (left to right): Karen Bertha, Glen Hopkins, Daniel Piazza, Stephen Kearney, Charles Shreve, Donald Sundman, Albert Horvath, Allen Kane, Richard Kurin, Cheryl Ganz, Wade Saadi; Back row (some partial view): Bruce Kendall, Vince King, Gordon Eubanks, Trish Kaufmann, Robert Rose, Roger Brody, Omar Rodriguez, Steven Rod, Janet Klug, David Straight, May Day Taylor, Robert Odenweller, Mary Ann Bowman, Michael Aldrich, Sonny Hagendorf, James Kloetzel, David Herendeen, Liz Hisey, John Hotchner; Back row (partial or hidden view): Ian Gibson-Smith, Tom Lera, Marv Murray

Smithsonian National Postal Museum

Smithsonian National Postal Museum

Smithsonian National Postal Museum entrance

Smithsonian National Postal Museum entrance

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Atrium

Reconstructed (1934) State House in St. Mary's City, Maryland, the first capital of Maryland, 2009 photo by Acroterion, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Archaeologists uncover Maryland’s first capital

Reconstructed (1934) State House in St. Mary's City, Maryland, the first capital of Maryland, 2009 photo by Acroterion, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Reconstructed (1934) State House in St. Mary’s City, Maryland, the first capital of Maryland, 2009 photo by Acroterion, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

ST. MARY’S CITY, Md. (AP) – Archaeologists have uncovered the stone and brick foundation of a St. Mary’s City structure that served as Maryland’s first state house.

The Calvert House site was identified in the 1980s. On Thursday, the Historic St. Mary’s City museum announced its excavations uncovered the structure’s foundation and cellars.

The museum says it’s the first time in 30 years that new portions of the Calvert House foundations have been exposed in excavations.

Calvert House was built soon after the settlement of Maryland was established. It was the home for the settlement’s founder and first governor, Leonard Calvert. It later served as an inn and a courthouse.

In 1662, the Province of Maryland purchased it to serve as the first state house. It served as the capital for most of the 17th century.

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Reconstructed (1934) State House in St. Mary's City, Maryland, the first capital of Maryland, 2009 photo by Acroterion, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Reconstructed (1934) State House in St. Mary’s City, Maryland, the first capital of Maryland, 2009 photo by Acroterion, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.