Tiffany Arrowroot lamp with confetti glass. Red Baron's Private Reserve.

Red Baron back in action with extraordinary sale Sept. 29

Tiffany Arrowroot lamp with confetti glass. Red Baron's Private Reserve.

Tiffany Arrowroot lamp with confetti glass. Red Baron’s Private Reserve.

ATLANTA – Red Baron’s Private Reserve – the new incarnation of the venerable auction firm formerly known as Red Baron Antiques – will hold an inaugural sale on Saturday, Sept. 29, in its new gallery facility at 8655 Roswell Road, five miles north of its previous Atlanta location. LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding, which begins at 10 a.m. EDT.

Among the 475 lots to be sold are six rare and outstanding pianos that are no longer in production.

“We are excited to be kicking off the fall season at our brand new facility with an auction packed with some of the highest quality antiques and décor items available anywhere,” said Bob Brown, Red Baron’s owner throughout its long and storied history. “Everything you’ve seen at Red Baron’s has been condensed into our new and improved location. I urge everyone to attend.”

Aside from the pianos, the auction will also feature a never-used copy of a late 1800s-style brewery, vintage and collectible automobiles, fantastic bars, statuary and fountains (staples at most Red Baron’s auctions), boats, estate jewelry, fine art, vintage guns, furniture, neons, garden accents, rare and unusual oddities and an overall inventory that can’t be found elsewhere.

The six pianos are expected to take center stage (as they no doubt have countless times in the past). One is the ultimate piano: a sleek black Steinway Model D-455 9-foot grand piano. It has graced the concert stage of virtually every performance venue in America, and boasts the largest dynamic range of any piano made, from whispering pianissimo to thundering fortissimo.

Another Steinway grand piano certain to garner attention is an important French ormolu-mounted mahogany, satin, sycamore and stained fruitwood marquetry piano, made circa 1913. Previously auctioned through Christie’s, the piano features a case made by Maison Jansen (Paris) from a model by Joseph-Emmanuel Zwiener. Movement is Steinway & Sons (serial #162332).

The other four pianos include a gold-mounted Bechstein grand piano with satinwood inlay and ormolu, circa 1883; a Samick white baby grand piano, Model SG-172; a Chickering ebonized baby grand piano, made circa 1924, Model #146544; and a Bechstein oak grand piano, Model #39038.

“To have six pianos of this caliber in one auction is extraordinary,” Brown said.

The late 19th century-style brewery is bound to attract attention, both for it rarity and its functionality. Made in Germany (and the only example currently in the United States), the gold medal-winning brewery has toured the U.S. and Germany and is valued at $400,000. It is 13 feet 1 inch by 10 feet, with a height of 12 feet. It goes with the auction’s Oktoberfest theme.

Oher notable pieces include an amazing Lalique cactus table, a Tiffany Arrowroot lamp, collectibles such as an F-16/15 aircraft ejection chair, completely authentic, polished and lacquered and ideal for use as a desk chair (and a surefire conversation starter); and a pre-Civil War pirate hook arm.

There is no admission fee for this auction, which will begin promptly at 10 a.m. and end around 7 p.m.

Red Baron’s Private Reserve is always in the hunt for quality consignments for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single item, an estate or a collection, send an e-mail to info@rbprivatereserve.com or phone 404-640-4604.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Late 19th century-style brewery, made in Germany and the only example currently in the U.S. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

Late 19th century-style brewery, made in Germany and the only example currently in the U.S. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

Steinway French ormolu-mounted mahogany, satin, sycamore and fruitwood piano, circa 1913. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

Steinway French ormolu-mounted mahogany, satin, sycamore and fruitwood piano, circa 1913. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

Lalique Cactus table. Red Baron's Private Reserve image.

Lalique Cactus table. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

Large-size green wrought iron solarium with tempered glass and detailed scrollwork decoration. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

Large-size green wrought iron solarium with tempered glass and detailed scrollwork decoration. Red Baron’s Private Reserve image.

 

Steve Retzlaff (American, 20th/21st century), ‘Freedom,’ cast .999 silver, on marble and walnut base, total height 34 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Skinner decorative arts auction Oct. 6 laden with silver

Steve Retzlaff (American, 20th/21st century), ‘Freedom,’ cast .999 silver, on marble and walnut base, total height 34 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Steve Retzlaff (American, 20th/21st century), ‘Freedom,’ cast .999 silver, on marble and walnut base, total height 34 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

BOSTON – Skinner Inc. will host an auction of European Furniture and Decorative Arts on Oct 6 in its Boston gallery. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding as Skinner sells an array of silver, Continental porcelain, glass, statuary, clocks, paintings and prints, lighting, rugs, textiles and antique furniture. The collection of renowned actor, director, and master teacher Michael Howard will also be offered during the 900-lot auction, which begins at 10 a.m. EDT.

The silver session features nearly 450 lots, with a broad range of flatware and hollow ware from the United States, Europe, the Middle East, and Central and South America. The bidding begins with British silver, and features two assembled Paul Storr covered tureens with unicorn finials (lot 40, estimated between $5,000 and $7,000).

Continental silver follows with highlights that include a large sterling silver compote with pendant grape clusters by Georg Jensen (lot 144, $9,000 to $12,000), as well as several Georg Jensen flatware sets including one in the Cactus pattern (lot 137, $10,000 to $15,000) and another in the Acorn pattern (lot 159, $3,000 to $4,000).

Offerings by American makers are particularly strong. An early 20th century Gorham presentation sterling silver punch bowl service (lot 300, $30,000 to $50,000) offers a fine example of Gorham design and craftsmanship. The punch bowl is lightly hammered and cast with grape and vine decoration. The tray and 12 cup holders bear a similar decorative motif, including grapes, oak leaves and acorns.

Highlights from Tiffany & Co. include four Chrysanthemum pattern sterling silver candlesticks (lot 310, $18,000 to $22,000) and a Persian-style sterling silver coffee service (lot 333, $6,000 to $8,000), both from the early 20th century. Several lots of silver designed by Elsa Perretti are expected to generate interest, including a sterling silver covered tureen and underplate (lot 151, $4,000 to $6,000) and a pair of Bone pattern sterling silver candlesticks (lot 153, $2,000 to $4,000).

The final lot of the session is a patinated .999 silver and bronze figure of an eagle, entitled Freedom, by contemporary American sculptor Steve Retzlaff (lot 442, $8,000 to $12,000). The sculpture stands 30 inches tall and the silver content amounts to nearly 700 troy ounces.

The sale will also feature approximately 50 lots of collectibles associated with theater from the personal collection of Michael Howard. Howard is a renowned actor, director and teacher of the dramatic arts, having taught at the Julliard School, Yale School of Drama, American Conservatory Theatre, and most notably at his own studio. Citing his master teacher, Lee Strasberg, as a major influence not only professionally but also as a collector, Howard has been actively collecting since his career started more than 60 years ago.

Much of the Michael Howard collection relates to Shakespearean characters and the actors who played them. Examples include a painting of Edwin Booth as Iago by Thomas Hicks (lot 509, $4,000 to $6,000) and three Chinese reverse paintings on glass illustrating scenes from The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest and Hamlet (lots 531-533, each $3,000 to $5,000).

Nineteenth century English actors and actresses are represented in paintings, needlework samplers, porcelain and pottery objects, and tinsel prints. The Commedia dell’Arte is represented in several lots including a collection highlight: a large needlework piece portraying an early stage production, complete with the characters Harlequin, Il Dottore and Scaramouche (lot 544, $4,000 to $6,000).

English pieces of note include a William IV amboyna and yew wood writing table (lot 746, $8,000 to $12,000), a Regency mahogany drum table (lot 792, $2,000 to $4,000), and a George III parcel-gilt and caned bergere (lot 829, $4,000 to $6,000).

The variety of Continental furniture is demonstrated by two case pieces. The first, a fine 18th century Dutch walnut armoire (lot 574, $15,000 to $25,000) is marquetry-inlaid throughout. The second, a brass- and alabaster-mounted mahogany veneer secretaire abattant (lot 606, $5,000 to $7,000) features burl- and string-inlaid fronts, a tambour door and other exquisite details. An important circular marble tabletop (lot 811, $6,000 to $8,000) inlaid with micromosaics and bordered by a rouge marble band depicts St. Peter’s Square and ruins in the Roman Forum.

American Victorian furniture is represented by a Renaissance Revival walnut cabinet secretary Wooton desk (lot 852, $6,000 to $8,000), and two Aesthetic Movement ebonized cherry side chairs attributed to Herter Brothers (lot 908, $4,000 to $6,000).

Highlights from the wide variety of Continental porcelain include several well-painted KPM plaques. One depicts the Tyrolean Rebellion of 1809 after the painting Vor Dem Aufstand 1809 in Tirol by Franz Defregger (lot 698, $1,200 to $1,800) and another, a portrait of Christopher Columbus in chains, after Gustave Wappers (lot 877, $600 to $800).

Notable decorative pieces also include an assortment of bronze sculptures highlighted by a Georges Gardet (French, 1863-1939) parcel-gilded casting titled Lioness Discovering a Foo Dog with a Barbedienne foundry mark (lot 550, $3,000 to $5,000).

For details contact Stuart Slavid, director of European furniture and decorative arts at Skinner Inc., 508-970-3278.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Steve Retzlaff (American, 20th/21st century), ‘Freedom,’ cast .999 silver, on marble and walnut base, total height 34 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Steve Retzlaff (American, 20th/21st century), ‘Freedom,’ cast .999 silver, on marble and walnut base, total height 34 inches. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Four Tiffany & Co. Chrysanthemum pattern sterling silver candlesticks, New York, early 20th century, 10 inches high. Estimate: $18,000-$22,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Four Tiffany & Co. Chrysanthemum pattern sterling silver candlesticks, New York, early 20th century, 10 inches high. Estimate: $18,000-$22,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Georges Gardet (French, 1863-1939), ‘Lioness Discovering a Foo Dog,’ cast gilt bronze, on a marble base, 13 x 25 inches. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Georges Gardet (French, 1863-1939), ‘Lioness Discovering a Foo Dog,’ cast gilt bronze, on a marble base, 13 x 25 inches. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Wooten Desk Co. walnut cabinet secretary, Indiana, circa 1874-80. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Wooten Desk Co. walnut cabinet secretary, Indiana, circa 1874-80. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Skinner Inc. image.

William IV writing table, England, circa 1840, finely veneered in amboyna wood with calamander banding to the top. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

William IV writing table, England, circa 1840, finely veneered in amboyna wood with calamander banding to the top. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Italian micromosaic tabletop, with central roundel depicting St. Peter's Square, encircled by six roundels of scenes of Rome, diameter 20 3/4 inches. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Italian micromosaic tabletop, with central roundel depicting St. Peter’s Square, encircled by six roundels of scenes of Rome, diameter 20 3/4 inches. Estimate: $6,000-$8,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Regency mahogany drum table, England, early 19th century, gilt-tooled red leather-inset top, diameter 44 1/4 inches. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Regency mahogany drum table, England, early 19th century, gilt-tooled red leather-inset top, diameter 44 1/4 inches. Estimate: $2,000-$4,000. Skinner Inc. image.

Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452-1519), 'Mona Lisa,' painted circa 1503-1506. Permanent collection of The Louvre, Paris.

Early ‘Mona Lisa’ to be shown in Geneva

Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452-1519), 'Mona Lisa,' painted circa 1503-1506. Permanent collection of The Louvre, Paris.

Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452-1519), ‘Mona Lisa,’ painted circa 1503-1506. Permanent collection of The Louvre, Paris.

GENEVA (AFP) – What is believed to be an earlier version of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” will be shown to journalists in Geneva on Thursday, according to the Mona Lisa Foundation.

The Zurich-based foundation said it would present “the stunning portrait of Lisa del Giocondo,” along with results from 35 years of research and scientific tests indicating that “it was indeed executed by Leonardo approximately a decade earlier than its famous sister in the Louvre.”

The foundation said in a statement that it would “present historical, comparative and scientific evidence, which demonstrates that there have always been two portraits of the Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci, the ‘Earlier Version’ and the ‘Jaconde’.”

A 320-page book titled “Mona Lisa — Leonardo’s Earlier Version”, encompassing evidence that da Vinci painted the piece, will be launched at the same time, the foundation said, without revealing the book’s author.

Among the participants in Thursday’s media event will be Alessandro Vezzosi, the director of the Leonardo da Vinci Museum in Vinci, Italy and a world-renowned expert on the artist and the Mona Lisa, the foundation said.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452-1519), 'Mona Lisa,' painted circa 1503-1506. Permanent collection of The Louvre, Paris.

Leonardo da Vinci (Italian, 1452-1519), ‘Mona Lisa,’ painted circa 1503-1506. Permanent collection of The Louvre, Paris.

Among the masterpieces in the permanent collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is the work 'Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers,' created in 1889.

Dutch Van Gogh Museum closes, masterpieces moved

Among the masterpieces in the permanent collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is the work 'Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers,' created in 1889.

Among the masterpieces in the permanent collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is the work ‘Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers,’ created in 1889.

AMSTERDAM (AP) – The operation began moments after the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam closed Sunday evening. Men removed alarm tags from behind some of Vincent Van Gogh’s greatest masterpieces, including Sunflowers, Irises and the famously crooked Bedroom, and quickly pulled the paintings down from the museum’s walls.

Fortunately, they were not thieves carrying out an epic heist, but curators preparing the works for transport to a temporary location across town where they will be on display for the next seven months while the museum is closed for renovations.

In all, 75 pieces — the cream of the biggest collection of Vincent Van Gogh’s work — are moving to The Hermitage, an Amsterdam dependency of the Russian state museum.

Watching the lifeblood of his museum disappear, Director Axel Ruger said he wasn’t nervous about the possibility the paintings could be damaged or stolen before they return next year.

“We do this all the time,” when individual paintings go on loan to another museum, he said. But never on this scale, he added.

“I cannot really say much about the (security) measures that are being taken, because you will understand that we need to keep those confidential in order to safeguard the security of the transport,” he said.

Standing near a blank space on the wall where Van Gogh’s final work, the 1890 painting Wheatfield with Crows, had hung just minutes earlier, Curator Leo Jansen described in brief the treatment the paintings would undergo.

After being loaded onto felt-covered trolleys, they would be taken to a workshop to be wrapped in protective insulation and packed into hard-shell carrying cases called “turtles” that are resistant to both physical shocks and temperature changes.

The cases have been assigned code numbers rather than bearing the paintings’ individual names.

About an hour later, the first shipment was loaded onto a yellow van and then driven away under police escort. The route each shipment followed was kept secret until the last moment.

The operation continued like clockwork through Sunday night and into the day Monday in order to get the paintings on display again as soon as possible: the Van Gogh Museum is Amsterdam’s most popular, attracting 1.6 million visitors in 2011 — eclipsing both the Rembrandt-rich Rijksmuseum and the Anne Frank House museum.

The exhibit at The Hermitage opens Saturday and runs through mid-April, with the Van Gogh Museum to reopen on April 25, 2013.

The closure of the Van Gogh Museum was timed in part to coincide with the reopening next door of the lesser-known Stedelijk, or city museum, which houses works by Dutch Modernists Piet Mondriaan and Gerrit Rietveld, as well as Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse and many others.

Dubbed “the bathtub” by local press, the most notable new feature of the renovated Stedelijk is a white roof with an overhang that stretches so far from the side of the building it looks like it might simply break off.

Architects say it is structurally sound, made possible thanks to a stronger-than-steel composite material.

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Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Among the masterpieces in the permanent collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is the work 'Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers,' created in 1889.

Among the masterpieces in the permanent collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is the work ‘Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers,’ created in 1889.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam has the largest Van Gogh collection in the world, comprising 200 paintings, 400 drawings and 700 letters. Photo by Wladyslaw, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam has the largest Van Gogh collection in the world, comprising 200 paintings, 400 drawings and 700 letters. Photo by Wladyslaw, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Purple Heart found amongst memorabilia is returned to NC family

Purple Heart in presentation case, awarded to a United States Army soldier in World War II. Photo by Jonathunder, available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Purple Heart in presentation case, awarded to a United States Army soldier in World War II. Photo by Jonathunder, available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (AP) – A Purple Heart found in a box of memorabilia in Jacksonville is headed to the family of the man who received the prestigious recognition in 1943.

The Daily News of Jacksonville reported that Debera Allen found the Purple Heart belonging to Olin White in a box and began searching for White’s family.

“I contacted everybody in the family and nobody knew who (Olin White) was,” said Debera Allen, the woman who found the Purple Heart in her family home. “That (Purple Heart) represented a life for our country and I didn’t want anything to happen to it.”

Eventually, Dan Stoy of the Military Order of the Purple Heart picked up the search. He found White’s niece, Lynn White, living in China Grove. He delivered the Purple Heart on Saturday.

The two of them had an emotional conversation when he called to tell White the Purple Heart had been found.

“My wife can tell you I just sat there and pretty much cried in front of my computer after I called her,” Stoy said. “To me, this guy’s a hero for what he did in the past. It’s a World War II vet — there’s not a lot of them around anymore — and it’s an honor to be able to take this and deliver it back to the family.”

Olin White, a teenager when he received the Purple Heart, was one of 183 soldiers who sank with the USS Drexler when Japanese kamikaze pilots struck it during World War II. Stoy says the medal will give the family closure since White’s body was never found.

___

Information from: The Daily News, http://www.jdnews.com

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Purple Heart in presentation case, awarded to a United States Army soldier in World War II. Photo by Jonathunder, available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Purple Heart in presentation case, awarded to a United States Army soldier in World War II. Photo by Jonathunder, available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Thomas Hollis by Sir Joseph Wilton, c. 1760 © National Portrait Gallery, London

National Portrait Gallery acquires bust of Thomas Hollis

Thomas Hollis by Sir Joseph Wilton, c. 1760 © National Portrait Gallery, London

Thomas Hollis by Sir Joseph Wilton, c. 1760 © National Portrait Gallery, London

LONDON – The National Portrait Gallery has acquired the last portrait of the 18th-century British thinker Thomas Hollis – one of the architects of American independence – to remain in Britain.

The compelling marble bust, of circa 1760, by Joseph Wilton, RA (1722-1803), the greatest native-born sculptor in mid-18th-century Britain, is recognized as the finest likeness of the internationally renowned defender of civil liberty.

At his death Londoner Thomas Hollis (1720-1774) was known as a champion of liberty but, due to his retiring nature, his historical importance is only now being recognized. An advocate of the rights of the American Colonists, he was closely associated with Benjamin Franklin and John Adams. The growing mismanagement of the American Colonies through penal and coercive legislation saw Hollis lead the opposition to the Stamp Act of 1765, which sought to tax legal transactions of subjects who were denied representation in Parliament. This ultimately led to the American War of Independence.

Devoting his life to lobbying for parliamentary reform, opposing corruption and promoting democracy, the liberal thought engendered by his interaction with the Founding Fathers eventually influenced the writing of the American Constitution. He was a generous donor to Harvard University where Hollis, the Library’s electronic catalog system, continues to commemorate his patronage and influence on the founding tenets of American liberty.

Hollis represented American interests to the Prime Minister and tried to change British policy through both Parliament and the press. He influenced domestic and international politics by distributing works of radical political philosophy in England and America and this helped forge a framework for legitimate dissent. He also published the works of leading American radicals, to the extent that by 1770 Hollis had become, said historian Professor Caroline Robbins, “the busiest literary agent for American writers against the ‘usurpations’ of George III’s ministers.”

Wilton’s bust shows Hollis bare-chested in the character of the senator Brutus, and incorporates the emblems of Liberty cap and daggers to represent Hollis’s commitment to the principles of Roman democracy. With its naturalistic carving and unusual half-smile the bust has a surprisingly life-like quality which, in keeping with Wilton’s finest works and intimacy with the sitter, encourages the viewer to see the philosopher as a complex and dynamic character.

The celebration of the bust by other contemporaries was neatly encapsulated, more than 12 years after Hollis’s death, when John Adams, the future president of the United States of America, saw Wilton’s sculpture in 1786 and commented on “the bust of my friend … in beautiful white marble.”

Wilton was one of the foremost sculptors of his age and though he produced relatively few portrait busts his finest are unequalled – and this is one of his finest. Its powerful naturalism and starkness were groundbreaking and was at the forefront of the transition from the baroque to the neo-classical idiom in British portrait sculpture. The National Portrait Gallery owns busts by Wilton of William Pitt, First Earl of Chatham and General Wolfe.

“This bust captures Hollis’s personality and principles and conveys his uncompromising devotion to the principles of liberty. It will now be in the displays to help explore questions of 18th-century political protest and to tell the story of the foundations of both British democracy and British sculpture.” said Dr. Lucy Peltz, curator of 18th century portraits, National Portrait Gallery, London.

The gallery acquired the portrait following a loan period from a private collection, for £293,157 having received £100,000 towards its purchase from the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) and £57,000 from the Art Fund.

The purchase was made possible following a generous offer of the bust to the Gallery at less than its market value by the vendor Dr. David Wilson and a negotiated tax arrangement to the advantage of the vendor and the Gallery in a Private Treaty transaction approved by HM Revenue and Customs for a pre-eminent work of national heritage. That arrangement further reduced the purchase price paid by the Gallery to £293,157. David Wilson begins trading this week as a dealer in fine art (www.davidwilsonfineart.com).

 

U.S. Scott no. 4. Fusco Auctions image.

Fusco bills Sept. 30 stamp auction as their best yet

U.S. Scott no. 4. Fusco Auctions image.

U.S. Scott no. 4. Fusco Auctions image.

WILLOUGHBY, Ohio – Fusco Auctions’ 113th public stamp auction, on Sunday, Sept. 30, is loaded with excellent quality material from the first lot through the last. The auction features excellent U.S. singles and collections with strong U.S. revenues in addition to some the best general foreign singles and collections the auction company ever offered. Also, excellent large lots and postal history lots as well as outstanding postcard lots are in the sale.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding. The sale will begin at 12 noon EDT.

Highlights of this auction include classic U.S. and worldwide singles with outstanding early high value Great Britain King Edward and Queen Victoria issues. Complete, hard to find sets of unused British Commonwealth material are also present.

“This is one of our best offering of classic stamps and collections that we have ever offered. This auction, which is our 113th public stamp auction, clearly places Fusco Auctions as one of the leading stamp auction companies in the world today,” said owner and auctioneer Paul Fusco.

For details contact Fusco Auctions. Email pfusco@fuscoauctions.com or phone 440-975-8938.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


U.S. Scott no. 4. Fusco Auctions image.

U.S. Scott no. 4. Fusco Auctions image.

U.S. Scott no, 129. Fusco Auctions image.

U.S. Scott no, 129. Fusco Auctions image.

U.S. Scott no, 243. Fusco Auctions image.

U.S. Scott no, 243. Fusco Auctions image.

Great Britain Scott no. 93. Fusco Auctions image.

Great Britain Scott no. 93. Fusco Auctions image.

Great Britain Gibbons L9. Fusco Auctions image.

Great Britain Gibbons L9. Fusco Auctions image.

Great Britain Scott 124. Fusco Auctions image.

Great Britain Scott 124. Fusco Auctions image.

Scarlett Johansson, Los Angeles, 2004. © Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz’s ‘master set’ both iconic, personal

Scarlett Johansson, Los Angeles, 2004. © Annie Leibovitz

Scarlett Johansson, Los Angeles, 2004. © Annie Leibovitz

COLUMBUS, Ohio — It was a job in itself for Annie Leibovitz to cull the first 40 years of her wide-ranging life as a photographer down to a core “master set” to be turned into museum-quality prints.

Leibovitz had so many pivotal moments to draw from: her thousands of assignments for Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair and Vogue; her enviable access to rock stars, athletes, dancers and politicians; and volumes of personal photographs.

The 63-year-old Leibovitz envisioned selecting 100 prints as a legacy for her three children, but ultimately landed at 156. The full complement, “Annie Leibovitz: Master Set,” is displayed the first time in its entirety at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus through Dec. 30.

“Each photograph is kind of a landmark for me or a moment or a place, or represents not only someplace in cultural history but also in photography for me,” Leibovitz said in an interview with The Associated Press.

John Lennon clinging naked to Yoko Ono, the nude and pregnant Demi Moore, and Whoopi Goldberg in a bathtub of milk are all here. So are Mick Jagger, Hunter Thompson, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Miles Davis, George W. Bush, the Obamas and Queen Elizabeth II.

Leibovitz also included the faces of those dear to her but perhaps lesser-known to consumers of her celebrated magazine photography: her daughter, Sarah, staring through wide infant eyes; her siblings; and her mother looking both stalwart and kind.

Her photojournalism also is represented, including an iconic image of the red carpet being withdrawn as Richard Nixon departs the White House.

“You see the history of my adventure in photography through the work,” Leibovitz said. “It’s a very eclectic, I’d have to say even an uneven, set. It’s not cohesive and smooth, it’s kind of erratic.”

Leibovitz said she borrowed the idea of focusing on a narrow selection of work from famed landscape photographer and environmentalist Ansel Adams, who staged a retrospective exhibition in 1974 and spent much of his later career making reprints.

“As a magazine photographer … you’re not making prints, you’re not thinking about prints,” she said. “So really the master set was an idea based on something that Ansel Adams did at a certain point in his life. He stopped and he thought, looking back on a certain point in his life, what he thought was important, and he spent the rest of his days printing those sets.”

Leibovitz intended this set of images to be available to museums and other institutions, but she had never envisioned it as a show. The idea was slipped to one of her associates by Wexner Center director Sherri Geldin, with whom Leibovitz had a growing professional rapport, and it clicked.

Leibovitz said the Wexner is legendary among artists and provided the right fit for showing the work.

“It was just this mythological place,” she said. “They’re just a place that supports artists.”

The master set is paired with two other installations for the run of show. Her Smithsonian-curated show “Pilgrimage” is displayed in the center gallery of the museum. It’s a collection of images of iconic items, such as Sigmund Freud’s couch and Elvis Presley’s motorcycle.

And in the museum lobby is a casually hung collection of Leibovitz’s photographs of dozens of artists who have displayed, performed or been featured or honored by the Wexner. Leibovitz became the latest recipient of the prestigious Wexner Prize ahead of the show’s opening.

The Leibovitz show had the early signs of a blowout for the museum, something Geldin views as good for both the Wexner and Leibovitz.

“We are able to put Annie’s work in a context that allows it to be seen as fine art,” Geldin said. “Often people who get their start in photojournalism and remain more or less in magazines and the media, they’re sort of thought of us stepchildren in the art world. And I think these works are extraordinarily artistic. Annie’s artistry is unquestionable.”

The master set exhibit represents Leibovitz’s work from 1968 to 2009.

“It isn’t a greatest hits, but it’s milestones in the work for me,” the photographer said.

#   #   #

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Scarlett Johansson, Los Angeles, 2004. © Annie Leibovitz

Scarlett Johansson, Los Angeles, 2004. © Annie Leibovitz

The expected star lot of the auction is this 1970 Pontiac GTO (‘The Judge’), in original condition. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

’70 GTO, coins, stamps power Tim’s Inc. auction Sept. 30

The expected star lot of the auction is this 1970 Pontiac GTO (‘The Judge’), in original condition. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

The expected star lot of the auction is this 1970 Pontiac GTO (‘The Judge’), in original condition. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

BRISTOL, Conn. – A 1970 Pontiac GTO (“The Judge”) in original condition, a large single-owner lifetime stamp collection, hundreds of fine gold and silver coins, vintage clocks and antique furnishings are just some of what bidders can expect when they attend the first-ever Fall Sizzler Estate Extravaganza Auction scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 30, by Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding on the more than 1,000 lots.  The sale will be comparable in size to Tim’s Inc. Auction’s last Cabin Fever Auction held in March. And, said Tim Chapulis, the firm’s owner, there are similarities between the two sales.

“We’ve got so much wonderful estate merchandise packed into one day, just like Cabin Fever, all of it drawn from local estates and collections,” Chapulis said, He mentioned a bank-sealed bag of fine silver coins with a face value of $1,000, that will be sold as one lot.

Chapulis said it took 12 hours and 15 minutes to sell everything in Cabin Fever. “This will be the same thing,” he said, “a marathon – it might go till midnight, maybe 1 o’clock in the morning. We’ll be selling wonderful merchandise until it’s all gone.” There are six major estates being liquidated.

To borrow a line from Sammy Davis Jr. on TV’s Laugh-In, “Here comes the judge!” The probable headliner of the auction will be the 1970 Pontiac GTO (“The Judge”), in part because it is a desirable muscle car from the era and in part because of its impeccable provenance. The car is from the original owner, who purchased it new in West Hartford for $4,400 in 1969. The light green “Pon-Pon,” with a dark green top, has been stored and garaged for the past 34-plus years.

Features of the car include matching VIN numbers, Hurst four-speed transmission, a 400-cubic-inch engine (rated at 366 horsepower) and Quadrajet four-barrel carburetor. The interior is all-original. “We’re offering the car in as-found condition, but the fact is it’s been stored in a nice dry garage for years,” Chapulis said. “We’ve estimated it will sell for $15,000-$25,000.”

Chapulis described the massive single-owner stamp collection as “one of the largest and most important collections we’ve ever sold,” adding, “It will probably end up being 200 lots or so, and it will appeal to just about any collector, with great U.S. and international examples.”

The coins, too, are certain to spark fierce bidding for two reasons: many are highly collectible and the silver and gold content makes them desirable for the sheer weight alone. The aforementioned bag of silver coins has an estimated market value of around $25,000 Chapulis said it would fetch $15,000-$25,000. And the gold coins, of course, will get paddles waving.

Nearly 100 gold coins will come under the gavel, to include half-ounce Panda gold coins from 1983. In all, around 800 lots of coins will be sold, among them 29 sets of silver Chinese 5-yuan coins, each set honoring Chinese nobility. Many U.S. coins will also be sold. “What better way to invest in America than by buying U.S. coins with genuine history?” asked Mr. Chapulis.

Estate jewelry will feature four diamond rings, all with stones of one carat or more, other rings, pocket watches and vintage jewelry pieces, to include ladies’ bracelets and a stunning 18kt gold necklace with a weight of 2.5 troy ounces. Also sold will be pillar-and-scroll clocks by Eli Terry and other Connecticut makers, a gorgeous hand-carved gold gilt carved spread eagle made by a Boston carver in the early 1900s and saying “Live Free or Die,” Oriental carpets and more.

Artwork will include paintings by noted, listed artists, and much of it will be housed in beautiful gold gilt frames. Examples include an antique oil painting by Belgian artist Charles P. Ceradano (1829-1909), titled Shepherdess and Sheep; an oil on canvas seascape by Addison Thomas Millar (American, 1850-1913); a 19th century oil on canvas landscape rendering by William Berry; and an oil on board landscape done circa 1930s by the noted German artist Max Heichele.

The auction will begin promptly at noon EDT. Admittance to the auction will be a suggested $10 donation to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in memory of Peter W. Chapulis, Tim’s late father.

“The outpour of support for this effort has been tremendous,” Tim said. “Many people have given more than we asked. To date this year, we’ve raised over $49,000 for the charity. The goal is to reach $50,000, which will coincide with St. Jude’s 50th anniversary.”

Tim’s Inc. Auctions is celebrating 33 years in business. The firm is always accepting quality consignments. Call Tim Chapulis at (860) 459-0964, or e-mail him at tims.inc@snet.net.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The expected star lot of the auction is this 1970 Pontiac GTO (‘The Judge’), in original condition. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

The expected star lot of the auction is this 1970 Pontiac GTO (‘The Judge’), in original condition. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

Gorgeous hand-carved gold gilt carved spread eagle, made by a Boston carver in the early 1900s. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

Gorgeous hand-carved gold gilt carved spread eagle, made by a Boston carver in the early 1900s. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

This beautiful and highly collectible 1924 gold coin is one of hundreds of gold and silver coins to be sold. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

This beautiful and highly collectible 1924 gold coin is one of hundreds of gold and silver coins to be sold. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

  Pillar-and-scroll clock by Connecticut clockmaker Eli Terry, one of several vintage clocks in the sale. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

Pillar-and-scroll clock by Connecticut clockmaker Eli Terry, one of several vintage clocks in the sale. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

One of 29 sets of silver Chinese 5-yuan coins, honoring Chinese nobility, and highly collectible. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

One of 29 sets of silver Chinese 5-yuan coins, honoring Chinese nobility, and highly collectible. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

The auction will feature four diamond rings, all with stones of more than one carat (like this one). Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

The auction will feature four diamond rings, all with stones of more than one carat (like this one). Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

This stunning and monumental mahogany breakfront is just one of many antique furnishings that will cross the block. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

This stunning and monumental mahogany breakfront is just one of many antique furnishings that will cross the block. Tim’s Inc. Auctions.

Man Ray, self-portrait with walking stick, 1930-1940. Estimate: 10,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Soler y Llach presents auction of Man Ray photos Oct. 30

Man Ray, self-portrait with walking stick, 1930-1940. Estimate: 10,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Man Ray, self-portrait with walking stick, 1930-1940. Estimate: 10,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

BARCELONA, Spain – On Oct. 30, the photography department of Soler y Llach will present an auction titled “Man Ray, Collection d’Afflitto, New York.” The 144-lot sale is the largest offering of photographs by Man Ray since 1995. Estimates range from 2,000 to 150,000 euros (1 euro = $1.30US).

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding for the auction, which will begin at 6 p.m. Central European Time.

The auction will be exhibited in Madrid (Oct. 17, Espacio Salesas, c/ Conde de Xiquena 8), Paris (Oct. 22-23, Sale VV, 3 Rue Rossini) and Barcelona Oct. 29-30, Soler y Llach, c/ Beethoven, 13).

The photographs, mostly vintage black and white, are from the most interesting periods and subjects that define this unique American-born artist. The collection, assembled by Florentine art dealer Camillo d’Afflitto (1951-2009) during the last 30 years, approaches the recurring themes of the work of Man Ray that have marked his production: the self-portrait, portraits of artists and creators, their relationship and shared work with Marcel Duchamp, Dada, Surrealism, fashion photography, the body and architecture.

Other photos show primitive African art that he observed and immortalized with his camera from the perspective of modern artwork and not as a mere object. Also important are pictures of objects Man Ray ironically called “objects of my affection.”

The photographs were collected by the gallery owner and collector Camillo d’Afflitto, who was interested in avant-garde artists such as Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia. In 1981 he founded a gallery in Florence specializing in contemporary art.

For details call Soler y Llach at 34 93 201 87 33.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Man Ray, self-portrait with walking stick, 1930-1940. Estimate: 10,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Man Ray, self-portrait with walking stick, 1930-1940. Estimate: 10,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Portrait of Tristan Tzara, circa. 1921. Estimate: 8,000-12,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Portrait of Tristan Tzara, circa. 1921. Estimate: 8,000-12,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Photograph of Ady Fidelin in front of the plaster sculpture ´Albatros´ by Alberto Giacometti, circa 1937. Soler y Llach image.

Photograph of Ady Fidelin in front of the plaster sculpture ´Albatros´ by Alberto Giacometti, circa 1937. Soler y Llach image.

‘Negro y blanco, positivo,’ ‘Black and White, positive,’ 1926, printed in 1950s. Estimate: 150,000-200,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

‘Negro y blanco, positivo,’ ‘Black and White, positive,’ 1926, printed in 1950s. Estimate: 150,000-200,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Senufo feminin figure, Niena, Mali, circa 1934, vintage gelatin silver print. Estimate: 30,000-40,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Senufo feminin figure, Niena, Mali, circa 1934, vintage gelatin silver print. Estimate: 30,000-40,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Six prints of African objects used for the illustration of ‘Michael Leiris for Cahiers d’Art,’ 1936. Estimate: 100,000-150,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Six prints of African objects used for the illustration of ‘Michael Leiris for Cahiers d’Art,’ 1936. Estimate: 100,000-150,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Unidentified interior, 1920-1930, vintage gelatin silver print. Estimate: 12,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Unidentified interior, 1920-1930, vintage gelatin silver print. Estimate: 12,000-15,000 euros. Soler y Llach image.

Object, mathematical ruled surface, 1936, vintage gelatin silver print, Estimate: 40,000-50,000. Soler y Llach image.

Object, mathematical ruled surface, 1936, vintage gelatin silver print, Estimate: 40,000-50,000. Soler y Llach image.