Cowan’s Auctions to host fine jewelry, timepieces sale Apr. 14

The top lot in Cowan’s Fine Jewelry and Timepieces Auction was this 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott of the Cincinnati Reds. It sold for $192,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

A 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott, former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, estimated to bring $65,000-$85,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

A 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott, former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, estimated to bring $65,000-$85,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc. will host their spring Fine Jewelry and Timepieces: Live Salesroom Auction on April 14. The auction will include over 200 lots of modern and vintage fine jewelry and timepieces by renowned designers and makers such as Tiffany & Co., Patek Philippe, Cartier, Vacheron & Constantin and others. Cowan’s is also pleased to present thee unique pieces from the estate of Marge Schott, Cincinnati native, philanthropist and Cincinnati Reds owner for 15 years. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Featured in the auction on April 14 is a 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott of the Cincinnati Reds, estimated to bring $65,000-$85,000. Schott was the president and CEO of the Cincinnati Reds from 1984 to 1999. Two other pieces from the Schott estate will hit the auction block in this sale. A platinum and diamond 18-carat brooch is estimated at $35,000-$50,000, and a platinum Hamilton wristwatch with 8 carats of diamonds is expected to bring $14,000-$20,000.

Bracelets will also be highlighted in the sale. A ladies 31-carat platinum and diamond bracelet is estimated to bring anywhere between $30,000-$45,000. A ladies platinum Art Deco emerald and diamond bracelet is estimated at $20,000-$30,000, and a ladies 14K white gold baguette and round diamond bracelet is estimated at $5,000-$6,500.

Cowan’s will be selling a number of rings and earrings in the April auction. An 18K white gold emerald and diamond ring is expected to bring $8,000-$12,000, a pair of platinum fancy yellow diamond earrings is estimated at $9,000-$12,000, and a Tiffany and Co. platinum three-stone ring with an additional band is estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

Cowan’s will be offer exceptional items in the timepieces portion of the sale. A Vacheron and Constantin 18K gold pocket watch is expected to bring $8,000-$12,000. A Patek Philippe 18K 20-jewel open-face pocket watch is estimated at $6,000-$8,000. A men’s Rolex Cellini Cestello 18K rose gold wristwatch is estimated to bring anywhere between $4,500-$6,500, and an E. Mathey 14K yellow gold hunter case repeater pocket watch is estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

Cowan’s April 14 Fine Jewelry and Timepieces: Live Salesroom Auction will begin on April 12 at noon EDT.

For more information about the auction or to consign for future auctions, call Brad Wanstrath at 513-871-1670.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott, former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, estimated to bring $65,000-$85,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

A 28-carat platinum and diamond necklace made for Marge Schott, former owner of the Cincinnati Reds, estimated to bring $65,000-$85,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

An 18K white gold emerald and diamond ring is expected to bring $8,000-$12,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

An 18K white gold emerald and diamond ring is expected to bring $8,000-$12,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Vacheron and Constantin 18K gold pocket watch is estimated at $8,000-$12,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Vacheron and Constantin 18K gold pocket watch is estimated at $8,000-$12,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Jeffrey S. Evans lighting sale generates strong bidding

This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. – Lighting and lighting accoutrements were the specialty offering at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates’ March 23 auction. Period lighting is considered the finishing touch by many decorators and historians alike – a clear signifier of period, time and place. Bidders came from as far away as Canada; New Hampshire and Missouri to attend the sale in person, and participants from 15 countries bid on-line for items ranging from period kerosene lamps to parts such as chimneys, burners and shades. LivewAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

A rare Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no. 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period number 2 burner and extremely rare matching-pattern chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., dating to the late 19th or early 20th century, sold for a record $5,175. The lamp came from the Dorothy Gooch collection of Hopkinsville, Ky., and was estimated to bring $1,500-2,000. Listed and photographed in contemporary literature on period lamps, this example was in great condition and fresh to the market.

“The late Dorothy Gooch’s name is known to all kinds of lighting collectors and items from her collection really stimulate collectors to bid,” said auctioneer Jeffrey S. Evans.

Second highest price of the day was another Gooch-owned rarity, a Diamond and Loop Panel with Triple-Dolphin stem base stand lamp, with a colorless font and opaque lavender base. This lamp had a no. 1 fine-line collar, with the base by Boston & Sandwich Glass Co. Dating to the third quarter of the 19th century, the lamp sold for $4,025.00, far above the $1,000-1,500 estimate.

The third in the highest-priced offerings department, and also sold with a rare color and shape description, was a cast brass Plume & Atwood “Harvard” double-arm student lamp, with horizontal tanks, ornately embossed with scrolls and various figural heads. This lamp was fitted with a period setup comprising two H.C. Moehring electrified burners, shade rings, matching cased lemon-yellow narrow ribbed umbrella-form shades and slip chimneys, and dated to the fourth quarter of the 19th century. The combination of the bright yellow shades and the rare form created a bidding frenzy, leading to a finished price of $2,760, well over the estimate of $400-600.

Among the highlights of the parts section of this auction, a setup comprising a cut and frosted ball-form shade with rare applied blue rim, a lip burner by E. F. Jones with a Merrill’s air director, a shade ring with edge coining, and a lip chimney, sold for $1092.50 against its estimate of $200-300. The shade was probably a product of the Mt. Washington Glass Co. based on the example illustrated in Ken Wilson’s Mt. Washington and Pairpoint Glass Volume 1, page 55, figure 3-10.

A Christmas Tree no. 2 size slip chimney decorated with alternating medallions of floral patterns and a female bust, and a gauffered eight-petal rim sold for $805. It was also a likely product of the Mt. Washington Glass Co. Victorian shades were led by a jadeite green dragon-decorated ball-form shade, also formerly in the Dorothy J. Gooch collection, dating to the late 19th or early 20th century sold for $862.50.

The auction realized $185,455 (including 15 percent buyer’s premium) from 779 registered bidders spanning 15 countries. The 538 cataloged lots were followed by 300 uncatalogued lots of lamp parts.

Phone 540-434-3939 for more details.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates March 2, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

This Coral Reef / Seaweed squat stand lamp featuring a blue opalescent font, with a no 2 fluted collar, fitted with a period no. 2 burner and rare chimney-shade, by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. or Beaumont Glass Co., sold for a record $5,175. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Diamond and Loop Panel with Triple-Dolphin stem base stand lamp, with a colorless font and opaque lavender base. Price realized: $4,025. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Diamond and Loop Panel with Triple-Dolphin stem base stand lamp, with a colorless font and opaque lavender base. Price realized: $4,025. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Victorian shades were led by a jadeite green dragon-decorated ball-form shade, which sold for $862.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Victorian shades were led by a jadeite green dragon-decorated ball-form shade, which sold for $862.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

A cut and frosted ball-form shade with rare applied blue rim, a lip burner by E.F. Jones with a Merrill’s air director, a shade ring with edge coining, and a lip chimney, sold for $1092.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

A cut and frosted ball-form shade with rare applied blue rim, a lip burner by E.F. Jones with a Merrill’s air director, a shade ring with edge coining, and a lip chimney, sold for $1092.50. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Cast brass Plume & Atwood ‘Harvard’ double-arm student lamp, with horizontal tanks. Price realized: $2,760. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

Cast brass Plume & Atwood ‘Harvard’ double-arm student lamp, with horizontal tanks. Price realized: $2,760. Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates image.

 

 

 

Judaica, fine art, jewelry highlight Leighton’s Apr. 18 sale

KPM Porcelain plaque 'The Expulsion of Hagar,' estimated at $4,000-$6,000. Leighton Galleries Inc. image.

KPM Porcelain plaque 'The Expulsion of Hagar,' estimated at $4,000-$6,000. Leighton Galleries Inc. image.

KPM Porcelain plaque ‘The Expulsion of Hagar,’ estimated at $4,000-$6,000. Leighton Galleries Inc. image.

ALLENDALE, N.J. – Leighton Galleries’ April 18 auction will feature a fine estate collection of Judaica silver, artwork, jewelry, mid-century modern furniture, Asian arts, gold and silver coins, decorative arts and other objects of value. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Judaica silver to be offered includes a Hanukkah oil menorah, a large Sabbath challah plate, a Torah breast plate, a seder tray and matzoh holder, a megillah case, a two-handled washing cup, a wine decanter, a well-form washing bowl, Torah finials, a four-piece havdalah set, seder plates and more. Other fine silver includes tea and coffee services by Reed & Barton and International, and several flatware sets by Towle, International, Reed & Barton, Tiffany, Gorham and Stieff.

Highlighting fine art in the sale includes a KPM Porcelain plaque The Expulsion of Hagar, a dore bronze figural group after Lanzirotti Le Printemps de la Vie, an Old Master portrait on wood The Virgin Mary, and a painted four-panel screen by Gustavo Novoa Strolling Panthers amidst Flowers. Paintings include a 19th century canvas La Malaria by or follower of Ernest Hebert, Jian Wu Child on Donkey Cart, J. Alsina Wash Day on a River, Suzanne Eisendieck Clown, and Vincent Clare Fruit Still Life. Leighton will also offer works on paper by G. Rodo Boulanger, Joan Miro, Marc Chagall, Bernard Buffet and Leroy Neiman.

Fine jewelry being offered includes a diamond starburst brooch (6.80 carats), an antique diamond and ruby tiara-style collar necklace (10.0 carats), a Rolex stainless steel oyster perpetual watch, a Cartier 18K ladies’ watch, a platinum and diamond solitaire ring (1.00 carat), an Art Deco platinum and diamond bracelet (1.10 carats), a gold mechanical Pesag bracelet watch, a Tiffany sapphire and diamond ring, an 18K men’s Ebel “In God we Trust” watch, a platinum, emerald and diamond ring (2.00 carats), a gold Fences bracelet by Vicki Thaler, an Art Deco diamond and sapphire bracelet, a ruby and diamond tri-color retro clip, diamond bar pins, gold lots and more.

Mid-century modern furniture will also be presented for sale including a set of six Finn Juhl for Niels Vodder teak Egyptian chairs, a Hans Wegner for Johannes Hansen valet chair, a Worts Mobler teak expansion table and pair of buffet credenzas. Other fine items of interest include an extensive 216-piece Royal Crown Derby china service in Blue Aves pattern, a Bull Durham tobacco bronzed bull store display, an 18th century Italian walnut inlaid desk, a 13-piece Royal Doulton Soldiers of the Revolution bicentennial set no. 217, a 19-inch Samuel Yellin wrought iron candlestand, a Tiffany Studios Zodiac desk set, and a large estate collection of gold and silver coins.

The auction is scheduled for Thursday, April 18, at 5 p.m. For information call 201-327-8800 or email info@Leightongalleries.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOT OF NOTE


KPM Porcelain plaque 'The Expulsion of Hagar,' estimated at $4,000-$6,000. Leighton Galleries Inc. image.

KPM Porcelain plaque ‘The Expulsion of Hagar,’ estimated at $4,000-$6,000. Leighton Galleries Inc. image.

Spring marks return of Kamelot garden auction Apr. 13

Fiske aquarium. Kamelot image.

Fiske aquarium. Kamelot image.

Fiske aquarium. Kamelot image.

PHILADELPHIA – On Saturday, April 13, Kamelot Auction House will host its premier annual Garden and Architectural Antiques Auction, now in its eighth year running. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Founded in 2003, Kamelot remains one of the few auction houses to showcase architectural antiques on a regular basis, and in only eight short years the annual garden and architectural auction has grown in stature to become one of the most anticipated and exclusive events in the garden antiques sector, firmly establishing the auction house as a trusted source for distinctive garden and architectural antiques of the finest quality.

Traditionally, the annual garden sale beckons a spectrum of bidders from seasoned collectors, dealers and design professionals to garden enthusiasts and novice buyers. The upcoming sale will showcase over 600 lots, including wrought and cast-iron pieces, garden furniture, industrial objects, planters, urns, statuary, fountains, lighting, mantels and a variety architectural elements. The auction will feature four lots of rare Victorian era-aquariums, one of which was made by prominent 19th century American manufacturer J.W. Fiske circa 1870, estimated at $3,000 – $5,000 (lot 273). Also featured in the sale are several other J.W. Fiske pieces including urns, statuary, fountains, a rare life-size cast-iron statue of a deer with estimates of $1,000 – $2,000 (lot 287) as well as a cast zinc statue of a recumbent dog, also life-size with estimates of $3,000 – $5,000 (lot 295).

The sale will feature an array of beautiful statuary including a number of life-size figural statues. Lot 24 and lot 25, two monumental bronze figural statues of Roman soldiers holding shields and signed “Arturo D. Modica” are sure to draw great interest, both with estimates of $3,000 – $5,000. Other exceptional pieces include lot 280, a monumental classic female cast zinc standing fountain figure, circa 1900 estimated at $1,000 – $1,500, and lot 267, a very good signed Wheeler Williams “Hercules” lead garden figure, circa 1930 estimated at $1,500 – $2,500. Fountains will also be well represented, highlights include lot 14, a three-piece marble carved figural fountain circa 1910 with estimates of $2,500 – $4,500, and lot 169, and a large bronze figural fountain with two putti estimated at $2,200 – $2,800. Also significant to this sale is lot 65, a very early large carved marble sarcophagus form trough having a figural frieze, which is estimated at $1,000 -$1,500, as well as lot 13, a fine and rare late 19th century museum-quality ornate bronze sarcophagus, which is estimated at $7,000 – $9,000.

Architectural elements include several grandiose carved stone mantels such as lot 572, a large carved white marble mantel with full standing figure and cherubs over the top which is estimated at $2,000 – $3,000. Other architectural lots include antique store counters, columns, pedestal pieces, building fragments, and a selection of antique doors and windows. Also featured will be a variety of antique lighting and lampposts, wrought iron gate pieces, and a selection of industrial objects and furniture.

The Spring Garden and Architectural Auction will begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 13. For more information, call 215-438-6990.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Fiske aquarium. Kamelot image.
 

Fiske aquarium. Kamelot image.

Fiske deer. Kamelot image.
 

Fiske deer. Kamelot image.

Fisk zinc dog. Kamelot image.

Fisk zinc dog. Kamelot image.

Ornate bronze sarcophagus. Kamelot image.
 

Ornate bronze sarcophagus. Kamelot image.

Lot 14: three-piece marble fountain. Kamelot image.
 

Lot 14: three-piece marble fountain. Kamelot image.

Lot 24: Roman figure. Kamelot image.

Lot 24: Roman figure. Kamelot image.

Wheeler Williams 'Hercules' figure. Kamelot image.
 

Wheeler Williams ‘Hercules’ figure. Kamelot image.

White marble mantel. Kamelot image.

White marble mantel. Kamelot image.

Ivan Lendl’s collection of Mucha posters on center court

Alfonse Mucha poster 'Cycles Perfecta.' Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Alfonse Mucha poster 'Cycles Perfecta.' Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Alfonse Mucha poster ‘Cycles Perfecta.’ Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

PRAGUE, (AFP) – Sport will meet art on Wednesday, when Czech-born tennis star Ivan Lendl’s near exhaustive collection of Art Nouveau posters by painter Alphonse Mucha goes on display in Prague.

With the determination that earned him eight grand slam titles and 270 weeks as world No. 1, Lendl, 53, collected all but three of the original Mucha posters over the years.

“He’s very serious and very focused when he’s on the tennis court, and he’s just as focused when it comes to … Alfonse Mucha,” curator Jack Rennert told reporters Tuesday.

The exhibition at the Art Nouveau Municipal House features 116 of Mucha’s 119 posters alongside dozens of his other paintings.

After moving to Paris, Mucha (1860-1939) gained fame for his posters of French actress Sarah Bernhardt, which he embellished with the flowing floral motifs typical of the Art Nouveau style.

The first, painted to advertise the Gismonda melodrama starring Bernhardt, turned him into a star in Paris overnight.

That poster opens the exhibition – located above a hall designed by Mucha himself – where an artificial grass carpet was laid as a nod to Lendl’s sport.

Lendl first became acquainted with Mucha’s work upon meeting the artist’s grandson in 1982, two years before he left Communist Czechoslovakia for the United States.

The posters, on display until late July, advertise plays, food and beverages, bicycles and even a Czech insurer.

Skipping the show opening, Lendl said in a video spot that after moving from Connecticut to Florida a few years ago, “I felt sorry to leave thecollection there on its own.”

So the posters went on display, fuelling a Mucha fever in Prague after last year’s exhibition of “The Slav Epic,” his huge cycle of 20 allegories partly inspired by Slavic mythology.

When Lendl comes to Prague later this month to inspect the exhibition, the grass on the floor will no doubt remind him of Wimbledon, the only grand slam tournament he never won.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Alfonse Mucha poster 'Cycles Perfecta.' Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Alfonse Mucha poster ‘Cycles Perfecta.’ Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

National Portrait Gallery unveils portrait of Dame Maggie Smith

Dame Maggie Smith by James Lloyd, 2012 © National Portrait Gallery, London; commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery.
Dame Maggie Smith by James Lloyd, 2012 © National Portrait Gallery, London; commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery.
Dame Maggie Smith by James Lloyd, 2012 © National Portrait Gallery, London; commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery.

LONDON – The National Portrait Gallery, London, has unveiled its most recent commissioned portrait, a painting of Dame Maggie Smith by the artist James Lloyd. It was commissioned by the gallery with the support of J. P. Morgan through the Fund for New Commissions.

The large (six feet by three feet) oil painting shows the Downton Abbey actress in jacket and trousers sitting in a bare studio on a draped chair which is placed on an intriguing trompe-l’oeil platform. The red and blue chequer-board pattern of the platform give color to an otherwise muted palette of grey, black and brown.

The sittings began in 2011 and took place at the artist’s studio in Southwark. Lloyd started by working on sketches, in both oil and charcoal, and took photographs to determine the pose he wanted. He settled on one in which Dame Maggie was seated cross-legged, her head tilted to rest on a raised hand, with her eyes looking out at the viewer.

Lloyd made a plinth to raise her to eye level when seated, a small platform painted with an illusory cube pattern he often uses, in this case to convey a feeling of the stage. The tumbling drapery catches the light as it falls, adding, he says, “a certain monumentality to an otherwise ordinary studio chair.”

While Dame Maggie indicated she was very happy “to be directed,” the artist did not want to represent her in period costume or as one of her characters in which she is known to millions. This was to be a contemporary painting of the actress in her everyday attire.

Despite her busy work schedule, Dame Maggie was very obliging with her time. Having painted actors in the past, Lloyd was aware that if the painting process went on long enough sitters’ appearances were liable to change according to the roles they were currently playing. In this instance, Dame Maggie turned up to one sitting with peroxide blonde hair (she had started work on the film Quartet directed by Dustin Hoffman). Lloyd could have included this but he decided to go with her previous hair color, in keeping, he says, with the tone of the portrait.

James Lloyd says: “I was delighted to be asked by the National Portrait Gallery to paint Dame Maggie Smith: not only because this was an opportunity to have a third painting in the gallery’s collection, but also for the honor of trying to portray such a luminary of stage and film. I learnt that Dame Maggie had been reluctant to have her portrait painted in the past, and at my first meeting with her, her opening words were, ‘Poor you.’ This was quite the opposite from my own feelings, and everyone to whom I mentioned the commission was extremely envious – I lost count of the number of people who offered to make tea during the sittings.

“It is a large canvas but I don’t think it’s flashy,” says Lloyd. “I was after a certain understated grandeur. The background is quite stark, and apart from the patterned floor there is little color bar the neutral grays and browns. This directs the concentration on to the warm flesh tones of the face. And with a face and character like Dame Maggie Smith’s that’s definitely more than enough.”

Dame Maggie Smith (b. 1934) made her stage debut as Viola in Twelfth Night in 1952. While at the Oxford Playhouse School she received early acclaim for her role in Nowhere to Go (1958) and subsequently in As You Like It and Richard II at the Old Vic. Roles in The Recruiting Officer (1963) and The Master Builder (1964) were followed by a performance as Desdemona in Othello opposite Sir Laurence Olivier. Smith was subsequently nominated for an Oscar for her film reprisal of that role and then won two for The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1968) and California Suite (1978). Other notable screen performances include A Private Function (1984), A Room with a View (1986) and Tea With Mussolini (1999). More recently, appearances in the Harry Potter series of films and in the award-winning television series Downton Abbey have won Smith new audiences internationally.

James Lloyd (b. 1971) held the Paul Smith Scholarship at the Slade School of Art and in 1997 won first prize in the BP Portrait Award as well as the Ondaatje Prize for portraiture in 2008. Lloyd has exhibited internationally, most recently at the Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart, and his work is held within collections including those of the House of Commons and Kunsthalle, Mannheim. His portrait of Dame Maggie is the third to enter the National Portrait Gallery’s Collection. His previous portraits were of Sir Paul Smith (the commission awarded to him as part of his first prize in the BP Portrait Award 1997) and David Alec Gwyn Simon, Baron Simon of Highbury (both 1998).


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Dame Maggie Smith by James Lloyd, 2012 © National Portrait Gallery, London; commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery.
Dame Maggie Smith by James Lloyd, 2012 © National Portrait Gallery, London; commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery.

Judge will determine Renoir painting’s owner

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841-1919), 'Paysage Bords de Seine.' Image source: Wikicollecting.org.
Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841-1919), 'Paysage Bords de Seine.' Image source: Wikicollecting.org.
Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841-1919), ‘Paysage Bords de Seine.’ Image source: Wikicollecting.org.

ALEXANDRIA, Virginia (AP) – A federal judge will seek to unravel an art mystery and determine the rightful owner of a napkin-sized painting by French impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir that a Virginia woman says she bought at a flea market for $7.

The ownership is in dispute after documents were uncovered showing a Baltimore museum reported the painting stolen more than 60 years ago.

The painting has been seized by the FBI, and the federal government filed an action last month in U.S. District Court in Alexandria asking a judge to determine who should keep the painting.

Among the contenders is Marcia “Martha” Fuqua who has told the FBI that she bought the painting at a flea market in late 2009 for $7 and stored it in a plastic trash bag for two years before having it authenticated as a genuine Renoir.

Last year, Fuqua planned to have the painting sold at auction, where it was expected to fetch at least $75,000. But the auction was postponed after it was learned that the Baltimore Museum of Art reported the painting stolen in 1951. Records show an insurer, the Fireman’s Fund, paid a $2,500 claim on the theft.

The insurer says it is now the rightful owner, based on payment of that claim.

According to an appraisal commissioned by the FBI, Renoir painted Paysage bords de Seine, or On the Shore of the Seine, on a linen napkin in 1879 on the spot at a riverside restaurant for his mistress.

The appraiser says the Renoir’s value is about $22,000, much less than the auction house estimated, because Renoir’s paintings have fallen out of favor with some art collectors who consider them old fashioned and because questions about the painting’s ownership and possible theft diminish its value to collectors.

Fuqua, who had managed to remain anonymous until the court case was filed, told the FBI under penalty of perjury that she bought the painting at a flea market, never believing the painting to be a true Renoir, even though a plate reading “RENOIR” is attached to the frame. She describes herself as an “innocent buyer” and questions the FBI’s authority to seize the painting.

“Because I am not an art historian, collector, appraiser, or dealer, I lacked the expertise to identify the Renoir Painting’s authenticity, origins or previous ownership history,” she wrote.

On Friday, The Washington Post reported that Fuqua’s 84-year-old mother, who operated an art school for decades in Fairfax County under the name Marcia Fouquet, is an artist who specialized in reproducing paintings from Renoir and other masters. The Post said Fouquet had artistic links to Baltimore in the 1950s, when the painting was stolen, and graduated from Goucher College with a fine arts degree in 1952.

A man who identified himself as Fuqua’s brother, Owen M. Fuqua, told the Post that the painting had been in the family for 50 or 60 years and that “all I know is my sister didn’t just go buy it at a flea market.”

The man later retracted his story, and ultimately said it was another person using his name who gave the initial interview.

Efforts by the AP Friday to reach Martha and Owen Fuqua Friday were unsuccessful. Martha Fuqua’s lawyer did not return a call Friday seeking comment.

The FBI has an ongoing investigation, according to spokeswoman Lindsay Godwin.

Meanwhile, U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema ordered all parties seeking to claim ownership of the painting to make their case in written pleadings later this month.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-05-13 1926GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841-1919), 'Paysage Bords de Seine.' Image source: Wikicollecting.org.
Pierre-Auguste Renoir (French, 1841-1919), ‘Paysage Bords de Seine.’ Image source: Wikicollecting.org.

Art auction to benefit Whitney Museum building fund

NEW YORK (AP) – Original works from 25 artists coming to auction are estimated to bring in more than $8 million to support the construction of a new building for the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City.

Sotheby’s says Friday original paintings from artists like Jasper Johns, Cy Twombly and Ellsworth Kelly have been donated by the artists, artists’ estates, private collectors and dealers.

A 2012 Jasper Johns work called Untitled is estimated to bring in as much as $2 million alone.

The auction will be held on May 14 and 15 at Sotheby’s.

The museum’s new building is projected to open in 2015 and will have three times more gallery space. The designer is Italian architect Renzo Piano.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-06-13 0020GMT

 

 

 

Potential for good buys at Antiquities-Saleroom auction Apr. 19

Pre-Columbian Maya Copador monkey bowl, El Salvador, ca. A.D. 500 – 900. Estimate: $500 to $750. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Pre-Columbian Maya Copador monkey bowl, El Salvador, ca. A.D. 500 – 900. Estimate: $500 to $750. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Pre-Columbian Maya Copador monkey bowl, El Salvador, ca. A.D. 500 – 900. Estimate: $500 to $750. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

BOULDER COUNTY, Colo. – For their upcoming April 19 Antiquities and Ancient Ancient Art Discovery Auction, Antiquities-Saleroom thought the idea of a spring cleaning-type sale would be an excellent way to help clear out affiliated Artemis Gallery’s warehouse, plus have a few other dealers to join in on the fun.

LiveAuctioneers will provide Internet live bidding.

With all lots priced under $350, this special sale features authentic examples of ancient and ethnographic art, as well as prehistoric artifacts – most priced below dealer cost. Examples include classical antiquities from Egypt, Greece and Rome, the Near East, the Far East, plus pre-Columbian art from over a dozen ancient American cultures. Bidders will also find really fine and fun examples of ethnographic art, as well as out-of-this-world items like meteorites.

According to Teresa Dodge, executive director and co-founder of Antiquities-Saleroom, the April 19 auction includes more than 300 lots of ancient and ethnographic art from cultures all over the world, as well as several interesting fossil and mineral specimens. “All lots in this auction are priced to move, so this is a sale for collectors and dealers alike.” Dodge points out that the April auction showcases more than three dozen published examples from the private collection of Byron Farwell, as featured in the book, The Farwell Collection published in 1953 by Franklin P. Johnson, University of Chicago art historian and archaeologist. Byron Farwell was a young Army captain stationed in Italy during World War II, and pieces presented in this book were personally excavated by him in 1944-1945 in Ordonia, Italy, with the Italian government’s blessing.

Aside from the published Greek pieces from Farwell, there are also a large number of Egyptian and Roman antiquities, including examples in stone, bronze, pottery and glass, many examples from the Middle East and Far East, especially India, Tibet and China, as well as more than 75 lots of pre-Columbian artifacts.

And to keep things interesting, and just a little bit different from what Antiquities-Saleroom usually offers at auction, bidders will also find several fine Inuit Eskimo stone carvings, 18th century Delft tiles, early Spanish Colonial silver spurs and carved wooden Santos, and many Native American paleo points / arrowheads lots. With six lots of JFK memorabilia, this auction truly has something for everyone, said Dodge.

And like everything offered for sale by Antiquities-Saleroom, all auction lots have been legally acquired, are legal to resell and are guaranteed to be as described. “We do not sell replicas or anything ‘in the style of’ any ancient culture. What’s more, no sale is ever final if the buyer isn’t happy. We want satisfied customers who are happy with what they buy… so they will come back and buy more,” Dodge said.

Antiquities-Saleroom’s Ancient and Ethnographic Art Discovery Sale auction will start at 10 a.m. MDT (noon Eastern) on Friday, April 19.

For additional information about the auction, call Teresa Dodge directly at 720-502-5289, or send her an email at AntiquitiesSaleroom@gmail.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Pre-Columbian Maya Copador monkey bowl, El Salvador, ca. A.D. 500 – 900. Estimate: $500 to $750. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Pre-Columbian Maya Copador monkey bowl, El Salvador, ca. A.D. 500 – 900. Estimate: $500 to $750. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Set of three Egyptian Faience ushabtis, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1090 to 663 B.C. Estimate: $600 to $900. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Set of three Egyptian Faience ushabtis, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1090 to 663 B.C. Estimate: $600 to $900. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Roman bronze bull votive, ca. first-second century.  Estimate: $600 to $900. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Roman bronze bull votive, ca. first-second century. Estimate: $600 to $900. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Dong Son bronze ladle, Vietnam, Dongson Culture, ca. 300 B.C – A.D. 300. Estimate: $300 to $450. Antiquities-Saleroom image.

Dong Son bronze ladle, Vietnam, Dongson Culture, ca. 300 B.C – A.D. 300. Estimate: $300 to $450. Antiquities-Saleroom image.