Print of Andy Warhol's Mao Tse-tung. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Art Partner Galerie SPRL.

Mao’s image omitted as Warhol exhibition opens in China

Print of Andy Warhol's Mao Tse-tung. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Art Partner Galerie SPRL.

Print of Andy Warhol’s Mao Tse-tung. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Art Partner Galerie SPRL.

SHANGHAI (AFP) – Shanghai’s contemporary art museum on Sunday opened a show featuring the works of American pop artist Andy Warhol, but without his iconic portraits of former Chinese leader Chairman Mao.

The Pittsburgh-based Andy Warhol Museum, which supplied more than 300 pieces for the show, said months in advance that paintings of Mao Tse-tung would not be shown in keeping with the wishes of the Chinese hosts.

“We worked with curators at both institutions in Shanghai and Beijing and there was a little bit of concern about bringing them right now,” Warhol museum director Eric Shiner told AFP on Sunday.

“We wanted to introduce Andy Warhol’s work to China. If those paintings could be a problem in any way, we didn’t want them,” he said, adding it was a “mutual decision” not to include them.

The show has already traveled to Singapore and Hong Kong, and will head to Beijing and Tokyo after Shanghai.

Among the highlights of the Warhol museum’s collection is a 1972 painting showing a blue-suited Mao.

Shanghai is seeking to become an art capital on a par with New York and Paris, opening government-funded modern and contemporary art museums in October last year.

But critics have questioned how Shanghai can become a true cultural center since the government censors art that it considers politically sensitive or pornographic.

During the 1960s and 1970s, China built a personality cult around Mao, worshipping his portrait, but images and statues of the leader, who died in 1976, have now largely disappeared.

Chinese artists have also depicted Mao in their works, including painter Li Shan, who shows the leader with a leaf in his mouth in a well-known piece.

Warhol himself visited China not long before his death in 1987.

“He was very interested, when he went to Beijing, in how Mao Zedong was represented, over and over again,” said Abigail Franzen-Sheehan, director of

publications for the Warhol museum.

The exhibition “Andy Warhol: 15 Minutes Eternal” is showing at Shanghai’s Power Station of Art for three months.

The works on display include his famous depiction of Campbell’s Soup cans as well as his portraits of movie star Marilyn Monroe.

“His work contains significance in terms of looking at your contemporary surroundings with a critical eye. We hope that (people) will think about Warhol’s work, the questions he was provoking,” Franzen-Sheehan said.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Print of Andy Warhol's Mao Tse-tung. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Art Partner Galerie SPRL.

Print of Andy Warhol’s Mao Tse-tung. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Art Partner Galerie SPRL.

Chinese painting depicting the old Summer Palace. Image by Shen Yuan, Tangdai, Wang Youdun. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Pinault family to donate looted bronzes to China

Chinese painting depicting the old Summer Palace. Image by Shen Yuan, Tangdai, Wang Youdun. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Chinese painting depicting the old Summer Palace. Image by Shen Yuan, Tangdai, Wang Youdun. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

BEIJING (AP) – The family that runs French luxury-goods conglomerate Kering won plaudits from Beijing on Friday for offering to return a pair of looted Qing dynasty bronzes at the heart of a Chinese campaign to overcome the legacy of bullying by foreign powers.

The offer from company CEO Francois-Henri Pinault was “an expression of friendship toward the Chinese people,” the State Administration of Cultural Heritage said.

“The Chinese side offers its high praise for this action and considers that it conforms with the spirit of relevant international cultural heritage protection treaties,” the administration said in a statement posted on its website following a meeting between Pinault and administration Deputy Director Song Xinchao.

The pieces to be returned are the bronze heads of a rat and rabbit that were among 12 animal heads looted during the sacking of the old Summer Palace in Beijing by French and British troops in 1860 at the close of the Second Opium War. The palace’s elaborate buildings were burned and left in ruins, and the bronzes—the centerpieces of an elaborate zodiac fountain—spirited abroad into private hands.

China has campaigned to recover the bronzes in recent years amid burgeoning pride in the country’s economic achievements and a subtle drive to recover its former cultural and political glory. Five of them have already been returned to China and one is in Taiwan, but the whereabouts of four others remain unknown.

The bronzes had been owned by Yves Saint Laurent and were put up for auction in 2009 following his death. China strongly protested the sale and the auction was botched after a Chinese businessman refused to honor his winning bid of $40 million.

In a statement, the Pinault family said it went to “great efforts to retrieve these two significant treasures of China, and strongly believe they belong in their rightful home.”

The family said it would work with the Cultural Heritage Administration to return the bronzes “as early as possible.” It didn’t say how the bronzes were acquired, but thanked the auction house Christie’s, which managed the 2009 auction and is part of the Kering group, along with Saint Laurent.

The donation is a canny public relations move by Kering, formerly known as PPR, which owns a stable of businesses also including Gucci and Alexander McQueen that are thriving in China’s booming luxury market. Pinault was traveling in China with French President Francois Hollande on a visit to strengthen economic ties.

___

Associated Press writer Sarah DiLorenzo contributed to this report from Paris.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-26-13 1339GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Chinese painting depicting the old Summer Palace. Image by Shen Yuan, Tangdai, Wang Youdun. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Chinese painting depicting the old Summer Palace. Image by Shen Yuan, Tangdai, Wang Youdun. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria (1830-1916). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Austrian emperor’s lock of hair highlights auction

Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria (1830-1916). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria (1830-1916). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

VIENNA (AP) – Bidders looking for a pair of mended underwear worn by a former emperor came away disappointed Thursday from an auction of Austrian imperial memorabilia. But a lock of his hair was on offer, and went under the hammer for nearly 14,000 euros (around $18,000)—more than 20 times its listed worth.

The Vienna auction house had said Emperor Franz-Josef’s linen would be put on the block, suggesting there was a least a chance that one of the parsimonious ruler’s patched undergarments would be put on sale.

But the only intimate apparel being sold off Thursday was a pair of silk long johns made for his wife, Elizabeth. She was assassinated in 1898 before ever wearing them, and that appeared to lower their attraction. The garment went for 2,000 euros, 500 euros below its estimated value.

Not so the hair. Bedded in a worn purple velvet case, the silvery strands fetched 13,720 euros. Hushed murmurs rippled through the room as the winning bid was announced on behalf of Austrian restaurateur Mario Plachutta, who was said to own of the world’s largest collections of items from the imperial Habsburg dynasty.

“We’ve been concentrating on expanding the collection with special objects and the ringlet fits in very well,” said Katrin Unterreiner, who bid for Plachutta.

As might have a pair of patched undies. Journalist and author Georg Markus, who has chronicled the Hapsburg era like few others, said even Franz-Josef, who ruled from 1848 to 1916, poked fun at himself for his reluctance to replace his worn out shorts—or move up from plain cotton to silk.

“He would sometimes wear the same pair for decades,” Markus said.

Like the hair, most of other pricey objects—a portraits, tableware, statues—were also snapped up behalf of collectors or museums with fat wallets.

A picture of Elisabeth by Franx Xaver Winterhalter sold for 70,000 euros. That was more than three times its estimated value and reflected the growing scarcity of Austrian imperial memorabilia nearly a century after the end of World War I, the conflict that doomed more than 700 years of Habsburg rule.

“It’s becoming increasingly difficult to get objects,” said Georg Ludwigstorfer, who has organized previous Habsburg auctions and helped stage Thursday’s event.

But many articles—lithographs, a copper can from the imperial kitchens—changed ownership for only a few hundred euros, with ordinary Austrians placing the winning bid. Their efforts to secure a small piece of the greatness that was Austria suggested a longing for a time before the reputation of their country was tarred by the birth of another leader—Adolf Hitler.

The most recent manifestation of that nostalgia was provided two years ago.

Then, an estimated 10,000 spectators packed the 2.4-kilometer (1.5-mile) route from the Gothic cathedral where Otto von Habsburg, the oldest son of Austria’s last ruling emperor, was eulogized, to the imperial crypt where he was entombed after his death in 2011 at age 98.

“Austrians are happy to look back on their times of glory,” Markus said.

He called Franz-Josef an “unfortunate figure” who “lost all battles and wars” and who was responsible for the loss of the empire by actions that led to World War—a conflict Austria also lost. Franz-Josef’s son Charles I—Otto’s father—was Austria’s last emperor.

At the same time, Markus said, the mustachioed Franz-Josef was “honest and not disgusting” like Hitler, adding, “We naturally all like to remember people more pleasant” than the Nazi dictator.

__

Associated Press video journalist Philipp Jenne contributed.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-25-13 2131GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria (1830-1916). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria (1830-1916). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Elvis Presley pictured with an acoustic guitar on an album cover late in his career. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Quinn's Auction Galleries.

Elvis’ guitar is in the building at National Music Museum

Elvis Presley pictured with an acoustic guitar on an album cover late in his career. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Quinn's Auction Galleries.

Elvis Presley pictured with an acoustic guitar on an album cover late in his career. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Quinn’s Auction Galleries.

VERMILLION, South Dakota (AP) – A 16th-century Amati violoncello displayed in the National Music Museum has long been nicknamed “The King,” but the ghost of a legendary rock’n’ roller has arrived in South Dakota to reclaim his regal moniker.

A slightly smashed acoustic guitar played by Elvis Presley on his final tour in 1977 now greets visitors in front of the museum’s main galleries. The Martin D-35 was tossed aside by “The King” during a St. Petersburg, Fla., concert after suffering a broken strap and string, said Robert Johnson, a Memphis-based guitarist who donated the item.

“He broke the strap and at the same time he broke a string,” said Johnson, noting Presley’s frustration. “He tosses it straight up in the air and it just comes down.”

Johnson, who played with singer Isaac Hayes and the band John Entwistle’s Ox in the 1970s, donated the Elvis guitar and four other celebrity items to the National Music Museum, which is tucked away in an old Carnegie library building on the University of South Dakota campus. The museum’s trustees also purchased Johnson’s 1967 Gibson Explorer Korina wood guitar, formerly owned by Entwistle, who’s best known as a member of The Who.

Johnson, a longtime collector, also donated a Chet Atkins hollow body guitar given to country pianist Floyd Cramer and later played by Jerry Lee Lewis and Mickey Gilley, a 1966 custom Grammer guitar made for Johnny Cash, a 1961 Kay Value Leader guitar signed by blues legend Muddy Waters and one of Bob Dylan’s Hohner Marine Band harmonicas.

“These instruments probably make the biggest splash of any celebrity things that we’ve had before,” said museum director Cleveland Johnson. “We have some nice things, but this is a degree of magnitude higher.”

Cleveland Johnson, who is not related to Robert Johnson, took over as director in November after the retirement of Andre Larson, who’d been at the helm since it was established in 1973. The museum’s holdings grew out of a private collection owned by Larson’s father, Arne B. Larson, who continually added items while serving as a public school music director.

Robert Johnson said he owns some 600 guitars and another 2,000 to 3,000 artifacts, so he began discussions with Andre Larsen in 2010 to get involved with the museum.

“I was trying to find a place to hoard the rest of my stuff so it could be in place,” said Johnson, 61. “It gets to be an overwhelming, oppressive burden to keep up with all this stuff.”

The museum’s 800 or so instruments on public display are the superstars of a broader collection of more than 15,000 pianos, harpsichords, guitars, horns, drums and other musical items. It includes a rare Stradivarius violin with its original neck, saxophones built by inventor Adolphe Sax, and the earliest French grand piano known to survive, an ornate green and gold instrument built by Louis Bas in Villeneuve les Avignon in 1781.

Cleveland Johnson said it has always been easy to drop names like Stradivari and Amati (whose centuries-old violins are considered the finest ever made) when he talks to people in classical music circles, but the new items will help the museum reach a different demographic.

“The motorcycle guys rolling across the state on their way to Sturgis, this would be a nice detour,” he said. “Or a bus tour going from Sioux Falls to Memphis or down to Branson, this would be a perfect stop off on the way.”

A $15 million expansion plan calls for tripling its 23,000 square feet (2,137 square meters) of gallery space, improving the entrance and revamping the vast archives where music scholars can peruse the thousands of instruments and documents not on public display. The limited space has not only prevented instruments from getting their proper display, but also has hampered curators’ efforts to find creative and hands-on ways to program and teach visitors and school groups.

The plan recently earned a federal seal of approval with the awarding of a $500,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, whose chairman Jim Leach called the facility “a national treasure.”

Cleveland Johnson said the museum is shifting its focus from acquisitions to developing programs to get the attraction better known around the country.

“I’m tired of being the best-kept secret,” he said. “I’m over that. I’m ready to be the best-known musical instrument museum and not the best-kept secret.

“These instruments will take us in that direction, will take the veil off, I hope, for much of the American public.”

___

Reach Dirk Lammers on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ddlammers

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-26-13 0340GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Elvis Presley pictured with an acoustic guitar on an album cover late in his career. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Quinn's Auction Galleries.

Elvis Presley pictured with an acoustic guitar on an album cover late in his career. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Quinn’s Auction Galleries.

Vincent van Gogh, 'Two Cut Sunflowers,' oil on canvas, 1887. Van Gogh Museum. Amsterdam. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Van Gogh masterpieces back home in remodeled museum

Vincent van Gogh, 'Two Cut Sunflowers,' oil on canvas, 1887. Van Gogh Museum. Amsterdam. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Vincent van Gogh, ‘Two Cut Sunflowers,’ oil on canvas, 1887. Van Gogh Museum. Amsterdam. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

AMSTERDAM (AFP) – Masterpieces by Vincent van Gogh, including his world-famous Sunflowers and The Potato Eaters, have been returned to the Amsterdam museum that bears the Dutch artist’s name ahead of its reopening next week.

The paintings were transferred on Friday to the Van Gogh Museum from another of the Dutch capital’s famous museums, the Hermitage, where they had been on display for the last seven months during the renovations.

“From today, Sunflowers, The Bedroom, Irises, Cornfield with Crows and The Potato Eaters are back,” the Museum said in a release.

“These and other top pieces are on show during the anniversary exhibition of ‘Van Gogh at work’ marking the reopening of the museum on May 1,” it said.

The Van Gogh Museum is located on Amsterdam’s historic Museumplein where many other Dutch art treasures like Rembrandt’s “Night Watch”, can also be found at the recently reopened Rijksmuseum.

It closed its doors for renovations in September last year and some 75 of Van Gogh’s works moved to the Hermitage, where they attracted some 665,000 visitors.

When the museum reopens next week, visitors will be treated to a unique display based on eight years of research and loans from other museums. For instance the Van Gogh Museum’s version of Sunflowers will be hung next to another from the same series on loan from London’s National Gallery.

“The exhibition also enables visitors to find out for themselves how Vincent van Gogh worked, by using microscopes and touch screens for example,” museum director Axel Rueger said.

The Van Gogh Museum is the last of Amsterdam’s three major museums to reopen its doors after extensive refurbishments, underlining the Dutch capital’s status as a top art destination.

Earlier this month Dutch Queen Beatrix reopened the Rijksmuseum to fanfare and fireworks after a decade of refurbishment, while the Stedelijk modern art Museum reopened late last year after a nine-year renovation.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Vincent van Gogh, 'Two Cut Sunflowers,' oil on canvas, 1887. Van Gogh Museum. Amsterdam. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Vincent van Gogh, ‘Two Cut Sunflowers,’ oil on canvas, 1887. Van Gogh Museum. Amsterdam. Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

1913 Liberty Head nickel, sold for $3,172,500 on April 25, 2013. Heritage Auctions image.

Heritage Auctions sells famous 1913 ‘lost’ nickel for $3.17M

1913 Liberty Head nickel, sold for $3,172,500 on April 25, 2013. Heritage Auctions image.

1913 Liberty Head nickel, sold for $3,172,500 on April 25, 2013. Heritage Auctions image.

DALLAS – A fabled, century-old rare U.S. nickel, recovered from a fatal car crash and then unsuspectingly kept in a closet for 41 years because it was mistakenly declared to be a fake, sold for $3,172,500 on Thursday, as part of Heritage Auctions’ Central States Numismatic Society U.S. Coins Signature Auction in Schaumburg, Ill. The preauction estimate on the coin was $2.5 million or more.

Jeff Garrett of Lexington, Ky., and Larry Lee of Panama City, Fla., purchased the coin in partnership.

“This particular example of one of the world’s most famous rare coins is perhaps the most special of them all given its amazing story,” said Todd Imhof, executive vice president of Heritage Auctions. “Not only is it just one of only five known, genuine 1913-dated Liberty Head design nickels, this particular one was off the radar for decades until it literally came out of the closet after a nationwide search and was authenticated by experts in a secret midnight meeting Baltimore in 2003.”

This 1913 Liberty nickel was consigned by the heirs of George O. Walton, a North Carolina collector who acquired the coin in the mid-1940s for a reported $3,750. He had it with him when he was killed in a car crash on March 9, 1962.

Melva Givens of Salem, Va., one of Walton’s heirs, eventually received the coin after being told it was suspected of being an altered date fake.

“She kept the nickel in a box with family items in the closet, and it stayed there for four decades,” said Ryan Givens of Salem, Va., one of Walton’s nephews who, with his two sisters and his brother, consigned the 1913 Liberty Head nickel to Heritage.

According to the family, Melva Givens believed the 1962 evaluation that it was an altered date coin, but she also adamantly believed her brother had a real 1913 Liberty Head nickel and continued to look for it. She kept the “fake” coin, likely out of sentiment for her late brother and likely because of the date on the coin, 1913, her birth year.

A minimum $1 million reward for the accounted for fifth 1913 Liberty Head nickel prompted Walton’s heirs to take the coin to Baltimore in July 2003 to the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money. The four other surviving 1913 Liberty nickels were scheduled to be exhibited at the convention. In a secret midnight meeting in a security room at the Baltimore Convention Center, a team of rare coin experts unanimously agreed the Walton nickel was the long-missing fifth coin.

“This is one of the greatest coins at that price range,” said Garrett after placing the successful bid.

The winning bid of $3,172,500 includes the 17.5percent percent buyer’s premium and represents the total price paid by the winning bidder.

The 1913 Liberty Head nickel was one of the highlights of a $40-million auction of rare coins and historic paper money offered by Heritage Auctions, April 24-28, in conjunction with the Central States Numismatic Society (CSNS.com) convention in the Schaumburg Convention Center, April 24-27.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


1913 Liberty Head nickel, sold for $3,172,500 on April 25, 2013. Heritage Auctions image.

1913 Liberty Head nickel, sold for $3,172,500 on April 25, 2013. Heritage Auctions image.

Newly rebuilt, this Porsche 911 S/ST has a July 1970 registration date. Estimate: 100,000-200,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Campari starring at Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg, May 10-11

Newly rebuilt, this Porsche 911 S/ST has a July 1970 registration date. Estimate: 100,000-200,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Newly rebuilt, this Porsche 911 S/ST has a July 1970 registration date. Estimate: 100,000-200,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

LADENBURG, Germany – Having done a special feature on Rudolf Caracciola at the auction in November, Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg will dedicate a separate section to exceptional Italian driver Giuseppe Campari at this year’s spring auction, which will take place May 10-11.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding. The auctions will begin at 10 a.m. Central European Time, 1 a.m. Pacific, both days.

Campari, who died in an accident at Monza in 1933, was the lead driver for the Alfa Romeo team in the early 1920s, along with Antonio Ascari. Campari took out the Coppa Acerbo three times, in 1927, 1928 and 1931, and also won the Mille Miglia in Brescia in two consecutive years: 1928 and 1929. He joined the Scuderia Ferrari team in 1929, along with Achille Varzi and Tazio Nuvolari.

In 1933, Campari moved to Maserati, where he became the teammate of Borzacchini and Fagioli. His career, and that of Borzacchini, ended on Sept. 10, 1933 at the Italian Grand Prix in Monza. While leading the race, his Maserati skidded and crashed into a side wall. Borzacchini, who was close behind him, could not avoid Campari’s car, and crashed into it. Both drivers died instantly at the scene.

During his time as a race-car driver, Campari recorded 14 first places, 16 second places and 11 third places at all international race tracks. He was twice crowned Italian champion—in 1928 and 1931. He came in second in the European championship in 1931.

Another highlight will undoubtedly be the over 600 Porsche lots, which include rarities such as the original bodywork of a Porsche 917/10, the gear box of a Porsche 917, a rare 2-L 356 Carrera engine, and many parts for the Porsche 904. As always, there will additionally be a wide range of documents and catalogs.

The large number of Alfa Romeo sales catalogs and brochures from the prewar era is remarkable.

Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg’s automotive products generated great interest at the Techno Classica, namely the Porsche 356 Poroto Special, of which there are only four models, built by Otto Daetwyler between 1965 and 1969. The last of these vehicles, displayed here, bears chassis number 159830, delivered as a Porsche 356 SC, and was registered in Switzerland on May 1, 1969 as a Poroto Special. Daetwyler built the vehicle in the mid-1960s, based on the Porsche 904. The car features four disc brakes, and has only just been reconditioned.

This year’s spring auction covers more than 3,000 lots, and, for the first time, will also include a large number of spare parts.

The catalogue contains over 30,000 spare parts, which are illustrated in both the print and online catalogue.

For details phone 00496203 957777 or email info@autotechnikauktion.de

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

(1.00 euro = $1.30US)

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Newly rebuilt, this Porsche 911 S/ST has a July 1970 registration date. Estimate: 100,000-200,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Newly rebuilt, this Porsche 911 S/ST has a July 1970 registration date. Estimate: 100,000-200,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Swiss racing driver Peter Daetwyler constructed this Porsche based on the 904 model. With the chassis number 159830, it is a Poroto special type 1600 with a 1963 registration date. Estimate: 180,000-360,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Swiss racing driver Peter Daetwyler constructed this Porsche based on the 904 model. With the chassis number 159830, it is a Poroto special type 1600 with a 1963 registration date. Estimate: 180,000-360,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Considered rare, this 1935 Alfa-Romeo six-page folder is in English. It features the Alfa-Romeo 8 C 2900 S and includes the Racing Model, Le Mans Model and Grand Sport Model; Estimate: 2,900-5,800 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Considered rare, this 1935 Alfa-Romeo six-page folder is in English. It features the Alfa-Romeo 8 C 2900 S and includes the Racing Model, Le Mans Model and Grand Sport Model; Estimate: 2,900-5,800 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Jack MacAfee and Danny Ongais of the Porsche/Polak Racing Team are listed as drivers on this original Porsche 917-10 car body. It consists of a front part, rear part and two doors. Estimate: 10,000-20,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Jack MacAfee and Danny Ongais of the Porsche/Polak Racing Team are listed as drivers on this original Porsche 917-10 car body. It consists of a front part, rear part and two doors. Estimate: 10,000-20,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

This original 2-liter Carrera engine is designed to power a type 356 Porsche. Estimate: 135,000-270,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

This original 2-liter Carrera engine is designed to power a type 356 Porsche. Estimate: 135,000-270,000 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Racing champion Giuseppe Campari autographed this large black and white photograph of himself on the occasion of the Gran Premio d’Italia, 1925. Estimate: 700-1,400 euros.

Racing champion Giuseppe Campari autographed this large black and white photograph of himself on the occasion of the Gran Premio d’Italia, 1925. Estimate: 700-1,400 euros.

Giuseppe Campari’s 18K gold Longines pockete watch, 1928/1929, is engraved 'Complimenti per la Vittoria alla Mille Miglia Alfa Romeo.’ Estimate: 2,900-5,800 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Giuseppe Campari’s 18K gold Longines pockete watch, 1928/1929, is engraved ‘Complimenti per la Vittoria alla Mille Miglia Alfa Romeo.’ Estimate: 2,900-5,800 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Dated Feb. 10, 1935, this poster for Titisee-Eisrennen is in good condition. Estimate: 1,200-2,400 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

Dated Feb. 10, 1935, this poster for Titisee-Eisrennen is in good condition. Estimate: 1,200-2,400 euros. Automobilia Auktion Ladenburg image.

This side chair features handmade needlework often found on parlor furniture. The piece also has a maple burl veneer along the back top rail. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

Visitors to furniture exhibit told to make themselves at home

This side chair features handmade needlework often found on parlor furniture. The piece also has a maple burl veneer along the back top rail. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

This side chair features handmade needlework often found on parlor furniture. The piece also has a maple burl veneer along the back top rail. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

PIERRE, S.D. – The Museum of the South Dakota State Historical opened its new exhibit “Furniture: The Fancy & The Functional” at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre.

“Museum staff members worked very hard to create a visually stimulating and educational exhibition with hands-on activities,” said Jay Smith, director of the museum.

“Furniture: The Fancy & The Functional” is about furniture found in the home, and the myriad of information one can learn from a careful study of both the fancy and functional materials in today’s homes and those of the past. From a famous wooden desk to a metal dinette set, all of the artifacts displayed in the exhibit come from the permanent collection of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society. Some of the furniture on display has never been exhibited before.

Dispersed throughout the gallery will be interpretive signage, graphics and advertisements, demonstrating an evolution in how the use of rooms in the home has evolved and the impact of cultural change on the function and design of furniture.

Hands-on activities include building a chair and designing two 12-by-12-inch “rooms” with choices of floor coverings, wallpaper and furniture. There is a comfortable sofa for relaxing and reading more about furniture in American society or watching videos about crafts and design.

“We hope people take advantage of this opportunity to visit the museum in the Cultural Heritage Center to see the new exhibit,” said Jay D. Vogt, director of the State Historical Society. “We are sure it will be an enjoyable experience for people of all ages.”

For more information, visit www.history.sd.gov or call (605) 773-3458.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


This side chair features handmade needlework often found on parlor furniture. The piece also has a maple burl veneer along the back top rail. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

This side chair features handmade needlework often found on parlor furniture. The piece also has a maple burl veneer along the back top rail. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

The exhibit’s entry features two desks, one fancy and one functional. The writing desk on the left was used by First Lady Grace Coolidge and given to Sen. Peter Norbeck’s wife, Lydia. The desk on the right was a Christmas gift from a father to his daughter in 1911. As a child, the daughter dreamed of becoming a teacher. She fulfilled that dream and the desk traveled with her as she taught in a variety of schools. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

The exhibit’s entry features two desks, one fancy and one functional. The writing desk on the left was used by First Lady Grace Coolidge and given to Sen. Peter Norbeck’s wife, Lydia. The desk on the right was a Christmas gift from a father to his daughter in 1911. As a child, the daughter dreamed of becoming a teacher. She fulfilled that dream and the desk traveled with her as she taught in a variety of schools. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

The exhibit area is divided into five room settings in a house. This space, the dining room, features a variety of high chairs, dining table with chairs, and a china cabinet. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

The exhibit area is divided into five room settings in a house. This space, the dining room, features a variety of high chairs, dining table with chairs, and a china cabinet. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

Mid-Century Modern design, as shown in this kitchen set, developed after World War II. Earlier furniture styles had emphasized furniture as ornament. Modern design shifted the emphasis to function and accessibility. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

Mid-Century Modern design, as shown in this kitchen set, developed after World War II. Earlier furniture styles had emphasized furniture as ornament. Modern design shifted the emphasis to function and accessibility. Courtesy of the Museum of the South Dakota State Historical Society.

EBay president urges sellers: ‘Tell Congress no’ to new sales taxes

SAN JOSE, Calif. – EBay president and CEO John Donahoe has sent a letter to all eBay users urging them to contact their Members of Congress regarding a proposed bill to introduce new sales taxes on online businesses. Donahoe’s letter reads as follows:

Dear (eBay Seller),

Congress is considering online sales tax legislation that is wrongheaded and unfair, and I am writing to ask for your help in telling Congress “No!” to new sales taxes and burdens for small businesses.

Whether you’re a consumer who loves the incredible selection and value that small businesses provide online, or a small-business seller who relies on the Internet for your livelihood, this legislation potentially affects you. For consumers, it means more money out of your pocket when you shop online from your favorite seller or small business shop owner. For small business sellers, it means you would be required to collect sales taxes nationwide from the more than 9,600 tax jurisdictions across the U.S. You also would face the prospect of being audited by out-of-state tax collectors. That’s just wrong, and an unnecessary burden on you.

Big national retailers are aggressively lobbying Congress to pass online sales tax legislation to “level the playing field” with Amazon. And, as they compete with big retail, Amazon is advocating for this legislation too, while at the same time they are seeking local tax exemptions across the country to build warehouses. This is a “big retail battle” in which small businesses and consumers have a lot to lose. But eBay is fighting, as we have for more than 15 years, to protect small online businesses and sellers and ensure healthy competition, value, and selection that benefit consumers online.

The solution is simple: if Congress passes online sales tax legislation, we believe small businesses with less than 50 employees or less than $10 million in annual out-of-state sales should be exempt from the burden of collecting sales taxes nationwide. To put that in perspective, Amazon does more than $10 million in sales every 90 minutes. So we believe this is a reasonable exemption to protect small online businesses. That’s what we’re fighting for, and what big companies such as Amazon are fighting against.

I hope you agree that imposing unnecessary tax burdens on small online businesses is a bad idea. Join us in letting your Members of Congress know they should protect small online businesses, not potentially put them out of business. Together, I believe our voices can make a difference.

Sincerely,

John Donahoe

President and CEO, eBay Inc.

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Stibnite specimen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Valuable mineral stolen from Nev. mining museum

Stibnite specimen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Stibnite specimen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

RENO, Nev. (AP) – A mineral with metallic crystals worth an estimated $30,000 has been stolen from a mining museum display at the University of Nevada, Reno.

UNR campus police are investigating and Secret Witness is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of whoever took the mineral called “stibnite.”

The mineral is found primarily in hot springs deposits. It is prized by collectors for the long slender bladed crystals with a brilliant gray and black metallic luster.

Police said in a statement late Wednesday the one stolen from the Mackay Mines Keck Museum weighed 25 to 30 pounds and was 15 inches long by 10 inches and 8 inches.

Investigators believe it make have been taken on April 8 and could now be in two pieces.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-25-13 1015GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Stibnite specimen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Stibnite specimen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.