A shot of the crowd at the AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser. Image courtesy of AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser.

Stars turn out for art auction benefiting Los Angeles AIDS charity

A shot of the crowd at the AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser. Image courtesy of AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser.

A shot of the crowd at the AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser. Image courtesy of AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser.

LOS ANGELES (Globe Newswire via COMTEX) – Familiar faces from the entertainment world and L.A. arts community gathered together to fight AIDS at the fourth annual Art Project Los Angeles on Saturday. The evening was the perfect blend of music, art, and fashion, and raised over $185,000 for the lifesaving care, prevention, and advocacy work of AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA).

Celebrity attendees included Bruno Amato (The Internship), Tess Broussard (Kroll Show), Deanna Lee Douglas (The A-List), Richard Grieco (21 Jump Street), Carolyn Hennesy (True Blood), Richard Herd (Seinfeld, V, Star Trek: Voyager), Walter Jones (Prime Suspect), Miranda Rae Mayo (The Game), Valery Ortiz (South of Nowhere, Hit the Floor), Ivana Shein (Person of Interest), Chuti Tiu (The Internship), Oscar Torre (Cane, The Hangover III), Kate Walsh (Private Practice), Daphne Wayans (Hollywood Exes), and more.

Guests enjoyed cocktails and hors d’oeuvres as they took in the breathtaking works of art that lined the walls of beautifully-renovated Bonhams auction house. Over 230 pieces were donated to the auction, from both well-known and emerging local artists. The silent auction pieces ranged from an original Polaroid taken by Andy Warhol, to works by Shepard Fairey, to Takashi Murakami lithographs.

The line between art and fashion was blurred as guests had the opportunity to bid on a pair of diamond earrings from Mark Lash, and models walked around the gallery showcasing gorgeous gowns designed by Mon Atelier’s Ali Rahimi. During the live auction, guests had the opportunity to bid on the chance to have a custom gown or suit designed especially for them by Rahimi.

The live auction alone raised over $70,000 for APLA, and included masterpieces from artists such as Dali, Picasso, Ruscha, Therrien, and more. One of the most sought-after pieces of the evening was a painting that was completed over the course of the night, right there in the live auction room. Art Project Los Angeles’ featured artist, David Anson Russo, created a piece from his colorful and vibrant What a Great Life collection. The piece was auctioned off for more than any other item in the live auction.

To view photos and auction items from the evening, visit apla.org/artproject or the Art Project Los Angeles Facebook page.

About APLA:

AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA), one of the largest non-profit AIDS service organizations in the United States, provides bilingual direct services, prevention education, and leadership on HIV/AIDS-related policy and legislation.

In 2013, APLA marks its 30th year of operation and is a community-based, volunteer-supported organization with local, national and global reach. Annually, the agency provides direct services and HIV prevention education to more than 11,000 clients in Los Angeles, a city with the second-largest HIV/AIDS epidemic in the nation. For more information, visit apla.org.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A shot of the crowd at the AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser. Image courtesy of AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser.

A shot of the crowd at the AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser. Image courtesy of AIDS Project Los Angeles art auction fundraiser.

Early 34-inch banjo clock, circa 1802-1805, in the original crossband style, attributed to Simon Willard. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Asian antiques comprise Act 2 at Converse sale July 20

Early 34-inch banjo clock, circa 1802-1805, in the original crossband style, attributed to Simon Willard. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Early 34-inch banjo clock, circa 1802-1805, in the original crossband style, attributed to Simon Willard. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

WEST CHESTER, Pa. – A little over 300 lots of quality merchandise will be sold in a two-session, Internet-only auction slated for Saturday, July 20, at 11 a.m. EDT by Gordon S. Converse & Co. Internet bidding will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

The first session, beginning promptly at 11 a.m., will feature 136 lots of antiques, to include fine art, period furniture, vintage clocks and decorative accessories. Then, with little or no break in the action, the second session will commence, offering 174 lots of important Asian antiques and arts. The firm’s March 23 online-only sale also featured many fine Chinese objects.

“We’re doing it this way—splitting it up into two sessions—so that people will be able to know what’s coming up as the day progresses,” said Gordon Converse of Gordon S. Converse & Co. “We expect the Asian portion of the sale will attract good amount of attention, and we wanted all the items in that category to be grouped into one session. It’ll just make things easier.”

Converse added, “For the first time in one sale we have been fortunate to gather up a collection of better Asian antiques, with great variety and depth, to go with a fine selection of porcelains, artwork and furniture. We expect this sale to do well. It won’t feature as many lots as our March sale, but the quality is there. We expect to attract high-end buyers of Asian antiques.”

One of the items in session two is an antique Chinese carved throne chair believed to have been made in the middle of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). It is being re-offered from the March sale because the buyer in that auction did not make payment on his winning bid of $80,000.

The throne chair is a highly sought after item by collectors of antique Chinese furniture. It was considered the highest form of chair for its time, as only emperors were permitted to sit in it. It is replete with delicate and sophisticated carving, and was crafted from zitan wood, which is known for its strength and durability. It is bed-like in shape, in accordance with Chinese custom.

Additional Chinese furniture pieces will include an early Qing Dynasty altar table with the top supported by pierce carved brackets, 70 1/2 inches by 19 1/2 inches by 34 inches, in well-worn and apparently original condition (but surface-cleaned with oils); and a pair of late 19th century Qing Dynasty horseshoe-back folding chairs with armrests and intricately carved backs.

Chinese artwork will include a watercolor rendering with rural scenery, signed by Li Keran (1907-1989), the renowned contemporary Chinese painter and art educator whose style emulates both ancient and modern masters; and a watercolor signed by Li Kuchan (1899-1983), a great master of the traditional Chinese free idea painting. The work is 37 inches by 16 inches.

The sale will feature two watercolor paintings (one of them a scroll) by Zhang Daqian, the artist also known as Chang Dai-chien who is heralded as one of China’s most gifted artists. His output spans the early Chinese Masters to later works showing a more Western influence. He is known for his fakes of works by Chinese Masters that are indistinguishable from the originals.

Other Chinese offerings will include a pair of Cantonese famille rose vases, decorated with a Chinese opera story, each one about 35 1/2 inches tall; one lot consisting of 13 pieces of Chinese currency, all dated 1953; and a carved green jade seal with a set of eight jade plaques. The box lid does not fit perfectly and it is believed to be a replacement.

American furniture pieces will include a solid walnut tilt-top candlestand with inlay, 28 inches tall, probably from eastern Maryland; and a cabinet that has been festively hand-painted all over with floral images. It has a single drawer set above a one-door cabinet, on cabriole legs.

Only a half dozen or so clocks will be sold, a fact that will feel strange to fans of Gordon S. Converse & Co., which built its reputation largely on the sale of rare and antique timepieces. One lot, though, is certain to attract bidder attention: a 34-inch early banjo clock in the original “crossbanded” style with mahogany carcass, all attributed to Simon Willard, circa 1802-1805.

Rounding out just a few more of the sale’s expected highlights is a framed and matted antique map, signed by the noted London engraver and prolific map maker John Lodge (1754-1796), measuring 13 inches by 20 inches; and not one but two medical, or hospital, lamps.

For anyone interested in personally examining the items to be sold in the auction, a live preview will be held on the day (or days) prior to auction day, or by appointment, in a showroom located at 1128 Greenhill Road in West Chester, Pa.

Gordon S. Converse & Co. is based in Wayne, Pa., near Philadelphia.

Gordon S. Converse & Co. is always accepting quality consignments for future sales. To consign a single item, an estate or a collection call them at 610-722-9004; or send an e-mail to Todd Converse at Todd@ConverseClocks.com or Gordon Converse at Gordon@ConverseClocks.com. All e-mailed inquiries get prompt replies.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the auction is in progress at LiveAuctioneers.com.

 


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Early 34-inch banjo clock, circa 1802-1805, in the original crossband style, attributed to Simon Willard. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Early 34-inch banjo clock, circa 1802-1805, in the original crossband style, attributed to Simon Willard. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Zitan wood Chinese emperor's throne chair, probably from the middle of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Zitan wood Chinese emperor’s throne chair, probably from the middle of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Late 19th century Qing Dynasty Chinese horseshoe-back folding chairs with intricately carved back and arm rests. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Late 19th century Qing Dynasty Chinese horseshoe-back folding chairs with intricately carved back and arm rests. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Pair of Cantonese famille rose vases, decorated with a Chinese opera story, 35 1/2 inches tall. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Pair of Cantonese famille rose vases, decorated with a Chinese opera story, 35 1/2 inches tall. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Watercolor painting signed by Li Kuchan (1899-1983), a master of traditional Chinese free idea painting. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Watercolor painting signed by Li Kuchan (1899-1983), a master of traditional Chinese free idea painting. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Cabinet hand-painted all over with floral images, a single drawer set above a one-door cabinet on cabriole legs. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Cabinet hand-painted all over with floral images, a single drawer set above a one-door cabinet on cabriole legs. Gordon S. Converse & Co. image.

Jamie Farr, who played 'Klinger' in the TV show 'Mash' meets members of the crew of attack submarine the USS Norfolk on Sept. 7, 2007. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Roadell Hickman.

M.A.S.H. actor Jamie Farr expected at Red Skelton museum opening

Jamie Farr, who played 'Klinger' in the TV show 'Mash' meets members of the crew of attack submarine the USS Norfolk on Sept. 7, 2007. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Roadell Hickman.

Jamie Farr, who played ‘Klinger’ in the TV show ‘Mash’ meets members of the crew of attack submarine the USS Norfolk on Sept. 7, 2007. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Roadell Hickman.

VINCENNES, Ind. (AP) – Organizers say actor Jamie Farr from the TV series “M.A.S.H.” is expected to attend the opening of the Red Skelton Museum of American Comedy this month in his southwestern Indiana hometown.

Farr was a regular on “The Red Skelton Show” before playing Cpl. Max Klinger on “M.A.S.H.” Organizers say they are receiving reservation requests for the opening of the museum from around the country. The museum in Vincennes will feature Skelton memorabilia donated by his widow, including original costumes and 200 original Skelton paintings.

The museum is scheduled to open July 18, which also marks the 100th anniversary of Skelton’s birth in a home near the Vincennes museum. Skelton died in 1997.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Jamie Farr, who played 'Klinger' in the TV show 'Mash' meets members of the crew of attack submarine the USS Norfolk on Sept. 7, 2007. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Roadell Hickman.

Jamie Farr, who played ‘Klinger’ in the TV show ‘Mash’ meets members of the crew of attack submarine the USS Norfolk on Sept. 7, 2007. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Roadell Hickman.

The late Rep. Bob Bethell of Kansas, District 113. Official photo from Kansas Legislature.

Late Kan. lawmaker’s antique cars being auctioned

The late Rep. Bob Bethell of Kansas, District 113. Official photo from Kansas Legislature.

The late Rep. Bob Bethell of Kansas, District 113. Official photo from Kansas Legislature.

ALDEN, Kan. (AP) – Kansas’ late Rep. Bob Bethell amassed so many antique cars and other items that he built a large garage to house his collection. He was even planning to add an adjoining room to hold more at his home in Alden.

But that project wasn’t completed before Alden died in a car accident on May 20, 2012, while returning home after the close of the Kansas Legislature. Now, his wife has decided to part with some of his beloved antique cars at an auction on Saturday _ and she has a story for each one of them, The Hutchinson News reported.

Lorene Bethell explains that there’s the 1958 Oldsmobile two-door hardtop, like the one she and her late husband drove when they were dating. And a Mary Kay pink Cadillac four-door sedan with white-wall tires that she has used to venture out since her husband’s death.

The Navy-blue 1966 Ford Mustang, a two-door vehicle with a white soft top, was their daughter’s car when she was in high school. And a 1928 Model A Ford, a two-door sedan with only 8,647 miles, was used in parades her husband would ride in each summer. And there’s the 1992 red Geo Metro that he bought, drove for a while, and parked in the garage with only 55,430 miles.

“I once asked Bob: What car did he really want?” Lorene said. “And he told me, ‘The next one.'”

Seven cars will be sold, along with Volkswagen bodies for parts and several tractors, including a Ford 8N with a mower, loader and buckets, plus an Allis Chalmers. Other items include a Pepsi machine, a traffic light and several fire hydrants.

The auction is scheduled for 10 a.m. on Saturday in Alden.

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Information from: The Hutchinson (Kan.) News, http://www.hutchnews.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

Never before made available, the one and only license plate honoring Texas A&M University's 12th Man tradition will be auctioned in an online event running from Aug. 12 through Sept. 12, 2013. Image courtesy of myplates.com.

Texas A&M to auction unique 12THMAN license plate

Never before made available, the one and only license plate honoring Texas A&M University's 12th Man tradition will be auctioned in an online event running from Aug. 12 through Sept. 12, 2013. Image courtesy of myplates.com.

Never before made available, the one and only license plate honoring Texas A&M University’s 12th Man tradition will be auctioned in an online event running from Aug. 12 through Sept. 12, 2013. Image courtesy of myplates.com.

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (PRWeb) – To “Aggies” – undergrads or alumni of Texas A&M University – the 12th Man tradition is sacred. Generically, “12th Man” has come to mean a contingent of high-spirited fans supporting a football team during a game. Its origin dates back to 1922, when Aggies started using the term as their distinctive moniker. In 1990, Texas A&M trademarked “12th Man.”

No one has ever had 12THMAN on an official Texas license plate, but soon Texas A&M University will auction online the right to display the one and only 12THMAN license plate.

Bidding opens August 12th and ends September 12th, 2013 – two days prior to the Aggies’ SEC showdown with defending national champion Alabama at Kyle Field.

Proceeds from the 12THMAN license-plate auction will benefit Texas A&M University and the General Revenue Fund of Texas. My Plates, which is hosting the auction, will redirect its share to the university.

This is the first time 12THMAN has ever been available on a Texas license plate, and it could be the last. The top bidder in the 12THMAN auction wins the plate for a 10-year term, with an option to renew the plate after that. The winner also has full rights to transfer or sell the plate to someone else.

By law, only a Texas license plate sold at auction by My Plates can be transferred. However, if the winner of the 12THMAN plate chooses never to sell and instead hand the plate on to heirs, the plate might never be available again. That means this may be the first and only time this coveted plate message is available for sale.

The plate has never been available before because only six letters were allowed on personalized plates in Texas until 2011. When the State made seven letters available, MyPlates.com reserved the plate message 12THMAN for auction, understanding such a highly sought-after plate has tremendous potential to raise money for the State of Texas and Texas A&M University.

“The 12th Man tradition at Texas A&M dates back to 1922 and signifies the loyalty and selfless service that is embodied by Aggies everywhere,” said Texas A&M Senior Associate Athletics Director Jason Cook.

Since November 2009, Texans have purchased more than 150,000 My Plates, putting more than $17.5M in the general revenue fund, which helps pay for services for all Texans. Texas A&M-related proceeds from My Plates have supported championship opportunities for Aggie student-athletes, both in the classroom and in competition, as well as funding for the Corps of Cadets and the Bonfire Memorial.

Texas A&M University Athletics is committed to “Building Champions” through academic achievement, athletic excellence and national recognition of student-athletes, teams and programs. Texas A&M’s almost 650 student-athletes compete at the NCAA Division 1-A level in 20 varsity sports. The university officially became a member of the storied Southeastern Conference on July 1, 2012. Opened in 1876 as Texas’ first public institution of higher learning, Texas A&M University is a research-intensive flagship university with more than 50,000 students — including 10,000 graduate students — studying in more than 120 undergraduate and 240 graduate degree programs in ten colleges. www.aggieathletics.com

Aggie fans and former students can register their interest in the MyPlates.com’s 12THMAN Auction at www.myplates.com/12THMAN.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Never before made available, the one and only license plate honoring Texas A&M University's 12th Man tradition will be auctioned in an online event running from Aug. 12 through Sept. 12, 2013. Image courtesy of myplates.com.

Never before made available, the one and only license plate honoring Texas A&M University’s 12th Man tradition will be auctioned in an online event running from Aug. 12 through Sept. 12, 2013. Image courtesy of myplates.com.

Gilt roof section, Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 1993 photo by John E. Hill, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Report: Contested renovation in Tibet capital complete

Gilt roof section, Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 1993 photo by John E. Hill, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Gilt roof section, Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 1993 photo by John E. Hill, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

BEIJING (AFP) – The controversial renovation of the historic area around a key monastery in the Tibetan capital has been completed, Chinese state media said on Tuesday.

The 1.5 billion-yuan ($240 million) project in downtown Lhasa around the Jokhang Temple, a UNESCO World Heritage site, has raised concerns that commercialisation would harm old structures and local religious traditions.

The seven-month project to upgrade infrastructure and preserve buildings was “completed on Sunday,” the Global Times said, citing a Lhasa media official. It covered an area of 1.3 square kilometers (0.51 square miles), it said.

More than 100 Tibet experts last month sent a petition to Chinese President Xi Jinping and UNESCO head Irina Bokova detailing the negative impact of the project.

“It has been and is destroying irreplaceable structures that in some cases have stood for centuries, creating what appears to be a contrived tourist village,” they said.

The renovations had also forced Tibetans from their homes and impeded their religious practice, they added.

Lhasa propaganda chief Ma Xinming rejected such criticism, saying that the project adhered strictly to Tibetan culture, the Global Times reported.

The Chinese Academy of Urban Planning and Design took part in the effort “to ensure that the authenticity and traditional flavors in the area be preserved,” it said.

China has worked to develop Tibet, which is relatively poor, in recent years, bringing an influx of investment and ethnic majority Han Chinese seeking work.

But the changes have caused friction with the local community, and overseas rights groups complain of religious and cultural oppression.

More than 100 Tibetans in and around the plateau region have set themselves on fire in recent years in apparent protest at Chinese rule.

A report by Human Rights Watch last month said more than two million Tibetans in China were forced to change homes or relocate from 2006 to 2012 in a government-sponsored program.

China criticized the report, citing “huge development and progress on all fronts” in the region.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Gilt roof section, Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 1993 photo by John E. Hill, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Gilt roof section, Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 1993 photo by John E. Hill, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 2004 image by onwardtibet.org, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Jokhang Temple in Tibet; 2004 image by onwardtibet.org, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Claw Money at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Reading the Streets: Greening of Lower East Side garden

Claw Money at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Claw Money at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

NEW YORK – The Siempre Verde Garden on Stanton Street, already a poised to become a green oasis on the Lower East Side, is now home to a mural filled with artists established and emerging. Claw Money is female pioneer in the graffiti game, Swoon, also a rare woman in this world has been doing amazing life-size pasteups since 1999, and Mirf, the duo of artists Mint and Serf, are fresh off collaborations with the Yankees for a new ad.

Claw Money’s contribution features a purple and pink fist with her trademark black claws, gleaming in the early summer sun. Her piece reminds viewers not to dismiss those colors as overly soft.

Good Food pays tribute to the garden space, with a cheerful man carrying a shovel. He’s standing next to a slightly less cheerful looking cat-like animal with sharp teeth. They both have their hands up like they’re cheering though, so perhaps I’m just prejudice against fangs?

Swoon’s black and gray pasteup features a daydreaming woman with bangs and black wings, peaceful among the cheerful chaos of the all around her. She’s holding what looks like a fish, and her bottom half resembles that of a mermaid.

The Siempre Verde garden has made excellent progress since its days as an empty lot on the Lower East Side. Now, it’s not only an excellent place for New Yorkers to get involved in gardening, but also to get a great introduction to street art.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Claw Money at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Claw Money at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Swoon at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Swoon at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Good Food at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Good Food at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Roycer at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Roycer at Siempre Verde Garden, New York. Photo via blog.nowyourecool.com

Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

1844 campaign flag raises $49,350 at Cowan’s auction

Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc.’s American History: Live Salesroom Auction realized just over $750,000 on June 21. Over 350 bidders on the floor, phone and Internet participated in the auction. The sale featured rare political campaign ephemera, photographs, daguerreotypes, books, manuscripts, Lincoln items, maps, Civil War collectibles, and folk art carved Civil War soldiers pipes from the collection of the late Jan Sorgenfrei, who owned and operated Old Barn Auction in Findlay, Ohio, for many years. Strong bidding from the phones and Internet drove many of the lots well past their estimates.

LiveAucitoneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

“From the never-before-seen Clay and Frelinghuysen 1844 campaign flag, which brought $49,350, to the Alexander Gardner photograph of President Lincoln at Antietam and the Mathew Brady portrait of Robert E. Lee and staff, we were elated with the strong prices realized in Friday’s American History Auction.” said Katie Horstman, director, American history department.

The highest selling lot in the auction was a Clay and Frelinghuysen “The Same Old Coon” 1844 presidential campaign flag, which quadrupled its original estimate of $10,000-$15,000 and sold for $49,350. Two bidders on the phone and Internet battled for minutes over the item, which eventually sold to the phone bidder. This previously unknown red, white and blue silk flag banner depicts the Henry Clay coon in the act of skinning a fox, meant to symbolize Martin Van Buren, in the center.

Rare and exceptional daguerreotypes also garnered high prices in the auction. A remarkable sixth plate stereo daguerreotype by Southworth and Hawes of Samuel Gilman Brown, president of Hamilton College, sold for $17,625. A half plate daguerreotype of a ’49ers mining scene hammered down at $16,450, and a half plate daguerreotype of the gold rush also realized $16,450.

Other photography also had a strong showing and exceeded their estimates in the sale. A History of the Northern Pacific Railroad, featuring F. Jay Hayes tipped-in photographs and a letter from the author, E.V. Smalley, trounced its estimate of $2,500-$4,500 and sold to a phone bidder for $29,375. A rare Gen. Robert E. Lee and staff photograph by Mathew Brady realized $19,975, a photograph by Alexander Gardner of President Lincoln at the Battlefield of Antietam sold for $15,275, and a Lewis half plate daguerreotype camera with a Jamin/Darlot lens sold for $10,575.

Manuscripts and archives also brought competitive bidding. A rare 1844 Southern illustrated stagecoach broadside sold for $10,575, another rare 1791 Kentucky statehood broadside realized $9,400, a Benedict Arnold letter to J. Thompson, dated to 1780, sold to a phone bidder for $5,581.50, and a Civil War diary of CSA Col. George K. Griggs, Virginia 38th Infantry, hammered down at $12,925.

Other featured items in the sale that realized high prices included Blind Tom, the African American musical prodigy’s flute, which hammered down at $14,100. An exceptional collection of over 18,000 cigar labels sold for $18,800, a rare 1863 Gettysburg battlefield map by T. Ditterline realized $5,400, and a Civil War folk art carved pipe depicting the Battle of New Bern from the collection of Jan Sorgenfrei realized $4,500.

For more information about the auction or to consign for an upcoming sale, visit cowans.com or call Katie Horstman at 513-871-1670 ext. 46.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog of Cowan’s Auctions’ American History sale June 21, complete with prices realized, at LiveAuctioneers.com.

 


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Clay and Frelinghuysen ‘The Same Old Coon’ 1844 presidential campaign flag. Price realized: $49,350. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

‘History of the Northern Pacific Railroad,’ featuring F. Jay Haynes tipped-in photographs and letter from the author, E.V. Smalley. Price realized: $29,375. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

‘History of the Northern Pacific Railroad,’ featuring F. Jay Haynes tipped-in photographs and letter from the author, E.V. Smalley. Price realized: $29,375. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Exceptional collection of cigar labels. Price realized: $18,800. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Exceptional collection of cigar labels. Price realized: $18,800. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Rare Gen. Robert E. Lee and staff photograph by Matthew Brady. Price realized: $19,975. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Rare Gen. Robert E. Lee and staff photograph by Matthew Brady. Price realized: $19,975. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Rare Southern illustrated stagecoach broadside, 1855. Price realized: $10,575. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Rare Southern illustrated stagecoach broadside, 1855. Price realized: $10,575. Cowan’s Auctions Inc. image.

Miniature Daum cameo glass vase, diameter 1 3/16 in, est. $300-500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Leslie Hindman to auction superb miniatures collection July 17

Miniature Daum cameo glass vase, diameter 1 3/16 in, est. $300-500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Miniature Daum cameo glass vase, diameter 1 3/16 in, est. $300-500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

CHICAGO – On July 17th, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers will lift the lid on a remarkable miniature realm containing every imaginable object in small scale. The single-owner auction inventory consists of property from the Estate of Adell Venus, and the featured collection encompasses a diverse selection of miniatures, dolls and accessories, ranging from antiques to modern day miniaturists’ works. LiveAuctioneers will provide the Internet live bidding for the sale.

Over five decades, Adell’s passion for collecting led to the accumulation of tens of thousands of items and is undoubtedly one of the largest and most extraordinary collections of its kind. Born in 1932 to Russian immigrant parents in Chicago, Adell Venus (nee Lifschutz) was an only child. She attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which is known today as having one of the finest collections of Thorne miniature rooms. Skilled in watercolor, pastels and charcoal, Adell’s artistic eye is evident in the collection. It embodies her spectacular taste and knowledge of the quality and value of miniatures.

Although she was very private regarding her own collection, she was often sought by others to provide her expertise in the 1:12 scale. In addition to her role as a loving wife, mother and grandmother, Adell dedicated herself to this collection. “We are honored to have had the opportunity to work with Adell’s family and friends, and to present her phenomenal collection to the public for the first time,” Leslie Hindman Auctioneers stated in a press release announcing the sale.

The auction consists of more than 750 lots. Some of the categories and artisans include furniture and decorative arts by Harry Cooke, Denis E. W. Hillman, Ernie Levy and William R. Robertson; Crystalina by Jim Irish, rugs by Sharon Garmize, porcelain by Ron Benson and pieces by Le Chateau Interiors. Additionally, there are guns by Cliff Feltrope, instruments by W. Foster Tracy, jewelry by Lori Ann Potts, plants by Hiroyuki and Kyoko Kimura; dolls, dollhouses and dioramas. The list continues with Asian works of art, paintings by Marjorie Adams, Johannes Landman and Paul Saltarelli; books by Barbara J. Raheb, and silver and gold objects by Acquisto and Eugene Kupjack, to name but a few categories. The sale also features items by Erhard & Söhne, cameo glass by Daum and Devez; Austrian cold-painted bronzes, seals and other antiques.

For more information about the auction, call Leslie Hindman Auctioneers at 312-280-1212.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

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ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Miniature Daum cameo glass vase, diameter 1 3/16 in, est. $300-500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Miniature Daum cameo glass vase, diameter 1 3/16 in, est. $300-500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Miniature late-Victorian-style horn chair, Susanne Russo, Height 3 1/2 in, est. $100-200. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Miniature late-Victorian-style horn chair, Susanne Russo, Height 3 1/2 in, est. $100-200. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Miniature American Federal tall-case clock, William R. Robertson, 7 7/8 in, est. $1,000-$2,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Miniature American Federal tall-case clock, William R. Robertson, 7 7/8 in, est. $1,000-$2,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Scale model of a cello, W. Foster Tracy, length 5 1/4 in, est. $300-$500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Scale model of a cello, W. Foster Tracy, length 5 1/4 in, est. $300-$500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

The 'Twist Piano', which was attracting admiring eyes — and ears — on the stand of Based Upon, an innovative London-based contemporary design atelier, at the Masterpiece fair. Image courtesy Masterpiece Fair.

London Eye: June 2013

The 'Twist Piano', which was attracting admiring eyes — and ears — on the stand of Based Upon, an innovative London-based contemporary design atelier, at the Masterpiece fair. Image courtesy Masterpiece Fair.

The ‘Twist Piano’, which was attracting admiring eyes — and ears — on the stand of Based Upon, an innovative London-based contemporary design atelier, at the Masterpiece fair. Image courtesy Masterpiece Fair.

It is June in London and, as on every other day in what is now nostalgically referred to here as summer, it is raining. This is not appreciated by the thousands of overseas visitors flocking to the capital to enjoy its numerous tourist attractions. But for those heading to the Masterpiece Fair, held in an enormous architectural marquee in the grounds of the Royal Hospital in fashionable Chelsea, it is a good excuse for spending a few hours gazing at museum-quality works of art, Maserati motor cars, Riva power boats, and other high-ticket luxury goods.

Luxury goods such as Riva powerboats were among the star attractions at the prestigious Masterpiece Fair in London. Image courtesy Masterpiece Fair.

Luxury goods such as Riva powerboats were among the star attractions at the prestigious Masterpiece Fair in London. Image courtesy Masterpiece Fair.

This year the entrance to the fair was lent added impact by pair of enormous candelabra made from empty blue champagne bottles by French-born sculptor Joana Vasconcelos.
A pair of enormous candelabra made from champagne bottles by Joana Vasconcelos lent some drama to the entrance to the main entrance to the Masterpiece Fair in Chelsea. Image by Auction Central News.

A pair of enormous candelabra made from champagne bottles by Joana Vasconcelos lent some drama to the entrance to the main entrance to the Masterpiece Fair in Chelsea. Image by Auction Central News.

The work was part of a “sculpture walk” that was one of the least successful aspects of the event, the works being rather clumsily situated and poorly promoted.

Masterpiece is a modest version of Maastricht’s much grander European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF), but is nevertheless one of the most important events in the London art and antiques calendar. It is difficult to get an accurate picture of how successful these fairs are each year since dealers understandably tend to put a positive spin on how much business they are doing, even if they are doing none at all. The best way to judge the viability of a fine art fair is whether it survives in the longer term. Masterpiece is now in its fourth year, which would suggest that the model works. However, the word among exhibitors was that around 40 major dealers had elected not to appear this year, perhaps as a result of the significant increase in stand rents. The organizers therefore had to work hard to find newcomer replacements.

One dealer in European polychrome sculpture who was appearing for the second time described the stand fees as “shockingly expensive,” while another firm specializing in Russian works of art chose not to come at all this year. Their representative told Auction Central News: “Last year’s stand rental of £50,000 has been increased to £65,000 this year, which we cannot afford.” Others keep coming, however, despite not doing any business. Mayfair-based 19th-century picture dealers Stair Sainty were appearing for the third year, but director Stair Sainty said, “We are virgins. In three years we have yet to make a sale at this fair.” He was hoping to find a buyer for an important work by Delaroche, Les Enfants d’Edouard,

This important work by Paul Delaroche, ‘Les Enfants d'Edouard,’ a version of the famous painting in the Wallace Collection, was on the stand of London dealers Stair Sainty at Masterpiece. Image courtesy of Stair Sainty.

This important work by Paul Delaroche, ‘Les Enfants d’Edouard,’ a version of the famous painting in the Wallace Collection, was on the stand of London dealers Stair Sainty at Masterpiece. Image courtesy of Stair Sainty.

familiar from the larger version in the Wallace Collection known as The Princes in the Tower.

Some business was, however, being done. Philip Mould, London’s specialist dealer in Old Master portraits, sold an important Nicholas Hilliard miniature, known as The Cholmondely Hilliard, a portrait of An Unknown Woman of the Tudor Court, for £200,000 ($304,250), while London sculpture dealer Robert Bowman sold two works by Modern British sculptor Kenneth Armitage and a 1982 Henry Moore, Head of Horse, for £35,000 ($53,250).

Peter Osborne of Bruton Street-based Modern British dealers Osborne Samuel also spoke positively. “You have to bring the right things to a fair like this. You need to bring masterpieces to Masterpiece if you want to do well.” He claimed to have sold classic works by Modern British sculptors Lynn Chadwick and Henry Moore and a major work by Frank Auerbach. The Fine Art Society sold a large sculpted granite head by Emily Young, which was the centerpiece of the fair’s champagne-bar piazza. The price was £120,000 ($182,500).

An impressive carved granite head by Emily Young, presented by the Fine Art Society at the Masterpiece fair, which sold for £120,000 ($182,500). Image by Auction Central News.

An impressive carved granite head by Emily Young, presented by the Fine Art Society at the Masterpiece fair, which sold for £120,000 ($182,500). Image by Auction Central News.

These results are surely a slightly more reliable index of the value of a fair like Masterpiece than the celebrity factor, which, predictably perhaps, grabs all the media headlines. Sarah Jessica Parker, Uma Thurman and former Roxy Music crooner Bryan Ferry were among the luminaries present at the glitzy preview evening, although whether Ferry chose to sing a few tunes to the accompaniment of the Twist Piano on the stand of London contemporary design atelier, Based Upon, remains unconfirmed. The piano, which was played by a gifted young pianist throughout the fair, was one of the star attractions, providing a relaxing and eye-catching diversion for visitors.

With the right forward planning, events like Masterpiece can be a launch pad for more ambitious partnerships. Auction Central News was present for the evening party staged by the Fine Art Asia Fair in the Hong Kong Pavilion stand.

The Hong Kong Pavilion at the Masterpiece Fair, aiming to build productive relationships between Asian and Western businesses. Image courtesy of the Hong Kong Pavilion.

The Hong Kong Pavilion at the Masterpiece Fair, aiming to build productive relationships between Asian and Western businesses. Image courtesy of the Hong Kong Pavilion.

The event brought together a number of Hong-Kong based contemporary art and design businesses to create a display aiming to promote a partnership between Masterpiece and the Fine Art Asia Fair 2013, which takes place in October.

Works on display at the Pavilion included some exquisite sculptural objects in Canadian maple and bronze by architect designer Chi Wing Lo (born 1954), brush paintings by Lue Shou Kwan (1919-1975) and contemporary sculpted metal garments by acclaimed Hong Kong artist Man Fung-Yi (born 1968).

A work in Canadian maple and oxidized bronze by Hong Kong based architect designer Chi Wing at the Hong Pavilion at Masterpiece 2013. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Pavilion.

A work in Canadian maple and oxidized bronze by Hong Kong based architect designer Chi Wing at the Hong Pavilion at Masterpiece 2013. Image courtesy of Hong Kong Pavilion.

Calvin Hui, co-chairman and director of Fine Art Asia, told Auction Central News: “We aim to build a strong partnership with Masterpiece London to expand the opportunities to promote galleries in both Asia and Europe and will be hosting a European Pavilion at Fine Art Asia in October in order to reciprocate this evening’s event.” The long-term goal is to encourage Asian collectors to engage with “Western museum-quality fine art in order to take collecting in Asia to the next level,” said Hui.
Calvin Hui, co-chairman and director of the Fine Art Asia Fair, sponsors of the Hong Kong Pavilion at Masterpiece, London 2013. Hui seeks to foster strong ties between the Fine Art Asia Fair and Masterpiece. Image courtesy Hong Kong Pavilion.

Calvin Hui, co-chairman and director of the Fine Art Asia Fair, sponsors of the Hong Kong Pavilion at Masterpiece, London 2013. Hui seeks to foster strong ties between the Fine Art Asia Fair and Masterpiece. Image courtesy Hong Kong Pavilion.

The connection between the London and Asian art markets was reinforced elsewhere this month with the announcement that London’s leading dealers in Asian art, Eskenazi Ltd., have appointed Sara Wong as a director of the company.

Sarah Wong, who has just been appointed a director of Eskenazi Ltd., the leading London-based dealers in Asian art. Image courtesy of Eskenazi Ltd.

Sarah Wong, who has just been appointed a director of Eskenazi Ltd., the leading London-based dealers in Asian art. Image courtesy of Eskenazi Ltd.

Wong’s career should be an encouragement to any aspiring graduate seeking to succeed in the highly competitive art market. An Oxford graduate in English Literature with a master’s degree in Chinese Studies from Harvard University, she joined Eskenazi in 1993 as a gallery assistant before moving to New York to work for Christie’s, eventually becoming vice president and specialist in the Asian art department. She returned to Eskenazi in 1999 and has now risen to the role of full director.

Turning to the London European fine art scene, this week saw the unveiling of another major sculpture by acclaimed British artist Helaine Blumenfeld, now widely recognized as the most significant sculptor of her generation. Blumenfeld’s works are in important public and private collections around the world, but the UK has recently been catching on to the appeal of her extraordinary large-scale works in marble, which are fabricated by a team of skilled artisans in Pietrasanta, Tuscany to Blumenfeld’s designs. The latest work to find a London home is her 4-meter-high Spirit of Life,

Cambridge-based sculptor Helaine Blumenfeld, sitting beside her 2007 work titled ‘Spirit of Life,’ recently installed on a plinth near the Dorchester Hotel in Park Lane. Image courtesy of Helaine Blumenfeld and Robert Bowman Ltd., London.

Cambridge-based sculptor Helaine Blumenfeld, sitting beside her 2007 work titled ‘Spirit of Life,’ recently installed on a plinth near the Dorchester Hotel in Park Lane. Image courtesy of Helaine Blumenfeld and Robert Bowman Ltd., London.

made in the Studio Sem workshops in Pietrasanta in 2007. The piece stands on a plinth opposite the famous Dorchester Hotel in Park Lane, which is expected to be seen by an average of 700,000 people per day, although quite how those statistics were computed has not been revealed.

Finally, a notable event in the world of painting this month was the announcement that London-born painter Thomas Newbolt has been awarded first prize in the 2013 Ruth Borchard Self-Portrait competition.

A self-portrait by Thomas Newbolt, which has just won first prize in the prestigious annual Ruth Borchard Self-Portrait Competition. It will be on display at Kings Place, London until September. Image courtesy Ruth Borchard Foundation.

A self-portrait by Thomas Newbolt, which has just won first prize in the prestigious annual Ruth Borchard Self-Portrait Competition. It will be on display at Kings Place, London until September. Image courtesy Ruth Borchard Foundation.

The artist’s subtly expressive and searching image won out against 120 shortlisted works from over 1,000 competition entrants and can be seen on the walls of Kings Place in Kings Cross until Sept. 22.