Gallery Report: August 2013

 

19th century Russian icon, $21,960, Crescent City Auction Gallery

 

A diminutive 19th century Russian icon of St. Nicholas sold for $21,960 at an estates auction held July 13-14 by Crescent City Auction Gallery in New Orleans, La. Also, a Chinese Qianlong jade censer, circa 1736-1795, changed hands for $9,760; an untitled sculpture by Lynda Benglis (American, b. 1941) fetched $8,540; a pair of early 19th century patinated and gilt bronze four-light candelabra went for $7,703; and a pair of 19th century Louis XV-style carved gilt wood upholstered wing chairs climbed to $2,607. Prices include an 18.5 percent buyer’s premium.

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Pair of Sevres vases. Kaminski Auctions image.

Fine estate collections to sell at Kaminski tent sale Aug. 10

Pair of Sevres vases. Kaminski Auctions image.

Pair of Sevres vases. Kaminski Auctions image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – Kaminski Auctions will host their second Under the Tent Sale of the summer on Aug. 10. The auction, which begins at 10 a.m. Eastern, will feature many exciting lots from a number of important estates, including furniture, decorative items and several nautical pieces. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live biding.

One of the most anticipated paintings of the sale is Paul Lauritz’s Winter Landscape. Signed “P. Lauritz” in the lower left, the scene depicts a small stream that cuts through the blanket of snow covering the surrounding forest. Originally from Norway, Lauritz eventually moved to Los Angeles, where he made his name as a landscape and portrait artist. The winter scene offered at Kaminski is estimated to sell for between $1,500 and $2,500.

Highlights of the nautical section of the auction include a Richard Barnett Spencer ship portrait, Helen Campbell Inward Bound. Spencer, along with his brother William, was a successful commissioned British nautical painter of the first half of the 19th century. His work is expected to fetch between $1,500 and $3,000 in the upcoming auction.

Sevres pieces are among the top lots in the sale. Particularly striking are two pairs of Sevrés vases. One features an ultramarine blue ground with gilt details and painted images of female figures among the clouds with cupid, and is estimated at $2,500 to $3,500. The second pair is estimated at $4,000 to $6,000 and carries the Sevres mark. Other important decorative items include a 19th century pair of painted and gilded lamps, offered at $2,000 to $3,000, and a Tiffany desk set in the American Indian pattern, estimated to sell for between $2,000 and $3,000.

From the estate of former Yale professor Barnard Chaet comes a large collection of artifacts from around the world. Chaet was a noted artist and taught in the School of Art as the William Leffingwell Professor or Painting and Drawing, from 1979 to 1990. During his tenure at Yale and throughout his life, Chaet collected fine works. Among the most intriguing are Greek and Russian icons from the 17th through the 19th centuries, an Egyptian painted mask and European antique wooden figures, all offered at midrange estimates between $300 and $700.

Furniture of various styles will feature prominently in the sale. The selection ranges widely, to include a bombe desk from the 19th century with an estimate of $2,500 to $4,500, and a Sevrés table estimated at $3,500 to $5,000. An 18th century Italian cassone in carved walnut and decorated with an armorial shield will also cross the podium, with an estimate of $2,500 to $3,500.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Pair of Sevres vases. Kaminski Auctions image.

Pair of Sevres vases. Kaminski Auctions image.

Paul Lauritz, ‘Winter Landscape,’ oil on canvas. Kaminski Auctions image.

Paul Lauritz, ‘Winter Landscape,’ oil on canvas. Kaminski Auctions image.

Richard Barnett Spencer ship portrait, ‘Helen Campbell Inward Bound,’ oil on canvas. Kaminski Auctions image.

Richard Barnett Spencer ship portrait, ‘Helen Campbell Inward Bound,’ oil on canvas. Kaminski Auctions image.

Tiffany desk set. Kaminski Auctions image.

Tiffany desk set. Kaminski Auctions image.

Oil on canvas mounted to a Masonite board by Ivan Trusz (Ukraine/Russia, 1869-1941) of a landscape scene with olive trees on a plateau (est. $8,000-$12,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Elite Decorative Arts to sell Swedish count’s treasures Aug. 10

Oil on canvas mounted to a Masonite board by Ivan Trusz (Ukraine/Russia, 1869-1941) of a landscape scene with olive trees on a plateau (est. $8,000-$12,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on canvas mounted to a Masonite board by Ivan Trusz (Ukraine/Russia, 1869-1941) of a landscape scene with olive trees on a plateau (est. $8,000-$12,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. – Around 150 lots from the estate of Count and Countess Claes-Eric de Lewenhaupt of Sweden will headline an Elite Decorative Arts estates auction Saturday, Aug. 10, at 1 p.m. Eastern. In all, about 300 lots will be sold. Internet live bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Count Lewenhaupt was formerly an officer in the Swedish Royal Navy and served as a diplomat in Russia, France, Egypt and Spain. He was director of communications for the Carillon Hotel in Miami Beach, Fla., manager of the Barcelona Hotel and Yacht Club, also in Miami Beach, and was a vice president of Gibraltar Life Insurance Co. in London.

He and his wife enjoyed life’s finer things, and it’s reflected in the many items to be sold. These include fine artworks, porcelains, silver, bronzes, estate jewelry, art glass, Chinese antiquities and more. He often said, “I have bread money, but I’m working for my daily caviar.” In 1967, the count was sent to Sweden by Florida Gov. Claude Kirk to present a gigantic silver and mahogany replica of the state seal to Sweden’s King Gustavus Adolphus IV.

Three original oil painting portraits from the count’s estate are certain to generate keen bidder interest. One is a depiction of Oscar II (1829-1907) of Sweden, by the Swedish artist Edward Perseus (1841-1890). The work, mounted in an impressive gilded frame with a name plaque at the lower center (‘Oscar II’), is signed and dated 1885. It should fetch $4,000-$5,000.

Another is a lovely rendering of an unnamed aristocratic lady, by another Swedish artist, Elisabeth Keyser (1851-1898). A family crest with a crown can be seen in the upper right. The 32-inch by 24-inch portrait is mounted in a heavy gilded wood frame behind a glass screen, with the original Eugene Stahl (Paris) label to the back. The painting should breeze to $2,000-$2,500.

The third is a depiction of the Swedish officer and politician Gustaf Fredrik Wirsen (1779-1827), after the original work by Johan Gustaf Sandberg (Sweden, 1782-1854). The portrait was executed sometime around 1827. It is mounted in a stunning gilded frame and measures 51 inches in height by 39 inches wide, minus the frame. It is expected to command $1,500-$2,000.

Decorative accessories will feature a Ditta Torchiana & Loda 800 Italian silver repousse charger, having a stunning floral design and scalloped rim (est. $1,000-$1,200). The charger holds the 800 silver mark with the 47 MI mark, denoting Ditta Torchiana & Loda, Silversmiths and the city of Milan, Italy. Made in the first half of the 20th century, it weighs 43.4 troy ounces.

Also sold will be a beautiful antique 36-piece Swedish and English silver fork and knife set, with year marks of 1895 and 1896 and housed in a Mappin & Webb fitted presentation box (est. $1,800-$2,000). The 18 knives hold M&W maker’s marks, Sheffield town marks and a Lion Passant Guardant purity mark. The 17 forks are made of Swedish silver with JET maker’s marks. An 18th fork—an antique French 950 sterling with Minerva’s head—makes up for one missing.

Items not from the Lewenhaupts’ estate, but certainly worth noting, include an oil on canvas rendering of a landscape scene with olive trees on a plateau, by the Ukranian-Russian artist Iwan Trusz (1869-1941). The work, mounted to a Masonite board using an impasto technique, is signed and measures 27 inches by 37 inches. It should garner $8,000-$12,000.

Also offered will be a pair of 19th century Sevres French porcelain six-arm candelabra (est. $1,500-$2,500), with each candelabra showing hand-painted scenes of courting couples and landscapes and surrounded by cobalt ground. Both are signed “A. Daret.” Each candelabrum is mounted on a gilded bronze lion base with scrolled floral arms and stands about 25 1/2 inches tall.

Rounding out just a few of the expected top lots is a three-piece porcelain figural tea set by Irina Zaytceva (Russia, b. 1957). The set includes a covered pitcher and two footed tea cups. Each piece has a figural face and hand-handled design, with Zaytceva’s signature style. Each piece is also initialed “IZ.” The tallest piece is 10 1/2 inches tall. The tea set should sell for $1,500-$2,000.

For more information about the auction or to inquire about consigning an item, a collection or an estate call Elite Decorative Arts at 561-200-0893 or send an email inquiry to info@eliteauction.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAucitoneers.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Oil on canvas mounted to a Masonite board by Ivan Trusz (Ukraine/Russia, 1869-1941) of a landscape scene with olive trees on a plateau (est. $8,000-$12,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on canvas mounted to a Masonite board by Ivan Trusz (Ukraine/Russia, 1869-1941) of a landscape scene with olive trees on a plateau (est. $8,000-$12,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on canvas portrait by Edward Perseus (Sweden, 1841-1890), depicting Oscar II of Sweden (est. $4,000-$5,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on canvas portrait by Edward Perseus (Sweden, 1841-1890), depicting Oscar II of Sweden (est. $4,000-$5,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on canvas portrait by Elisabeth Keyser (Sweden, 1851-1898) of an aristocratic lady (est. $2,000-$2,500). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on canvas portrait by Elisabeth Keyser (Sweden, 1851-1898) of an aristocratic lady (est. $2,000-$2,500). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Early 19th century oil portrait of Swedish politician Gustaf Fredrik Wirsen (1779-1827) after the original by Johan Sandberg (est. $1,500-$2,500). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Early 19th century oil portrait of Swedish politician Gustaf Fredrik Wirsen (1779-1827) after the original by Johan Sandberg (est. $1,500-$2,500). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Ditta Torchiana & Loda 800 silver repousse charger with floral design and scalloped rim (est. $1,000-$1,200). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Ditta Torchiana & Loda 800 silver repousse charger with floral design and scalloped rim (est. $1,000-$1,200). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Swedish and English sterling silver knife and fork set, 18 of each (est. $1,800-$2,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Swedish and English sterling silver knife and fork set, 18 of each (est. $1,800-$2,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Three-piece figural tea set by Irina Zaytceva (Russia., b. 1957), with covered pitcher and two footed tea cups (est. $1,500-$2,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Three-piece figural tea set by Irina Zaytceva (Russia., b. 1957), with covered pitcher and two footed tea cups (est. $1,500-$2,000). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Pair of 19th century Sevres French porcelain six-arm candelabra, each having hand-painted scenes of courting couples and landscapes (est. $1,500-$2,500). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Pair of 19th century Sevres French porcelain six-arm candelabra, each having hand-painted scenes of courting couples and landscapes (est. $1,500-$2,500). Elite Decorative Arts image.

Statue of Stan Musial statue depicting the Cardinals slugger in his signature batting stance; Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

Heritage announces Oct. auction of Stan Musial collection

Statue of Stan Musial statue depicting the Cardinals slugger in his signature batting stance; Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

Statue of Stan Musial statue depicting the Cardinals slugger in his signature batting stance; Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

DALLAS – The family of Hall of Famer and St. Louis Cardinals great Stan “The Man” Musial have chosen Heritage Auctions to offer The Stan Musial Collection, more than 500 lots of never-before-offered milestone game-used treasures, correspondence and mementos from Musial’s personal collection, as the centerpiece of its October Signature® catalog auction.

“Stan Musial was known as ‘Baseball’s Perfect Knight’ for good reason,” said Chris Ivy, Director of Sports Auctions at Heritage. “His incredible talent and humility on the field influenced his beloved status off, which endures to this day. His legacy will be celebrated in this auction and the top collectors will finally have a chance to acquire some of the things that meant the most to him from his storied career.”

Heritage Auctions will be exhibiting highlights of the collection at its booth, #818, at the National Sports Collectors Convention, July 31-Aug. 4, in Chicago.

“This will be the first look that collectors will get at the collection,” said Ivy, “and we expect the response to be substantial since Musial’s popularity was nationwide. The Musial family has never offered any of Stan’s memorabilia at auction before, though they have donated substantial pieces to museum collections. This is an historic moment in baseball collecting associated with one of the greatest to ever play the game.”

Some of the Musial treasures that will be offered for the first time include, but are not limited to:

Milestone baseballs including Musial’s 1,000th, 2000th and 3,200th hit baseballs; several rings including a 2004 St. Louis Cardinals National League Championship Ring presented to Musial; a 2006 St. Louis Cardinals World Series Ring presented to Musial and a 2011 St. Louis Cardinals World Series Ring presented to Musial.

Historic correspondence and autographs including: a Ty Cobb letter written to Musial on the subject of hitting; a Babe Ruth signed baseball personally given to Stan Musial as a minor leaguer; a Branch Rickey letter to Musial regarding his importance to baseball and many presidential items signed and personalized to Musial.

Important game-used gear will include Musial’s 1946 Navy baseball uniform as well as St. Louis Cardinals game-used material.

Visit Heritage online at www.ha.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Statue of Stan Musial statue depicting the Cardinals slugger in his signature batting stance; Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

Statue of Stan Musial statue depicting the Cardinals slugger in his signature batting stance; Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri.

Baseball legend Stan Musial (1920-1913). Image courtesy of Heritage Auction Galleries.

Baseball legend Stan Musial (1920-1913). Image courtesy of Heritage Auction Galleries.

Ruins of Dacian temples at Sarmizegetusa Regia. Image by Ionut Vaida. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Romania license.

Romania recovers ancient coins, jewels bound for auction

Ruins of Dacian temples at Sarmizegetusa Regia. Image by Ionut Vaida. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Romania license.

Ruins of Dacian temples at Sarmizegetusa Regia. Image by Ionut Vaida. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Romania license.

BUCHAREST, Romania (AFP) – Romania recovered gold coins and silver jewelry dating back to the first century B.C. that were stolen from the site of Sarmizegetusa Regia, the capital of the ancient Dacian people, the national history museum said Tuesday.

“The recovery of five coins and 14 pieces of jewelry is the crowning of more than two years of efforts made by prosecutors, policemen and by Romanian and German experts,” the museum said in a statement.

The coins, from the era of king Koson (first century B.C.), were stolen from Sarmizegetusa between 2004 and 2007, museum director Ernest Oberlander-Tarnoveanu told AFP.

He said that both the coins and the jewels were recovered from a German auction house.

Since 2007, Romania has recovered 13 golden Dacian bracelets and more than 500 gold coins plundered from archaeological sites.

The Dacians, an Indo-European people conquered by the Romans in the first century A.D., are the ancestors of the Romanians.

A man charged with “complicity to the theft of cultural goods” was arrested Monday, prosecutors said.

The suspect, Horia-Camil Radu, had been indicted in 2008 but fled Romania before the trial began.

In 2010 he was arrested by British authorities while he was heading to Germany where he planned to sell 160 Dacian, Byzantine and Roman gold coins.

Tests conducted by British Museum experts showed that 145 of the coins were part of a Dacian treasure stolen from Sarmizsegetusa, an UNESCO heritage site.

The coins are to be sent back to Romania soon, prosecutors said.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ruins of Dacian temples at Sarmizegetusa Regia. Image by Ionut Vaida. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Romania license.

Ruins of Dacian temples at Sarmizegetusa Regia. Image by Ionut Vaida. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Romania license.

Carlton International Hotel in Cannes, France, site of the diamond robbery. Photo taken June 2006 by Christophe Finot, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Daring Cannes diamond heist nets $136M in jewels

Carlton International Hotel in Cannes, France, site of the diamond robbery. Photo taken June 2006 by Christophe Finot, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Carlton International Hotel in Cannes, France, site of the diamond robbery. Photo taken June 2006 by Christophe Finot, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

PARIS (AP) – Wearing a scarf to mask his face, the gunman sneaked into the posh Cannes hotel and held up a diamond show as three security guards looked on, then fled on foot about a minute later. In the end, he made off with a breathtaking $136 million worth of valuables — the biggest jewelry heist in years, maybe ever.

It was a French Riviera robbery that might make Hollywood scriptwriters smile. And it even happened at a hotel that was featured in Alfred Hitchcock’s jewel-encrusted thriller “To Catch a Thief.”

On Monday, a state prosecutor provided new details about the brazen heist a day earlier at the Carlton Intercontinental hotel – not least that the loot was actually worth more than twice the (EURO)40 million ($53 million) estimate that police had first announced.

The noontime caper Sunday along the town’s seaside promenade, La Croisette — a playground for the rich and famous, sunbathing tourists, and most notably, world cinema stars every year – looked set to dwarf the value of two other jewelry thefts in the Riviera during the Cannes Film Festival in May.

It also could eclipse two other massive heists over the last decade. In 2008, thieves – some dressed as women – stole $118 million in rings, necklaces and luxury watches from the Harry Winston store in Paris. A robbery five years earlier at Belgium’s Antwerp Diamond Center netted an estimated $100 million.

Philippe Vique, assistant prosecutor in the nearby town of Grasse, said the show’s Dubai-based organizer – whom he would not identify – had carried out a more complete inventory of the jewelry by Monday, and came up with the $136 million figure.

In a telephone interview with The Associated Press, Vique described a canny, quick and logistically simple break-in.

So far, the suspect is believed to have acted alone. He wore a scarf, cap and gloves, and somehow got into the ground-floor showroom through the hotel’s French doors, which open out onto a terrace on the Croisette — not the main entrance.

The suspect then held up the show participants with a handgun, took the valuables, and fled through a side door onto a perpendicular street.

“He took a bag containing a briefcase and a small box,” Vique said. Rings, earrings and pendants were inside the bag. “He left on foot … it was very fast.”

As the suspect exited through the side door in his getaway, a few jewels spilled out of the bag and were quickly recovered.

The holdup itself took about a minute — with three private security guards, two vendors, and a show manager on hand, Vique said. No customers were present at the time, and no police were deployed at the hotel.

“This was a private event – so it had private security,” the prosecutor said. It was not immediately clear whether the security guards were armed.

“I wouldn’t say it was easily done – opening a locked door,” Vique said, wondering: “Why was he able to open this door?”

The jewelry was part of a summertime display centering on the prestigious Leviev diamond house, owned by Israeli billionaire Lev Leviev. It was to run until the end of August.

The show was hardly low-key. Large banners adorned with pictures of diamond rings or necklaces over Leviev’s rose-themed background were draped over the street-front terrace on the Croisette.

A Leviev spokesman declined to comment. A day earlier, the company issued a statement saying its officials were cooperating with authorities and were relieved that no one was injured in the robbery.

The Carlton, in a statement, confirmed the robbery had happened and said none of its employees or guests “were involved in or affected by the incident.” The hotel said it was cooperating with police and would not comment further on the criminal investigation.

Vique said French authorities were pursuing all possible leads – which he would not describe — and reviewing surveillance video footage, notably from cameras put in place by Cannes municipal authorities. But he said there was no indication so far that the suspect had links to any organized crime group.

Scott Andrew Selby, co-author of “Flawless: Inside the Largest Diamond Heist in History,” about the 2003 Antwerp heist, said initial estimates of jewel heists are often wrong: He believes that the safe-deposit box theft in Belgium actually brought in $400 million to $500 million.

Selby said he doubted the Cannes culprit was working alone, because the quick-in, quick-out operation seemed professional, “and people who know what they’re doing operate in teams.” He said Cannes was particularly tempting to high-end jewel thieves who are looking for a “soft target.”

“Cannes is an amazing place to rob because you have this stuff coming in just for temporary sales,” he said.

The Carlton, a Cannes fixture which is celebrating its centennial this year, featured in Hitchcock’s “To Catch a Thief,” which starred Grace Kelly as an heiress and Cary Grant as a reformed burglar chasing a jewel thief.

Fiction aside, it isn’t the first time the hotel has dealt with jewelry theft: In 1994, machine-gun-toting thieves stole $45 million in gems there.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Carlton International Hotel in Cannes, France, site of the diamond robbery. Photo taken June 2006 by Christophe Finot, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Carlton International Hotel in Cannes, France, site of the diamond robbery. Photo taken June 2006 by Christophe Finot, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license.

Ohio gallery is mini-Cooperstown for baseball fans

MONTGOMERY, Ohio (AP) — Shoeless Joe Jackson might have asked if THIS is heaven.

Here was one of his thick-handled bats, being gripped lovingly and studied for cleat nicks and baseball smudges from games he played nearly 100 years ago. Newly arrived, it soon will be carefully displayed, near a rare Jackson signature, and in the days and years to come, it will be viewed by dedicated fans who will also be mingling with stars of the game.

Jackson, depicted in the movie “Field of Dreams,” was banned from baseball for his role in the 1919 “Black Sox” World Series-fixing scandal, by lore disappointing a young fan who shouted: “Say it ain’t so, Joe!” But the ill-fated star has a place amid such greats as Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle and Hank Aaron in the Green Diamond Gallery in suburban Cincinnati.

The gallery showcases a top private collection of baseball memorabilia while hosting a small club of fans who in recent months have been able to ask pitcher Jack Morris about falling short of making the Hall of Fame, slugger Jose Canseco about illicit steroid use, and manager Tony La Russa about secrets of the St. Louis Cardinals’ success.

“There’s Cooperstown, then it’s Green Diamond, and I don’t know what would be a close third,” La Russa said, referring to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, celebrating its annual induction weekend in upstate New York. The Hall’s president, Jeff Idelson, has visited the gallery and agrees it’s unlike anything else he’s seen outside Cooperstown.

The gallery’s roots are in a child’s first trip to a baseball game five decades ago.

Bob Crotty still savors memories of the sights, sounds and smells of Crosley Field, then home of the Cincinnati Reds. He was drawn to the souvenir stand, buying buttons and other inexpensive trinkets.

And so it began.

“Once I got the bug, I got it pretty bad,” Crotty said.

The preteen boy cut lawns for cash to fund his new passion, and he spent hours writing letters to teams requesting yearbooks and other items. His bedroom desk and shelves filled, then his entire bedroom, then the family’s basement.

He networked with collectors and learned the best auction houses and authenticators while becoming a top executive in the family-run Van Dyne Crotty uniform company. When it was bought in 2006 by industry giant Cintas Corp., Crotty suddenly had plenty of time and money — and a very large collection.

“I was pretty much at a crossroads … either get rid of all this stuff or do something with it,” said Crotty, now 54. He met with Kevin Manley, who had worked for a nonprofit that Crotty’s company supported, to brainstorm.

Most collectors by nature want to protect their privacy and valuables, so not many fans get to view what they have.

“I always wanted to give this a home where I could display it, share it in some capacity, maybe create an environment where we could do something different,” said Crotty, who made Manley the manager of what opened in 2007. It included:

— A one-floor exhibit area packed with 4,000 items such as autographed baseballs, game-used jerseys, ballpark relics, rare documents, photos and letters, organized into categories such as Hall of Famers, greatest teams, the Negro Leagues and a tribute to character and courage honoring Jackie Robinson, Lou Gehrig and Roberto Clemente.

— A private club, initially having 100 dues-paying members, then upped to 250 with two levels of membership. The club, which includes female members, has a waiting list for the few spots in the top-level Wright Society that open each year, at $2,000 annual dues.

— A charitable foundation, supporting baseball-related activities for economically disadvantaged youths and disabled and sick children. Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench has headlined fundraising events.

— Monthly receptions, featuring question-and-answer sessions with baseball’s stars and characters. Hall of Fame pitchers Steve Carlton, Bert Blyleven and Jim Bunning (also a former U.S. senator) were among last year’s speakers, and hitting star Rod Carew is coming up in August.

“I was overwhelmed,” said La Russa, who spoke last month. “The collection is staggering, the whole concept of the club … You are surrounded by people who love the game.”

Among them: Buck Newsome, an investment adviser who was part of initial word-of-mouth membership recruiting.

“I was like a little kid again. It was just unbelievable,” Newsome recalled. “Within five or 10 minutes, I asked, ‘How do I join?'”

Newsome tries to make every meeting, appreciating the chance to rub elbows with stars in a convivial atmosphere for hearing inside stories. Speakers like talking baseball with knowledgeable fans who aren’t hounding them for autographs; after visiting, La Russa decided to help arrange for a Cardinal predecessor, Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, to make an upcoming appearance.

Rentals for special events such as off-site corporate meetings and wedding rehearsal dinners help cover operating costs. Tight space and security concerns restrict numbers of visitors, but the gallery opens once or twice a year for paid tours.

Crotty, meanwhile, keeps adding. Besides the Jackson bat, he just bought Warren Spahn’s Hall of Fame ring after the late pitcher’s son put memorabilia up for auction. He doesn’t disclose prices paid and said the only way to know the value of his collection would be to sell it.

“When you’re a collector, it can be a lonely journey,” Crotty said. “The beauty of having this model is I can continue to collect, and I’ve made friendships and relationships you can’t put a monetary value on.”

___

Online:

www.greendiamondgallery.com

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC. Sculptor: Daniel Chester French (American, 1850-1931). Photo taken in 2007 by Jeff Kubina, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Woman arrested over paint attacks on DC landmarks

Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC. Sculptor: Daniel Chester French (American, 1850-1931). Photo taken in 2007 by Jeff Kubina, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC. Sculptor: Daniel Chester French (American, 1850-1931). Photo taken in 2007 by Jeff Kubina, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

WASHINGTON (AFP) – US police arrested a female suspect Monday after three iconic Washington landmarks, including the Lincoln Memorial, were vandalized with green paint.

A spokeswoman for the US capital’s Metropolitan Police Department confirmed the woman’s arrest to AFP, but gave no other details.

The Smithsonian Institution said “hard-to-notice, greenish paint” was discovered on Monday on a bronze statue of its first secretary Joseph Henry outside its headquarters on the National Mall.

“US Park Police looked at the paint to see if it matched what was thrown on the Lincoln Memorial” overnight Thursday, Smithsonian spokeswoman Linda St. Thomas told AFP.

Elsewhere, fresh green paint was found Monday in two chapels within the National Cathedral, a spokesman for the Episcopal church said.

Back at the Lincoln Memorial, workers with high-pressure hoses continued to carefully erase remaining bits of green paint on the white marble sculpture of Civil War president Abraham Lincoln.

“It’s going to take several days,” US Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson told reporters.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC. Sculptor: Daniel Chester French (American, 1850-1931). Photo taken in 2007 by Jeff Kubina, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Lincoln Memorial, Washington, DC. Sculptor: Daniel Chester French (American, 1850-1931). Photo taken in 2007 by Jeff Kubina, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

This Ferock vase has an unfamiliar mark, but its Arts and Crafts design and important history brought an auction price of $2,760 at Humler & Nolan in Cincinnati.

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of July 29, 2013

This Ferock vase has an unfamiliar mark, but its Arts and Crafts design and important history brought an auction price of $2,760 at Humler & Nolan in Cincinnati.

This Ferock vase has an unfamiliar mark, but its Arts and Crafts design and important history brought an auction price of $2,760 at Humler & Nolan in Cincinnati.

Ferock is a name that appears on art pottery but is not well known. In 2012 a vase marked “Ferock” was sold at a Humler & Nolan auction in Cincinnati for $2,760. The auction house and a few collectors knew who made it and how rare it is.

Frank Ferrell (sometimes spelled Ferrel) worked in Zanesville, Ohio, in the early 1900s. He also worked for Weller (1897-1905), Roseville (1918-1954), J.B. Owens and Peters and Reed, all nearby Ohio potteries. He is best known for his work at Roseville designing pottery lines.

The Ferock vase that just sold was made for the University of North Dakota from North Dakota clay. It was shown at the National Corn Exhibition in 1909. The Arts and Crafts style was interpreted with angular designs on one side and raised fold-like markings on the other. The 12-inch-high vase is covered with a matte, crazed, light beige glaze. It is pictured in two books about the University of North Dakota School of Mines pottery.

The university’s pottery opened in 1892 and its pieces were sold, but student work was not offered until 1909. It closed in 1949. Because the vase has such a complete history and was made by an important designer, it attracted the bids of serious collectors and brought a high price.

Collectors today search for the less-publicized but well-designed pottery of the 1900-1950s era as well as later studio pottery. The best pieces of well-known art pottery like Rookwood and Weller can sell for more than $10,000.

Q: About 25 years ago, I bought a solid copper lithographic printing plate at a yard sale. It weighs 15 pounds and is 10 by 6 1/2 inches. The image is a navigational aid for the “Mahukona Harbor and Approaches” of Hawaii. It’s also marked “No. 4101 C&GS.” Does the plate have any value?

A: Copper printing plates like yours were made to print surveying charts for the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The survey that resulted in the manufacture of your plate was done in 1910. Today the U.S. surveying agency, which manages a national coordinate system for mapping, charting and other engineering applications, is called the National Geodetic Survey. It’s part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Survey plates as old as yours and in excellent condition can sell for $150 or more.

Q: I have an Ada Lum cloth doll with embroidered Chinese features and a long braid in the back. It is dressed in blue “pajama-style” jacket and pants, woven sandals and a straw hat. There is a tag on the doll’s wrist that says “Farmer, an original Ada Lum Doll” and “Made in Hong Hong.” Can you tell me something about the maker?

A: Ada Lum began designing and making dolls in Shanghai in the 1940s. At first she made them just for friends, but as more people wanted them she started a business making dolls. When the communists took over in 1949, Ada Lum and her family fled to Hong Kong, where she continued her business and employed other Chinese refugees. At first she worked out of her home, but by 1962 she had a shop in the Mandarin Hotel. Her dolls were popular during the 1950s and ’60s and many were bought by American tourists. Ada Lum died in 1988. Value of your doll: about $75.

Q: I have a 1920s tea cart made by the Paalman Furniture Co. of Grand Rapids, Mich. It’s in excellent condition. Can you tell me its value?

A: Tea wagons, also called “tea carts,” became popular in the early 1920s. They have a tray top, one or two shelves below and wheels so they can be pushed from the kitchen to dining room. Some have leaves that can be extended for use as a table. Paalman Furniture Co. was one of the best-known makers of tea wagons. The company was founded by John H. Paalman in 1916. He worked for several other furniture companies and was a designer and manager for Stickley before leaving to form Paalman Furniture Co. The company was sold in 1966. Vintage tea carts sell well today. Value of your tea wagon: $250-$300.

Q: I have a sugar and creamer set from the Pine Ridge Sioux Indians. I purchased them at a yard sale about 20 years ago. On the bottom it is signed “O. Cottier” and “Pine Ridge Sioux.” It is also marked with a pine tree design. I did some research. Olive Cottier is a sister of Ella Irving, aka Ella Woody aka Ella Cox, whose pottery is in the Smithsonian Institution. Just wondering if there is any value to my sugar and creamer set.

A: In the 1930s, the Works Progress Administration set up a program to teach students at the Pine Ridge Indian reservation boarding school how to make pottery. Experienced artists and potters were brought in to teach. Olive Cottier (1909-1974) and her sisters, Ella and Bernice, were students in the program. Sometime after the WPA program ended, Ella bought a building in Pine Ridge, S.D., where the sisters continued to make pottery from local clays. Ella and Olive made the pottery and Bernice decorated it. Their pottery closed in the 1980s. Your sugar and creamer set is worth about $75.

Tip: Save your broken dishes, vases and other decorative china to make mosaic stepping stones or tabletops for your garden. Chipped vases can still be used for flowers or turned upside to make toad homes.

Take advantage of a free listing for your group to announce events or to find antique shows and other events. Go to Kovels.com/calendar to find and plan your antiquing trips.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Riviera, creamer, green, $15.
  • Embroidered towel, Come Up & See Me Sometime, girl, bonnet, crocheted edge, 1950s, 26 x 16 inches, $40.
  • Bulldog cap gun, cast iron, single-shot, Stevens, 6 1/2 inches, $65.
  • Westmoreland compote, Doric, blue, 6 3/4 x 8 1/2 inches, $65.
  • Mason’s bowl, scalloped, pagodas, willows, bridge, blue, white, c. 1850, 11 inches, $210.
  • Spatterware creamer, black and purple, 1800s, 4 1/2 inches, $215.
  • Georg Jensen silver spatula, Danish, 8 3/4 inches, $265.
  • Yellowware rolling pin, c. 1900, 15 x 3 1/4 inches, $400.
  • Hooked rug, white cat seated, pink collar, oval border, wool burlap, c. 1900, 38 x 24 inches, $470.
  • KPM plaque, girl, pink dress, coral necklace, curly hair, giltwood frame, marked, 7 1/4 x 5 1/2 inches, $1,780.

Keep up with changes in the collectibles world. Send for a free sample issue of our 12-page, full-color newsletter, “Kovels on Antiques and Collectibles,” filled with prices, news, information and photos, plus major news about the world of collecting. To subscribe at a bargain $27 for 12 issues, write Kovels, PO Box 8534, Big Sandy, TX 75755; call 800-829-9158; or subscribe online at Kovelsonlinestore.com..

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This Ferock vase has an unfamiliar mark, but its Arts and Crafts design and important history brought an auction price of $2,760 at Humler & Nolan in Cincinnati.

This Ferock vase has an unfamiliar mark, but its Arts and Crafts design and important history brought an auction price of $2,760 at Humler & Nolan in Cincinnati.

Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Moderne-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.

Art Moderne-style home in Ind. no longer ‘endangered’

Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Moderne-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.

Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Moderne-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Modern-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.

MUNCIE, Ind. (AP) – A Muncie man who once admired a 1930s-era house that is a rare example of Art Moderne-style architecture is now working to preserve the dwelling as its owner.

Jeff McCoy bought the T.G. Wilkinson House in May 2012 at a sheriff’s sale after the property was placed on Indiana Landmarks’ list of the 10 Most Endangered Historic Places.

McCoy tells The Star Press he has always been attracted to older, unique homes. The Wilkinson house is often compared to a movie star’s home.

The house was designed by Indianapolis architect Leslie Ayres in 1933.

McCoy, who is director of testing at nearby Ball State University, says Art Moderne-style homes were often chic homes of wealthy residents who liked to entertain.

McCoy says he doesn’t have time to entertain because fixing up the house is a huge undertaking.

___

Information from: The Star Press, http://www.thestarpress.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Moderne-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.

Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Moderne-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.Jeff McCoy stands in front of the T.G. Wilkinson House, which he bought last year and is in the process of restoring. The Art Modern-style home is constructed of steel-reinforced concrete faced with brick veneer that has been painted white, an element of the original design. Photo Courtesy Indiana Landmarks.