Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Andy Warhol folio tops Woodbury Auction event at $25,830

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

WOODBURY, Conn. – Andy Warhol’s Wild Raspberries a folio of 18 hand-colored lithographs created in 1959 and signed by Warhol to/for the original purchaser, sold for $25,830 at Schwenke’s Woodbury Auction Spring Anniversary Fine Estates Auction held June 9. Internet live bidding was provided by LiveAuctioneers.com.

The original owner, legendary New York folk art dealer Gerald Kornblau, had granted folio rights for the book Pre-Pop Warhol, published by Panache Press of Random House, and the auction lot included two original letters of thanks from the publisher detailing permission rights of material from the folio to be exhibited in the book

A 14-piece Tiffany “Venetian” desk set, consigned by a member of the original owner’s family totaled $6,450. The set, which was sold individually, included the inkwell, blotter, penholder, calendar, notepad, letter hold, pen tray, postage scale, stamp box and paper clip. A Tiffany “Spanish” pattern picture frame from the same consignor was claimed by a California bidder for $1,920.

This sale also featured many estate Oriental carpets including Persian and Caucasian room- and scatter-size rugs, and other regional Asian rugs of varying sizes. Top rug lot of the sale was a fine Persian wool and silk Tabriz rug, 20th century, with central floral medallion on a rose ground with floral and spandrel decoration enclosed in a wide floral border, 12 feet 4 inches by 8 feet 3 inches, which went for $3,960. A Persian wool Nain rug, first half 20th century, made $2,640.

Portraits and portrait miniatures fared well, with a Continental School, 18th century oil on copper portrait of a woman, framed in an elaborate gilt metal and wood frame, was claimed by an English bidder on the Internet for $3,720 against an estimate of $500-$700. Another British Internet bidder bought a full-size Continental School, 17th century oil on canvas, unsigned and titled Prince in Regalia, for $3,240, against an estimate of $2,500-3,500.

A fine oil on canvas by Virgil Maley Williams (American, 1830-1886) Ox Cart and Ruins in Landscape, 1864, also went abroad to yet another British buyer, racking up $3,240 from the distant Internet bidder.

A framed Tibetan thangka, 19th/20th century, depicting a central blue deity surrounded by smaller deities, was hammered down to a bidder in the room for $4,500. The piece had been picked from storage in a closet by Schwenke during a visit to a consignor’s home in New York City.

Two Asian porcelain lots brought surprising results. Both were groups of framed Chinese porcelain signed scenic plaques. One group of four and the second a pair were both claimed by the same Asian buyer, bidding on the Internet, for a combined total of $6,900.

Top silver lot of the sale was a rare sterling silver tankard made in London in 1839 by Richard Pearce and George Burrows. With elaborate chased detail and weighing 48.8 troy ounces, the tankard fetched $3,480.

American and English furniture performed well with a rare Federal mahogany specimen cabinet going for $2,280 and a Federal bird’s-eye maple server selling for $1,800.

For additional information call Woodbury Auction at 203-266-0323.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

 


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

Image courtesy of Woodbury Auction.

The centerpiece of the new installation is the iconic painting 'Washington Crossing the Delaware' (1851) by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Met logs 1M visitors to redesigned American galleries

The centerpiece of the new installation is the iconic painting 'Washington Crossing the Delaware' (1851) by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The centerpiece of the new installation is the iconic painting ‘Washington Crossing the Delaware’ (1851) by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

NEW YORK – Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, announced that attendance to its New Galleries for American Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts topped the 1-million mark Aug. 2. Since opening to the public on Jan. 16, 2012, the expanded, reconceived and reinstalled galleries have attracted an average of 2,000 visitors per day, or approximately 11 percent of the museum’s total attendance during this time.

The New Galleries for American Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts provide visitors with a broad swath of American history—from the 18th through the early 20th century—through great works of art from the museum’s collection. The suite of new galleries represents the third and final phase of a comprehensive, decade-long project to redesign the museum’s entire American Wing. The earlier phases included galleries dedicated to the classical arts of America, 1810-1845, which were inaugurated in January 2007; and the reopening of the renovated Charles Engelhard Court and American Period Rooms in May 2009.

“The American Wing’s glorious new galleries provide an elegant 21st-century home for the museum’s unparalleled collection of American paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts,” said Campbell. “An estimated one-third of all visitors to the Met include a visit to the American Wing in their itineraries. Whether they are members of the public with a general interest in art, international visitors or schoolchildren, all of those who come to see our stellar collection of American art have responded enthusiastically to the new spaces, which have been redesigned and reconceived for the first time in 40 years.”

The New Galleries for American Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts added 3,300 square feet of gallery space to the American Wing, allowing for an in-depth, chronological installation of American art, and improved pathways connecting to adjacent areas of the museum. Nearly all of the American Wing’s 17,000 works are now on view.

The centerpiece of the new installation is the iconic painting—one of the best-known works in all of American art—Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze. Other well-known artists whose works can be seen in the new galleries include such American masters as: John Singleton Copley, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Cole, Frederic Edwin Church, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins and John Singer Sargent. Sculptors whose works are on view include: Erastus Dow Palmer, John Quincy Adams Ward, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Daniel Chester French, Frederic Remington, and Frederick William MacMonnies.

The new galleries are featured on the museum’s website http://www.metmuseum.org/en/collections/new-installations/american-wing.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The centerpiece of the new installation is the iconic painting 'Washington Crossing the Delaware' (1851) by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The centerpiece of the new installation is the iconic painting ‘Washington Crossing the Delaware’ (1851) by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze.Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Maine folk art carving. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Peace ’n’ Plenty carvings herald John McInnis auction Aug. 12

Maine folk art carving. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Maine folk art carving. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

AMESBURY, Mass. – John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers will conduct a major summer estate auction on Monday, Aug. 12.. There are over 500 lots to be sold featuring property from many estates including the estate of Deborah Black of Manhattan and Nantucket and the personal property of a Newburyport, Mass. family. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

“We are pleased to offer outstanding examples of art and antiques in categories that include clocks, folk art, furniture jewelry, paintings, Asian art, silver and more,” said auctioneer John McInnis. “There is really something for everyone. For example we will sell a pair of Newburyport folk art carvings of Peace and Plenty, originally carved, circa 1800, by ship figurehead carver Joseph Wilson for the famous mansion belonging to Lord Timothy Dexter. It is believed that these figures were blown down in the 19th century during a hurricane. Only a few of examples of his work are known to exist and his work is on display at the Smithsonian. Each carved lady in the sale is nearly 5 feet in length,” said McInnis. “The figures were covered in several coats of overpaint. After a close examination and tests to remove the 20th century enamel at the owner’s request, the restorer was able to reveal most of the original polychromeware colors and surface.”

The estimate for Peace and Plenty is between $40,000 and $60,000.

Folk art collectors will also be interested in the Opus Eagle carving by Bernier the Lumberman of Biddeford, Maine. This 36-inch carved and painted eagle was featured in Magazine Antiques in 2010. The highly regarded artist Ronald Bernier (1873-1852) worked primarily during the 1930s and 1940s.

Another highlight in the art category would be the oil-on-board painting Seated Men by Korean artist Park Soo-Keun (1914-1965). This significant work by the artist was discovered on the West Coast in a thrift shop. It has an estimate of $120,000-$160,000.

An important 18th century Philadelphia Chippendale tall case clock with elaborate carvings will attract national attention. The outstanding clock that came from a Florida estate is expected to bring between $20,000 and $40,000.

An enormous Japanese Meiji Period bronze palace urn with figures of dragons and foo dogs surrounded by a mountainous landscape is eye catching. The urn is expected to bring between $12,000 and $18,000.

One of the more unusual lots in the sale is a monumental pair of elephant tusks, 87 1/2 inches long. They are mounted in 1960s vintage custom wrought iron bases with cast and relief bronze elephant plaques. They are expected to sell for between $22,000 and $28,000.

There is a 17 percent buyers premium, including 2 percent discount for cash, or check, and 6.25 percent Massachusetts sales tax. For further information, call the gallery at 800-822-1417.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Maine folk art carving. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

 

Maine folk art carving. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Important 18th century Philadelphia tall-case clock. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Important 18th century Philadelphia tall-case clock. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Rare pair of Newburyport folk art carvings of Peace and Plenty. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Rare pair of Newburyport folk art carvings of Peace and Plenty. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Meiji urn and elephant tusks. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

Meiji urn and elephant tusks. John McInnis Auctioneers and Appraisers image.

A giant Muffler Man holding a hotdog outside Bunyon's in Cicero, Ill. Image by Mykl Roventine. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Oversize noggin of missing Muffler Man turns heads

A giant Muffler Man holding a hotdog outside Bunyon's in Cicero, Ill.  Image by Mykl Roventine. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

A giant Muffler Man holding a hotdog outside Bunyon’s in Cicero, Ill. Image by Mykl Roventine. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) – A love for roadside attractions helped Greg Holmes get a big head—and he’s proud of it.

It takes two arms stretched wide to carry and is taller than the 5-foot-6 Holmes when he’s kneeling.

Holmes first saw the decapitated head at an antique show in Colorado.

“They were big advertising fiberglass giants made in the early ’60s to sometime in the ’70s,” said Holmes. If still attached to its body, it would have been at least 22 feet tall— much too large for Holmes to store.

They were made by a company called International Fiberglass in California. They were called “Muffler Men” because some of the earlier statues held car mufflers, according to roadsideamerica.com.

Holmes had been studying and taking photos of Muffler Men since 2000, so he couldn’t pass up the head that hung inside a bar called the State Armory, in Greeley, Colo., from 1977 to 2009.

“I picked it up thinking it’d be kind of fun to use in parades and such,” he said.

The head recently caught the attention of American Giants, an Internet documentary series on finding Muffler Men, and Holmes took the head to Wichita last week for filming.

Holmes’ Muffler Man head made its Hutchinson debut in the 2009 Christmas parade.

Holmes’ friends Sharon Scott, Patsy Terrell, Jocelyn Woodson, Mark Reddig and a few others helped convert the head into Santa Claus, though Holmes admits it turned out a little scary.

“I can’t say I wouldn’t do it again, because it was kind of fun,” Holmes said, “but hopefully there are no kids in therapy still.”

The head became another attraction when the film crew met with Holmes.

Joel Baker and his crew usually visit the larger Muffler Men around the country—the ones that still have bodies. When they saw Holmes’ Muffler Man, they had to try it on. A crew member fitted the Muffler Man head over his body and carefully walked around. The head nearly reached his knees. He couldn’t see anything, and Holmes said anyone who puts on the head is disoriented.

He looked like a bobble head walking around in front of the camera, but it was something different for the documentary. The crew has visited more than 100 Muffler Men. Episodes began airing in the spring of 2013, on Baker’s YouTube channel.

Holmes said he believes the show he is on will air sometime in the fall, though he has already gotten photo credit for pictures he has taken of Muffler Men around the country.

A shipment of the late actor Dennis Hopper’s Muffler Men from Anaheim, Calif., to Dodge City was featured on A&E’s Shipping Wars.

The problem is Dodge City wasn’t sure where to put them when Hopper died.

The pieces—La Salsa Man and Mobil Man—are 26 and 21 feet tall, respectively.

The pair weren’t as old as most fiberglass sculptures, with the molds cast in 2000. They were on display at the 3i show earlier this month, which the American Giants crew attended.

Hopper was born in Dodge City, and he said his childhood shaped his artistic foundations, Taylor Livingston, art administrator of the Dennis Hopper Art Trust, told the Dodge City Daily Globe after the pieces were donated to the city.

They weren’t the first Muffler Men in Dodge City. It used to have a statue called Big Matt that stood at the entrance of the Boot Hill Museum. However, according to roadsideamerica.com, it was too windy for Big Matt, whose head was blown off at least four times. High winds and vandalism forced Dodge City to remove the figure.

With strong stabilization, especially in Kansas, Muffler Men could be popular roadside attractions, Holmes suggested.

A Wichita tire dealership has a Muffler Man with lights in its eyes. Holmes thinks Hutchinson needs to incorporate a statue or something like a Muffler Man to attract viewers. He pointed to the popularity of Hutchinson renaming itself Smallville, which has attracted tourists from around the country and the world.

“We don’t have a lot of roadside vernacular architecture,” he said. “You know, things that are designed to look like other things.”

He pointed out the Medicine Shoppe building, the neon sign at Johnson Music Center and the windmill building on Fourth Avenue, but said Hutchinson needs more. It needs something people might want to take their photo alongside when museums are closed.

“We need something permanently whimsical,” he said. “If one of these—the 22-foot variety—was a Superman statue, that would just be awesome. There’s a whole class of tourists that go city-to-city doing things like ‘the world’s largest ball of twine’ or the Garden of Eden.

“It would be nice if we had something a little more ‘roadside America-ish’ to lure people in. And, of course, coincidentally that generates some more tourist dollars, now doesn’t it?”

___

Information from: The Hutchinson (Kan.) News, http://www.hutchnews.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-03-13 1531GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A giant Muffler Man holding a hotdog outside Bunyon's in Cicero, Ill.  Image by Mykl Roventine. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

A giant Muffler Man holding a hotdog outside Bunyon’s in Cicero, Ill. Image by Mykl Roventine. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Nina Felix by Bob Dylan © Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan pastels debut at National Portrait Gallery

Nina Felix by Bob Dylan © Bob Dylan.

Nina Felix by Bob Dylan © Bob Dylan.

LONDON – Pastel portraits by Bob Dylan will be shown for the first time at the National Portrait Gallery, London, in September—the first time his work will have been seen in a museum in a Britain.

The 12 new works to be displayed represent the latest portrait studies from an artist who has sketched and drawn since childhood and painted since the late 1960s, but only began to exhibit his art works six years ago.

“Bob Dylan: Face Value” is a side-step for the Gallery in that Dylan’s portraits are not of subjects from British public life, past or present, nor are they made by a working portrait artist. The portraits represent characters, with an amalgamation of features Dylan has collected from life, memory and his imagination and fashioned into people, some real and some fictitious.

For the art historian John Elderfield, who was instrumental in bringing the display to the National Portrait Gallery, Dylan’s paintings, like his songs, are “products of the same extraordinary, inventive imagination, the same mind and eye, by the same story-telling artist, for whom showing and telling—the temporal and the spatial, the verbal and the visual – are not easily separated.”

Bob Dylan is one of America’s most influential and important cultural figures. With over 600 songs, 46 albums and an astonishing 110 million record sales to his name, Dylan, in his sixth decade as a worldwide cultural icon, is turning increasingly to another form of artistic expression; one that has occupied him throughout his life, but for which he is much less well known.

Previous Bob Dylan work has included “Drawn Blank,” a collection of sketches, published in 1994, and in 2007-08 a series of gouaches and watercolors based on this work was exhibited at the Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz in Germany, and later at the Halcyon Gallery in London. “The Brazil Series,” exhibited in Copenhagen in 2010, was followed by the “Asia Series” at the Gagosian Gallery, New York in 2011. Additional exhibitions include “The Revisionist Series,” at the Gagosian Gallery, New York, in 2012 and “The New Orleans Series,” which premiered at the Palazzo Reale in Milan in 2013.

“Bob Dylan Face Value” is curated by Sarah Howgate, the National Portrait Gallery’s contemporary curator, whose exhibitions include the highly successful Lucian Freud Portraits (2012) and David Hockney Portraits (2006). The exhibition will run through Jan. 5. Admission is free.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Nina Felix by Bob Dylan © Bob Dylan.

Nina Felix by Bob Dylan © Bob Dylan.

This Italian 7-inch grasshopper is felt with painted wooden eyes. It was made by Lenci, probably in the 1960s, and sold for $336 at a 2012 Theriault's doll auction.

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Aug. 5, 2013

This Italian 7-inch grasshopper is felt with painted wooden eyes. It was made by Lenci, probably in the 1960s, and sold for $336 at a 2012 Theriault's doll auction.

This Italian 7-inch grasshopper is felt with painted wooden eyes. It was made by Lenci, probably in the 1960s, and sold for $336 at a 2012 Theriault’s doll auction.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Lenci is a famous name among doll collectors. Lenci dolls were first made by Elena Konig Scavini (1886-1974).

She ran away from home when she was 14 and joined a circus. A few years later, she started making dolls. In the early 1900s, she married Enrico Scavini, and by 1919 she had established the Scavini company to make dolls. By 1922 the company was listed as Lenci di E. Scavini. “Lenci” may have been a pet name for Elena. Her felt dolls were carefully made, with pouty mouths, googly eyes and elaborate felt costumes. They were expensive. The single word “Lenci” was used as a trademark as early as 1925. The company later had financial trouble and was sold in 1939. It closed in 2002.

Lenci dolls are very popular with collectors, but few know about the company’s line of “fetish dolls.” They were shaped like vegetables or flowers or imaginary creatures. Fetish dolls were introduced in 1926. A later group was made in the 1960s. One rare fetish doll is a grasshopper wearing a top hat. A collector paid $336 for it at an important Theriault’s doll auction in November 2012.

Q: My vintage gold-tone pocket cigarette lighter is marked “Regel pat. pend.” History and value?

A: Regel lighters were made in Rhode Island in the 1930s. Most were marketed under the brand name “Regeliter.” The mechanism, manufactured by Regel under a German patent that belonged to Altenpohl & Pilgram, is not considered safe today. But your lighter still is collectible. If it’s in good condition, it would sell for about $40.

Q: About 10 years ago, I rescued an old stove from a land dump. It’s 31 inches tall and 15 inches in diameter. A metal plate on it read: “Wetter’s Emerald” and “211.” Can you tell me something about this stove?

A: H. Wetter & Co. was in business in Memphis, Tenn., before 1883. The company was listed that year as “jobbers, agents and dealers in stoves, tinware, hardware, etc.” The factory in Memphis burned down in 1902, and the company moved production to an old stove factory in South Pittsburg, Tenn. The company was reorganized in about 1931 and became the United States Stove Co. The South Pittsburg factory was razed in 2003, but the United States Stove Co. still is in business, with facilities in Richard City, Tenn., and Bridgeport, Ala.

Q: My old copper bowl is so tarnished that I can’t get it clean. Any suggestions?

A: First, make sure your bowl is not from a famous maker. Check the bottom for a mark. If you find a mark, you may want to think twice about cleaning it. The patina that builds up through the years protects copper from corrosion, and some collectors don’t want the patina removed. But if the bowl is not valuable, you can buy a commercial cleaner at a hardware store or try a couple of home remedies. If the bowl is small, fill a zinc-free pot with enough water to cover the bowl. Add a tablespoon of salt and a cup of vinegar. Put the bowl in the pot, bring the water to a boil and let it boil for several hours. Take the bowl out, let it cool, wash it with liquid dishwashing soap, rinse and dry with a soft cloth. Tarnish often can be removed by using a mixture of vinegar, salt and a bit of flour and water. Or try tomato paste or a mixture of salt and lemon juice. Do not use abrasive cleaners or steel wool.

Q: After my husband died, I was going through his things and found a dollar “silver certificate” autographed by actress Ingrid Bergman. The bill is from “Series 1935A” and is signed by Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau Jr. My husband never said anything about the bill’s history. What is it worth, and how I can sell it?

A: Silver certificates were issued from 1878 to 1964 and could be redeemed for silver dollars or silver bullion. After a certificate was redeemed, it was destroyed and not recirculated. Early silver certificates were larger than today’s dollar bill, and are worth more than face value. Small certificates like those in your series were first issued in 1928. The government stopped redeeming the certificates for silver in June 1968, but the certificates still can be used as “legal tender” at face value. Your certificate without Ingrid Bergman’s autograph would be worth just $1, but her autograph on a 3-by-5-inch card sold at auction for $100 last year. So your certificate probably is worth about that much if the autograph is genuine.

Q: My mother was given a 1967 Wurlitzer Model 3100 jukebox. Where is the best place to sell it, and what is it worth?

A: The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co. was in business in Cincinnati from 1853 to 1988. It sold pianos made abroad before starting to manufacture its own coin-operated pianos in the 1880s. The company eventually made other musical instruments and manufactured jukeboxes from 1934 to 1974. Your late model is not worth as much as earlier ones, but if it works, it could sell for about $700. You will find websites that post jukeboxes for sale, but you also could try a live auction that specializes in coin-operated machines. You can find those online, too.

Tip: Keep old, worn, vintage doll accessories. Even if you substitute new accessories, save the old ones. They add value.

Need prices for collectibles? Find them at Kovels.com, our website for collectors. More than 84,000 prices and 5,000 color pictures have just been added. Now you can find more than 856,000 prices that can help you determine the value of your collectible. Access to the prices is free at Kovels.com/priceguide.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Pepsi-Cola crate, Drink Pepsi Cola, red paint, metal straps, carrying holes, c. 1920, holds 24 bottles, $35.
  • Pressed glass compote, Barberry pattern, scalloped rim, 7 1/2 inches, $50.
  • Hooked rug, central rose in medallion, buds in corners, wool, c. 1950, 18 x 31 inches, $70.
  • Hay fork, wood, stamped “M.B. Young,” Pennsylvania, c. 1865, 72 inches, $90.
  • Noritake cheese keeper, lid, cornucopia, fruit basket, multicolored, green trim, 1920s, 7 5/8 inches, $175.
  • Clewell vase, copper clad, bulbous, green, 5 x 5 1/2 inches, $315.
  • Baby rattle, silver repousse openwork, jester bust, bell tassels, mother-of-pearl teething ring, England, 19th century, 6 3/4 inches, $360.
  • Northwest Indian wooden paddle, painted, stylized designs, c. 1920, 69 inches, $705.
  • Enamel cross, leaf-and-vine design, 14-karat gold, Victorian, 3 inches, $710.
  • Gothic Revival chair, rosewood, cathedral back, turned legs, upholstered, c. 1855, $720.

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st-Century Way, by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship, as well as what to wear, what to bring and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. It also includes tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 in. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This Italian 7-inch grasshopper is felt with painted wooden eyes. It was made by Lenci, probably in the 1960s, and sold for $336 at a 2012 Theriault's doll auction.

This Italian 7-inch grasshopper is felt with painted wooden eyes. It was made by Lenci, probably in the 1960s, and sold for $336 at a 2012 Theriault’s doll auction.

Ken Price's 'Death Shrine I.' Image by Tina Larkin, courtesy of the Harwood Museum of Art.

Taos museum lands major gift of contemporary art

Ken Price's 'Death Shrine I.' Image by Tina Larkin, courtesy of the Harwood Museum of Art.

Ken Price’s ‘Death Shrine I.’ Image by Tina Larkin, courtesy of the Harwood Museum of Art.

TAOS, N.M. (AP) – Art studios are everywhere—hidden in backyards, at the end of narrow dirt driveways and tucked behind the adobe storefronts that line the historic main street.

This northern New Mexico mountain town has long been known for attracting painters, photographers, sculptors and writers, so it’s no wonder Gus Foster was sitting on a gold mine of sorts.

An artist himself, Foster has spent the last four decades collecting the work of contemporary artists who flocked to Taos from Los Angeles, New York and elsewhere. Now, he’s giving the collection to the Harwood Museum of Art.

It’s considered one of the foremost collections of contemporary art in the Southwest. The more than 340 works include pieces from famous sculptors Ken Price and Larry Bell as well as Ron Cooper and Ron Davis.

“It puts us on the map,” museum director Susan Longhenry said of Foster’s gift. “This is the place to come see and experience the art colony of Taos, and we are now in a much better position to share that.”

The museum is already well known for its collection of work by the Taos Society of Artists, a collaborative that jumpstarted the community’s reputation for being a well of creativity during the early 1900s. It’s also known for its collection of post-World War II abstract art that was the product of the Taos Moderns.

What the Harwood was missing was art from the wave of artists who discovered the community in the 1970s and later.

A former museum curator and avid collector, Foster realized the gap in the Harwood’s collection and began keeping his eye out as he visited his friends’ studios throughout Taos.

“When I saw something that worked and if it was in my means to be able to get it, I added it to my collection,” he said.

But it was no art shopping trip. There were trades, and Foster remembers getting some of the works as gifts from his good friends Price and Bell. He said the value of the collection “really transcends dollars.”

Included in the collection is Price’s Death Shrine I, a Mexican folk-inspired funerary alter that is framed by a white picket fence and a pair of candelabras. There is also one of Bell’s newest Light Knot works, a sculpture of cut and folded Mylar film that reflects light and moves with the slightest breeze.

For Foster, it came down to having the foresight to recognize what would someday be valuable to the museum in helping explain the evolution of art in Taos. As time passes, he said, art can disappear or become so expensive a museum would be unable to afford it.

Having a place where people can see the work of local artists is invaluable, said Happy Price, the widow of Ken Price, whose work is currently on exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Drawing Center in New York. Despite her husband’s prominence, she said the museums in New Mexico have not collected his work.

“Finally,” she said. “I think this will be an amazing gift, an amazing resource. Maybe this will inspire the museums of New Mexico and Arizona to pay more attention to Southwest artists.”

That has been the mission of the Harwood in recent years.

“What other art museum should be collecting the work of these artists except the Harwood,” Longhenry said. “These artists moved here because they were inspired by this very unique place.”

The museum is planning an exhibition featuring a portion of the Foster collection next summer. Before that can happen, each piece must be cataloged and transferred to the museum.

The walls and ceilings of Foster’s home are still covered with art.

“It’s a big undertaking. No good deed goes unpunished,” he said jokingly of the tedious task.

___

Follow Susan Montoya Bryan on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/susanmbryanNM

___

Online:

http://www.harwoodmuseum.org/

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-03-13 1825GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ken Price's 'Death Shrine I.' Image by Tina Larkin, courtesy of the Harwood Museum of Art.

Ken Price’s ‘Death Shrine I.’ Image by Tina Larkin, courtesy of the Harwood Museum of Art.

A similar Johnson pipe organ at the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church in Albion, N.Y. Image by Pmucpastor. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Restoration gives historic pipe organ second wind

A similar Johnson pipe organ at the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church in Albion, N.Y. Image by Pmucpastor. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

A similar Johnson pipe organ at the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church in Albion, N.Y. Image by Pmucpastor. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

HEATH, Mass. (AP) – After a 21/2-year absence, the Opus 16 Johnson pipe organ is back in its place of honor inside the Heath Union Evangelical Church—better than ever after its $160,000 restoration.

Built around 1850, the organ was scheduled to be rededicated in a special service on July 21, an event that was supposed to include an inaugural performance featuring international concert organist Nathan J. Laube. The free concert was planned to be held in the Heath Union Church.

Gone is the white paint, which was applied to the original faux-wood grain surface, and back again are the original gold-plated facade pipes that had been stored inside the organ for at least a century.

All the original leather components have been replaced, and a missing rank of pipes has been replicated.

Ruth Johnson of Heath, who has spearheaded fundraising efforts for at least two decades, played the newly restored organ for the first time during this year’s Palm Sunday church service.

When asked how the organ sounds, she replied, “It’s got much better depth. With the old (electric) blower, there wasn’t as much air-flow as there should have been.”

Johnson, who is not related to the organ builder, said the restoration “was much more authentic than they thought it was going to be. That’s why this is such a treasure.”

By the 1980s, it was clear to church members that the organ needed an overhaul. Sometimes the 130-year-old leather parts would fail, rendering the organ unplayable. Fundraising started, but was put on hold when the church had to raise money to make structural repairs to this historic church building.

By January 2009, the group had $50,000, but needed another $100,000 to restore the organ to museum quality. With a $50,000 challenge grant in honor of the Dickinson family, the fundraising goal was reached during the 2009 annual Heath Fair.

“It’s been miraculous,” said Johnson. “We had people from all over the country (donate)—people that knew Heath, or that had summer places, or that were organ-lovers.”

S. L. Huntington & Co. of Stonington, Conn., which specializes in the restoration of period instruments, was hired to do the work. In June 2010, the restoration workers began dismantling the room-sized organ, carefully numbering each component, before taking them to Connecticut for cleaning and restoration.

Fundraisers originally thought the organ was built in 1851, based on a list of models published by Johnson in 1894. But the organ itself tells another story: Found in two places on a pedal pipe that would never have been seen until it was taken apart were signatures and dates from one Cyrus Burnett Smith of Haydenville. On a hidden pipe regulator was his name and the message: “Cyrus Burnett Smith pumped this organ 1850 1851 1852 1853 1854.” On another pipe he wrote: “I blowed this organ from 1850 to 1854. Cyrus B. Smith.”

Also, a piece of newspaper dated April, 1849 had been used as a shim in one of the wood pipes.

Research from Ned Wolf and organ restorer Scot Huntington indicates that Opus 16 started to be built on speculation in 1849, and was purchased, unfinished, by Joel Hayden Sr. for the Haydenville Congregational Church, which was also under construction. But midway through its construction, Opus 16 was modified from a G-compass organ to a smaller-scale C-compass organ, with several of the original note channels blocked off.

The restoration adheres strictly to guidelines by the Organ Historical Society, which has recognized the Heath Union Church organ as a “National Heritage Pipe Organ of Historical Significance.”

Out of about 10,000 pipe organs believed to be in existence, fewer than 500 have received this designation.

The wind pressure, which had been lowered at some point in the organ’s past, has been raised to original strength, restoring a fullness to the tone. Also, missing items, such as stop lables and pipes were carefully crafted as replicas of the originals.

The organ was dubbed “Opus 16,” because it was the 16th instrument out of an eventual 860 organs to be built by the Westfield-based Johnson Organ Co. between 1848 to 1898.

When new, the Opus 16 was installed in the Haydenville Congregational Church, then replaced 23 years later by a larger instrument also made by Johnson. Opus 16 then went to the Congregational Church in Whately, where it stayed until 1912, when that church bought a newer style model.

The Heath congregation purchased the old organ for $100, it was taken apart, then brought up to Heath by horse and wagon in 1914, according to the restoration committee. It was reassembled in the Heath church, and the only modification made to it since then was in 1940, when an electric blower was installed, to eliminate the need for someone to hand-pump the bellows as the organist played.

Nathan J. Laube has played concerts throughout the United States and Europe, and has been a featured performer at three national conventions of the Organ Historical Society. The William Fulbright grant-holder has a master’s degree in organ from the Muskihochschule in Stuttgart, Germany. This fall, he will join the faculty of the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. He has also won top prizes in international competitions.

Johnson said the plan is to continue hosting organ concerts at the Heath Union Church, including performances by local organists.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-02-13 1639GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A similar Johnson pipe organ at the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church in Albion, N.Y. Image by Pmucpastor. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

A similar Johnson pipe organ at the Pullman Memorial Universalist Church in Albion, N.Y. Image by Pmucpastor. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

An early Civil War rifled Schenkl artillery shell 6 pounder having a copper percussion fuse. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Affiliated Auctions.

S.C. man collects shells—Civil War artillery shells

An early Civil War rifled Schenkl artillery shell 6 pounder having a copper percussion fuse. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Affiliated Auctions.

An early Civil War rifled Schenkl artillery shell 6 pounder having a copper percussion fuse. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Affiliated Auctions.

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) – Behind a two-story home on a rural Lowcountry road, long-forgotten relics from a more than century-old conflict lie marinating in electrolyte baths so that future generations might someday see them up close.

Dozens of cannonballs, mortar shells and other munitions used in the Civil War sit in water-filled barrels that are juiced with a small electrical charge that travels along a maze of wires from a battery. It’s part of a yearlong process to remove iron oxide, salt water and rust to keep the aged armaments from chipping, cracking and crumbling when they are exposed to the air after years under water or ground.

The backyard operation is not part of a high-tech laboratory or the brainchild of a noted scientist. Rather, it’s a labor of love launched by a coastal native with a passion for history and skills honed by decades of experimentation, trial-and-error and advice from those who came before him.

Unexploded rounds from the War Between the States pepper the region and are uncovered from time to time during construction digs and renovation projects, prompting anxious calls to local police and military bomb squads. Their solution, more often than not, is to blow up the old rounds to eliminate any threat to the public.

That galls some preservationists, who see each exploded piece of ordnance as another chunk of history lost.

“They don’t need to do that,” said the man with the backyard munitions collection. “This stuff needs to be seen by people.”

The man has what may be the largest private collection of Civil War munitions in the state, but he stays far clear of the limelight as a general rule. He agreed to talk with The Post and Courier on the condition that his name not be used and the location of his home kept secret.

He’s wary of thieves, curiosity-seekers and reality-TV producers looking to make a buck off his endeavors.

More than a half-dozen TV types tried to track him down after he appeared anonymously in a Garden & Gun magazine article this year. But the collector, known by some as Iron Man, said he is not interested in helping with low-budget productions looking to ridicule the South or spur a frenzied hunt for artifacts on solemn ground.

“South Carolina is one of the few states where you can still find artifacts,” he said. “And it is a privilege.”

His relic-hunting days are pretty much over, but he still spends hours laboring over munitions found by friends and others who come to him through word-of-mouth referrals. He has advised military explosive experts, historians and others.

The scientific team working on the restoration of the Hunley even stopped by to pick his brain on electrolysis restoration techniques after the Confederate sub was pulled from waters off Charleston in 2000.

Still, some bomb-squad members question the wisdom of trying to save old, and potentially volatile, explosive rounds. They also said federal law makes old munitions found on U.S. soil the property of the military, regardless of the vintage or who fired the round in the first place.

Lt. Patrick Morris, commander of the Charleston County Sheriff’s bomb squad, acknowledged that most people who hand over found munitions to authorities won’t ever see those rounds again.

“I understand the other side of the argument, and it’s shame to lose good historical pieces,” Morris said. “Unfortunately, these could still be live rounds and they could still be deadly.”

Black powder can survive decades and still ignite, even if it got wet during that time, Morris said. Cannonballs more than 100 years old can pack the punch of a large pipe bomb, he said.

In February 2008, for example, an avid relic collector in Virginia was killed when a Civil War cannonball he was restoring exploded in his driveway, the blast blowing shrapnel a quarter-mile away.

Morris said police just can’t take the chance that something deadly might happen when such a relic is discovered.

“It’s like I tell people, I don’t ever want to be the last casualty of the Civil War,” he said.

Keith Purdy, a local re-enactor and vintage artillery expert, said authorities tend to greatly exaggerate the danger posed by old ordnance. Most cannonballs and shells can be safely carted away in a bucket of water, and he and Iron Man said they have not encountered a single instance of someone being injured moving old ordnance.

“They can be transported and disarmed safely,” he said. “There’s no question about it.”

Iron Man said that before soaking his relics, he has them safely drilled under water and emptied of gunpowder. Once that is done, they are completely harmless.

“This place could burn down and they’re still not going to hurt anybody,” he said.

Iron Man developed his passion for old projectiles as a kid fascinated by military history in the 1960s. He found his first Parrott shell along Morris Island in 1969, and was crushed when a military bomb squad hauled it away. “I vowed they’d never take another from me.”

Among the items on display at his home are 200-pound Parrott shells, a Harding shell made in Charleston and fired at the Battle of Seccessionville on James Island, early grenades, two anchors used to hold torpedoes in Charleston Harbor, and an extremely rare 15-inch cannonball packed with iron that would serve as a shrapnel when exploded.

Iron Man hopes to someday find a place to properly display his collection so that future generations can experience the history firsthand. But that would cost money, and he’s not seen much interest from local institutions in making that happen.

“It’s not a Blue or Gray issue with this,” he said, rubbing his fingers together. “It’s a green issue.”

___

Information from: The Post and Courier, http://www.postandcourier.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-02-13 1826GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


An early Civil War rifled Schenkl artillery shell 6 pounder having a copper percussion fuse. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Affiliated Auctions.

An early Civil War rifled Schenkl artillery shell 6 pounder having a copper percussion fuse. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Affiliated Auctions.

A 200-pound Parrott rifle in Fort Gregg on Morris Island, South Carolina, 1865. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

A 200-pound Parrott rifle in Fort Gregg on Morris Island, South Carolina, 1865. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Circa-1890 ivory-handled, engraved pistol, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Kimball Sterling Sept. 8 auction to benefit St. Jude’s

Circa-1890 ivory-handled, engraved pistol, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Circa-1890 ivory-handled, engraved pistol, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. – Kimball M. Sterling will conduct a September 8 auction featuring the Waylon J. Young Estate Collection, with proceeds benefiting St. Jude Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. The auction will commence at 11 a.m. Eastern Time, and Internet live bidding will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

Waylon Young was an avid collector from Illinois. He collected items from many different categories and was well known to auctioneers throughout the United States. In fact, his collection is so vast that it will take several auction houses with various specialties to disperse the contents in their entirety.

Kimball Sterling in handling Waylon Young’s cane collection and ivory smalls plus other interesting items such as straight razors, Eskimo items, knives and more. Nautical items, gambling, sewing, medical and many interesting smalls will also be auctioned. Note: All ivory offered via the Internet auction will be pre-ban ivory. In accordance with US Fish and Game laws, all pieces made after the ban will be available only to Tennessee in-house bidders.

A few selected consignments have been added to the auction and will be identified as such to buyers.

For additional information on any lot in the auction, contact Kimball M. Sterling by calling 423-928-1471 or emailing kimballsterling@earthlink.net.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 

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ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Circa-1890 ivory-handled, engraved pistol, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Circa-1890 ivory-handled, engraved pistol, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Circa-1860 whalebone nautical cane, est. $1,000-$1,500. Kimball Sterling image.

Circa-1860 whalebone nautical cane, est. $1,000-$1,500. Kimball Sterling image.

Collection of paintings on ivory, est. $400-$600. Kimball Sterling image.

Collection of paintings on ivory, est. $400-$600. Kimball Sterling image.

Circa-1860 ivory pie crimper, est. $400-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Circa-1860 ivory pie crimper, est. $400-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Khanjaril ivory-handle knife, probably mid-19th century, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.

Khanjaril ivory-handle knife, probably mid-19th century, est. $300-$500. Kimball Sterling image.