Large Chinese jadeite covered vessel, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan's Auctions Inc.

Cowan’s Asian art sale Sept. 13 features fine ivory, jade

Large Chinese jadeite covered vessel, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan's Auctions Inc.

Large Chinese jadeite covered vessel, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

CINCINNATI – Cowan’s Auctions Inc. will host an Asian art auction on Sept. 13. The sale will feature over 800 lots consisting of a wide selection of high quality ivory, jade and porcelain, Chinese and Japanese prints and scroll paintings, Chinese furniture and reference material on Asian Art. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

“Cowan’s will be offering several important collections of Asian Art on Sept. 13th,” notes Graydon Sikes, director, Asian art. “Among the strongest categories include several very fine 19th century robes, altar covers and other embroidered textiles, two outstanding pairs of Japanese carved tusks will be offered, as well as a fine collection of Chinese ivory from a private collector in Indiana.”

A Tibetan bronze Manjushri is estimated to sell anywhere between $20,000-$30,000. The statue is a gilt bronze figure of Manjushri inlaid with coral and turquoise painted details.

Jade pieces are expected to perform well in the auction. A large Chinese jadeite covered vessel is estimated at $20,000-$30,000. A Chinese celadon jade covered vessel is estimated at $8,000-$12,000, a Chinese white jade Buddha is estimated to bring anywhere between $8,000-$12,000, and a Chinese Mind Period jade water buffalo carving is estimated at $11,000-$12,000.

Exceptional works of ivory will be offered in the sale. A Chinese standing ivory Guanyin with a bouquet of flowers is estimated to bring $4,000-$8,000, a Chinese carved ivory fantasy mountain with Guanyin is expected to sell for $4,000-$8,000, and a grouping of Japanese carved ivory figures are estimated at $6,000-$8,000.

The auction will also feature Japanese and Chinese vases. A pair of mixed metal Japanese vases from the Meiji Period are estimated at $20,000-$30,000, a rare Chinese Meiping double-fish vase is expected to sell for $8,000-$12,000, and an important pair of Republic Period vases by Liu Yuchen are estimated at $6,000-$8,000.

Chinese furniture will come up for auction in the Asian Art sale. A pair of Chinese carved hall chairs are estimated at $2,000-$3,000, a pair of Chinese carved throne chairs with mother of pearl inlay are estimated at $2,000-$3,000, and a Ming-style rosewood stand is expected to bring anywhere between $1,000-$1,500.

For more information contact Graydon Sikes at 513-871-1670.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Large Chinese jadeite covered vessel, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan's Auctions Inc.

 

Large Chinese jadeite covered vessel, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Tibetan bronze Manjushri, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan's Auctions Inc.

Tibetan bronze Manjushri, estimate $20,000-$30,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Chinese celadon jade covered vessel, estimate $8,000-$12,000. Cowan's Auctions Inc.

Chinese celadon jade covered vessel, estimate $8,000-$12,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

Exceptionally carved pair of Meiji Period Japanese brush pots, $6,000-$8,000. Cowan's Auctions Inc.

Exceptionally carved pair of Meiji Period Japanese brush pots, $6,000-$8,000. Cowan’s Auctions Inc.

A gift to American inventor and entrepreneur George Westinghouse from his wife Marguerite, this unusual silver vase was made in Moscow by Antip Kuzmichev for Tiffany & Co. in 1893. John Moran Auctioneers image.

John Moran Auctioneers kicks off season of major sales Sept. 10

A gift to American inventor and entrepreneur George Westinghouse from his wife Marguerite, this unusual silver vase was made in Moscow by Antip Kuzmichev for Tiffany & Co. in 1893. John Moran Auctioneers image.

A gift to American inventor and entrepreneur George Westinghouse from his wife Marguerite, this unusual silver vase was made in Moscow by Antip Kuzmichev for Tiffany & Co. in 1893. John Moran Auctioneers image.

PASADENA, Calif. – The program for John Moran Auctioneers’ highly anticipated fall season is set, promising a spectacular finale to the Southern California house’s successful run this year. The series of important sales begins with the two-session Antiques and Fine Art Auction on Sept. 10. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

The first act of this four-act play, the Sept. 10 sale introduces more than 200 items from multiple private collections and estates, covering a range of collecting areas. In addition to Continental, British and American furniture, silver, art objects, and fine art, it will feature Asian art and furniture, Native American artifacts, and select contents of a Montana ranch.

September’s silver selection is led by a large Imperial era Russian silver presentation vase. A remarkable piece of craftsmanship made in Moscow in 1893 by noted smith Antip Kuzmichev for Tiffany and Co., it bears silent witness to the life of an American titan of industry in the Gilded Age. Arriving at auction after decades out of sight in a storage facility, it is inscribed with a dedication to George Westinghouse from his wife Marguerite “in remembrance of his mother, Christmas 1895.” George Westinghouse Jr. (1846-1914), founder of Westinghouse Electric and a leading pioneer of the American electrical industry, was married to Marguerite Walker for 47 years. Weighing 94 troy ounces, the vase is of an unusual tripartite form, and covered with an elaborate floral repoussé pattern. A grand piece befitting Westinghouse’s opulent Pittsburgh mansion, it is offered with an estimate of $4,000-$6,000.

Additional silver pieces include a circa 1905 Tiffany centerpiece bowl with a pierced lattice design (estimate: $1,000-$2,000), a set of Buccellati flatware in the rare Winterset pattern, and an Austrian tipping kettle with sinuous, curving lines in the organic style of l’Art Nouveau. Made in Vienna, with maker’s mark “HAG,” the kettle is complete with stand and burner and is expected to fetch $1,000-$1,500. Also of superlative design is a six-piece sterling tea service by important Arts & Crafts-era maker Arthur Stone. Stunningly simple, judiciously detailed and shaped with perfect proportions, it is expected to reach $2,000-$3,000.

Continental and American decorative arts highlights include a large Rococo revival KPM / Berlin porcelain mantel clock encrusted with flowers, swags and masks (estimate: $5,000-$7,000), a large group of KPM / Berlin porcelain plaques, a 17-inch-tall Galle cameo glass landscape vase (estimate: $3,000-$5,000), a Pablo Picasso / Madoura ceramic owl pitcher (estimate: $2,000-$3,000), a rare Rene Lalique “Tete De Paon” blue glass mascot (offered at a low estimate of $2,000-$4,000 due to damages to the base), a Tiffany & Co. Art Deco nephrite jade and enamel desk clock (estimate: $1,000-$2,000), and a French Boulle marquetry center table (estimate: $1,000-$2,000).

Several good examples of English furniture making are to be had as well. Two George III mahogany card tables (estimate: $800-$1,200 each), a pair of delicate Victorian painted satinwood demilune card tables (estimate: $2,000-$4,000), an ornate Victorian gilt bronze-mounted amboyna and ebony bonheur du jour with inset Sevres-style porcelain plaques (estimate: $2,000-$3,000), and a lovely Regency gilt bronze-mounted mahogany cellaret (estimate: $800-$1,200) are all offered from private collections.

Native American items are limited to a high quality selection of pottery, baskets and woven textiles. Several pottery ollas hailing from the Southwestern United States illustrate the skill of passed down through generations of artisans from the 19th century to the present day. A 9 1/2-inch-tall black-on-red olla by Tonita Roybal of the San Ildefonso pueblo is expected to earn $4000-$6,000 on the block. Tonita Martinez Roybal (1892-1945) is regarded by experts as equal in skill to her more famous contemporary, Maria Martinez. Moran’s is also pleased to offer three circa-1900 Acoma ollas (estimates: $4,000-$6,000 each) and a delightful pair of Zia three-color ollas dating from the early 20th century (estimate: $6,000-$9,000), accompanied by photographic documentation from the family of the original owner. Textiles include a circa-1900 Navajo Germantown pictorial sampler on loom ($1,500-$2,500), a circa-1890 Germantown eye dazzler textile (estimate: $4,000-$6,000), and an unusual Navajo regional weaving featuring the letters of the alphabet arranged in two rows within an arrow-tip border (estimate: $1,000-$1,500). Four Apache basketry bowls dating from the first quarter 20th century are remarkable for their excellent condition. One featuring depictions of deer, humans and dogs is offered for $4,000-$5,000, while another pictorial basket with figures of humans is expected to realize $3,000-$5,000.

Serious collectors of horse tack, including saddles, spurs and bits, as well as those who are simply fans of cowboy style will want to compete for the group of furnishings and accoutrements consigned from a ranch in Montana. Moran’s is pleased to offer select contents from both house and stables fresh to the market with attractive estimates.

More than 60 fine art works by listed European, British and American artists are offered, with estimates ranging from $500 up to $7,000. At the higher end of the price scale are paintings by Antoine Blanchard (1910-1988 French), Carl Heinrich Hoff (1833-1890 German) and Henryk Siemiradzki (1843-1902 Polish, Arthur Wardle (1864-1949 British), and Russian artists Georgii Alexasandrovich Lapchine (1889-1950) and Konstatin Ivanovich Gorbatov (1876-1945). Prints by Marc Chagall (1887-1985 French), Joan Miro (1893-1983 Spanish) and David Alfaro Siqueiros (1896-1974 Mexican) offer excellent opportunities to acquire works by world-renowned artists at affordable prices.

Consignments are accepted throughout the year for Moran’s Antiques and Decorative Arts Auctions. Contact Moran’s offices at 626-793-1833 or info@johnmoran.com for more information about any of their upcoming events.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A gift to American inventor and entrepreneur George Westinghouse from his wife Marguerite, this unusual silver vase was made in Moscow by Antip Kuzmichev for Tiffany & Co. in 1893. John Moran Auctioneers image.

A gift to American inventor and entrepreneur George Westinghouse from his wife Marguerite, this unusual silver vase was made in Moscow by Antip Kuzmichev for Tiffany & Co. in 1893. John Moran Auctioneers image.

This Austrian Art Nouveau silver tipping kettle with maker’s mark ‘H.A.G.’ dates from circa 1900 (estimate: $1,000-$1,500). John Moran Auctioneers image.

 

This Austrian Art Nouveau silver tipping kettle with maker’s mark ‘H.A.G.’ dates from circa 1900 (estimate: $1,000-$1,500). John Moran Auctioneers image.

Measuring 17 1/2 inches in height, this Galle cameo glass vase depicts a serene waterside landscape (estimate: $3,000-$5,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

Measuring 17 1/2 inches in height, this Galle cameo glass vase depicts a serene waterside landscape (estimate: $3,000-$5,000). John Moran Auctioneers image.

Estimated to realize $2,000-$4,000 is this pair of nicely painted Victorian satinwood games tables. John Moran Auctioneers image.

Estimated to realize $2,000-$4,000 is this pair of nicely painted Victorian satinwood games tables. John Moran Auctioneers image.

This pair of Zia three-color pottery ollas (estimate: $6,000-$9,000) is among the select group of Native American artifacts in Moran’s Sept. 10 sale. John Moran Auctioneers image.

This pair of Zia three-color pottery ollas (estimate: $6,000-$9,000) is among the select group of Native American artifacts in Moran’s Sept. 10 sale. John Moran Auctioneers image.

Ruth Asawa's San Francisco fountain. Smithsonian Save Outdoor Sculptures project, U.S. Federal Government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Apple revises SF store plans to preserve Ruth Asawa fountain

Ruth Asawa's San Francisco fountain. Smithsonian Save Outdoor Sculptures project, U.S. Federal Government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Ruth Asawa’s San Francisco fountain. Smithsonian Save Outdoor Sculptures project, U.S. Federal Government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple Inc. has redesigned its plans for a flagship store in San Francisco to preserve a popular bronze fountain that has stood at the site for four decades.

The San Francisco Chronicle reported Tuesday that Apple is proposing to move the circular fountain by the late sculptor Ruth Asawa while still incorporating the artwork into a plaza outside the new Union Square store.

The absence of the 7-foot-tall fountain from the plans Apple unveiled in May prompted an outcry from residents.

The fountain, installed in 1973, depicts local buildings and characters that Asawa cast in bronze from models that friends and local schoolchildren formed out of bread dough.

Asawa’s works are known nationally and are included in the collections of leading museums. The Japanese American artist died this month at age 87.

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Information from: San Francisco Chronicle, http://www.sfgate.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-27-13 2027GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ruth Asawa's San Francisco fountain. Smithsonian Save Outdoor Sculptures project, U.S. Federal Government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Ruth Asawa’s San Francisco fountain. Smithsonian Save Outdoor Sculptures project, U.S. Federal Government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Presidential Press and Information Office. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Artist who painted Putin in women’s underwear seeks asylum

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Presidential Press and Information Office. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Presidential Press and Information Office. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AFP) – A Russian artist said Thursday he has fled to France and is applying for asylum after police seized his painting of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev in women’s underwear.

Police on Tuesday raided an exhibition in St. Petersburg, which next week hosts the G20 summit, and confiscated works including a painting of Putin in a strappy nightie and Medvedev in a bra and skimpy knickers.

The artist, Konstantin Altunin, 45, said by telephone from Paris that he had requested political asylum and was now gathering the necessary documents.

“Yesterday I went to the prefecture in Paris … and made this request. I now need to go through the procedure and bring written confirmation of where I am staying,” he said.

Altunin said he flew out of Russia as soon as he heard that the exhibition had been shut down on Tuesday evening and the organizers had been detained by police and questioned into the night.

He said that the police had described the exhibition at the newly opened Museum of the Authorities as extremist and he feared criminal charges.

“They have already said directly that my exhibition is extremist—that’s a very serious charge,” he said.

The exhibition also included paintings of Lenin and Stalin.

Altunin said he had expected the authorities would view the works with humor and was shocked by their reaction.

“They just said ‘We don’t like it’ and sealed up the doors and that was it. I don’t think there is such backwardness in any other country.”

Altunin said he had created the painting of Putin and Medvedev when they announced in 2011 a job swap with Putin returning to the Kremlin and Medvedev becoming prime minister.

“It is absolutely innocent irony,” he said.

Police also confiscated a painting of local lawmaker Vitaly Milonov, known for his backing of a controversial law banning the promotion of homosexuality to minors that Putin signed into law this summer.

Altunin said the organizers of the exhibition had commissioned him to paint the portrait, which shows Milonov with the rainbow flag of the gay pride movement.

The director of the Museum of the Authorities, Alexander Donskoi, told AFP that Altunin had not yet been charged with any crime.

“He is not charged with anything, but if the authorities confiscated the paintings, they could do anything.”


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Russian President Vladimir Putin. Presidential Press and Information Office. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. Presidential Press and Information Office. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Hou Hanru at the during the Istanbul Biennial in 2007. Image by Leandrostr. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Rome museum eyes world stage with new director Hou Hanru

Hou Hanru at the during the Istanbul Biennial in 2007. Image by Leandrostr. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Hou Hanru at the during the Istanbul Biennial in 2007. Image by Leandrostr. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

ROME (AFP) – Rome’s MAXXI art museum said Thursday it wanted a bigger role on the world stage with the appointment of its new Chinese-born artistic director Hou Hanru.

The contemporary art and architecture museum, housed in a building designed by renowned architect Zaha Hadid, has been plagued with financial troubles.

But museum director Giorgia Melandri said it was reducing its dependence on public subsidies and managing to allocate more resources to core activities.

“Hanru will help us occupy a bigger place on the international map,” Melandri said at a joint press conference with Hou, an international art curator.

Hou said he hoped “this institution can provide an example of how creativity can change the world.

“We should not see a museum like this as a replica or an extension of something in New York but as a chance to come up with new ideas,” he said.

Hou moved to Paris from China in 1990 and has worked as a director of exhibitions at the San Francisco Art Institute, a consultant at the Guggenheim in New York and a co-director of the first World Biennale Forum.

He will take up his four-year contract in December.

Melandri said the museum urgently needs public funds of around 6 million euros ($8 million) just for yearly running costs and is hoping to raise the same amount in donations, sponsorships and ticket sales.

She said around 60 percent of its budget was currently public funds and she was hoping to reduce this proportion to 50 percent over the next three years.

Italy has seen steep cuts in culture budgets in recent years in a series of austerity programs aimed at reducing its heaving public debt, although the current government has promised to increase funding.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Hou Hanru at the during the Istanbul Biennial in 2007. Image by Leandrostr. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Hou Hanru at the during the Istanbul Biennial in 2007. Image by Leandrostr. This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Southern patio of the Seward House Museum in Auburn, N.Y. Image by SewardHouse2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Dispute over Thomas Cole painting heading to court

Southern patio of the Seward House Museum in Auburn, N.Y. Image by SewardHouse2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Southern patio of the Seward House Museum in Auburn, N.Y. Image by SewardHouse2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

AUBURN, N.Y. (AP) – A descendent of Abraham Lincoln’s secretary of state is asking a judge to force a foundation to return a valuable painting to a central New York museum.

Thomas Cole’s Portage Falls on the Genesee was removed from the Seward House Museum earlier this year. Museum officials say they intend to sell the artwork, which has been appraised at $18 million to $20 million.

The painting was given to William Seward when he was governor of New York in the 1840s. The artwork had hung in Seward’s home in Auburn for more than 150 years.

The Post-Standard of Syracuse reports that Seward descendant Ray Messenger has filed a petition in Cayuga County Court, requesting that Fred L. Emerson Foundation return the painting to the museum. Arguments are scheduled for Sept. 12.

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Information from: The Post-Standard, http://www.syracuse.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-28-13 1024GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Southern patio of the Seward House Museum in Auburn, N.Y. Image by SewardHouse2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Southern patio of the Seward House Museum in Auburn, N.Y. Image by SewardHouse2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Circa-190 B.C. (?) parian marble sculpture known as 'La Victoire de Samothrace' or 'Winged Nike of Samothrace.' Discovered in the Greek island of Samothrace in 1863. From the Louvre Collection. 2007 photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Louvre appeals for funds to restore iconic statue

Circa-190 B.C. (?) parian marble sculpture known as 'La Victoire de Samothrace' or 'Winged Nike of Samothrace.' Discovered in the Greek island of Samothrace in 1863. From the Louvre Collection. 2007 photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Circa-190 B.C. (?) parian marble sculpture known as ‘La Victoire de Samothrace’ or ‘Winged Nike of Samothrace.’ Discovered in the Greek island of Samothrace in 1863. From the Louvre Collection. 2007 photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

PARIS (AFP) – The Louvre museum will launch an appeal for one million euros in donations to restore The Winged Victory of Samothrace, a second-century BC marble statue of the Greek goddess Nike and one of the world’s most famous sculptures.

The appeal will be launched by the famed Paris museum on Tuesday, the day the statue will be removed from its normal site at the top of an imposing staircase.

The Winged Victory is one of the Louvre’s main attractions along with the Mona Lisa and a statue of Venus de Milo.

Sculpted in white and grey marble, the Winged Victory portrays the goddess standing on the prow of a ship. The headless figure was discovered in Samothrace in 1863.

The Daru staircase which houses the Samothrace statue will also be renovated “without shutting off this major access which is used by seven million visitors every year,” museum official Ludovic Laugier told AFP.

The cost of the renovation will amount to four million euros both for the staircase and the statue. The museum has already raised three million euros ($3.9 million) in donations from Nippon Television Holdings, Fimalac and Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

Donations can be made online on www.louvresamothrace.fr and www.tousmecenes.fr.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Circa-190 B.C. (?) parian marble sculpture known as 'La Victoire de Samothrace' or 'Winged Nike of Samothrace.' Discovered in the Greek island of Samothrace in 1863. From the Louvre Collection. 2007 photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Circa-190 B.C. (?) parian marble sculpture known as ‘La Victoire de Samothrace’ or ‘Winged Nike of Samothrace.’ Discovered in the Greek island of Samothrace in 1863. From the Louvre Collection. 2007 photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

2007 photo of Julia Alvarez. Photo by LaBloga.

UT’s Ransom Center acquires archive of writer Julia Alvarez

2007 photo of Julia Alvarez. Photo by LaBloga.

2007 photo of Julia Alvarez. Photo by LaBloga.

AUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, has acquired the archive of acclaimed novelist, poet and essayist Julia Alvarez (b. 1950-).

Alvarez’s extensive archive consists of manuscripts, correspondence, journals and professional files. The manuscripts span her writing career and include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, essays and unpublished works, often in multiple drafts. Alvarez regularly sent drafts of her work to friends and colleagues, and these copies usually bear handwritten comments from the reader alongside Alvarez’s revisions.

Alvarez’s correspondence includes poems and letters from fellow writers such as Sandra Cisneros, Edwidge Danticat, Dana Gioia and Marilyn Hacker.

Alvarez was born in New York City but raised in the Dominican Republic until she was 10. In 1960 her family was forced to flee the Dominican Republic when it was discovered that her father was involved in a plot to overthrow dictator Rafael Trujillo.

Alvarez once noted of her return to the U.S.: “I think of myself at 10 years old, newly arrived in this country, feeling out of place, feeling that I would never belong… I found myself turning more and more to writing as the one place where I… felt I belonged and could make sense of myself, my life, all that was happening to me.”

Much of Alvarez’s work is considered semi-autobiographical, drawing on her experiences as an immigrant and her bicultural identity. Alvarez’s unique experiences have shaped and infused her writing—from such award-winning novels as “How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents” and “In the Time of the Butterflies” to her poetry.

“I feel very moved that my archive has found a home in your amazing library,” said Alvarez. “So much of my work is about homecoming, finding roots in the English language, in the craft of writing. It’s heartening to know that I have found a home in readers’ imaginations, and now very literally, at the Harry Ransom Center, where I hope those who read for pleasure and those most careful readers of all, scholars and critics, will be able to follow a life given over to a calling. To trace and track an emerging voice at the very cusp of a Latino writing boom in the USA, working in multiple genres, connecting with a community of other contemporary writers. To quote myself at the end of the ‘33’ sequence in my first book, ‘Homecoming’: ‘I once was in as many drafts of you.’ The papers will prove that I wrote the truth!”

Alvarez’s archive will reside alongside the papers of other prominent contemporary writers such as T. C. Boyle, Denis Johnson, Tim O’Brien, Jayne Anne Phillips and David Foster Wallace. It will also complement the university’s internationally respected resources in Latin American studies, providing a unique and enriching resource not only for literary study but also for the study of Latin American history and government and other prominent social and cultural issues of our time.

“Alvarez’s archive will provide students and scholars access to her experience-driven explorations of race, family, culture and society,” said Ransom Center Director Thomas F. Staley. “As one of the key figures in the rise of Caribbean and Latino writing over the past three decades, she writes poignantly and authentically about topics that are central to current cultural debates, from immigration to bicultural identity.”

Visit the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas website at http://www.hrc.utexas.edu.

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Embroidered on one of the blocks of the Jane Stickle quilt is the phrase: 'In War Time 1863.' Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

Vt. museum observes prize quilt’s 150th anniversary

Embroidered on one of the blocks of the Jane Stickle quilt is the phrase: 'In War Time 1863.' Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

Embroidered on one of the blocks of the Jane Stickle quilt is the phrase: ‘In War Time 1863.’ Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

BENNINGTON, Vt. – The year 2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the Jane Stickle Quilt, which was created in Vermont during the Civil War.

Quilters, quilt collectors, and folk art enthusiasts travel from around the country and world to see the Jane Stickle Quilt during the brief period it is on display each year. In celebration of the quilt’s 150th year, the museum developing an expanded exhibition that incorporates the results of new research on the history of the quilt, the woman who created it, and the troubled times in which it was created. The Jane Stickle Quilt will be on display at the Bennington Museum in Bennington from Aug. 31 through Oct. 14.

The quilt, one of the Bennington Museum’s greatest treasures, is comprised of 169 five-inch blocks, each in a different pattern, containing a remarkable total of 5,602 pieces, all surrounded by a unique scalloped border. The craftsmanship of the quilt has been mentioned in numerous quilting books, and is the topic of Dear Jane, The Two Hundred Twenty-Five Patterns from the 1863 Jane A. Stickle Quilt, by Brenda Papadakis. This quilt is world-renowned and a perfect example of American folk art.

Recently discovered information from the museum’s records and rarely seen artwork by Stickle, along with some items related to both the quilt and quilter, will be on view for the first time.

Additionally, Pam Weeks, a recognized scholar of 19th-century/Civil War-era quilts, will be a contributing writer to the museum’s scholarly journal, the Walloomsac Review. Week’s article will be the result of new research findings on the history of the Stickle Quilt and its ties—personal and otherwise—to the Civil War.

Jane Stickle was born Jane Blakely on April 8, 1817 in Shaftsbury, Vt. She married Walter Stickle sometime before 1850. The two did not have a family of their own and led a simple life in Shaftsbury. During a period when she was alone in the 1860s, Jane lovingly created what is now known as the Jane Stickle Quilt. As a lasting reminder of the turbulent times the country was going through, she carefully embroidered “In War Time 1863” into the quilt. Due to its extreme rarity and fragility, the quilt is shown for only a short period each year to limit light exposure.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Embroidered on one of the blocks of the Jane Stickle quilt is the phrase: 'In War Time 1863.' Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

Embroidered on one of the blocks of the Jane Stickle quilt is the phrase: ‘In War Time 1863.’ Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

Jane Stickle Quilt, 1863. Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

Jane Stickle Quilt, 1863. Created by Jane A. Stickle. Collection of the Bennington Museum.

Crosier of Abbot Erkanbald. German (Hildesheim), circa 997 or before 1011. Silver with gilding, 4 1/2 inches high. Dom-Museum Hildesheim (DS 7).

Medieval church treasures sparkle at Metropolitan Museum

Crosier of Abbot Erkanbald. German (Hildesheim), circa 997 or before 1011. Silver with gilding, 4 1/2 inches high. Dom-Museum Hildesheim (DS 7).

Crosier of Abbot Erkanbald. German (Hildesheim), circa 997 or before 1011. Silver with gilding, 4 1/2 inches high. Dom-Museum Hildesheim (DS 7).

NEW YORK – Germany’s Hildesheim Cathedral in Lower Saxony has one of the most complete surviving ensembles of ecclesiastical furnishings and treasures in Europe, including many medieval masterpieces made between about 1000 and 1250. The cathedral was designated a UNESCO world cultural heritage site in 1985. Major renovations that are currently underway provide the opportunity for “Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim”—an extraordinary selection of about 50 medieval church treasures, most of which have never been shown outside Europe—to travel to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where they will be on view beginning Sept. 17.

The first section of the exhibition will focus primarily on the legacy of Bishop Bernward of Hildesheim (960–1022), one of the greatest patrons of the arts in the Middle Ages. During his time, Hildesheim was a center for bronze-making and other artistic activities. In addition to the famous monumental bronze doors and the column in Hildesheim Cathedral that cannot travel, Bernward commissioned many smaller precious works of art, mostly for his Benedictine monastic foundation. These include the Golden Madonna, a silver crucifix, a pair of richly decorated silver candlesticks and sumptuously illuminated manuscripts, all of which will be included in the exhibition. The monumental life-size wood carving known as the Ringelheim crucifix is one of the earliest surviving three-dimensional sculptures of the Middle Ages. It will provide a focal point for the gallery, which will contain one of the most impressive groups of 11th-century works of art ever seen in North America.

The exhibition will also examine the continuing artistic production of Hildesheim in the high Middle Ages. Opulent jeweled crosses, as well as reliquaries and portable altars decorated with enamel and ivory will be featured. The late-12th-century St. Oswald reliquary surmounted by a silver-gilt bust of the saint and decorated with finely drawn niello plaques is a highlight as are the three gilt-bronze liturgical fans with openwork decoration and cabochon stones, each over 16 inches in diameter.

Hildesheim re-emerged as a major center for bronze casting in the early 13th century. The cathedral’s monumental bronze baptismal font from that time will be the centerpiece of a group of objects that includes a cast bronze eagle lectern, a lion aquamanile, a candlestick and a crozier (a religious staff of office, in the shape of a shepherd’s crook). The baptismal font, dating to about 1226, is one of the most important works to survive from the Middle Ages. The basin and its lid rest on free-standing kneeling figures of the four Rivers of Paradise and the complete ensemble measures 6 feet in height. Richly decorated in relief, the basin depicts the Baptism of Christ and the Virgin Enthroned flanked by scenes from the Hebrew Bible that were understood in the Middle Ages to prefigure the Baptism of Christ. The lid has four additional scenes in relief, and ancillary figures and lengthy inscriptions further enrich the font.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog written by scholars on the museum’s staff in collaboration with scholars in France and Germany. This first comprehensive overview of the Hildesheim collection in English is published by the Metropolitan Museum and distributed by Yale University Press, and will be available in the museum’s book shops ($24.95, hardcover).

Among the education programs organized in conjunction with the exhibition will be a series of gallery talks and a “How Did They Do That?” weekend program for all ages. On Oct. 6, a “Sunday at the Met” program includes the showing of a film on the creation of a bronze aquamanile, followed by a discussion by Peter Dandridge, conservator, Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum, and Ubaldo Vitale, renowned metalsmith and 2011 MacArthur Foundation Fellow. The conversation will focus on the baptismal font, eagle lectern, and other major cast works from Hildesheim within the context of medieval metal casting.

The exhibition will be featured on the website of the Metropolitan Museum (www.metmuseum.org).


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Crosier of Abbot Erkanbald. German (Hildesheim), circa 997 or before 1011. Silver with gilding, 4 1/2 inches high. Dom-Museum Hildesheim (DS 7).

Crosier of Abbot Erkanbald. German (Hildesheim), circa 997 or before 1011. Silver with gilding, 4 1/2 inches high. Dom-Museum Hildesheim (DS 7).