Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Lois Stavsky via streetartnyc.org.

Reading the Streets: Magda Love

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Lois Stavsky via streetartnyc.org.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Lois Stavsky via streetartnyc.org.

BROOKLYN, N.Y. – Construction sites are breeding grounds for street art. Before an apartment building or store or school is built in Brooklyn, fresh plywood practically breeds tags, stickers, stencils, ads for every event and project imaginable, and now, commissioned, legal murals.

Argentinian artist Magdalena Marcenaro, a k a Magda Love, with some help from the Pacific Street Block Association and other Brooklyn nonprofits has transformed a dusty, dreary site on Pacific Street between Court Street and Boerum Place into a surrealist garden.

The first panel features a woman standing in a garden, against the blue background of the construction site. The garden grows not only neon pink and orange flowers, but also a collection of clocks, and an adorable white rabbit hiding in the corner. The woman is painted in variations on off-white, with no discernable facial features, outlined in gray. Around her neck is a yellowish boa, but otherwise she’s naked and covering herself. Still, there’s nothing salacious about it. It’s as if she simply decided, “It’s a nice day. I think I’ll go outside. Clothes are overrated.” Clocks, however, will never be in short supply.

The next panel is a bright pink open mouth, with equally pink lips and gleaming white teeth. The mouth looks like it’s screaming at all of Brooklyn, or perhaps just the collection of black and white ears next to it. Pouring out of this mouth are curls of thick white smoke, with anonymous men’s faces nestled among them.

While a few construction sites have alerted me to exciting concerts, mostly they’re just trying to sell me jeans, which is why I hope this construction site as gallery trend continues, and hopefully, grows. Jeans are fine, but I’d much rather see some art.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Lois Stavsky via streetartnyc.org.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Lois Stavsky via streetartnyc.org.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Magda Love on Pacific Street, New York City. Photo by Ilana Novick.

Heritage offers $500 auction credit to Antique Trader contest winner

IOLA, Wis. — Antique Trader has announced details of its 5th Annual Favorite Find Contest. Entries eligible for inclusion in the 2013 contest will be accepted July 1 through September 30, 2013.

“Once again this year we are teaming up with Heritage Auctions — one of the world’s largest auction houses — offering collectors an array of fine decorative arts and quality pop culture collectibles,” said Karen Knapstein, Print Editor of Antique Trader. “I’m happy to announce this year’s favorite finds grand prize will once again be a $500 auction credit good for any qualifying Heritage auction.” [See official contest rules and view complete details online at http://bit.ly/1955n7q].

“Heritage helps more than 800,000 bidder members add favorite finds to their collection every year and we are delighted to again sponsor Antique Trader’s fun and inspiring contest,” said Noah Fleisher, Public Relations Director at Heritage. “It was a lot of fun assisting last year’s winner in his pursuit and we are looking forward to working with this year’s winner, too.”

Knapstein continued, “Since it’s difficult to pick just one winner from the dozens of entries, we are once again issuing a runner-up prize: a 10-volume reference library courtesy of Krause Publications, plus a one-year subscription to Antique Trader.”

Contest entries can be sent to Antique Trader Favorite Finds, 700 E. State St., Iola, WI 54990 or to atnews@fwmedia.com or fax 715-445-4087. If sending by e-mail, the words “Favorite Finds” should be included in the subject line of the message. Contest entries must be received before midnight September 30, 2013. Full contest rules can be found at http://www.antiquetrader.com/blog/antique-trader-favorite-finds-contest-rules-2013.

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Brian del Toro Buddha, 30in tall, opening bid $450. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Aug. 26 auction features designer picks from Hampton Showhouse

Brian del Toro Buddha, 30in tall, opening bid $450. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Brian del Toro Buddha, 30in tall, opening bid $450. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

BRIDGEHAMPTON, N.Y. (LAPRS) – Home to movie stars and millionaires, the Hamptons on Long Island’s East End are synonymous with stylish homes and luxurious living. But only rarely have furnishings and decorative objects from an uber-chic Hamptons home been made available to purchase at auction online – and until now, never on such a large scale. Through a collaborative effort undertaken by LiveAuctioneers, Hampton Designer Showhouse, Traditional Home magazine and several of America’s top interior designers, more than 300 pieces from the actual rooms and outdoor living spaces of the 2013 Hampton Designer Showhouse will be auctioned online on Monday, Aug. 26th.

The LiveAuctioneers online-only auction exclusively features furnishings and design elements on view through Sept. 2 at the Showhouse in Bridgehampton. A portion of the auction proceeds will benefit Southampton Hospital in nearby Southampton, New York.

Each year, thousands of visitors flock to the Showhouse to view interior-design trends in rooms created by design luminaries.

“This year’s event is special because each designer has personally selected furniture and decorative objects from the Showhouse rooms to be sold through LiveAuctioneers, with part of the proceeds benefiting Southampton Hospital. Being a resident of the Hamptons, I know how important Southampton Hospital is to our area,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO Julian R. Ellison. “It’s exciting to work jointly with internationally acclaimed designers and respected media partners like Traditional Home to achieve a common goal: raising as much money as possible for the hospital,” he added.

Among the many noted designers represented in the Showhouse is Brian del Toro, who, prior to establishing his own successful firm, worked for the legendary Parish Hadley Associates, Connie Beale Inc., and Bunny Williams Inc. The pieces del Toro chose for inclusion in the Hampton Designer Showhouse auction include a super pair of Chinese turquoise vase lamps of his own design, estimated at $10,000-$20,000; and a pair of 1950s Italian open-arm red velvet chairs with an opening bid of $2,500.

Colorado-based Worth Interiors brings understated lines and high style to the Showhouse’s recreation room and wine cellar. They chose for the auction a James De Wulf pool table constructed of concrete with black felt top, estimated at $12,000-$24,000. Dramatically accenting the rec room is a John Pomp sculpted-glass pendant chandelier, estimated at $10,800-$21,600. A modest estimate of $465-$930 belies the high-end vibe imparted by a porcelain with gold Lladro Canvas Tree Rings vase.

From Baltimore Design Group’s Showhouse bedroom comes a selection of auction pieces that reflect company owner Keith Baltimore’s anthropologically influenced modern design vision. His 72-inch-tall sculpture of a pair of faceless, stark-white male and female figures, known jointly as “Rendezvous,” is entered in the auction with a $30,000-$60,000 estimate. In situ at the Showhouse, the sculptural artwork stands beside a rose linen upholstered sectional sofa that has a starting bid of $4,000.

Celerie Kemble of Kemble Interiors chose for the Showhouse two fantastic rugs from her own Celerie Kemble Collection for Merida. One is a striking circular “Catalyst” rug with irregular herringbone pattern, estimate $2,500-$5,000; the other is a 100 percent sisal “Nasturtium” rug woven in Belgium, estimate $3,000-$6,000.

Other must-see furnishings and design elements within the 300+ auction lots come directly from the porch areas created by Bryant Keller Interiors, Kim E. Courtney Interiors & Design, and Ken Gemes Interiors; Brady Design’s guest suite, and Bradley Stephens’ master sitting room, among other Showhouse areas.

There are price points to please every pocketbook in the Aug. 26 sale. Bids on some lots start as low as $40.

“Everyone wishes they could afford to hire a world-class interior designer. This auction presents a rare opportunity to bid on furniture, decorative art and accessories that have been handpicked by a prestigious team of design experts. This is an opportunity not to be missed,” said Ellison.

For additional information on the 2013 Hampton Designer Showhouse or to purchase tickets, please visit www.hamptondesignershowhouse.com.

Absentee bidding has already begun. Live online bidding will commence at 12 noon Eastern time on Monday, August 26th. View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid now or live online on auction day at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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About LiveAuctioneers:

Manhattan-based LiveAuctioneers revolutionized the auction industry when it launched its live-auction technology in conjunction with eBay in 2002. The company now provides Internet live-bidding services to more than 1,800 auction houses in 40+ countries and is the Web’s leading auction-related site. In 2009, LiveAuctioneers introduced its iPhone and Android apps, which opened up a new mobile pipeline to bid in auctions anytime, from anywhere, with complete anonymity.

About Hampton Designer Showhouse:

The Hampton Designer Showhouse is produced by Hampton Designer Showhouse Foundation, Inc. (HDSF, Inc.). HDSF, Inc. is led and operated by a dynamic team of specialists from the worlds of marketing, public relations, fundraising and special events production. They have combined their talents to produce what is now recognized as one of the country’s most successful showhouses. Hampton Designer Showhouse Foundation Inc. is a 501(c)(3) corporation. For more information or to purchase tickets to visit the Showhouse, visit www.hamptondesignershowhouse.com.

About Traditional Home Magazine:

As the largest upscale shelter magazine in America, Traditional Home celebrates the union of timeless design with modern living, inspiring 5 million design lovers to reinterpret classic elegance in a thoroughly personal way. From home, garden, and green living to food, entertaining, and travel, the magazine is a tribute to quality, craftsmanship, authenticity, and family—a trusted resource that respects the past, lives in the present, and embraces products designed for the future. For more information, please visit www.traditionalhome.com. For more information regarding the magazine’s exciting online companion, TRADhome, visit www.tradhomemag.com.

About Southampton Hospital:

Since its establishment in 1909, Southampton Hospital has remained faithful to the vision of its founders in its dedication to providing the very best medical care to the East End community. An affiliate of Stony Brook Medicine and a member of East End Health Alliance, the nonprofit Hospital is fully accredited by the Joint Commission and offers a full continuum of ambulatory and inpatient services ranging from primary medical care to specialized surgical procedures. The only major medical facility on eastern Long Island’s South Fork, the Hospital offers primary, emergency and specialty healthcare, extended service hours and community outreach programs to Southampton, East Hampton and Shelter Island towns. For more information, visit www.southamptonhospital.org.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Brian del Toro Buddha, 30in tall, opening bid $450. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Brian del Toro Buddha, 30in tall, opening bid $450. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Sectional sofa by Pearson, chosen by designer Sherrill Canet, opening bid $2,250. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Sectional sofa by Pearson, chosen by designer Sherrill Canet, opening bid $2,250. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Pool table by James De Wulf, concrete with black felt top, chosen by Worth Interiors, opening bid $6,000. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Pool table by James De Wulf, concrete with black felt top, chosen by Worth Interiors, opening bid $6,000. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Birch cocktail table designed by Keith Baltimore, opening bid $2,250. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Birch cocktail table designed by Keith Baltimore, opening bid $2,250. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Custom upholstered queen-size bed in honeydew velvet designed by Barbara Page, opening bid $1,750. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Custom upholstered queen-size bed in honeydew velvet designed by Barbara Page, opening bid $1,750. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Celerie Kemble Collection for Merida custom ‘Catalyst’ rug, 11ft 6in circle, opening bid $1,250. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Celerie Kemble Collection for Merida custom ‘Catalyst’ rug, 11ft 6in circle, opening bid $1,250. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Liza Sherman NY bubble light fixture of Moroccan hand-blown glass, chosen by designer Patrick Mele, opening bid $3,000. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Liza Sherman NY bubble light fixture of Moroccan hand-blown glass, chosen by designer Patrick Mele, opening bid $3,000. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Pair of rosewood and handwoven cane plantation chairs from Cochin, India; Dutch, 1860, chosen by Bryant Keller, opening bid $4,000. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Pair of rosewood and handwoven cane plantation chairs from Cochin, India; Dutch, 1860, chosen by Bryant Keller, opening bid $4,000. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Faux bamboo ottoman upholstered in turquoise canvas with melon piping, chosen by designer Ken Gemes, opening bid $400. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Faux bamboo ottoman upholstered in turquoise canvas with melon piping, chosen by designer Ken Gemes, opening bid $400. Photo by William A. Boyd Jr.

Restored Star Trek ship Galileo arrives in Houston

HOUSTON (AP) – When the smoke cleared and the music died down, Candy Torres could no longer contain herself. Looking at the shiny, restored Star Trek Galileo shuttlecraft sitting in Houston in all its TV glory, she broke down.

“All of a sudden I was just crying. I was in tears. I couldn’t believe it,” Torres said, donning a brown tourist engineer hat and a NASA mission operations shirt. “It meant something.”

And Torres wasn’t alone. Trekkies of all stripes arrived in Houston Wednesday for the momentous unveiling of the shuttlecraft that crash-landed on a hostile planet in the 1967 “Star Trek” episode called “The Galileo Seven.” Some wore Scotty’s Repair Shop T-shirts, others full-blown spandex outfits worn by Mr. Spock and his peers in the famous TV show and movies that have garnered a following so large and so devoted it is almost cult-like.

Adam Schneider paid $61,000 for the battered shuttlecraft in an auction and spent about a year restoring the fiberglass ship and making it look nearly as it did on that episode. He flew in from New York to mark the unveiling at the Space Center Houston, where it will be permanently displayed not far from NASA’s Mission Control.

“Unbelievably proud,” he said, beaming alongside the white shuttle. “Like sending your kid to college and having them get a job to build a successful life, because this was under our care for a year and we grew very attached.

Jeff Langston, 45, drove more than 160 miles from Austin with his two sons to see the moment. He and his 12-year-old son, Pearce, wore matching red Scotty’s Repair Shop T-shirts. His 10-year-old son, Neo, couldn’t find his shirt, but that didn’t put a damper on the moment.

“It was very exciting,” Neo said, bouncing on his feet. “When they filmed Star Trek the Galileo was cool and now that they remade it, it’s cool to see a new version of the Galileo. And it’s beautiful.”

Richard Allen, the space center’s 63-year-old CEO and president, hopes that just as the Star Trek movies and others like it inspired Torres to pursue a career in science and engineering, that today’s generation will be similarly inspired when they see the Galileo.

“It’s fantastic,” he said of the shuttlecraft. “We’re all about exciting and educating … and I’m convinced that space is one of the best, if not the best, way of creating inquiry in young minds.”

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Plushnick-Masti can be followed on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RamitMastiAP.

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

1924 KKK photo loses Ohio blue ribbon after complaint

XENIA, Ohio (AP) – A photo taken at a 1924 Ku Klux Klan rally with burning crosses was stripped of its winning blue ribbon at a county fair after a complaint that it was offensive.

The photo, which won first place in an antique photo category at the Greene County Fair in Xenia, depicts robed and unrobed KKK members kneeling in a circle at a Dayton rally. Burning crosses are visible in the background of the white supremacist group’s gathering. On the photo is written “Dayton Klan 23 … Realm-of-Ohio … September 27, 1924.”

The photo was removed from the western Ohio fairgrounds Tuesday after someone complained to a fair board member about what it showed and said it shouldn’t have been rewarded by the fair, the Dayton Daily News reported.

Officials want to make clear that the fair in no way was endorsing what the photo depicted.

“We stripped the first-place placing and we have removed the photo from the fairgrounds,” said Jeff Barr, Greene County Agricultural Society director. “The photo was not something we support at all. … We’re here for everybody.”

He said judges in such contests are considering artistry and antiquity when awarding ribbons.

“It could have been the oldest antique there,” Barr said.

The photo was returned to its owner, who wasn’t identified by the fair.

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Information from: Dayton Daily News, http://www.daytondailynews.com

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Nelson Mandela has inspired wall art all over the world. This graffiti painting by Thierry Ehrmann is displayed in the Abode of Chaos museum in France. Courtesy of Organ Museum, copyright 2011, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Artist punches Mandela’s ‘freedom spirit’ onto Chinese wall

Nelson Mandela has inspired wall art all over the world. This graffiti painting by Thierry Ehrmann is displayed in the Abode of Chaos museum in France. Courtesy of Organ Museum, copyright 2011, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Nelson Mandela has inspired wall art all over the world. This graffiti painting by Thierry Ehrmann is displayed in the Abode of Chaos museum in France. Courtesy of Organ Museum, copyright 2011, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

SHANGHAI (AFP) – The portrait of Nelson Mandela is — like the man himself — forged from violence and endurance, created as the artist pounded the wall 27,000 times with a boxing glove which bore the Chinese character for “freedom”.

The resulting Mandela — a boxer and leader of armed struggle jailed for 27 years before becoming South Africa’s president and world-renowned peacemaker — smiles softly with twinkling eyes and a gentle, knowing gaze.

The mural dominates the Shanghai studio of Belgian artist Phil Akashi, 34, who spent late June and early July punching in the intense summer heat of the city where he has made his home, telling AFP: “I think I lost three to five kilos in five weeks”.

He began the work — which is six meters (20 feet) high — after hearing Mandela was battling for his life, entering hospital two months ago and turning 95 there in July.

Mandela’s health, said to be critical at times but lately showing improvement, has captured worldwide attention.

Akashi used cinnabar paste, which is associated with life and eternity in Chinese culture, and the color black to represent Mandela’s fight against his country’s institutionalized racism.

“I really consider Nelson Mandela an extraordinary artist of peace,” Akashi says. “He really represents a fantastic source of inspiration for the entire world.”

The “freedom” character was on a rubber Chinese-style seal mounted on the glove.

Mandela won the 1993 Nobel peace prize jointly with South Africa’s last white president Frederik de Klerk for his “long walk to freedom” and hard-fought reconciliation with South Africa’s minority government.

His release from prison in 1990 became one of the most powerful images of the time.

Elected the country’s first black president four years later, he worked to steer society from racial division to multiracial democracy. Yet Mandela began his struggle endorsing violence, as commander in chief of the armed underground wing of the African National Congress in 1961, before being arrested three years later.

Akashi believes Mandela, as an international symbol of unification, can inspire China’s younger generation even from his sickbed.

Mandela’s story might bring a “message of hope”, Akashi says, and “inspire some people to act or to fight for freedom.”

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Nelson Mandela has inspired wall art all over the world. This graffiti painting by Thierry Ehrmann is displayed in the Abode of Chaos museum in France. Courtesy of Organ Museum, copyright 2011, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Nelson Mandela has inspired wall art all over the world. This graffiti painting by Thierry Ehrmann is displayed in the Abode of Chaos museum in France. Courtesy of Organ Museum, copyright 2011, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

An archival shot of a dealer's booth at the prestigious NHADA New Hampshire Antiques Show, showing the general type of merchandise Michael Whittemore sells, including Americana and weathervanes. Note: This image is for illustrative purposes only; the merchandise shown here is not from the actual heist. Photo by Catherine Saunders-Watson.

Antiques dealer’s van, goods stolen from hotel parking lot

An archival shot of a dealer's booth at the prestigious NHADA New Hampshire Antiques Show, showing the general type of merchandise Michael Whittemore sells, including Americana and weathervanes. Note: This image is for illustrative purposes only; the merchandise shown here is not from the actual heist. Photo by Catherine Saunders-Watson.

An archival shot of a dealer’s booth at the prestigious NHADA New Hampshire Antiques Show, showing the general type of merchandise Michael Whittemore sells, including Americana and weathervanes. Note: This image is for illustrative purposes only; the merchandise shown here is not from the actual heist. Photo by Catherine Saunders-Watson.

ORANGEBURG, S.C. – It has happened all too many times in the past – an antiques dealer traveling to a show hundreds of miles away spends the night in a hotel en route to their destination and awakens to find their vehicle and merchandise have been stolen. This time the victim is Michael Whittemore, an Americana dealer from Punta Gorda, Florida, who was headed north to the 56th Annual New Hampshire Antiques Show in Manchester, New Hampshire.

On the night of July 29th, Whittemore stayed at the Country Inn & Suites in Orangeburg, S.C., parking his Ford van and 16ft covered cargo trailer on the premises. Whittemore took pains to ensure the trailer’s contents were secured, but when he walked out into the parking lot on the morning of July 30th, he discovered his vehicle and trailerful of antiques were gone.

According to published reports, the value of Whittemore’s goods was somewhere in the vicinity of $300,000-$400,000. The contents consisted of folk art, New England furniture, paintings, architectural garden antiques and valuable weathervanes.

The stolen vehicle is a 2010 E-350 white Ford Club Wagon van. Based on hotel surveillance video, the thieves hot-wired the van and simply drove off with it, trailer in tow.

Whittemore told a reporter from WLTX-TV in Columbia, S.C., that the vehicle is not of primary importance to him. “All I want back is the stuff, vans are replaceable, trailers are replaceable, but these things are one of a kind,” he said.

Anyone with information regarding the theft is asked to contact the Orangeburg Sheriff’s Department by calling tollfree 1-888-CRIMESC (274-6372).

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


An archival shot of a dealer's booth at the prestigious NHADA New Hampshire Antiques Show, showing the general type of merchandise Michael Whittemore sells, including Americana and weathervanes. Note: This image is for illustrative purposes only; the merchandise shown here is not from the actual heist. Photo by Catherine Saunders-Watson.

An archival shot of a dealer’s booth at the prestigious NHADA New Hampshire Antiques Show, showing the general type of merchandise Michael Whittemore sells, including Americana and weathervanes. Note: This image is for illustrative purposes only; the merchandise shown here is not from the actual heist. Photo by Catherine Saunders-Watson.

The redesign of LiveAuctioneers’ website creates a richly visual environment in which to browse and bid online. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

LiveAuctioneers unveils new look, mobile use doubles in Q2

The redesign of LiveAuctioneers’ website creates a richly visual environment in which to browse and bid online. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

The redesign of LiveAuctioneers’ website creates a richly visual environment in which to browse and bid online. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

NEW YORK (LAPRS) – LiveAuctioneers, a Manhattan-based company that provides Internet live bidding services to more than 1,800 auction houses worldwide, entered its second decade of operation in Q1 2013 with a substantial increase in both international auction-house clients and new users outside the United States. During the second quarter, the firm unveiled a stylish redesign of its website that CEO Julian R. Ellison described as “smart and modern – right in step with our technology.”

The website’s new theme is spare and generously visual, with a homepage that offers visitors the option of viewing upcoming auctions in a grid-like format with four auctions displayed per horizontal line, or in the traditional LiveAuctioneers style that features one auction with five relevant highlight images per horizontal line. According to Ellison, this is just one example of the many changes LiveAuctioneers has implemented recently in direct response to feedback received from auctioneers and bidders.

“Our website redesign continues to evolve. We want to make LiveAuctioneers not only a place where bidders can enjoy browsing online catalogs and bidding live via the Internet but also a destination for useful information presented as they prefer to view it. That’s why we’ve placed such an emphasis on listening to input from those who rely on our services – the bidders and the auction houses,” Ellison said.

All bidder activities are now aggregated on a freshly designed bidder dashboard. At that location, a logged-in LiveAuctioneers user can check their inbox, view all saved items from future sales, manage their profile and auction alerts; and monitor approvals to bid online in upcoming auctions. They can also contact an auction house to pay for a recent auction purchase and even estimate shipping costs. Another valuable dashboard tool connects to an archive of past online purchases that the user can view chronologically with a single mouse click. The auction-purchase archive provides a valuable record of when the user made each of their purchases, for how much, and from which auction house.

LiveAuctioneers’ second quarter of 2013 was a period marked by significant growth in mobile and tablet use. As compared to Q2 2012, there was a 49.89% increase in mobile visits to LiveAuctioneers.com, while visits through tablets jumped more than 64%. The average mobile visitor remained on the site 6.49% longer than in the comparable quarter of 2012.

Statistics indicated steady growth in many other key areas during Q2. Page views were up 6.98% as compared to Q2 2012, rising from 77,240,751 to 82,631,295. The number of overall visits to the site grew by 2.68% to 8,991,156; and the number of unique visitors rose 1.40% to 4,836,332. The average time spent on the site per visit increased nearly 10% over the comparable quarter of 2012.

“As these figures show, LiveAuctioneers has maintained a solid pattern of growth that has not wavered since the company was launched more than 10 years ago. We’re expecting a very busy fall and winter auction season, which should bring with it a surge of new-bidder sign-ups,” said Ellison.

Click to view a video that shows an auction in progress through the LiveAuctioneers bidding platform: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vD7aSvcHjxw

To contact LiveAuctioneers, email info@liveauctioneers.com.

Online: www.LiveAuctioneers.com

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


The redesign of LiveAuctioneers’ website creates a richly visual environment in which to browse and bid online. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

The redesign of LiveAuctioneers’ website creates a richly visual environment in which to browse and bid online. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

All bidder activity is aggregated within the newly designed dashboard, where users can check their inbox, view saved items from future sales, manage their profile and auction alerts; and perform many other useful auction-related functions. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

All bidder activity is aggregated within the newly designed dashboard, where users can check their inbox, view saved items from future sales, manage their profile and auction alerts; and perform many other useful auction-related functions. Photo: LiveAuctioneers

American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson at the January 21, 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama, where she sang 'My Country 'Tis of Thee.' Official US Marine Corps photo by Kathy Reesey.

UK halts export of Jane Austen ring purchased by Kelly Clarkson

American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson at the January 21, 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama, where she sang 'My Country 'Tis of Thee.' Official US Marine Corps photo by Kathy Reesey.

American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson at the January 21, 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama, where she sang ‘My Country ‘Tis of Thee.’ Official US Marine Corps photo by Kathy Reesey.

LONDON (AP) — The British government has stepped in to stop singer Kelly Clarkson from taking a ring once owned by author Jane Austen out of the country.

The “American Idol” winner bought the gold and turquoise ring at auction last year for just over 150,000 pounds ($228,000). But on Thursday, Culture Minister Ed Vaizey put an export bar on the item until Sept. 30 in the hope that a British buyer will come forward.

Vaizey said Austen’s modest lifestyle and early death aged 41 “mean that objects associated with her of any kind are extremely rare, so I hope that a U.K. buyer comes forward so this simple but elegant ring can be saved for the nation.”

The government has the power to temporarily halt the export of works judged to be national treasures.

The author of “Pride and Prejudice” left the ring to her sister Cassandra, and it remained in the family until it was sold last year.

The export ban can be extended until Dec. 30 if there is a British campaign to buy the ring at a recommended price of 152,450 pounds. Clarkson has agreed to sell the ring should a buyer come forward.

Clarkson has sold millions of records since winning the first series of TV talent show “American Idol” in 2002.

She told a British newspaper last year that as well as the ring she’d bought a first edition of Austen’s novel “Persuasion” in the Sotheby’s sale.

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Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson at the January 21, 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama, where she sang 'My Country 'Tis of Thee.' Official US Marine Corps photo by Kathy Reesey.

American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson at the January 21, 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama, where she sang ‘My Country ‘Tis of Thee.’ Official US Marine Corps photo by Kathy Reesey.

Aaron Turner's untitled oil painting depicting Grand Rapids, Michigan, as it looked in 1836 when he was a 13-year-old boy. Image courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum.

Museum acquires painting of Grand Rapids in 1830s

Aaron Turner's untitled oil painting depicting Grand Rapids, Michigan, as it looked in 1836 when he was a 13-year-old boy. Image courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum.

Aaron Turner’s untitled oil painting depicting Grand Rapids, Michigan, as it looked in 1836 when he was a 13-year-old boy. Image courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) – Grand Rapids Public Museum has acquired a 19th century painting offering a look at the city at the time of its founding.

It’s also a view of a hill that no longer exists, as seen from an island that’s only a memory today.

Though it was painted in the 1880s, artist Aaron Turner was an early pioneer who already was a teenager here when the village of Grand Rapids was organized in 1838.

The untitled oil painting, well preserved, now is on display at the museum in its Newcomers Exhibition.

“This painting, of great significance to the history of Grand Rapids, is essential to have in the collection of the Grand Rapids Public Museum,” Tom Dilley, chair of the museum’s collections committee, told The Grand Rapids Press. “We are fortunate to have such an early depiction of the city decades prior to the advent of photography.”

The ideated painting of two small cabins on the east bank of the Grand River, overlooking a narrow channel of water with a canoe on the bank, several trees on shore, and Prospect Hill in the distance, offers a view of what today is the heart of downtown Grand Rapids at the time of Turner’s arrival around 1836 when he was 13 years old.

It’s a view looking east from Island No. 1, one of two small islands in the Grand River that no longer exist.

Island No. 1, now occupied by the JW Marriott Hotel and its surroundings, began near the foot of Pearl Street. Turner’s landscape is a view of what today includes Amway Grand Plaza Hotel, McKay Tower and Rosa Parks Circle, as seen from the island.

Pioneer Charles Belknap, who arrived in Grand Rapids in 1854 as a boy, recalled years later that Island No. 1 mostly was a meadow, and cows would wade across the river to feed on its grass. Winds from the west would blow through wild plum and crabapple trees on the islands and carry the fruity scent into the village.

Prospect Hill, some 200 feet beyond the original east bank of the Grand River, began its steep climb at Monroe Center and continued north beyond Lyon Street, peaking some 60 to 70 feet above the water level.

Over time, Pearl and Lyon streets and Ottawa Avenue were cut through the wooded ridge of clay and gravel, and the excavated material was used to fill in the channels between Island Nos. 1 and 2 and the east bank.

By the 1890s, both islands and Prospect Hill had disappeared forever.

Privately owned for over 100 years, the painting was given last year to the Grand Rapids Public Museum by the estate of Harold Garter.

Turner later became a newspaper editor and Grand Rapids’ first city clerk. He designed the City of Grand Rapids Seal that still is in use today.

The colorful landscape is signed in the lower left corner “Renrut” or “Turner” reversed.

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Information from: The Grand Rapids Press, http://www.mlive.com/grand-rapids

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Aaron Turner's untitled oil painting depicting Grand Rapids, Michigan, as it looked in 1836 when he was a 13-year-old boy. Image courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum.

Aaron Turner’s untitled oil painting depicting Grand Rapids, Michigan, as it looked in 1836 when he was a 13-year-old boy. Image courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum.

Cityscape view of downtown Grand Rapids as it looks today. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Cityscape view of downtown Grand Rapids as it looks today. Image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.