Dive indicates more treasure to come from US pirate shipwreck

A sampling of gold coins from the 1717 wreck of the Whydah, which was laden with more than 4.5 tons of gold, silver and precious treasure plundered from 50 other ships. The coins pictured here were recovered from the Whydah by Barry Clifford, who discovered the wreck of the pirate ship in 1984. In 2010, the coins were exhibited at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, where this photo was taken. Photo by Theodore Scott, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
A sampling of gold coins from the 1717 wreck of the Whydah, which was laden with more than 4.5 tons of gold, silver and precious treasure plundered from 50 other ships. The coins pictured here were recovered from the Whydah by Barry Clifford, who discovered the wreck of the pirate ship in 1984. In 2010, the coins were exhibited at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, where this photo was taken. Photo by Theodore Scott, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
A sampling of gold coins from the 1717 wreck of the Whydah, which was laden with more than 4.5 tons of gold, silver and precious treasure plundered from 50 other ships. The coins pictured here were recovered from the Whydah by Barry Clifford, who discovered the wreck of the pirate ship in 1984. In 2010, the coins were exhibited at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, where this photo was taken. Photo by Theodore Scott, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

BOSTON (AP) – Fog was swallowing his ship’s bow, the winds were picking up and undersea explorer Barry Clifford figured he needed to leave within an hour to beat the weather back to port.

It was time enough, he decided, for a final dive of the season over the wreck of the treasure-laden pirate ship, Whydah, off Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

That Sept. 1 dive at a spot Clifford had never explored before uncovered proof that a staggering amount of undiscovered riches — as many as 400,000 coins — might be found there.

Instead of packing up for the year, Clifford is planning another trip to the Whydah, the only authenticated pirate shipwreck in U.S. waters.

“I can hardly wait,” Clifford said.

The Whydah was built as a slave ship in 1716 and captured in February 1717 by pirate captain “Black Sam” Bellamy. Just two months later, it sank in a ferocious storm a quarter-mile (400 meters) off Wellfleet, Massachusetts, killing Bellamy and all but two of the 145 other men on board and taking down the plunder from 50 vessels Bellamy raided.

Clifford located the Whydah site in 1984 and has since documented 200,000 artifacts, including gold, guns and even the leg of a young boy who took up with the crew. He only recently got indications there may be far more coins than the roughly 12,000 he’s already documented.

Just before his death in April, the Whydah project’s late historian, Ken Kinkor, uncovered a Colonial-era document indicating that in the weeks before the Whydah sank, Bellamy raided two vessels bound for Jamaica. “It is said that in those vessels were 400,000 pieces of 8/8,” it read.

The 8/8 indicates one ounce (28 grams), the weight of the largest coin made at that time, Clifford said.

“Now we know there’s an additional 400,000 coins out there somewhere,” he said.

The final dive may have provided a big hint at where. Diver Rocco Paccione said he had low expectations when Clifford excavated a pit about 35 feet (10.5 meters) below the surface and sent him down. But his metal detector immediately came alive with positive, or hot, readings.

“This pit was pretty much hot all the way through,” he said.

The most significant artifact brought up by Paccione was an odd-shape concretion, sort of a rocky mass that forms when chemical reactions with seawater bind metals together.

X-rays this week revealed coin-shaped masses, including some that appear to be stacked as if they were kept in bags, which is how a surviving Whydah pirate testified that the crewmen stored their riches.

Clifford doesn’t sell Whydah treasures and said he would never sell the coins individually because he sees them as historical artifacts, not commodities. But he has given coins away as mementos. Two have been sold at the Daniel Frank Sedwick LLC auction house in Florida, with the highest going for about $11,400. The price per Whydah coin would plummet if tens of thousands hit the market, but a retail price of $1,000 each is a reasonable guess, said Augi Garcia, manager at the auction.

Ed Rodley, who studied Whydah artifacts during graduate studies in archaeology at the University of Massachusetts-Boston, said the Whydah site keeps producing treasure decades after its discovery partly because it’s so tough to work.

The site is on the edge of the surf zone, where waves start breaking toward shore. Clifford needs seven anchors to hold the boat in place and the murky ocean bottom is just as active underneath him. Rodley said any pits dug by archaeologists would collapse within hours.

What Clifford has gradually gotten to, three centuries after the Whydah went down, is impressive, Rodley said.

“It’s crazy the stuff that’s come out of that site and keeps coming out of that site, year after year after year,” he said.

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


A sampling of gold coins from the 1717 wreck of the Whydah, which was laden with more than 4.5 tons of gold, silver and precious treasure plundered from 50 other ships. The coins pictured here were recovered from the Whydah by Barry Clifford, who discovered the wreck of the pirate ship in 1984. In 2010, the coins were exhibited at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, where this photo was taken. Photo by Theodore Scott, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
A sampling of gold coins from the 1717 wreck of the Whydah, which was laden with more than 4.5 tons of gold, silver and precious treasure plundered from 50 other ships. The coins pictured here were recovered from the Whydah by Barry Clifford, who discovered the wreck of the pirate ship in 1984. In 2010, the coins were exhibited at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, where this photo was taken. Photo by Theodore Scott, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Diamonds, Rolexes auctioned in insurance fraud case

WAUSAU, Wis. (AP) – Fur coats, diamonds and Rolex watches were among hundreds of items once owned by a pair of Wausau insurance executives that were auctioned off this week to pay for their multimillion-dollar fraud scheme.

Federal agents seized the property from homes and storage units belonging to Timothy Mathwich, 62, and David Schofield, 85. The men and Susan Brockman, 62, of Hayward, were executives at Manson Insurance and were accused of forging millions of dollars in insurance premium financing notes and selling them to River Valley Bank in Wausau between February 2008 and December 2008.

A federal judge has ordered the three to pay nearly $6.3 million in restitution, according to Daily Herald Media.

“In all, we have somewhere in the neighborhood of between 800 and 1,000 victims in this case,” said Assistant United States Attorney Grant Johnson.

A diamond ring netted $40,000 at the auction, which was held at a hotel in Wittenberg on Monday. Auctioneer Jerry Chuilli said the auction raised more than $100,000, but he declined to give a specific total.

Victims of the fraud scheme won’t see any of the proceeds from the auction until a federal judge decides whether a portion of the assets seized by federal agents belong to Mathwich’s wife.

Mary Mathwich contends she is the “co-owner” of the assets under Wisconsin marital property law and is entitled to half of the assets seized, according to court documents filed in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin in Madison.

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Information from: Wausau Daily Herald, http://www.wausaudailyherald.com

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Nova Ars auction to showcase Studio Davico glass Sept. 17

Studio Davico sliding door, wooden structure hand decorated acid engraved glass panel. Panel dimensions: 70.8 inches x 98.4 inches x 1.2 inches. Estimate: €4,000-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico sliding door, wooden structure hand decorated acid engraved glass panel. Panel dimensions: 70.8 inches x 98.4 inches x 1.2 inches. Estimate: €4,000-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico sliding door, wooden structure hand decorated acid engraved glass panel. Panel dimensions: 70.8 inches x 98.4 inches x 1.2 inches. Estimate: €4,000-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

ASTI, Italy – Nova Ars with E-Art Auctions will auction off a 20th century art glass collection by Studio Davico on Sept. 17. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Studio Davico is an Italian company that has specialized in glass and crystal since 1920. It works with a unique technique: the engraving on the glass using acid. Born near artists like Gallè and Lalique, Studio Davico designed also for Fontana Arte and Cristal Art. Presently it continues the tradition with a particular focus on furniture and interior design. This collection is unique and priceless and all pieces are hand-painted.

At Studio Davico three generations—grandfather, father and son—are related by blood but especially united by a common passion: the art and the glass.

Grandfather Davico Giacomo started his activity as an artistic glassmaker. Born near artists like Gallè, Lalique and Val Saint Lambert, he loved popular traditions and ancient methods.

In this way acid engraving had its beginning.

A few pieces from Giacomo’s production are in the auction.

Father Davico Remo (1911-1971) went on with this work designing a new technique with acid. The deep engraving on the glass is unique.

Son Davico Eugenio, encouraged by his father, started working artistic glass and designing for Fontana Arte and Cristalart. He continues the Remo tradition with Davico Specchi, focusing on interior design.

The company currently produces mirrors and bathroom decors, doors and panels, tables, lights, etc.

Studio Davico is present in many international exhibitions like Dusseldorf (1965), Parigi, Brussels, Maastricht.

For details contact Valeria Vallese at Nova Ars: e-mail e.art.auctions@gmail.com, valeria@novaars.net, phone: +39 328 9667353.

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

 


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Studio Davico sliding door, wooden structure hand decorated acid engraved glass panel. Panel dimensions: 70.8 inches x 98.4 inches x 1.2 inches. Estimate: €4,000-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico sliding door, wooden structure hand decorated acid engraved glass panel. Panel dimensions: 70.8 inches x 98.4 inches x 1.2 inches. Estimate: €4,000-€5,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico Four Season screen. Wooden structure, hand decorated acid engraved glass panels. Estimate: €5,000-€6.000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico Four Season screen. Wooden structure, hand decorated acid engraved glass panels. Estimate: €5,000-€6.000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico table, hot curved glass legs, acid engraved glass top, 67 inches x 33.4 inches x 29.5 inches. Estimate: €7,000-€8,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico table, hot curved glass legs, acid engraved glass top, 67 inches x 33.4 inches x 29.5 inches. Estimate: €7,000-€8,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico, wall light panel and decorated acid engraved glass panel, 26.7 inches x 15.7 inches. Made for the Alchimismi exhibition, Salone del Mobile 2012, Frigoriferi Milanesi. Estimates: €3,000-€3,500. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico, wall light panel and decorated acid engraved glass panel, 26.7 inches x 15.7 inches. Made for the Alchimismi exhibition, Salone del Mobile 2012, Frigoriferi Milanesi. Estimates: €3,000-€3,500. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico coffee table, varnished metal, hand-decorated acid engraved glass top, signed Gianuzzi, circa 1970, 51.1 inches x 31.5 inches, 14.9 inches. Estimates: €2,500-€3,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico coffee table, varnished metal, hand-decorated acid engraved glass top, signed Gianuzzi, circa 1970, 51.1 inches x 31.5 inches, 14.9 inches. Estimates: €2,500-€3,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico coffee table, PVC light washbasin, hand-decorated acid engraved crystal panels, light furniture, 96.4 inches wide x 32.6 inches. Estimates: €15,000-€16,000. Nova Ars image.

Studio Davico coffee table, PVC light washbasin, hand-decorated acid engraved crystal panels, light furniture, 96.4 inches wide x 32.6 inches. Estimates: €15,000-€16,000. Nova Ars image.

Couple donates $500,000 for Univ. of Iowa art museum program

The University of Iowa Museum of Art's exhibition 'Jackson Pollock Mural' was the best-attended art exhibition in UIMA's history. Image courtesy of UIMA.
The University of Iowa Museum of Art's exhibition 'Jackson Pollock Mural' was the best-attended art exhibition in UIMA's history. Image courtesy of UIMA.
The University of Iowa Museum of Art’s exhibition ‘Jackson Pollock Mural’ was the best-attended art exhibition in UIMA’s history. Image courtesy of UIMA.

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – A Chicago couple has donated $500,000 to support a collection-sharing project for the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

The gift commitment from Matthew and Kay Bucksbaum will benefit a program that brings small, pre-selected exhibitions from the museum’s collection to museums, nonprofit galleries and art centers in Iowa.

The collection-sharing program began after a historic flood in 2008 damaged the museum and other campus buildings. The gift was made through the University of Iowa Foundation.

Since the flood, the museum’s collection of 14,000 paintings, sculptures, and other objects has largely been housed at the Figge Art Museum in Davenport and other sites around campus.

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The University of Iowa Museum of Art's exhibition 'Jackson Pollock Mural' was the best-attended art exhibition in UIMA's history. Image courtesy of UIMA.
The University of Iowa Museum of Art’s exhibition ‘Jackson Pollock Mural’ was the best-attended art exhibition in UIMA’s history. Image courtesy of UIMA.

Snapshots of bluesman Johnson lead to tug-of-war

The 'studio portrait' of legendary bluesman Robert Johnson was taken around 1935 in Hooks Brothers Studio in Memphis. Copyright 1989 Delta Haze Corporation. Fair use of low-resolution copyrighted image under terms of US Copright Law. No other copyright-free image of the subject is believed to exist.
The 'studio portrait' of legendary bluesman Robert Johnson was taken around 1935 in Hooks Brothers Studio in Memphis. Copyright 1989 Delta Haze Corporation. Fair use of low-resolution copyrighted image under terms of US Copright Law. No other copyright-free image of the subject is believed to exist.
The ‘studio portrait’ of legendary bluesman Robert Johnson was taken around 1935 in Hooks Brothers Studio in Memphis. Copyright 1989 Delta Haze Corporation. Fair use of low-resolution copyrighted image under terms of US Copright Law. No other copyright-free image of the subject is believed to exist.

JACKSON, Miss. — Only two photos of bluesman Robert Johnson — said to have sold his soul to the devil for his guitar talent — are known to exist. One, known as the “studio portrait,” was made for Johnson by Hooks Brothers Studios in Memphis, Tenn. The other, referred to as “the dime store portrait” or “the photo booth self-portrait,” was taken by Johnson himself.

Johnson’s heirs have been fighting over those photos — and his music — for nearly two decades. A Leflore County judge ruled in 2001 that when son Claud Johnson was declared the musician’s sole heir, the royalties provided for the photos and some biographical material were to go to him.

But plaintiffs argue there is a legal question about whether the photographs and writings of Robert Johnson were part of the estate at time of the singer’s death and therefore the property of Claud Johnson. They argue that a trial would determine whether the pictures were part of the estate.

Robert Johnson died in Leflore County, Miss., on Aug. 16, 1938, without leaving a will. Disputed accounts of his death include that he was poisoned by a woman’s jealous husband or that he was stabbed.

Johnson — legend says he sold his soul to the devil at a Delta crossroads, which inspired the 1986 movie “Crossroads” — recorded 29 songs before he died nearly penniless at age 27. But his music has stacked up royalties.

In 2003, the Supreme Court sided with a Leflore County judge who ruled that Claud Johnson should receive royalties from his father’s photographs and music. The ruling voided a 1974 contract signed by other Johnson heirs giving them ownership of the material.

In 2004, the Supreme Court reversed itself and ordered a trial in Leflore County on whether all of Robert Johnson’s memorabilia was owned by Claud Johnson. At the center of the case are the two photographs.

A Leflore County judge again ruled in 2012 that the photographs belong to Claud Johnson.

The Mississippi Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the family’s case Sept. 23 in Jackson.

Robert Johnson had two wives, Virginia Travis and Coletta Craft.

Claud Johnson, the son of Virgie Jane Smith, was born out of wedlock in Lincoln County on Dec. 16, 1931. His birth certificate names R.L. Johnson as his father and lists his occupation as a laborer.

At the time of the musician’s death, Carrie Harris Thompson, Robert Johnson’s half-sister, held herself out to be Johnson’s sole living heir. Thompson took possession of Johnson’s photographs.

On Nov. 20, 1974, Thompson signed a contract with promoter Stephen C. LaVere to assign all her purported rights to copyrights of Johnson’s work, photographs and any other material concerning Johnson that she might have. In return, LaVere was to pay Thompson 50 percent of all royalties he collected in his efforts to capitalize off Johnson.

Annye C. Anderson and Robert M. Harris argued that they were entitled to the royalties as heirs to Thompson, who died in 1983. Anderson is Thompson’s half-sister, but is not related to Robert Johnson. Harris is Thompson’s grandson.

Claud Johnson found out about his father’s estate in the early 1990s, after Thompson’s death, and went to court. In 2000, Claud Johnson was declared the musician’s sole heir.

Anderson and Harris unsuccessfully challenged Claud Johnson’s claim to be sole heir.

After that, in 1989, Anderson and Harris sued LaVere, Delta Haze Corp. and Sony Music Entertainment, claiming they were willed Thompson’s royalties when she died in 1983. Claud Johnson was not a party to the lawsuit.

LaVere signed a deal with CBS Records to release a new Robert Johnson collection. CBS, later acquired by Sony, released a boxed set of Johnson’s recordings. It sold more than a million copies and won a Grammy in 1990.

Leflore County Circuit Ashley Hines ruled in 2001 that when Claud Johnson was declared the musician’s sole heir, the royalties provided for in the 1974 contract were to go to him.

The Supreme Court found in 2004 that the question of whether the photos were the personal property of Carrie Thompson was never litigated. It directed Hines to rule on the issue.

Hines, without a trial, found in 2012 that there was no triable issue of fact on the merits of the plaintiffs’ arguments for royalties and breach of contract.

“Without the iconic photos of Robert Johnson, his mother, father and Carrie Thompson herself and his life story, Sony would not have issued and sold recordings of Robert Johnson, earning untold millions of dollars in the process,” attorneys for Anderson argue in briefs.

Anderson argues that her half-sister as the only surviving family member was closer to Robert Johnson than anyone else. Anderson argues LaVere offered false promises of riches for copies of the snapshots and without her knowledge offered the record company the photos and “her account of Johnson’s childhood and life.”

Sony counters that it had a valid agreement with LaVere and that the issue of ownership was settled when Claud Johnson was declared Robert Johnson’s legal heir, not Thompson or Anderson.

Attorneys for Sony said that after a decade of litigation, Anderson still has no evidence of any wrongdoing against has record company. The company said LaVere and his Delta Haze company were free to license the photographs to Sony and the parties could agree to whatever terms they wanted.

“The record before the court provides no evidence that Sony Music violated any of its duties of good faith and fair dealing toward Thompson and her heirs. Thompson entered into a contract with Sony Music and Sony Music complied with the terms of the CBS contract,” Sony attorneys said.

“Under the plain language of the CBS contract, Thompson agreed to CBS using the photographs, biographical materials and other artwork she furnished LaVere in respect to the album.”

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The 'studio portrait' of legendary bluesman Robert Johnson was taken around 1935 in Hooks Brothers Studio in Memphis. Copyright 1989 Delta Haze Corporation. Fair use of low-resolution copyrighted image under terms of US Copright Law. No other copyright-free image of the subject is believed to exist.
The ‘studio portrait’ of legendary bluesman Robert Johnson was taken around 1935 in Hooks Brothers Studio in Memphis. Copyright 1989 Delta Haze Corporation. Fair use of low-resolution copyrighted image under terms of US Copright Law. No other copyright-free image of the subject is believed to exist.

Bed attributed to Prudent Mallard tops $24,780 at Ahlers & Ogletree

This magnificent Victorian rosewood half tester bed, attributed to Prudent Mallard, was the sale's top lot, at $24,780. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

This magnificent Victorian rosewood half tester bed, attributed to Prudent Mallard, was the sale's top lot, at $24,780. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

This magnificent Victorian rosewood half tester bed, attributed to Prudent Mallard, was the sale’s top lot, at $24,780. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

ATLANTA – A magnificent Victorian rosewood half tester bed, attributed to the renowned 19th century American furniture maker Prudent Mallard, sold for $24,780 at a Summer Estates Auction held Aug. 4 by Ahlers & Ogletree, in the firm’s gallery located at 715 Miami Circle in Atlanta. The bed was the top achiever of the 650 or so lots that came under the gavel. Internet live bidding was provided by www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

“There was a lot of positive energy in the room and everybody had a good time,” said Robert Ahlers, president of Ahlers & Ogletree of just the young firm’s fifth auction. “Many lots sold for more than what we expected, which was a nice surprise, and others brought about what we estimated them for. Overall it was an exciting event. We got lots of positive feedback.”

Ahlers & Ogletree is fast becoming a rising star in the region’s auction industry, having already established itself as a premier player in the Southeastern states after just a handful of auctions.

The Aug. 4 auction featured fresh-to-the-market merchandise from three prominent local estates, plus other consignors. Items included fine works of art, American and continental period furniture, antique clocks, lamps and lighting, art glass, estate jewelry, watches and decorative accessories. Already plans are underway for a Fall Estates Auction, scheduled for Oct. 6. The firm is also handling the liquidation sale on Sept. 21 of Dante’s Down the Hatch in Atlanta.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include an 18 percent buyer’s premium.

Lamps and lighting ignited the crowd and illuminated the room. A Tiffany Studios 10-light lily lamp, marked on the gilt bronze lily plant base and having 10 “stems” holding 10 gold iridescent Favrile glass “lily” shades, realized $21,240; and an early 20th century Duffner & Kimberly table lamp with stained and leaded glass shade on a polished bronze base hit $3,835.

The sale’s number three top lot was an original oil painting by the noted magazine and commercial illustrator Haddon “Sunny” Sundblom (Michigan/Illinois, 1899-1976). Done in 1963, the painting, titled 1914 Kentucky Derby, showed the horse Old Rosebud winning the 1914 Kentucky Derby by eight lengths. The work gaveled for $17,700.

Other artwork featured an oil on board painting by William Aiken Walker (South Carolina, 1838-1921). The work, 8 3/4 inches by 14 3/4 inches depicted a sharecropper cabin scene in a pine and gesso molding frame. It fetched $12,980. Also, a mid-19th century unsigned oil on canvas showing the story of Moses, attributed to Constantin Flavitsky (Russian, 1830-1866), hammered for $4,130.

Bronzes and statuary were also offered. A late 19th century bronze bust of an Oriental beauty with red stone drop earrings, singed en verso by French sculptor Henri Ple (1853-1922), 24 inches tall, fetched $11,800. Also, a lifesize garden statue of the mythical creature Pan playing the flute, executed circa 1880-1920, 70 1/2 inches tall, with great patina, made $4,425.

From the furniture category, tables seemed to dominate the list of top lots, led by an R.J. Horner banquet table with nine 12-inch-wide leaves, which sold for $4,720. A classical Federal New York table attributed to J. & J.W. Meeks, made circa 1830-1840 with D-shaped drop-leaf ends raised $3,540. A rare undecorated and signed Kelvin and Laverne table with rectangular molded edge made $3,068.

Also, a modern brass console and mirror by Mastercraft, having six drawers and with Bernhard Rohne acid-etched details, measuring 30 inches tall by 78 inches wide for the console, rose to $4,484; and a late 19th or early 20th century French Art Nouveau table, rectangular, with molded edge and exotic wood veneer marquetry inlay of leaves, 29 1/2 inches tall, made $2,006.

A stunning men’s two-tone Rolex Submariner watch in good condition sold for $8,260. A rare R. Lalique perfume bottle (Jean de Parys L. Gui) with bright gold decoration and original silk tassel breezed to $2,950. A pair of early 20th century French porcelain urns, having a chrome yellow glaze with white interiors, 12 inches tall, rose to $2,360.

An embroidered velvet panel made for the New York Vanderbilt mansion by the Herter Brothers, having a minor tear and wear that was commensurate for its age, went to a determined bidder for $4,425. An important 18th century American mourning silk embroidery, depicting a young woman in classical dress weeping at a tomb set in a landscape, hammered for $4,130.

Persian rugs were a big hit with bidders. A Sarouk hand-knotted rug, brick red ground with a navy border and medallion, 9 feet by 12 feet 3 inches, coasted to $5,310; a Fereghan palace-size hand-knotted rug, navy ground with muted designs, 12 feet by 19 feet, garnered $5,015; and a Meyeler hand-knotted rug, 3 feet 1 inch by 4 feet 9 inches, topped out at $1,121.

Ahlers & Ogletree is a multi-faceted, family-owned business that spans the antiques, estate sale, wholesale, liquidation, auction and related industries. The firm is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To consign an item, an estate or a collection, you may call them at 404-869-2478 or you can send them an e-mail at info@aandoauctions.com.

 

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

 


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This magnificent Victorian rosewood half tester bed, attributed to Prudent Mallard, was the sale's top lot, at $24,780. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

This magnificent Victorian rosewood half tester bed, attributed to Prudent Mallard, was the sale’s top lot, at $24,780. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Tiffany Studios 10-light lily lamp on a gilt bronze lily plant base and having 10 stems. Price realized: $21,240. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Tiffany Studios 10-light lily lamp on a gilt bronze lily plant base and having 10 stems. Price realized: $21,240. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Gorgeous early 20th century Duffner & Kimberly table lamp with stained and leaded glass shade. Price realized: $3,835. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Gorgeous early 20th century Duffner & Kimberly table lamp with stained and leaded glass shade. Price realized: $3,835. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Oil painting by Haddon ‘Sunny’ Sundblom (American, 1899-1976) titled ‘1914 Kentucky Derby.’ Price realized: $17,700. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Oil painting by Haddon ‘Sunny’ Sundblom (American, 1899-1976) titled ‘1914 Kentucky Derby.’ Price realized: $17,700. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Oil on board painting by William Aiken Walker (Amican, 1838-1921) of a sharecropper cabin scene. Price realized: $12,980. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Oil on board painting by William Aiken Walker (Amican, 1838-1921) of a sharecropper cabin scene. Price realized: $12,980. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Late 19th century bust of an Oriental beauty by French sculptor Henri Ple (1853-1922), 24 inches tall. Price realized: $11,800. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Late 19th century bust of an Oriental beauty by French sculptor Henri Ple (1853-1922), 24 inches tall. Price realized: $11,800. Ahlers & Ogletree image.

Waverly’s to auction iconic Horydczak photos of DC, Sept. 19

Set of six French art and literary journals titled Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght) featuring original lithos by Chagall, Calder and Tapies. Est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.

Set of six French art and literary journals titled Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght) featuring original lithos by Chagall, Calder and Tapies. Est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.

Set of six French art and literary journals titled Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght) featuring original lithos by Chagall, Calder and Tapies. Est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. – Waverly Rare Books, a division of Quinn’s Auction Galleries in suburban Washington DC, will deliver a wealth of local nostalgia to the auction block on Thursday, September 19th, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. The centerpiece of the sale is a remarkable selection of gelatin silver photographic prints by Theodor Horydczak (Polish/American, 1890-1971), whose specialty was documenting in black and white the architecture and social activities in our nation’s capital primarily during the first half of the 20th century.

Horydczak was especially adept at capturing attractive angles of government buildings and landmarks, both inside and out. He enjoyed being in the heart of the action and was there with his camera for such events as the 1933 World Series and Washington’s World War II preparedness campaigns. The vast majority of Horydczak’s work – more than 14,000 photos in all – became part of the permanent collection at The Library of Congress after his family donated the extensive archive.

“Theodor Horydczak was an accomplished commercial photographer whose photos were turned into postcards, calendars and other printed ephemera. In our research, we came across a rare Mount Vernon souvenir postcard featuring one of Horydczak’s photos, which leads us to believe he also sold his photos to museums and cultural institutions,” said Monika Schiavo, director of Waverly Rare Books.

There are 35 large-format Horydczak photographs in the September 19th auction, some of them measuring over 6 feet. Three are pencil-signed and some are stamped on verso with Horydczak’s studio name and reproduction notice.

“The consignor of the Horydczak photographs purchased them years ago as a box lot at a country auction in Virginia, then stored them away,” Schiavo said. Estimates range from $300-$500 for a gelatin silver print of the National Cathedral Sanctuary, to $1,500-$2,500 for a dramatic after-dark image of the US Capitol and Reflecting Pool, pencil-signed by Horydczak. Beautiful photos of the Washington Monument and Mount Vernon are also among the signed lots.

The auction will recall America’s days as a new nation in the form of an archive of historical documents pertaining to Fries Rebellion. The 1798 uprising of German-American farmers near Philadelphia, led by John Fries (circa 1750-1818), protested a federal real property tax enacted by President John Adams to finance an anticipated war with France. In July of 1798 Fries led the group of dissenters to a jail in Bethlehem, Pa., demanding the release of prisoners who had been arrested for resisting the tax.

U.S. District Judge Richard Peters issued warrants for the tax protestors and sent U.S. Marshall William Nichols to Northampton County in February of 1798. Nichols arrested 20 violators and held them in the Sun Tavern in Bethlehem prior to their removal to court in Philadelphia. Fries led a company of men to the tavern and negotiated with Nichols, who eventually released the prisoners; whereupon Fries and his company dispersed. Later, Fries was captured and tried twice. Both times he was convicted of treason and sentenced to hang, but in 1800 he was pardoned by President Adams.

Group Lot 436 contains 31 documents pertaining to Fries Rebellion, including the written appointment of Capt. William Rodman of the Bucks County Troop of Light Dragoons to the post of Deputy Marshall, troop rolls, lists of equipment, payments to soldiers, and correspondence requesting payment for expenses for forage and stores. The archive is estimated at $2,000-$3,000.

A compelling slice of 20th-century British history is encapsulated in Lot 371, a set of three custom-cased, blue cloth albums originally belonging to Edward the Prince of Wales (briefly King Edward VIII until his abdication; later Duke of Windsor). The albums contain 117 photographs relating to Edward’s British Army service in Egypt and Sudan during March and April of 1916. The photos include such subjects as British military personnel in a rowboat crossing the Suez Canal, Indian military men on camels, two photos of a monkey on board the ship that transported Edward to Sudan, two photos of trains, and many pictures of the prince on horseback, with honor guards and other officers. Additionally, there are photos from the palace of the Governor-General of Sudan, and images of Sudanese commoners, some with livestock. The bound albums are embossed in gold: “Windsor Photographs Vol. 159/160/161.” Estimate: $400-$700.

Edward isn’t the only royalty represented in Waverly’s September 19 auction. Memories of America’s own “king” – Elvis Presley – are captured in Lot 434, a record-album sleeve personally inscribed “To Sue/Thanks./Elvis Presley.” In very good condition, the autographed sleeve is expected to make $300-$500.

Among the top entries in the Art & Illustrations section is Lot 192, a cased 1898 folio of Pierre Bonnard lithographs titled La Lithographie Originale en Couleurs (Paris: Andrew Mellerio). Two original lithographs by Bonnard are among those included. Estimate: $1,500-$2,500. Also, Lot 203, a set of six French art and literary journals, features original lithos by Chagall, Calder and Tapies. The six issues of Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght) are from as early as 1966, the period during which Calder’s star rose to prominence worldwide. Estimate: $200-$300. Lot 276, The Prints of Roy Lichtenstein – A Catalogue Raisonne 1948-1993 by Mary Lee Corlett, is estimated at $150-$200.

A boxed set designed by Jasper Johns as a tribute to Gertrude Stein is cataloged as Lot 53. The compartmented set was created for a 1971 museum exhibition in Germany and includes paper rolls that introduce and list the contents of the exhibit; as well as an advertisement for Johns’ “lightbulb” works, and a red plastic rose. The lot is affordably estimated at $80-$120.

Waverly Rare Books’ September 19 auction will begin at 6 p.m. Eastern time. The preview is on from September 14 through and including auction day (see website for hours). The gallery is closed on Sundays.

For information on any lot in the sale, call 703-532-5632 or e-mail monika.schiavo@quinnsauction.com. Visit Waverly Rare Books online at www.quinnsauction.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Set of six French art and literary journals titled Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght) featuring original lithos by Chagall, Calder and Tapies. Est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.
 

Set of six French art and literary journals titled Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght) featuring original lithos by Chagall, Calder and Tapies. Est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.

Boxed set designed by Jasper Johns as a tribute to Gertrude Stein for a 1971 museum exhibition in Germany. Est. $80-$120. Waverly Auctions image.
 

Boxed set designed by Jasper Johns as a tribute to Gertrude Stein for a 1971 museum exhibition in Germany. Est. $80-$120. Waverly Auctions image.

Pierre Bonnard lithograph, one of two originals included in a cased 1898 folio La Lithographie Originale en Couleurs (Paris: Andrew Mellerio). Est. $1,500-$2,500. Waverly Auctions image.

Pierre Bonnard lithograph, one of two originals included in a cased 1898 folio La Lithographie Originale en Couleurs (Paris: Andrew Mellerio). Est. $1,500-$2,500. Waverly Auctions image.

Alexander Calder lithograph depicting a card game, from the set of six issues of Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght). Lot est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.

Alexander Calder lithograph depicting a card game, from the set of six issues of Derriere Le Miroir (Paris: Maeght). Lot est. $200-$300. Waverly Auctions image.

Photograph of Edward the Prince of Wales taken on board a ship en route to Sudan from Egypt, April 1916. From a set of three albums containing 117 photographs documenting the prince’s British Army service. Lot est. $400-$700. Waverly Auctions image.

Photograph of Edward the Prince of Wales taken on board a ship en route to Sudan from Egypt, April 1916. From a set of three albums containing 117 photographs documenting the prince’s British Army service. Lot est. $400-$700. Waverly Auctions image.

Theodor Horydczak (Polish/American, 1890-1971), large-format black & white gelatin silver photographic print depicting the US Capitol Building. Est. $1,500-$2,500. Waverly Auctions image.

Theodor Horydczak (Polish/American, 1890-1971), large-format black & white gelatin silver photographic print depicting the US Capitol Building. Est. $1,500-$2,500. Waverly Auctions image.

Theodor Horydczak (Polish/American, 1890-1971), signed, large-format black & white gelatin silver photographic print depicting the Washington Monument. Est. $1,500-$2,500. Waverly Auctions image.

Theodor Horydczak (Polish/American, 1890-1971), signed, large-format black & white gelatin silver photographic print depicting the Washington Monument. Est. $1,500-$2,500. Waverly Auctions image.

Elvis Presley inscription and autograph on record-album sleeve. Est. $300-$500. Waverly Auctions image.

Elvis Presley inscription and autograph on record-album sleeve. Est. $300-$500. Waverly Auctions image.

From an archive of 31 original historical documents pertaining to the 1798 Fries Rebellion in Pennsylvania, the written appointment of Capt. William Rodman of the Bucks County Troop of Light Dragoons to the post of Deputy Marshall. Lot est. $3,000-$5,000. Waverly Auctions image.

From an archive of 31 original historical documents pertaining to the 1798 Fries Rebellion in Pennsylvania, the written appointment of Capt. William Rodman of the Bucks County Troop of Light Dragoons to the post of Deputy Marshall. Lot est. $3,000-$5,000. Waverly Auctions image.

Fu Baoshi paintings to be offered at Kaminski Auctions, Sept. 21

Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.
Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.

Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.

BEVERLY, Mass. – On Sept. 21, Kaminski Auctions will bring to the podium an exceptional pair of Chinese paintings. The pair of watercolor paintings by Fu Baoshi, each depicting a scholar viewing a waterfall in a rocky landscape, will be the highlight of Kaminski’s fine Asian art and antiques auction. The paintings were purchased 30 years ago by a private collector from the original owner of the paintings, who received them directly from the artist. The 540-lot auction begins at 10 a.m. Eastern. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet Live bidding.

“These are the best examples of 20th century Chinese painting that I have seen in the last few years. I am very glad to have the opportunity to sell them.” Bob Yang, head appraiser of Kaminski Auctions’ fine Asian art and antiques department.

The artist, Fu Baoshi, was born in Jiangxi Province, China in 1904 and trained at the School of Fine Arts in Tokyo, Japan before returning to China in 1935 to teach at the art department at Central University in Nanjing. The paintings are dated the summer of 1945 and were executed at Chengdu, China, the temporary capitol established by the Chinese Nationalist Party. Fu’s choice of subject matter for these two paintings could be interpreted as his expression of relief that the second Sino-Japanese war had ended. He depicts a scholar able to appreciate and contemplate the great beauty of the Chinese natural landscape during a brief moment of peace.

Fu Baoshi’s painting style evolved over the course of his life from a more traditional style of Chinese painting toward his own unique style that incorporated impressionistic brushstrokes and atmospheric washes. Fu has since become renowned for both the detailed figurative and the sublime landscape details that these paintings exemplify. Still intact in their original wooden frames, the paintings were designed to fit inside them exactly, thus preserving an important piece of the history of Chinese painting.

The pair of paintings at Kaminski is expected to sell for between $200,000 and $400,000.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.
 

Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.

Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.
 

Fu Baoshi watercolor painting, China, 20th century, in original wood frame under glass, 17 1/4 inches x 26 inches. Kaminski Auctions image.

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Sept. 9, 2013

This cane has no hidden features. It's a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig's foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan's auction in Cincinnati in July.
This cane has no hidden features. It's a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig's foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan's auction in Cincinnati in July.
This cane has no hidden features. It’s a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig’s foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan’s auction in Cincinnati in July.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – The first cane probably was just a strong stick, but by the 19th century a cane was a fashion accessory and sometimes hid a tool.

The heads of canes were made of wood, ivory, gold or silver, leather, pewter or porcelain, sometimes with inlay and precious gems.  At recent antiques sales, there have been some very unusual canes. Some hid weapons. Sword canes are familiar because of movies. But few know there are canes that held parts of a gun, including ammunition—a hidden arsenal. Another was a blow gun that could “shoot” bullets. A woman’s cane had a short knife blade to use for protection. A “flicker” cane was made so a short blade could pop out of the handle. Most deadly was the Diabolique, a cane outlawed in France. If someone tried to pull the cane, a set of spikes popped out of the shaft wounding the attacker’s hand. Tap the cane on the ground and the spikes disappeared.

Most canes are less threatening. There is a cane handle covered in carved grapes that unscrews to reveal a corkscrew. Another, a bamboo cane, has a horse-measuring ruler inside. One held supplies for a writer—pens, paper, inkwell, penknife, eraser, pencil, sealing wax, a candle and matches. Another held a woman’s accessories, including tweezers, nail picks, buttonhook, crochet needle, bottles and fan. But that is not all. Imagine a cane that held a long, thin working violin and bow. An artist could get a cane that held an easel, palette and paints. Some canes are amusing. A peephole let the owner look at a picture of a bathing beauty, while another held a whiskey bottle. Strangest is a Chinese “spitter” cane with a silver handle shaped like a man’s head. Press his pigtail, point and the head spits water at a victim. Any of these canes sell for thousands of dollars today.

Q: I’m looking for information about a W. Goebel figurine of a little boy and girl. It’s titled “Rosi & Rolf” and the number on the bottom is 17 603 11.

A: Your figurine was made in 1981 by the W. Goebel Porcelain Factory of Rodental, Germany. Its full name is “Rosi & Rolf, The Hikers.” It is sometimes advertised online as a Hummel figurine because Goebel also made Hummels, but it’s not a Hummel. We have seen Rosi & Rolf offered online for $20 and up.

Q: Going through piles of my stuff, I found my teen collection of 24 silly arcade cards called “Licenses to Do Anything.” I remember buying them from coin-operated machines in the late 1930s or early ’40s. Each one is postcard size, 3 1/4 by 5 1/2 inches, and is printed on heavy stock with green lettering and a fancy green border. Mine include a Back Seat Driver’s License, a Bachelor’s Permit and a Spendthrift Permit. What are they worth?

A: Your cards were issued by the Exhibit Supply Co. of Chicago. The copyright date on the ones we have seen is 1941. A set of 30 mint examples is being offered online for $30. So your smaller set would sell for less than that

Q: I understand that antique typewriters are popular again. I have a 1935 Remington typewriter that’s in good condition. It’s 10 by 11 inches and is in a black case. What is my typewriter worth?

A: Arms manufacturer E. Remington & Sons of Ilion, N.Y., made the first successful typewriter for Sholes & Glidden in 1874. It typed capital letters only. Remington made the typewriter in its sewing machine division. It sold its typewriter business and the rights to the Remington name to the Standard Typewriter Manufacturing Co. in 1886. Standard changed its name to Remington Typewriter Co. in 1902 and became Remington Rand in 1927. Remington portable typewriters were introduced in 1920. Typewriter sales fell in the 1990s as more people started using computers. Vintage typewriters have recently become popular with people who like the touch and enjoy seeing words appear on paper as they are typed. Value of your typewriter: about $145.

Q: Moving to a smaller place, I must sell or give away my collector plates. I have an Edna Hibel Mother’s Day plate called “Erica and Jamie” made in 1985. Is it worth anything? Are people collecting Edna Hibel plates?

A: Edna Hibel (b. 1917) is an artist known for her paintings of mothers and children. A series of Edna Hibel Mother’s Day plates was made by Edwin M. Knowles China Co. from 1984 to 1991. Collector plates have gone down in value during the past 10 years, and your plate currently sells for under $15.

Q: In the 1960s, I bought my daughter a large plush Cat in the Hat stuffed toy. She doesn’t want it, but I hear it’s collectible. What do you think?

A: Dr. Seuss’ “The Cat in the Hat” storybook was published in 1957, and plush Cat in the Hat toys soon followed—and are still being made. Early versions in “like new” condition might sell for more than newer toys. But don’t expect to get more than about $20 for it.

Tip: To remove stains from a glass vase, fill it with warm water and drop in a denture-cleaning tablet.

Sign up for our weekly email, “Kovels Komments.” It includes the latest news, tips and questions and is free if you register on our website. Kovels.com has lists of publications, clubs, appraisers, auction houses, people who sell parts or repair antiques and more. Kovels.com adds to the information in this column and helps you find useful sources needed by collectors.

Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, Auction Central News, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

  • Wooden recipe box, two roosters, hinged, Japan, 1950s, 5 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches, $5.
  • Riviera Pottery creamer, ivory, $20.
  • Candle snuffer, silver plate, baroque, Wallace, circa 1941, 8 inches, $25
  • Pressed-glass cake stand, Roman rosette, 10 1/4 inches, $55.
  • Hawaiian hula girl nodder, grass skirt, circa 1940, 5 1/2 inches, $80.
  • Slip burner lamp, green swirl iridescent shade, brass shoulder, c. 1920, 6 3/4 x 3 inches, $130.
  • Weather vane, eagle, copper, arrow directional, stand, c. 1910, 76 x 23 1/2 inches, $235.
  • Toy milk truck, rack, bottles, wood, Buddy L, 13 1/2 inches, $360.
  • Staffordshire spaniel, seated, red, white, c. 1860, 7 1/4 inches, pair, $360.
  • U.S. flag, wool, 45 stars, stamped “Vernon,” 1896-1907, 72 x 120 inches, $800.

The Kovels have navigated flea markets for decades. Learn from the best. Kovels Flea Market Strategies: How to Shop, Buy and Bargain the 21st-Century Way, by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, tells you about the latest smartphone apps and websites to help you shop, share and ship, as well as what to wear, what to bring and, most important, how to negotiate your way to a bargain. Also find tips on spotting fakes, advice about paying for your purchases, and shipping suggestions. Full-color booklet, 17 pages, 8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches. Available only from Kovels. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail $7.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

© 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This cane has no hidden features. It's a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig's foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan's auction in Cincinnati in July.
This cane has no hidden features. It’s a folk art cane with a handle carved in the shape of a pig and a pig’s foot. It sold for $240 at a Cowan’s auction in Cincinnati in July.

Long-lost van Gogh painting unveiled in Amsterdam

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), 'Sunset at Montmajour,' 1888, from the collection of the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Image courtesy of the Museum.
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), 'Sunset at Montmajour,' 1888, from the collection of the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Image courtesy of the Museum.
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), ‘Sunset at Montmajour,’ 1888, from the collection of the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Image courtesy of the Museum.

AMSTERDAM (AFP) – Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum unveiled a newly discovered landscape painting today that was painted at the peak of Vincent van Gogh’s career. The 1888 landscape oil, titled “Sunset at Montmajour,” previously had been considered a forgery.

Sunset at Montmajour was unveiled to applause by the museum’s director Axel Rueger as a “unique experience that has not happened in the history of the Van Gogh Museum.”

Depicting a landscape of oaks in the south of France, the painting was brought to the museum from a private collection.

Researchers set to work and authenticated it based on comparisons with van Gogh’s techniques and a letter he wrote on July 4 1888, in which he described the painting.

It had been lying for years in the attic of a Norwegian collector who thought the painting was a forgery, after buying it in 1908.

“This discovery is more or less a once in a lifetime experience,” said researcher Louis van Tilborgh, who helped with its authentication. “All research indicates that this is a painting by Van Gogh.”

The long-lost painting was made at around the same time as some of van Gogh’s most famous works, including “Sunflowers” and “The Bedroom”.

“This is a very, very special morning and you’re seeing a very, very happy director in front of you,” Rueger told AFP.

“When I was told that it had been authenticated as a genuine van Gogh, I could not believe it.”

The museum declined to be drawn on the identity of the mystery collector.

“Unfortunately we cannot divulge too much about the identity of this collector as we need also to protect his privacy,” Rueger said.

The Van Gogh Museum reopened its doors to the public in early May with a stunning new display of some of the Dutch master’s greatest works, completing a trio of renovations of the city’s most famous museums.

It is located on Amsterdam’s historic Museumplein where many other Dutch art treasures, like Rembrandt’s “Night Watch,” can also be found at the recently reopened Rijksmuseum.

The museum features 200 works, 140 by van Gogh, including “The Bedroom,” “Irises,” “The Potato Eaters” and “Wheatfield with Crows.” The museum’s collection also includes many works by contemporary painters.

The newly unveiled van Gogh will go on display on September 24, on a year-long loan from its owner.

With its reopening, the museum expects to attract some 1.2 million visitors over the next year and is one of the world’s 25 most popular museums, according to the City of Amsterdam.

The Van Gogh Museum was the last of Amsterdam’s three major museums to reopen its doors after extensive refurbishments, underlining the Dutch capital’s status as a top art destination.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), 'Sunset at Montmajour,' 1888, from the collection of the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Image courtesy of the Museum.
Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890), ‘Sunset at Montmajour,’ 1888, from the collection of the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Image courtesy of the Museum.