Keith Haring (American, 1958-1990), 'Kong,' 1988, screenprint in colors on canvas, 7 3/4 x 7 1/2in. Provenance: Private Collection. To be auctioned by Rago's on Nov. 16, 2013. Est. $800 - $1,000.

Master printer Steven Andersen to speak at Rago’s Nov. 13 open house

Keith Haring (American, 1958-1990), 'Kong,' 1988, screenprint in colors on canvas, 7 3/4 x 7 1/2in. Provenance: Private Collection. To be auctioned by Rago's on Nov. 16, 2013. Est. $800 - $1,000.

Keith Haring (American, 1958-1990), ‘Kong,’ 1988, screenprint in colors on canvas, 7 3/4 x 7 1/2in. Provenance: Private Collection. To be auctioned by Rago’s on Nov. 16, 2013. Est. $800 – $1,000.

LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – The Rago Arts and Auction Center will host an open house on Wednesday, November 13, featuring a talk by master printer Steven Andersen. Titled “Why Can’t We Do This? Renegade Artists and Contemporary Art,” the talk will commence at 6 p.m. The special event takes place during preview week for Rago’s November 16 Fine Art auction, which features over 200 original works and prints from Steven Andersen’s personal assemblage as the Vermillion Editions Limited collection. Internet live bidding is available through LiveAuctioneers.

Steven Andersen will share a freewheeling and unscripted reminiscence on his start in printmaking and the disruptive artists with whom he collaborated in the 1970s. These include Arakawa, Chuck Close, Robert Cumming, Martha Diamond, Allan D’Arcangelo, Sam Gilliam, Red Grooms, Robert Mapplethorpe, Malcolm Morley, Robert Moskowitz, John Newman, James Rosenquist, Hollis Sigler, as well as the aforementioned Nicolas Africano, Robert Mapplethorpe, James Rosenquist, Andy Warhol and William Wegman.

Andersen will also be at Rago during its auction exhibition on Tuesday, November 12th and Wednesday, November 13th for all who would like to meet him and speak with him about the work in the sale.

The auction house opens on Wednesday, November 13 at noon. A reception begins at 5 pm. Steven Andersen will speak at 6 pm. Please RSVP to 609.397.9374 ext. 119 or raac@ragoarts.com. Interested parties may still attend, even if they have not been able to RSVP in advance.

Visit Rago’s online at www.ragoarts.com.

The online auction catalog for the Nov 16 sale will be available to view soon at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Keith Haring (American, 1958-1990), 'Kong,' 1988, screenprint in colors on canvas, 7 3/4 x 7 1/2in. Provenance: Private Collection. To be auctioned by Rago's on Nov. 16, 2013. Est. $800 - $1,000.

Keith Haring (American, 1958-1990), ‘Kong,’ 1988, screenprint in colors on canvas, 7 3/4 x 7 1/2in. Provenance: Private Collection. To be auctioned by Rago’s on Nov. 16, 2013. Est. $800 – $1,000.

The top lot of the sale, an Art Deco painted glass panel attributed to the S.S. Normandie, sailed to $80,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Hindman 20th century decorative arts sale realizes $1.23M

The top lot of the sale, an Art Deco painted glass panel attributed to the S.S. Normandie, sailed to $80,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

The top lot of the sale, an Art Deco painted glass panel attributed to the S.S. Normandie, sailed to $80,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

CHICAGO – Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ 20th Century Decorative Arts auction on Oct. 23 realized $1.23 million. The top lot of the sale, an Art Deco painted glass panel attributed to the S.S. Normandie, sold for $80,500 to a buyer in Paris. The panel was likely part of a mural designed by Jean Dupas for the ocean liner, whose lavish interiors were masterpieces of the Art Deco period.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

A collection of rare cameo glass from the estate of Adrienne Krumhorn led the first hour of the sale.

A Gallé Crocus glass vase from Krumhorn’s collection sold for $17,500, estimated at $7,000-$9,000, a Gallé mold blown vase sold for $15,000, estimated at $4,000-$6,000 and a René Lalique Penthievre vase sold for $27,500, estimated at $10,000-$20,000. A majority of the Adrienne Krumhorn collection realized prices beyond the high estimate. Other examples of Daum, Gallé, René Lalique and Gabriel Argy-Rousseau works brought three and four times their presale estimates.

“Glass collections like these do not come to the market very often and when they do, we see fantastic results like we saw on Wednesday,” said Mike Intihar, a senior specialist with Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Bidding was lively throughout the auction in all categories. A Daum cameo glass lamp, which had been in storage and descended through family ownership, sold for $47,500. A René Lalique Suzanne figure sold for $25,000, and a Tiffany Studios Nautilus lamp sold for $25,000. These three lots drew bidders from France, Japan, England and New York, but all three sold to buyers in the Midwest, demonstrating the buoyancy of the market in Chicago for 20th century works.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ next 20th Century Decorative Arts auction is scheduled for April 15. Consignments are invited through Feb. 14. For details phone 312-280-1212.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The top lot of the sale, an Art Deco painted glass panel attributed to the S.S. Normandie, sailed to $80,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

The top lot of the sale, an Art Deco painted glass panel attributed to the S.S. Normandie, sailed to $80,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Tiffany Studios Nautilus lamp sold for $25,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Tiffany Studios Nautilus lamp sold for $25,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Daum cameo glass lamp realized $47,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Daum cameo glass lamp realized $47,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Gallé mold blown vase sold for $15,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Gallé mold blown vase sold for $15,000. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Gallé Crocus glass vase sold for $17,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

Gallé Crocus glass vase sold for $17,500. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers image.

German silver repoussé water pitcher, circa 1900, marks: ‘800,’ (crescent-crown), 9-1/8 x 6 x 6-3/4 inches (23.2 x 15.2 x 17.1 cm), 50.5 ounces. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Nearly 500 lots to shine in Heritage silver auction Nov. 5

German silver repoussé water pitcher, circa 1900, marks: ‘800,’ (crescent-crown), 9-1/8 x 6 x 6-3/4 inches (23.2 x 15.2 x 17.1 cm), 50.5 ounces. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

German silver repoussé water pitcher, circa 1900, marks: ‘800,’ (crescent-crown), 9-1/8 x 6 x 6-3/4 inches (23.2 x 15.2 x 17.1 cm), 50.5 ounces. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

DALLAS – A rare pair of Paul Storr George III silver entrée dishes on silver-plated stands is expected to bring $20,000, to spotlight nearly 500 lots in Heritage Auctions’ Fine Silver & Vertu Signature Auction taking place Tuesday, Nov. 5, beginning at 10 a.m. Central. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Also by Paul Storr is a cruet stand and a set of 12 George III plates, circa 1799-1800, which is expected to bring more than $20,000.

“From the 18th century to Modern and even Contemporary, encompassing work from Continental Europe, the Far East, Mexico and a strong selection of American silver, this truly is a silver auction with incredible breadth and is sure to delight a wide range of collectors,” said Karen Rigdon, consignment director of fine silver and decorative arts at Heritage. “The quality and diversity of silver available in this auction is truly exquisite.”

Topping a fine selection of Gorham silver is a highly desirable Martelé vase, which required a total of 108 hours of work to produce and chase according to Gorham’s own records, expected to bring $9,000 and a 123-piece Christofle French flatware service in the elegant Royal Cisele pattern, is expected to sell for $8,000-plus. A highly unusual nautical-themed German silver repoussé water pitcher, chased in gorgeous undulating waves centered with a striking open-mouthed mask personifying the wind, is expected to sell for $3,000.

A rare cup marked by the Texas silversmith/retailer Samuel Bell & Brothers of San Antonio is sure to bring interest. Its pure simplicity and weight are a pleasure to behold in hand and is sure to draw interest with an estimate of $3,000.

A striking selection of centerpieces in the auction is led by a circa 1960 Buccellati Italian swan, offered among several lots of fine Buccellati silver, which is estimated to bring $5,000-plus, a Walker & Hall Edward VII reticulated epergne, circa 1907-1908, featuring three suspended baskets, could fetch $4,000-plus, a Gorham figural centerpiece retailed by Tiffany & Co. with a standing figure supporting the bowl with birds perched to either side anticipated to hammer at $3,000-plus, and a modernist centerpiece by José Marmolejo, circa 1965, has been estimated to bring $3,000-plus.

Of significant interest is a large collection of George W. Shiebler & Co. silver incorporating enamel work and 14K gold: a cabinet vase with painted enamel chrysanthemum, expected to sell at $3,000-plus, and a letter opener with a beautiful geometric shaded enamel handle expected to bring $2,000-plus. Among the examples incorporating 14K gold medallions and embellishments is a 10-1/8 inch vase with gold poppy blooms topping sinuous leafed stems expected to bring $4,000-plus.

The depth and breadth of an extensive group of tableware includes an imposing Italian oval buffet meat server for Tiffany & Co., which is expected to bring $5,000-plus, and a pair of ewers and a tea service of the same pattern retailed by Tucker & Co of San Francisco but made by silversmiths on opposite coasts: a five-piece Gorham coin silver and silver gilt coffee service, could bring $4,000-plus and its mate, a pair of W.K. Vanderslice & Co. coin ewers, circa 1860, which are expected to bring $2,000-plus.

Following continued interest from bidders we are presenting a series of Tiffany & Co. silver and enamel circus figures by Gene Moore, including the prized standing elephant with a dragon emblazoned on its cloak expected to bring $3,000 and a collection of more than 40 American silver match safes to be presented starting with the rare Shreve & Co. 14K and gold quartz match safe to bring $6,000-plus.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


German silver repoussé water pitcher, circa 1900, marks: ‘800,’ (crescent-crown), 9-1/8 x 6 x 6-3/4 inches (23.2 x 15.2 x 17.1 cm), 50.5 ounces. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

 

German silver repoussé water pitcher, circa 1900, marks: ‘800,’ (crescent-crown), 9-1/8 x 6 x 6-3/4 inches (23.2 x 15.2 x 17.1 cm), 50.5 ounces. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Pair of George III silver entrée dishes on silver-plated stands, Paul Storr, London, England, circa 1809-1810, 10 x 16 x 9 inches (25.4 x 40.6 x 22.9 cm) 173.3 ounces. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Heritage Auctions image.

 

Pair of George III silver entrée dishes on silver-plated stands, Paul Storr, London, England, circa 1809-1810, 10 x 16 x 9 inches (25.4 x 40.6 x 22.9 cm) 173.3 ounces. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Set of 12 George III silver plates, Paul Storr, London, England, circa 1799-1800 9-5/8 inches diameter (24.4 cm), 208.3 ounces. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Set of 12 George III silver plates, Paul Storr, London, England, circa 1799-1800 9-5/8 inches diameter (24.4 cm), 208.3 ounces. Estimate: $20,000-$30,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Gorham Martelé silver and silver gilt vase, Gorham Manufacturing Co., Providence, R.I., 1898, 15-3/8 inches high (39.1 cm), 44.7 ounces. Estimate: $9,000-$12,000. Heritage Auctions image.

 

Gorham Martelé silver and silver gilt vase, Gorham Manufacturing Co., Providence, R.I., 1898, 15-3/8 inches high (39.1 cm), 44.7 ounces. Estimate: $9,000-$12,000. Heritage Auctions image.

French Royal Cisele pattern partial silver flatware service for 16, 123 pieces, Christofle, Paris, France, designed 1960, ‘STERLING, 925.’ Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Heritage Auctions image.

French Royal Cisele pattern partial silver flatware service for 16, 123 pieces, Christofle, Paris, France, designed 1960, ‘STERLING, 925.’ Estimate: $8,000-$10,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Samuel Bell & Brothers coin silver cup, Samuel Bell & Brothers, San Antonio, Texas, circa 1865, 3-3/4 inches high (9.5 cm), 10.1 ounces, inscribed ‘Tommy.’ Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Samuel Bell & Brothers coin silver cup, Samuel Bell & Brothers, San Antonio, Texas, circa 1865, 3-3/4 inches high (9.5 cm), 10.1 ounces, inscribed ‘Tommy.’ Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Heritage Auctions image.

The Cattolica di Stilo is a Byzantine church in the comune of Stilo, Calabria, southern Italy. It is a national monument and not the church dismantled by artist Francesco Vezzoli. Image by Montek. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

Italian artist dismantles church to rebuild it at MoMA

The Cattolica di Stilo is a Byzantine church in the comune of Stilo, Calabria, southern Italy. It is a national monument and not the church dismantled by artist Francesco Vezzoli. Image by Montek. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

The Cattolica di Stilo is a Byzantine church in the comune of Stilo, Calabria, southern Italy. It is a national monument and not the church dismantled by artist Francesco Vezzoli. Image by Montek. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

MONTEGIORDANO, Italy (AFP) – An Italian artist has dismantled a church in southern Italy to rebuild it at the Museum of Modern Art inNew York, ruffling feathers among heritage authorities.

The pretty church in the small village of Montegiordano in Calabria, built at the end of the 19th century and later desecrated, has been carefully taken apart and wrapped up stone by stone on the orders of Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli.

It now has to be shipped to the United States where it is expected to figure in the heart of one of the world’s top contemporary art museums, the MoMA PS1 in the Long Island City neighborhood of New York.

But locals in the village of 2,000 inhabitants are put out over losing their church and have reportedly filed a complaint alleging the property is national heritage.

Vezzoli, 42, a popular and controversial artist and filmmaker from northern Italy, aims to rebuild the church as part of his “Trinity” project on art, religion and glamor—a series of exhibitions being shown at the MOMA, the MOCA in Los Angeles and the MAXXI in Rome.

In Rome, he has created a gallery mixing the classical and contemporary, where faux Roman and Greek statues hold aloft examples of his work, while the Los Angeles exhibition plays on Vezzoli’s use of the cinema world to mark the modern obsession with celebrity status.

Vezzoli, best known for his works featuring celebrities such as Courtney Love, Sharon Stone and Lady Gaga, aims to use the shows in the three cities to explore links between art, religion, sex and divas.

He bought the Montegiordano church on the Internet and plans to project his video works onto its rough stone shell.

But the locals’ complaints have thrown a wrench in the works: While most of the dismantled church lies in a hangar in the local port of Gioia Tauro, the project has been blocked by the local cultural superintendent in Cosenza, according to the Corriere della Sera daily.

The artist, who insists he has all the correct paperwork and permits to proceed, told the daily that “the church was lost in scrub land and I’m taking it to the MoMA PS1, isn’t it better there?”

“Taking it to MoMA PS1 had a symbolic importance for me, which perhaps isn’t shared by whoever has blocked the project,” he said.

“I am ready to send it back again afterwards and rebuild it as it was, or even restore it,” he added.

Neither the cultural authorities nor the police were available for comment, but a source close to the artist told AFP the situation “is being resolved.”


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Cattolica di Stilo is a Byzantine church in the comune of Stilo, Calabria, southern Italy. It is a national monument and not the church dismantled by artist Francesco Vezzoli. Image by Montek. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

The Cattolica di Stilo is a Byzantine church in the comune of Stilo, Calabria, southern Italy. It is a national monument and not the church dismantled by artist Francesco Vezzoli. Image by Montek. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

Alexander Gardner's (American, 1821-1882) photographic portrait of Abraham Lincoln taken on Feb. 5, 1865, approximately two months before his assassination.

‘Lincoln’ movie props headed to Springfield museum

Alexander Gardner's (American, 1821-1882) photographic portrait of Abraham Lincoln taken on Feb. 5, 1865, approximately two months before his assassination.

Alexander Gardner’s (American, 1821-1882) photographic portrait of Abraham Lincoln taken on Feb. 5, 1865, approximately two months before his assassination.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) – Props and costumes from the Oscar-winning movie “Lincoln” are coming to Springfield.

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum said Monday the pieces will debut in early 2014 across the street from the library at Union Station. The exhibit is called “Lincoln: From History to Hollywood” and will include Lincoln’s office, Mary Lincoln’s bedroom and dresses and Lincoln’s suit.

“When we visited for research on the film, it was our thought that there might be an opportunity to bring such an exhibit to Springfield, and that is now a reality,” director Steven Spielberg said in the library’s statement.

The items are on loan from Spielberg and Dreamworks Studios. They previously were on display in a Lincoln exhibit at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in California. Officials say the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation will pay to move the items from California to Illinois.

The exhibit is free for children and $5 for adults. Museum officials say they expect it to have an open-ended run in Springfield, remaining for “many years to come.” The exhibit was first reported by Lee Enterprises Newspapers.

“Lincoln” premiered in 2012 and won two Academy Awards: best actor for Daniel Day-Lewis’ portrayal of the president and best production design.

Other props on display will include a uniform worn by Lincoln’s son, a stethoscope, papers and magazines from Lincoln’s office and gloves worn by Day-Lewis.

“This is a case where history and Hollywood come together to everyone’s benefit,” said Amy Martin, director of the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. The agency

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Online:

Presidential library and museum: http://www.illinois.gov/alplm/Pages/default.aspx

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Information from: The Pantagraph, http://www.pantagraph.com

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Alexander Gardner's (American, 1821-1882) photographic portrait of Abraham Lincoln taken on Feb. 5, 1865, approximately two months before his assassination.

Alexander Gardner’s (American, 1821-1882) photographic portrait of Abraham Lincoln taken on Feb. 5, 1865, approximately two months before his assassination.

First page of John Hay's draft of the Gettysburg Address, in Abraham Lincoln's handwriting, from the Library of Congress website.

First page of John Hay’s draft of the Gettysburg Address, in Abraham Lincoln’s handwriting, from the Library of Congress website.

Kevin W. Tucker. Image courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Kevin Tucker named senior curator at Dallas Museum of Art

Kevin W. Tucker. Image courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Kevin W. Tucker. Image courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

DALLAS – Kevin W. Tucker has been promoted to the position of the Margot B. Perot Senior Curator of Decorative Arts and Design effective Nov. 1.

“On behalf of the DMA Board of Trustees, it is with great pleasure that we announce Kevin’s promotion to senior curator, as he has been an exemplary part of our curatorial team,” said Maxwell L. Anderson, the Eugene McDermott Director of the Dallas Museum of Art. “Kevin’s work over the last decade has firmly established the decorative arts and design program in Dallas as one of the finest of its type in the country. For his many efforts as a leader in his field, we are very pleased to recognize Kevin with this promotion.”

“Kevin’s award-winning publications and major touring exhibitions, including ‘Modernism in American Silver’ and ‘Gustav Stickley and the American Arts & Crafts Movement,’ were received with acclaim by our peers and are now considered standards in the field,” said Olivier Meslay, the DMA’s associate director of curatorial affairs.

Currently co-organizing the first retrospective of industrial designer Peter Muller-Munk, in 2010 Tucker authored the catalog and nationally touring exhibition “Gustav Stickley and the American Arts & Crafts Movement,” a major study of one of the seminal figures in early 20th-century design. Tucker has lectured and written on various aspects of modern design and was the Dallas Museum of Art’s project director and co-curator for the nationally touring exhibition “Modernism in American Silver: 20th-Century Design” (2005); he also served as an editor and contributor for its accompanying award-winning catalog.

In addition, he co-curated the DMA exhibitions “All the World’s a Stage: Celebrating Performance in the Visual Arts” (2009), “There and Back Again: Selections from the Graham D. Williford Collection of American Art” (2005), and “Imperial Taste: Chinese Porcelain for the Western Trade” (2005); curated “Ten for Tea” (2007) and “Through the Needle’s Eye: American Quilts from the Permanent Collection of the Dallas Museum of Art” (2004); reinstalled the museum’s American decorative arts holdings, including the creation of galleries dedicated to 19th century American silver and 20th century design; and was responsible for numerous major acquisitions, including the Huntingdon wine cistern, a pair of Louis Comfort Tiffany “undersea” windows, a rare Gustav Stickley linen chest, Viktor Schreckengost’s “Jazz Bowl,” and a variety of American silver works such as a Viking vase for the 1901 Buffalo Exposition, a Tiffany & Co. Aztec coffee service for William Randolph Hearst, the gem-studded celestial centerpiece for the 1964 New York World’s Fair, a silver box designed by Archibald Knox, and a silver tea urn designed by architect Eliel Saarinen.

Kevin W. Tucker joined the Dallas Museum of Art as curator of decorative arts and design in June 2003. He has more than 20 years of experience in the field and is a specialist in American decorative arts and design of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Tucker came to the Dallas Museum of Art from the Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, S.C., where he had most recently served as chief curator and deputy director. Tucker also served as the Columbia Museum of Art’s curator of decorative arts and associate/assistant curator for decorative arts. In addition to his work in Columbia, Tucker served as curator of decorative arts & Owens-Thomas House at the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah, Ga.

Tucker has served on the board of the curators committee of the American Association of Museums, and of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and he has been involved with various regional and national professional committees, including that of the Association of Art Museum Curators.

Tucker holds an M.A. degree in Applied History/Museum Studies and a B.A. in History from the University of South Carolina and was the recipient of a 2007 Winterthur Research Fellowship for his work on “Gustav Stickley and the American Arts & Crafts Movement.”

The Dallas Museum of Art is known for the strength of its European and American decorative arts collections, with special emphasis in 18th century English silver, 19th and 20th century American silver and ceramics, and 20th century design. In 2002, the Dallas Museum of Art acquired the Jewel Stern American Silver Collection, one of the world’s most distinguished collections of 20th-century American silver. With about 8,000 works, the decorative arts and design collection spans a chronological range from the 16th century to the present in a broad range of media, including furniture, textiles, glassware, ceramics, and metalware, and, most significantly, silver.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Kevin W. Tucker. Image courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Kevin W. Tucker. Image courtesy of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Image by SPUI, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Okla. cities hope signs lure tourists to Route 66

Image by SPUI, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Image by SPUI, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – At least two cities in Oklahoma along the famed Route 66 are planning to turn to billboards and neon signs to lure visitors in.

Travel along the route, which runs from Chicago to Santa Monica, Calif., was popular first during the Dust Bowl era and later as a vacation destination for Americans. But traffic has slowed over the years as interstates became the more popular — and quicker — path to drive. This means some communities along Route 66 are bypassed by travelers.

Route 66 enthusiast Kathy Anderson has been working with the nonprofit Bethany Improvement Foundation to create the Billboard Museum, dedicated to commemorating vintage signs and billboards and the people who created them.

“There is a need, especially in Oklahoma, for a resting place for signs, whether it’s neon, porcelain (or) any kind of outside advertising that is being threatened with destruction, either because there has been a business change or the sign itself, the owner just doesn’t want the sign,” said Anderson, who has worked on several Route 66 videos.

Arlita Harris, the foundation’s secretary-treasurer, hopes the museum would draw more visitors to Bethany, located just west of Oklahoma City.

“There are a lot of people traveling Route 66, and I’m going to say 99 percent of them are international visitors,” Harris said. “… We have just needed an attraction that makes sure people go through the Bethany part of Route 66 and not bypass the (Oklahoma City) metro area.”

The museum is just an idea at the moment, though meetings are taking place all the time, Harris and Anderson said. Land _ and lots of it _ is what they are searching for now.

“A billboard museum cannot be small, so it won’t fit on two acres,” Anderson said.

The idea is to have a building to house some signs and billboards, as well as a driving loop to showcase vintage billboards. Anderson and members of the Billboard Museum committee also hope to locate a shopping complex called the Route 66 Retroplex near the museum.

“If we don’t start putting them in museums or keeping them local — they’re collectible — they’re going to be taken down sold and taken out of state,” said Jim Gleason, sales manager at Superior Neon Signs and a member of the Billboard Museum committee.

A little more than 100 miles to the northeast, Tulsa City Councilor Blake Ewing and members of a Route 66 Task Force have come up with their own ideas to draw route enthusiasts and other tourists to the area. One of the ideas is to promote neon signage along the famed highway in Tulsa.

“We want to relax the sign code on the Route 66 corridor to allow for the more historic neon signs like you would have seen the back in the day. I think, obviously, that’s part of the attraction.

“Neon now has a nostalgic cool about it,” Ewing said.

Ewing hopes the sign code would be updated within the year, along with a new city grant that would help businesses pay for the neon signs. The task force has proposed a Route 66 bus line using retro-style buses and a Route 66 Authority to oversee development and promotion of the corridor, among other recommendations.

“We’ve got 20-some odd miles of Route 66 running through our city and it’s just been neglected for some time, but we really believe it’s one of our city’s core assets, and if we just invest in it, it will improve the attraction,” he said.

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Map showing the route of U.S. 66 from Chicago to Los Angeles. Image by Freddie. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Map showing the route of U.S. 66 from Chicago to Los Angeles. Image by Freddie. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Prototype of the Twiggy Drive Macintosh, 1983. Auction Team Breker image.

Breker bracing for surge on early Apple computers Nov. 16

Prototype of the Twiggy Drive Macintosh, 1983. Auction Team Breker image.

Prototype of the Twiggy Drive Macintosh, 1983. Auction Team Breker image.

COLOGNE, Germany – In May, AuctionTeamBreker made news by breaking the record price for an Apple-1 computer. The 1976 original unit surpassed all expectations when it sold for 516,461 euros ($671,400). On Nov. 16 Auction Team Breker will be offering another Apple-1 computer, but this time with its original white cardboard box (estimate: 250,000-400,000 euros/$300,000-$500,000). LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

The unit comes from the first batch of 50 computers by Apple’s first client, the Byte Shop. “No. 46” is one of very few Apple 1 computers still in working order, as well as the only known example in its original box. A scarce photograph of the bedroom in Jobs’ parental house shows a stack of identical boxes of the first order of 50 units.

Although 500,000 euros/$670,000 for a computer that does not even have the Internet may seem staggering, the Apple 1 phenomenon has had a steady build-up. Early model Apple computers have been changing hands privately for many years but have only lately started to appear at public auctions.

Even rarer than the Apple-1 is the prototype of the Twiggy Drive Macintosh from 1983, only one other is known worldwide as it was Steve Jobs’ order to destroy all prototypes as soon as production started. This “original Macintosh” prototype is unique as it shows the signatures of the “Macintosh Division” molded on the inside of the cover, also from Steve Jobs and “Woz” Steve Wozniak. The keyboard with pullout card tray did not make it to production. This is a rare machine in fully working condition, this is one of only two worldwide existing examples known today. Included in this lot is a letter of authenticity signed by Dan Kottke, an early Apple employee who worked on the Macintosh team with Jobs. Also his signature is shown on the inside cover (estimate 40,000-70,000 euros/$50,000-$90,000).

Another landmark computer by the young Apple Inc. was world‘s first mouse-operated Apple Lisa-1, 1983, which was sold for six months only. This rare and historically important computer comes up at the same specialty auction in Germany on Nov. 16 (estimate: 15,000-30,000 euros/$20,000-$40,000).

Predating the Apple 1 by some 150 years is a rare 1835 Arithmomere—the first commercially viable mechanical calculator—in a boulle housing with engraved dedication from its inventor, Thomas-de-Colmar, (20,000-40,000 euros/$30,000-$50,000). Another legend is a 1944 example of the three-rotor Enigma ciphering machine of World War II, whose codes dramatically influenced the war so (20,000-40,000 euros/$30,000-$50,000).

Typewriter collectors will be delighted by the attractive North from 1892 (5,000-8,000 euros /$6,500-$10,000) and a fine Crown Model 1 from 1888 in original carrying case (9,000-12,000 euros/$12,000-$15,000).

In addition to early computer technology and office antiques, the sale features a private collection of scientific instruments from the Age of Enlightenment to the late 19th century.

Among the devices for timekeeping are a Universal Ring Dial, c. 1840 (1,200-2,000 euros/$1,500-$2,500) and a superbly engraved equinoctial silver sundial by Jose Marino Zilveti, c. 1790, (1,000-1,500 euros/$1,300-$2,000).

Eighteenth century British pieces include a lacquered brass reflecting telescope by James Lynch of Dublin, c. 1770 (1,500-2,500 euros/$2,000-$3,000) and mahogany waywiser, or surveyor’s wheel, by the royal instrument maker George Adams, London, c. 1740 (1,500-2,500 euros /$2,000-$3,000). Also from London comes an extensive Wenham’s binocular microscope compendium by Ross, circa 1875 (3,000-5,000 euros /$4,000-$6,500), while amicroscope compendium by Parisian maker Nachet, circa 1875 (2,000-3,000 euros/$2,500-$4,000) leads a selection of Continental instruments that includes an impressive astronomical transit telescope by Brunner Freres, circa 1870 (3,000-5,000 euros /$4,000-$6,500). Instruments of surveying and navigation, the majority with their original original patina, are also included.

From the mighty to the miniature, the auction showcases a selection of self-playing musical instruments, many from a distinguished private museum collection. The largest is a majestic Belgian Decap dance organ, 1950s, with illuminated facade housing a mechanical orchestra of bass pipes, three drums and a glockenspiel (20,000-35,000 euros/$25,000-$45,000). One of the smallest is an exquisite diamond-set musical jewelry box in the form of a grand piano, circa 1880, created for a senior guard of the Cossacks Regiment (30,000-50.000 euros/$40,000-$65,000).

Among the highlights from a lifelong Eurospean toy collection is a Gauge I Marklin H steam locomotive from circa 1930 (4,000-6,000 euros/$5,000-$8,000). A fine horse-drawn carriage, 1909, by the same maker, with original lamps and livery, conjures a graceful form of bygone transport (7,000-10,000 euros/$9,000-$13,000). Marklin was renowned for its pond yachts and miniature steamers such as the clockwork pleasure boat “Loreley”, 1914, (12,000-15,000 euros/$16,000-$20,000).

Toys by other makers are equally well-represented. Pristine automobiles by Carett, Bing and Tipp & Co. line the shelves alongside many near-mint motorcycles by Kraus and Distle and boxed examples of Ernst Paul Lehmann’ whimsical work.

Combining train and automobile with a particularly French frivolity is the surreal train automobile Renar, circa 1905, which was retailed exclusively by the Parisian department store Magasin du Louvre, and still retains its original box almost 110 years later (10,000-15,000 euros/$13,000-$20,000).

Representing the magical side of life is a collection of 19th and early 20th century French automata. One of the highlights is the beautiful Magicienn by Roullet et Decamps, circa 1890, with bisque portrait face, whose tranquil gaze makes the strange contents of the pots all the more surprising (40,000-60,000 euros/$50,000-$75,000).

Also associated with magic is Le Magnetiseur by Phalibois, Paris, c. 1910, (30,000-45,000 euros /$40,000-$58,000), probably modeled on Harry Kellar’s famous act, the “Levitation of Princess Karnac.” Another piece that seems to defy the laws of gravity is Renou’s Metamorphic Man, circa 1910, who increases in height as the temperature rises, until he is taller than the thermometer itself (6,000-8,000 euros/$8,000-$10,500).

Equally fantastical are Roullet et Decamps’ Monkey Patissier, circa 1885, with kitten pie, (8,000-12,000 euros/$10,000-$15,000) and a full-size wax working model of the Death of Cleopatra, circa 1890, (10,000-15,000 euros/$13,000-$19,000).

For details phone + 49-(0) 2236-38 43 40 or email auction@breker.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Prototype of the Twiggy Drive Macintosh, 1983. Auction Team Breker image.

Prototype of the Twiggy Drive Macintosh, 1983. Auction Team Breker image.

The Apple-1 computer. Auction Team Breker image.

The Apple-1 computer. Auction Team Breker image.

Arithmomere mechanical calculator, 1835. Auction Team Breker image.

Arithmomere mechanical calculator, 1835. Auction Team Breker image.

Le Magnetiseur Phalibois automaton, Paris, circa 1910. Auction Team Breker image.

Le Magnetiseur Phalibois automaton, Paris, circa 1910. Auction Team Breker image.

Belgian Decamps dance organ, 1950s. Auction Team Breker image.

Belgian Decamps dance organ, 1950s. Auction Team Breker image.

Marklin Loreley clockwork toy boat. Auction Team Breker image.

Marklin Loreley clockwork toy boat. Auction Team Breker image.

Washington Irving's headstone, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow N.Y. Image by James P. Fisher III. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

New TV series attracts tourists to real Sleepy Hollow

Washington Irving's headstone, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow N.Y. Image by James P. Fisher III. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Washington Irving’s headstone, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow N.Y. Image by James P. Fisher III. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

SLEEPY HOLLOW, N.Y. (AP) – In the real village of Sleepy Hollow, where the tour guides say “Halloween is our Christmas,” the fall season is even busier than usual, thanks to a hit TV show that plays off the legend of the Headless Horseman.

The new Fox series Sleepy Hollow, which brings Ichabod Crane into the present day with a save-the-world mission, has fostered interest in Washington Irving’s 1819 short story, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. In the original, Crane is a skinny, superstitious schoolmaster who has a nightmarish encounter with a decapitated Hessian soldier. It mentions several places in modern-day Sleepy Hollow, located on the Hudson River 25 miles north of New York City.

One of them is the Old Dutch Church, which Susan Laclair, of Granby, Conn., explored with her husband this month.

“We were watching the show, and I was remembering the old story I’d read as a kid. I love anything to do with history, and I said, ‘There’s a real Sleepy Hollow. Let’s go for a few days.’”

Also in town was the Werner family of Greenwood, Ind., which headed for Irving’s gravesite at the historic Sleepy Hollow cemetery and planned to visit his home in nearby Tarrytown. Christian Werner, 10, wore a cemetery-appropriate skeleton T-shirt.

“We’ve always kind of wanted to come here, and we love the TV show,” said his mother, Jill Werner. She said her younger son, 7-year-old Colin, planned to dress as the Headless Horseman for Halloween back home.

Anthony Giaccio, the village administrator, said, “We’ve always had people from all over come to our Halloween events, but the Fox show has really added to that.”

On the local tourism website, “every time there’s a show, the hits spike, and we’re at three times more than last year,” Giaccio said.

The extra attention fits the village’s goal of encouraging tourism to support a downtown that has struggled since General Motors closed an assembly plant in 1996. Later that year, the village voted to change its name from North Tarrytown to Sleepy Hollow.

In 2006, on Halloween, an 18-by-18-foot sculpture depicting the climax of Irving’s story was installed alongside Route 9. With a haunted Horseman’s Hollow at an 18th-century mill and performances of the “Legend” at the Old Dutch Church, the village is part of Historic Hudson Valley’s increasingly popular Halloween attractions.

Giaccio said the tourist season seems to be getting longer, starting in mid-September and stretching into mid-November, but the village hopes to encourage people to visit at other times of the year as well. A current TV ad, created using a state grant, says Sleepy Hollow “isn’t all about horror”—but the characters intoning the phrase include the Grim Reaper and a disembodied head.

Mark Goffman, an executive producer of Sleepy Hollow, said Irving’s tale was inspirational.

“Every Halloween I was read it as a kid, and I have loved it,” he said. “The idea that you can take this short story, which has such iconic characters in it, and then recreate it and reinvent it and involve the Revolution and put it in modern times, all told it just makes for a really epic kind of drama.”

Even apart from the time travel, many liberties are taken on TV. To name just a few, Ichabod Crane is handsome, there are several Starbucks in Sleepy Hollow and the population is 144,000 instead of 10,000. An upcoming episode will suggest a “blood tie” between Crane and the Horseman, Goffman said.

It all appears to be working. The debut episode of Sleepy Hollow was Fox’s most successful fall drama premiere since 24 began in 2001, and the series was renewed for a second season after just three episodes.

“The short story is 17 pages long, and we’re creating a show that will hopefully be on for a very long time,” Goffman said. “So we drew upon the short story as a basis and really needed to mold it into something new that people hadn’t seen before.”

Sleepy Hollow is shot in Wilmington, N.C., but Goffman said he’d like to travel to the real Sleepy Hollow for some scenes.

“We’re looking for story lines that will get us up there,” he said. “It would be great to take advantage of some of that iconic imagery.”

___

If You Go…

SLEEPY HOLLOW, N.Y.: http://www.visitsleepyhollow.com/ . Located about 30 miles north of Manhattan.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-10-28-13 1356GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Washington Irving's headstone, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow N.Y. Image by James P. Fisher III. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Washington Irving’s headstone, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Sleepy Hollow N.Y. Image by James P. Fisher III. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Portrait of Washington Irving (1783-1859) by John Wesley Jarvis (1780-1840). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Portrait of Washington Irving (1783-1859) by John Wesley Jarvis (1780-1840). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Raphael's 'Portrait of a Young Man' was looted by the Germans from the Czartoryski Museum in Poland in 1939. It was not located until 2012. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Study reveals Dutch museum artworks may be Nazi loot

Raphael's 'Portrait of a Young Man' was looted by the Germans from the Czartoryski Museum in Poland in 1939. It was not located until 2012. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Raphael’s ‘Portrait of a Young Man’ was looted by the Germans from the Czartoryski Museum in Poland in 1939. It was not located until 2012. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AFP) – A probe by Dutch museums revealed Tuesday that 139 of their artworks may have been stolen or forcibly acquired by the Nazis during World War II, many from Jewish owners.

Around a quarter of the 162 Dutch museums that took part in the probe into art acquisitions between 1933 and 1945 have objects with “potentially problematic history,” the Netherlands Museum Association said.

The questionable objects consist of 69 paintings, two sculptures, 31 decorative art object, 13 Jewish ritual objects and 24 drawings.

The probe’s findings were announced to coincide with the launch of a website (www.musealeverwervingen.nl) which details the objects and their histories, with the aim of getting help to complete missing information.

“The Museum Acquisitions research from 1933 gets to the heart of what museums do: studying their collections and telling the story to the public,” said the project’s director, Siebe Weide.

“It was no easy task, but our museums always realized the importance of the research. The fact that much time has passed since the end of the Second World War should not be a reason not to do the research,” Weide said.

Names of the original owners have been attributed to 61 objects, the association said.

“Where possible the museums will try to make contact with relatives or heirs of the original owners,” it said on its website.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Raphael's 'Portrait of a Young Man' was looted by the Germans from the Czartoryski Museum in Poland in 1939. It was not located until 2012. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Raphael’s ‘Portrait of a Young Man’ was looted by the Germans from the Czartoryski Museum in Poland in 1939. It was not located until 2012. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.