Pablo Picasso (Spanish 1881-1973) Vase deux anses hautes, 1952 Estimate:  $20,000 / 25,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Lalique, Picasso, Asawa & Tiffany lead Michaan’s Dec. 6 sale

Pablo Picasso (Spanish 1881-1973) Vase deux anses hautes, 1952 Estimate:  $20,000 / 25,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Pablo Picasso (Spanish 1881-1973) Vase deux anses hautes, 1952 Estimate:  $20,000 / 25,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Michaan’s Furniture and Decorative Arts Department brings over 130 lots of exceptional property to bidders on December 6, 2013. This fine auction, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers, will offer pieces of uncompromising quality from the department’s mainstay categories, including silver, porcelains, furniture and art glass.

Property ranges from the 18th through the 20th centuries and is of both European and American origins. Decorative items will undoubtedly delight at auction, with an impressive collection of Lalique glass available in 23 lots. Noteworthy examples from the Lalique collection are seen in an important opalescent Bacchantes vase of dancing maidens (lot 1277 $10,000-15,000), an opalescent Perruches coupe (lot 1279, $6,000-8,000), an aubergine Courges vase (lot 1273, $6,000-8,000), a blue Anges coupe (lot 1276, $6,000-8,000), a blue Soucis vase of flowers in raised relief (lot 1271, $8,000-10,000) and a Dahlias plafonnier vasque of dahlias and leaf sprays in raised relief with original hang and ceiling cap (lot 1288, $4,000-6,000). Also noteworthy are 12 lots of Russian icons, 6 lots of Handel lamps and Georg Jensen offerings of sterling flatware (lot 1256, $10,000-15,000) and bread plates (lot 1257, $2,500-3,000).

Yet another outstanding piece from the decorative selection lies in a Viennese Sucessionist silkscreen and painted figural tapestry (lot 1212, $10,000-15,000). Inspired and modeled after Gustav Klimt’s lush female figure paintings, the Vesna Studio piece bears a signature denoting “Vesna Fabrik.” An elegant and ethereal maiden stands as the focus of the fabric art, as she is depicted as a blue hued being. Such fine tapestries were often used as traditional window coverings and decor, with this piece’s production falling squarely in the first quarter of the 20th century.

From a private Northern California collection is a beautiful fire light painting by Eanger Irving Couse (1866-1936) titled “The Bead Maker” (lot 1023, $80,000-120,000). Arguably the most famous member of the Taos Society of Artists group, his figurative scenes focusing on Native American themes proved quite popular with New York buyers after his move to the city in 1901. His depictions of the natives of Taos Pueblo were often fire-lit, providing a soothing and serene quality. Couse’s subdued color palette, as well as softness of tone and detail, created peaceful scenes that expressed the natives’ spiritual relationship with nature. Couse’s works have graced numerous public galleries including the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the New Mexico Museum of Art, the Montclair Gallery and the Detroit Museum of Art.

Picasso’s Madoura ceramics personify his artistic genius and passion for the sculptural medium. The imagination of Picasso was brought to life by Madoura studio artisans, who worked in conjunction to execute prototypes and produce numerous editions. Together, they created 4,000 different ceramic forms in limited editions ranging from 25 to 500. Each piece remains a one-of-a-kind production, since every item was hand painted. The vase for sale typifies Picasso’s strong sense of form in harmony with bold, emotive brush strokes. Created in 1952, “Vase Deux Anses Hautes” bears a Picasso edition pottery stamp as well as a mark denoting “Madoura Plein Feu” (lot 1057, $20,000-25,000).

A quintessential oil painting by Armin Hansen (1886-1957) is yet another featured piece in the fine art selection. “After the Day’s Catch” captures the spirit and endurance of laborers who lived and worked along the California Pacific Coast in the early 20th century (lot 1034, $40,000-60,000). Hansen, who was a California native, carried a deep connection and appreciation for these particular laborers of the sea. He also spent the majority of his professional life working in Monterey. His signature, strong brush strokes of both figure and background beautifully communicate mood and locale. Hansen’s impressionist style and tonal color palette have elevated him to recognition as a world-class artist.

Another exceptional work is seen in “Dream of Alaska” by William Keith (lot 1026, $8,000-12,000). The striking and bold use of white and blue hues convey the magnificent glaciers of the Alaskan landscape. The image is masterfully painted in typical Keith (1838-1911) fashion as it displays a strong sense of locale and connection with the natural world. The piece is exceedingly rare, as he only touched upon Alaskan landscapes for approximately one year. Keith’s lifelong friendship with John Muir was instrumental in creating the series, as their travels lead them to remote locales. In 1886, he traveled to Alaska and returned to paint the series of canvases titled “Dreams of Alaska.” The paintings were not literal translations, but became fantasy vantage points inspired by the wonder of the Alaskan wilderness. “Dreams of Alaska” remains a significant work, as only documentarian depictions of the Alaskan wilderness preceded the series.

Highlighting modern sculpture is an original Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) wire wreath (lot 1059, $80,000-90,000). Her work is included in renowned art collections such as the M.H. de Young, Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney in New York. Her mark on San Francisco has been significant, with contributions including numerous public fountains (deeming her San Francisco’s “fountain lady”) as well as the honor of the San Francisco School of the Arts being renamed the Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts in 2010. Asawa’s tied wire sculptures have been nationally recognized and lauded for their balance of nature, form and artistry. When these masterpieces are viewed in person, they beautifully come to life as they continuously change depending upon the viewing angle.

A tapestry by modern master Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) stands as a coveted textile in the auction’s 20th century lots (lot 1085, $4,000-5,000). Motherwell’s artistic body of work focused primarily upon paintings and printmaking, making this tapestry a rare and collectible find indeed. The piece expresses his abstract expressionist sensibilities, measuring approximately 124 by 98 inches. Expert producer Gloria F. Ross completed the weave work, with the collaboration creating this exemplary piece.

A Jacque Schnier (1898-1988) clear acrylic creation titled “Ode to the Square” will be sold as lot 1062 at an auction estimate of $3,000-5,000. It was later in his career that he focused on mediums such as clear acrylic resin, or Plexiglas. His enthusiasm for the material led him to say that, “At last I’ve found my medium. It’s as though I am sculpting pure light. At 76, I’m hitting my stride.” Schnier was a pioneering figure at Berkeley, with a teaching career that spanned thirty years. He was instrumental in establishing both undergraduate and graduate degree programs in sculpture. He also won numerous awards for his work as well as for public commissions, including statues and bas-reliefs for the Golden Gate International Exposition in 1939-1940.

A print by Sam Francis (1923-1994) will be sold as lot 1086 at an auction estimate of $2,000-3,500. The silkscreen is a quintessential example of Francis’ splatter work, with a dynamic composition. Measuring approximately 47 by 34 inches, the piece is a formidable work from the artist. During his life, Francis was featured in 113 solo museum and gallery exhibitions. Over 90 posthumous exhibitions have chronicled his work as well. Auction records for Francis’ works include the sale of “Middle Blue” in 2010 for $6,354,500 and “Symphony in Blue” sold in May of this year for $1,145,000.

An impressive variety of superior jewelry pieces will grace Michaan’s Auctions December fine sale. Approximately 150 lots will be presented, with coveted collector items, quality diamonds, fine period pieces and desirable luxury manufacturers presented to the bidding public. Representing the diversity of the jewelry offerings are many exceptional pieces. A fine example is found in a Wellendorf diamond and 18 karat yellow gold “Princess” necklace (lot 1372, $5,000-7,000). A highly collectible piece is seen in a beautiful and unusual Arts and Crafts style necklace featuring an approximate 4.50 carat demantoid garnet (lot 1395, $5,000-7,000). Also available is a delightful Cartier brooch to be sold as lot 1367, whimsically designed as two oak leaves with perching acorns ($1,500-2,000). The auction also holds two painted portrait miniature pendant-necklaces from the early 1800s. Both remain in wonderful condition at conservative estimates (lot1397, $900-1,200/lot 1399, $800-1,200).

Highlighting the selection of fine diamonds in the sale are two rings, each with platinum settings. Lot 9125-001 centers a substantial old European cut diamond of approximately 3.20 carats, flanked by six old mine cut diamonds weighing a total of approximately 0.50 carats ($18,000-20,000). A classic emerald cut diamond ring is another choice example in the auction, featuring a center stone of approximately 2.30 carats accented by two baguette cut diamonds weighing a total of approximately 0.30 carats (lot 1421, $4,000-6,000).

Rounding out the auction collections are over 15 lots of remarkable jades featuring many certified pieces, traditional and contemporary designs and rare lavender. Estimates range from $600 to $47,500, providing bidding opportunities for a range of collectors. South Sea pearls make an appearance as well, in both gray and white hues. The pieces also carry a wide range of estimates, starting at $800 up to $10,000. An unusual and fine collection of cigarette cases dating to the first quarter of the 20th century will also be presented, stemming from a private collection spanning over 40 years.

Stellar Tiffany & Co. pieces are undoubtedly amongst the most exciting jewelry offerings on the auction block, sure to dazzle bidders worldwide. A prized ring features an incredible tsavorite, weighing an approximate 5.50 carats (lot 1425 $10,000-15,000). The stone is immaculate, with unparalleled clarity and color especially hard to find in such a large tsavorite. The majority of mined tsavorite is under one carat, with gem quality becoming even more scarce as the stone increases in carat size. The emerald cut tsavorite is accented by two trapezoidal shape diamonds, with the stones held in a simple platinum mounting. Yet another stunning Tiffany jewelry offering is found in a pink sapphire and diamond “Legacy” suite from “The Great Gatsby Collection” (lot 1426, $7,000-9,000). The suite is an exclusive find at auction, as this Tiffany collection debuted in April of 2013.

For general information please call 510-740-0220 ext. 0 or e-mail info@michaans.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

 

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Pablo Picasso (Spanish 1881-1973) Vase deux anses hautes, 1952 Estimate:  $20,000 / 25,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Pablo Picasso (Spanish 1881-1973) Vase deux anses hautes, 1952 Estimate:  $20,000 / 25,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

Eanger Irving Couse (American 1866-1936) The Bead Maker Estimate:  $80,000 / 120,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Eanger Irving Couse (American 1866-1936) The Bead Maker Estimate:  $80,000 / 120,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

Armin Carl Hansen (Californian 1886-1957) Norwegian Fishermen Oil on artist canvas board Estimate:  $40,000 / 60,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Armin Carl Hansen (Californian 1886-1957) Norwegian Fishermen Oil on artist canvas board Estimate:  $40,000 / 60,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

Ruth Lanier Asawa (Californian 1926-2013) Wire Sculpture, tied wire branching wall mounted wreath Estimate:  $80,000 / 90,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Ruth Lanier Asawa (Californian 1926-2013) Wire Sculpture, tied wire branching wall mounted wreath Estimate:  $80,000 / 90,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

Viennese Secessionist Silkscreen & Painted Figural Tapestry Estimate:  $10,000 / 15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Viennese Secessionist Silkscreen & Painted Figural Tapestry Estimate:  $10,000 / 15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

Georg Jensen Sterling Flatware Service (185) Estimate:  $10,000 / 15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

Georg Jensen Sterling Flatware Service (185) Estimate:  $10,000 / 15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

R. Lalique Soucis Vase Estimate:  $8,000 / 10,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

R. Lalique Soucis Vase Estimate:  $8,000 / 10,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

R. Lalique Opalescent Bacchantes Vase. Estimate:  $10,000 / 15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan's.

R. Lalique Opalescent Bacchantes Vase. Estimate:  $10,000 / 15,000. Image courtesy of Michaan’s.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

PBA’s Dec. 5 sale includes 1st edition Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

SAN FRANCISCO – PBA Galleries will feature a rare, true first edition of Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D. H. Lawrence in their December 5th auction. Internet live-bidding services will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.

Signed by the author at the limitation statement, this first edition of Lady Chatterley’s Lover was published by the Italian press Tipografia Giuntina and is one of only 1,000 copies privately printed in Florence, Italy, in 1928. It is bound in early quarter pigskin (estimate $7,000/$10,000).

Other fine literature highlights include the First American Edition of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, published in 1927 by Harcourt, Brace and Company. In a complete and unrestored dust jacket designed by Vanessa Bell, it is housed in a custom two-part box (estimate $2,500/$3,500). An Advance Proof Copy of Eric Ambler’s second novel, Uncommon Danger, in plain brown paper wrappers is offered in a custom clamshell box. Ambler is recognized as having raised the suspense novel to the level of literature. Also noted for his screenplays, this novel was published in 1937 before gaining fame in Hollywood (estimate $2,500/$3,500).

It is not well-known but Dr. Seuss wrote two books for adults. The first, The Seven Lady

Godivas, was published in 1927 by Random House. A rare first edition, first printing in the original dust jacket, it is inscribed from Dr. Seuss to his wife’s piano teacher. The lot also includes the Random House Godiva Book Mark (estimate $3,000/$5,000).

A complete set of the first editions of the Christopher Robin books by A. A. Milne and illustrated by Ernest H. Shepard are offered with three of the volumes in original dust jackets. Originally appearing in Punch as space fillers, the verses were expanded to a full page and illustrations were added by Shepard, the magazine’s political cartoonist. The verses were collected in the first book, When We Were Very Young, which had a first edition of only 5175 copies (estimate $4,000/$6,000). In addition, a complete set of American first editions of The Chronicles of  Narnia will be available in Sale 521. All are in original dust jackets and all except The Silver Chair are from the files of The Horn Book (estimate $4,000/$7,000).

An original pen and ink drawing by prominent illustrator Garth Williams depicts Stuart Little being washed overboard from his sailboat in Central Park. The image appears on page 40 of the first edition of Stuart Little published in 1945 (estimate $3,000/$5,000). The rare Japan Vellum edition of George Bernard Shaw’s This is the Preachment On going to Church includes seven watercolor illuminations by Bertha Hubbard, wife of Elbert Hubbard, the founder of Roycroft Press. The watercolor sketches appear within the margins and initial letters are colored by hand. This vellum edition has not been seen in an auction since 1963 ($2,500/$3,500).

There will be nearly 600 lots of books, original artwork, periodicals and other material, capturing literary and illustrative achievement spanning the centuries. For more information, please contact PBA Galleries at 415-989-2665 or pba@pbagalleries.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Image courtesy of PBA Galleries.

Stilnovo, Ceiling lamp. Nova Ars image.

Nova Ars to offer 20th century Italian design, Dec. 5

Stilnovo, Ceiling lamp. Nova Ars image.

Stilnovo, Ceiling lamp. Nova Ars image.

ASTI, Italy – On Dec. 5, Nova Ars will auction an interesting collection of 20th century Italian design and decorative art. LiveAuctioneers will provide the Internet live-bidding services for the sale.

Ceramics, furniture, lamps, chandeliers and glassworks are among the categories to be featured. As always, the focus is on items made in Italy, although the talents of designers from other countries will be showcased, as well. The auction will begin at 6:30 p.m. local, 9:30 a.m. Pacific Time.

The city of Asti is a destination for those who seek to learn and share knowledge about art, design and collecting. Nova Ars offers valuations of personal property, appraisals and auction exhibitions in person and online. Attention to consignors is of paramount importance and clients enjoy direct access to experts throughout the valuation, consignment and auction process.

For information about any item in the Dec. 5 auction, email valeria@novaars.net or e.art.auctions@gmail.com or call +39 328 9667353.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Stilnovo, Ceiling lamp. Nova Ars image.

 

Stilnovo, Ceiling lamp. Nova Ars image.

Artemide, Sergio Mazza, table lamp. Nova Ars image.

Artemide, Sergio Mazza, table lamp. Nova Ars image.

Zanolli e Sebellin, Ico and Luisa Parisi, pottery. Nova Ars image.

Zanolli e Sebellin, Ico and Luisa Parisi, pottery. Nova Ars image.

Candle, Angelo Mangiarotti, table lamp. Nova Ars image.

Candle, Angelo Mangiarotti, table lamp. Nova Ars image.

Alessandro Mendini, Zerodisegno, piece of furniture. Nova Ars image.

Alessandro Mendini, Zerodisegno, piece of furniture. Nova Ars image.

This photo of Ernest Zacharevic's mural in Singapore was widely shared through social media before authorities ordered the artwork to be painted over. Image courtesy of Ernest Zacharevic.

Lithuanian ‘Banksy’ a hit in anti-graffiti Singapore

This photo of Ernest Zacharevic's mural in Singapore was widely shared through social media before authorities ordered the artwork to be painted over. Image courtesy of Ernest Zacharevic.

This photo of Ernest Zacharevic’s mural in Singapore was widely shared through social media before authorities ordered the artwork to be painted over. Image courtesy of Ernest Zacharevic.

SINGAPORE – A Lithuanian artist who angered Malaysian officials with a street mural depicting a knife-wielding Lego robber has found unlikely admirers across the border in graffiti-averse Singapore for his works on a softer theme.

Ernest Zacharevic, who has been likened to British graffiti artist Banksy, has seen photos of his murals depicting children playing go viral on Facebook as Singaporeans unused to seeing art on outdoor walls expressed their approval.

Zacharevic received permission from the owners of private buildings in Singapore to paint the child-themed murals in the city’s picturesque Muslim trading and dining quarter, thereby avoiding a possible jail term for vandalism.

“It’s been a very interesting experience,” the 27-year-old Zacharevic told AFP by telephone.

“They do appreciate it. The moment I get out my tools, people approach me and they ask me what I’m doing,” said the artist, who has a studio in Malaysia’s Penang state.

Zacharevic angered Malaysian officials last week after he drew a mural on a wall in the southern city of Johor Baru depicting a woman drawn in the style of a Lego toy walking towards a street corner, where a black-clad, knife-wielding robber waited to pounce.

City officials quickly painted over the mural, an apparent commentary on the city’s reputation for crime, which drew on the image of a Legoland theme park which opened nearby last year.

Ordinary Malaysians however lauded the work as it tapped into concerns about the country’s crime problem, with photographs of it shared virally on Facebook and cut-out versions popping up across the country.

Vandalism in Singapore is punishable by up to three years in jail or a fine of up to Sg$2,000 ($1,600). Male offenders can also face caning.

In 2010 a Swiss man was jailed and caned for spray painting the signatures of infamous European train vandals on a Singapore metro train.

Zacharevic said there was no overall theme to his murals in Singapore, which also includes bollards painted to depict the yellow-colored “minion” characters from the animated film “Despicable Me.”

“I do not carry out any straightforward messages with my art…I try to provoke people to try to find their own meanings,” he said.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This photo of Ernest Zacharevic's mural in Singapore was widely shared through social media before authorities ordered the artwork to be painted over. Image courtesy of Ernest Zacharevic.

This photo of Ernest Zacharevic’s mural in Singapore was widely shared through social media before authorities ordered the artwork to be painted over. Image courtesy of Ernest Zacharevic.

Ming dynasty moonflask, the most expensive item auctioned in Christie's Hong Kong sale benefiting London's Croydon Council, hammered HK$28.1 million. Courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2013.

London’s Croydon council sells Chinese antiques for millions

Ming dynasty moonflask, the most expensive item auctioned in Christie's Hong Kong sale benefiting London's Croydon Council, hammered HK$28.1 million. Courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2013.

Ming dynasty moonflask, the most expensive item auctioned in Christie’s Hong Kong sale benefiting London’s Croydon Council, hammered HK$28.1 million. Courtesy Christie’s Images Ltd. 2013.

HONG KONG — London’s Croydon council raised millions of pounds Wednesday after controversially selling 24 Chinese antique ceramic items at a Christie’s auction in Hong Kong.

The collection, including vases, bowls and boxes, fetched a total of HK$102.4 million ($13.2 million) for the south London municipality — with a blue and white Ming dynasty moonflask the most expensive item at HK$28.1 million.

The ceramics, which had been bequeathed to the council by a local businessmen, were previously on public display. Their sale had been opposed by Britain’s Museums Association which described it as a “breach of the code of ethics.”

Croydon was later expelled by the association.

A legal challenge to the auction by a Croydon community association was withdrawn earlier this month after they fell short of the 20,000 pounds ($32,366) needed to cover legal costs.

Park Sung-Hee, a spokeswoman for Christie’s, told AFP the proceeds would be used to improve the borough’s cultural amenities.

Among the projects are the renovation of Fairfield Halls, a local arts centre frequently used for BBC recordings.

“The collection was offered for sale with proceeds to be invested in Croydon’s cultural infrastructure, including securing the future of the Fairfield Halls,” the spokeswoman said in an email.

“The council feels these are exceptional circumstances due to the costs of upgrading security and the high insurance.”

The remaining 206 pieces of the collection bequeathed by the businessman are still on show at a gallery in Croydon Clocktower.

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ming dynasty moonflask, the most expensive item auctioned in Christie's Hong Kong sale benefiting London's Croydon Council, hammered HK$28.1 million. Courtesy Christie's Images Ltd. 2013.

Ming dynasty moonflask, the most expensive item auctioned in Christie’s Hong Kong sale benefiting London’s Croydon Council, hammered HK$28.1 million. Courtesy Christie’s Images Ltd. 2013.

Title page from The Bay Psalm Book. For the first time since 1947, and only the second time since the nineteenth century, a copy of the first book printed in America was offered at auction. The Whole Booke of Psalmes—universally known as The Bay Psalm Book—was translated and printed in 1640 in the virtual wilderness of Massachusetts Bay Colony by the Congregationalist Puritans who left England in search of religious freedom. This is one of the finest of the eleven copies that survive from the original 1,700 that were printed. The Bay Psalm Book is not simply one of the great icons of book history, it is one of the greatest artifacts of American history. Formerly in the Collection of the Old South Church in Boston, Massachusetts. It was auctioned for more than $14 million on Nov. 26, 2013 at Sotheby's. Profits will benefit the church's mission and ministries. Image courtesy of Sotheby's.

World’s most expensive book auctioned for $14M in NYC

Title page from The Bay Psalm Book. For the first time since 1947, and only the second time since the nineteenth century, a copy of the first book printed in America was offered at auction. The Whole Booke of Psalmes—universally known as The Bay Psalm Book—was translated and printed in 1640 in the virtual wilderness of Massachusetts Bay Colony by the Congregationalist Puritans who left England in search of religious freedom. This is one of the finest of the eleven copies that survive from the original 1,700 that were printed. The Bay Psalm Book is not simply one of the great icons of book history, it is one of the greatest artifacts of American history. Formerly in the Collection of the Old South Church in Boston, Massachusetts. It was auctioned for more than $14 million on Nov. 26, 2013 at Sotheby's. Profits will benefit the church's mission and ministries. Image courtesy of Sotheby's.

Title page from The Bay Psalm Book. For the first time since 1947, and only the second time since the nineteenth century, a copy of the first book printed in America was offered at auction. The Whole Booke of Psalmes—universally known as The Bay Psalm Book—was translated and printed in 1640 in the virtual wilderness of Massachusetts Bay Colony by the Congregationalist Puritans who left England in search of religious freedom. This is one of the finest of the eleven copies that survive from the original 1,700 that were printed. The Bay Psalm Book is not simply one of the great icons of book history, it is one of the greatest artifacts of American history. Formerly in the Collection of the Old South Church in Boston, Massachusetts. It was auctioned for more than $14 million on Nov. 26, 2013 at Sotheby’s. Profits will benefit the church’s mission and ministries. Image courtesy of Sotheby’s.

NEW YORK — The first book printed in what is today the United States of America sold for $14 million at auction in New York on Tuesday, becoming the world’s most expensive printed book.

The translation of Biblical psalms “The Bay Psalm Book” was printed by Puritan settlers in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1640 and sold at a one-lot auction in just minutes by Sotheby’s.

Bidding opened at $6 million and closed swiftly at a hammer price of $12.5 million, rising to $14.165 million once the buyer’s premium was incorporated.

The book, with its browning pages and gilt edges, was displayed in a glass case behind the auctioneer to a relatively small crowd who attended the less than five-minute auction in person.

The settlers, who came to America to seek religious freedom, had set about making their own preferred translation from the Hebrew original of the Old Testament book after arriving from Europe.

Sotheby’s named the buyer as David Rubenstein, the billionaire American financier and philanthropist. He was in Australia and his bid was conducted by telephone.

Sotheby’s had valued the book at $15-30 million, but denied any disappointment in the sale price reached Tuesday.

David Redden, auctioneer and head of Sotheby’s books said $14.165 million “represents a new world record for any printed book.”

The previous record was $11.5 million, reached when a copy of John James Audubon?s “Birds of America” sold at Sotheby’s in December 2010.

Rubenstein plans to share the psalm book with the American public by loaning it to a number of libraries around the country and placing it on long-time loan to one of them, Redden said.

“We’re very very pleased about this purchase. If you recall David Rubenstein also brought the Magna Carta from us back in 2007 for the same reason, to make sure Americans would understand the significance of their heritage,” he added.

“We greatly appreciate his interest in the sale,” Redden said.

The Magna Carta sold for $21.3 million in New York. It was one of only 17 existing copies of the 800-year-old English royal manuscript setting out the rights of man.

Redden said “The Bay Psalm Book” was a “great rarity” and that only two of 11 surviving copies had come to sale in the last 100 years.

He described the price as “very strong and hefty”.

“It’s very important because of its story. It’s the first book printed in America and the first book written in America,” Redden told reporters.

Before the sale, Redden said the volume had even greater significance as a precursor to Lexington and Concord, and, ultimately, to American political independence.

“With it, New England declared its independence from the Church of England,” he said.

There were 1,700 copies of the original 1640 edition. The eleven that have survived are in collections such as The Library of Congress in New York and Harvard College Library.

No copy had previously been auctioned since 1947, when a different copy fetched $151,000 — a record at the time for any book, including the Gutenberg Bible or Shakespeare’s First Folio.

The book was sold by the Old South Church in Boston to benefit its work in the historic city. The same church possesses another copy of the “Bay Psalm Book.”

Selby Kiffer, from Sotheby’s special projects department, called it “not simply one of the great icons of book history, it is one of the greatest artifacts of American history.”

#   #   #


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Title page from The Bay Psalm Book. For the first time since 1947, and only the second time since the nineteenth century, a copy of the first book printed in America was offered at auction. The Whole Booke of Psalmes—universally known as The Bay Psalm Book—was translated and printed in 1640 in the virtual wilderness of Massachusetts Bay Colony by the Congregationalist Puritans who left England in search of religious freedom. This is one of the finest of the eleven copies that survive from the original 1,700 that were printed. The Bay Psalm Book is not simply one of the great icons of book history, it is one of the greatest artifacts of American history. Formerly in the Collection of the Old South Church in Boston, Massachusetts. It was auctioned for more than $14 million on Nov. 26, 2013 at Sotheby's. Profits will benefit the church's mission and ministries. Image courtesy of Sotheby's.

Title page from The Bay Psalm Book. For the first time since 1947, and only the second time since the nineteenth century, a copy of the first book printed in America was offered at auction. The Whole Booke of Psalmes—universally known as The Bay Psalm Book—was translated and printed in 1640 in the virtual wilderness of Massachusetts Bay Colony by the Congregationalist Puritans who left England in search of religious freedom. This is one of the finest of the eleven copies that survive from the original 1,700 that were printed. The Bay Psalm Book is not simply one of the great icons of book history, it is one of the greatest artifacts of American history. Formerly in the Collection of the Old South Church in Boston, Massachusetts. It was auctioned for more than $14 million on Nov. 26, 2013 at Sotheby’s. Profits will benefit the church’s mission and ministries. Image courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Marla Maples. Image provided by Kaminski Auctions.

Kaminski’s to auction the Marla Maples & Tiffany Trump collection

Marla Maples. Image provided by Kaminski Auctions.

Marla Maples. Image provided by Kaminski Auctions.

BEVERLY, Mass. – Kaminski Auctions will auction the personal collection of Marla Maples and Tiffany Trump on day two of their Annual Thanksgiving auction. The auction will be held at their auction gallery in Beverly, Massachusetts, on November 30th and December 1st. LiveAuctioneers will provide the Internet live-bidding services for the sale.

A portion of the proceeds from Marla Maples’ collection will benefit a cause very dear to her heart: the newly formed Brain Cancer Research Institute headed by Santosh Kesari in San Diego, California. Having first hand experience with a loved one battling brain cancer, Maples knows how important this research is to finding the cause and treatment of this terrible disease.

Featured from the collection is an Art Deco solid bronze Erte sculpture on a marble basevalued at $2,000-$3,000. Also highlighted is a wonderful Val St. Lambert Jupiter vase with 24K gold applied decoration.

Original furnishings from the consignors’ Trump Tower residence include a modern designer sideboard with coral type veneer and brass inlay, circa 1980s. The lot also includes three photographs of the sideboard in situ at the Trump residence. There is also a pair of designer chrome and beveled glass side tables, also part of the original furnishings at Trump Towers, New York.

Art from the collection includes an oil on canvas scene of children climbing a ladder signed “O. Tanner” purchased byDonald Trump for Marla Maples, along with multiple personal photographs and other interesting memorabilia from the couple’s years together. These personal effects include a “Rich Donald/Poor Donald” doll given to Donald Trump by David Letterman on his show in the late 1980s.

There is a fabulous original Escada trunk with brass locks stamped “Escada” and accompanied by a travel tag marked “Maples/Trump” with the original Trump Towers address. The trunk is conservatively valued at $2,000-$2,500. Other personal items of interest include a bottle of 1945 Chateau Lafite Rothschild, given to Marla and Donald Trump at their wedding. This special bottle of wine is valued at between $3,000 and $5,000.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Marla Maples. Image provided by Kaminski Auctions.

Marla Maples. Image provided by Kaminski Auctions.

This yellow pine pie safe was made in Virginia in the 19th century. It is 65 inches high. An eager buyer paid $3,159 for it at a Pook & Pook auction in Downingtown, Pa., in April 2013.

Kovels Antiques & Collecting: Week of Nov. 25, 2013

This yellow pine pie safe was made in Virginia in the 19th century. It is 65 inches high. An eager buyer paid $3,159 for it at a Pook & Pook auction in Downingtown, Pa., in April 2013.

This yellow pine pie safe was made in Virginia in the 19th century. It is 65 inches high. An eager buyer paid $3,159 for it at a Pook & Pook auction in Downingtown, Pa., in April 2013.

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – It’s time to think about Thanksgiving and the abundant dinner expected for the holiday. Tradition today suggests a menu of turkey with stuffing, cranberry sauce, creamed onions, sweet potatoes and apple or pumpkin pie. A green-bean casserole and deep-fried turkey are newer ideas. But the first Thanksgiving probably featured very different food: deer, turkey, wild birds, perhaps even passenger pigeons, fish, clams, mussels, some nuts and a grain called maize that was used to make bread.

But by later Colonial times, pies were popular for a main course when filled with meat and for dessert when made with fruit. There were no refrigerators, not even ice boxes, but a cooked pie could be safely stored for about a week if kept away from bugs and mice. A “pie safe” was used for food storage by the 19th century, especially in the Midwest. A wooden cupboard on four tall thin legs was made with shelves and drawers. But the sides and the cupboard doors had panels made of pierced tin. The sharp edges of the holes kept out most creatures and the holes let in air so the cooked fruit did not create mold. The cabinet was kept on a porch on the cool, shaded side of the house.

Collectors today like handmade informal kitchen furniture. The best pie safes had tin panels with the holes placed in attractive patterns. Sometimes the tin or the wood was painted. Some experts today say a pie can stay on a shelf for two or three days and still be OK to eat. Refrigerating a fruit pie lowers the quality the pie.

***

Q: My mother has some Royal Doulton figurines of women dressed in elaborate ruffled hoop skirts, bonnets and shawls. But one figurine seems a bit risque for Royal Doulton. She is wearing a tight, revealing dress while sprawled on a couch. Could it be a fake?

A: The Royal Doulton figurines made by Doulton and Co. after 1902 were made to sell in gift shops. Most of the figurines were sentimental, lovable, beautiful ladies from a more romantic century. But one of Doulton’s designers, Leslie Harradine, made small anthropomorphic animals and other figures that were unusual. He designed several figurines of women lounging on couches in provocative poses. One called “Dreamland,” made in the 1930s, was in the Art Deco style. Another, “Siesta,” made between 1928 and 1938, featured a shapely blond in a flimsy dress leaning on a sofa covered with a pink shawl. Both of these figurines are rare and expensive today. Siesta sold in 2013 for $1,560. Dreamland was listed a few years ago for $7,000, but is worth a little less today. The fame of the artist is the reason the figurines sell for high prices.

***

Q: A gumball machine was left in a commercial building we bought back in 1968. There is a one-cent decal on the glass top. A metal label on the silver lip where the gum comes out reads, “Parkway Machine Corp., 715 Ensor St., Baltimore 2. Md.” Can you give me any information about the machine?

A: Parkway Machine was founded in 1938 by Irv Kovens. He was a Baltimore cab driver who repaired and sold stamp machines on the side. Parkway Machine initially repaired vending machines. The company began selling vending machines and supplies in 1941. Your gumball machine was made between 1943, when one- or two-digit postal zone numbers were first used, and 1963, when five-digit ZIP codes were introduced. In 1999 the company’s name became A&A Global Industries. It’s still in business, run by members of the Kovens family, but is now based in Cockeysville, Md.

***

Q: I have a grayish foot warmer about 11 1/2 inches long. The words in blue on the top are “Henderson Foot Warmer.” The bottom is marked “Dorchester Pottery Wks., Boston, Mass.” There is a brass screw filler with a chain attached to the neck. On the filler it says “Pat. Nov. 15, 1912.” What would this foot warmer be worth today?

A: George Henderson founded Dorchester Pottery in Dorchester, Mass., in 1895. The pottery made jugs, jars, flower pots, butter pots, specialty items and, later, dinnerware. Henderson was granted a patent for “a new and useful improvement in taps or nipples for earthenware containers” in 1912. He designed a metal screw-off tap that was used in place of a rubber stopper. The Henderson foot warmer became one of Dorchester Pottery’s most popular products. The pottery made foot warmers until 1939. The pottery went out of business in 1979. The value of your foot warmer is $50-$100.

***

Q: Can you please give me information about my Ivanhoe three-burner stove with an extra side burner?

A: Ivanhoe kerosene stoves were made by the Perfection Stove Co. of Cleveland. The earliest Ivanhoe stoves, probably introduced around 1930, had a single burner. Ivanhoes with two or three burners plus a side burner were made later. Once electricity and gas were installed in houses across the country, the market for kerosene stoves and ovens dried up. Stoves like yours sell for $100 to $300, depending on condition.

***

Tip: When cleaning a chandelier, do not spin it around. This could damage the wiring or the chain holding it. Instead of moving the fixture, move your ladder around it.

***

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Name of this newspaper), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

* * *

CURRENT PRICES:

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Bed warmer, copper, pierced bird design, long wooden handle, c. 1865, 43 inches, $180.

Tiffany pie server, silver, Thanksgiving pattern, serrated edge, year 2000, 10 5/8 inches, $190.

Honey pot, glass, silver base and lid, embossed Hebrew text, c. 1980, 3 3/4 inches, $225.

Pocket watch, Waltham, woman’s, 14K gold, flower-incised case, $240.

Wedgwood pie dish, lid, caneware, relief-molded game and grapevines, hare finial, oval, c. 1860, 12 inches, $250.

Horse-drawn toy dray wagon, driver, cast iron, red paint, Wilkins, 20 1/2 inches, $305.

Spode Thanksgiving plates, central turkey, flower and fruit border, 10 3/4 inches, 12 pieces, $325.

Shaker box, pine and maple, Mt. Lebanon, N.Y., c. 1850, 1 3/4 x 4 inches, $375.

Arts & Crafts umbrella stand, oak, tapered, c. 1915, 30 x 15 inches, $565.

John. F. Kennedy press pin, Election Night pass, green, cardboard back, 1960, 3 1/2 inches, $2,210.

***

Order the special reports set: “Buyers’ Guide to 20th Century Costume Jewelry,” Part One and Part Two. Only $34.95. These reports identify the most popular makers and designers of costume jewelry – European and North American costume jewelry, Mexican silver jewelry and mid-century jewelry. Recognize Hobe and Sigi jewelry and rare pieces of Bakelite. For the serious collector and the beginner. Available only from Kovels for $34.95 plus $4.95 postage and handling. Order by phone at 800-303-1996; online at Kovels.com; or mail to Kovels, P.O. Box 22900, Beachwood, OH 44122.

***

Copyright 2013 by Cowles Syndicate Inc.

 


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This yellow pine pie safe was made in Virginia in the 19th century. It is 65 inches high. An eager buyer paid $3,159 for it at a Pook & Pook auction in Downingtown, Pa., in April 2013.

This yellow pine pie safe was made in Virginia in the 19th century. It is 65 inches high. An eager buyer paid $3,159 for it at a Pook & Pook auction in Downingtown, Pa., in April 2013.

Vincente Palmaroli (Italian, 1834-1896), Oil on Board 'Beautiful Woman,' Signed, Image 26 ½in x 14 ¼in, Overall 30 x 17in. Chamberlain's image.

You’re invited: Chamberlain’s Dec. 6 Holiday Champagne Auction

Vincente Palmaroli (Italian, 1834-1896), Oil on Board 'Beautiful Woman,' Signed, Image 26 ½in x 14 ¼in, Overall 30 x 17in. Chamberlain's image.

Vincente Palmaroli (Italian, 1834-1896), Oil on Board ‘Beautiful Woman,’ Signed, Image 26 ½in x 14 ¼in, Overall 30 x 17in. Chamberlain’s image.

CLARKSTON, Mich. – The ice bucket will be chilled and the hors d’oeuvres will be waiting for a virtual cocktail party on December 6th. That’s when Chamberlain’s Auction Gallery will be hosting its Holiday Champagne Auction, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. A 233-lot evening event commencing at 7 p.m. Eastern, the auction will feature a carefully chosen selection of exquisite antiques and vintage collectibles whose quality would please even the most discriminating collector

Among the highlights to be auctioned are 19th-century French clocks, a pair of signed Tiffany & Co. Favrile candlestick lamps (est. $3,000-$4,000), Pairpoint lamps, and fine 19th-century furniture. A circa-1770 George III green and gilt japanned long-case clock is signed on its face: “Robert Gratrese, London.” It is estimated at $7,000-$9,000.

An array of 18th and 19th-century paintings will cross the auction block at Chamberlain’s, including a David Burliuk (Ukranian, 1882-1967) oil on board titled “Flowers.” It measures 24 by 20 inches and is estimated at $7,000-$9,000. Another top painting is a signed, 26½ by 14¼ in Vincente Palmaroli (Italian, 1834-1896) oil on board titled “Beautiful Woman.” Estimate: $5,000-$6,000. An outstanding 19th-century Italian hand-carved wood sculpture with pedestal of a nude, titled “Figure Seated on Dragon,” stands 63½ inches tall. It is expected to make $5,000-$6,000.

A stocking stuffer no lady would refuse is the pair of 18K white gold drop earrings with snakelike pave-diamond dangles grasping two large rubies with a total ruby weight of 11.59 carats. The estimate on these most unusual earrings is $17,000-$19,000.

For additional information on any item in the auction, call 248-241-6588 or e-mail cag@chamberlainsauction.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Vincente Palmaroli (Italian, 1834-1896), Oil on Board 'Beautiful Woman,' Signed, Image 26 ½in x 14 ¼in, Overall 30 x 17in. Chamberlain's image.

Vincente Palmaroli (Italian, 1834-1896), Oil on Board ‘Beautiful Woman,’ Signed, Image 26 ½in x 14 ¼in, Overall 30 x 17in. Chamberlain’s image.

Pair Napoleon III Renaissance Revival Six Light Gilded Bronze Candelabra, 25 ¼in h., 12 ½in diameter. Chamberlain's image.

Pair Napoleon III Renaissance Revival Six Light Gilded Bronze Candelabra, 25 ¼in h., 12 ½in diameter. Chamberlain’s image.

Early 19th Century Mantel Clock, 19 ½in h., 13 ¾in w., 4 ¾in diameter. Chamberlain's image.

Early 19th Century Mantel Clock, 19 ½in h., 13 ¾in w., 4 ¾in diameter. Chamberlain’s image.

Early 19th Century Hand-Carved Wooden Figural Wall Shelf, 33in h., 19 1/2in w., 14in diameter. Chamberlain's image.

Early 19th Century Hand-Carved Wooden Figural Wall Shelf, 33in h., 19 1/2in w., 14in diameter. Chamberlain’s image.

David Burliuk (Ukranian, 1882-1967), Oil on Board, 'Flowers,' Signed, Image 24in x 20in. Chamberlain's image.

David Burliuk (Ukranian, 1882-1967), Oil on Board, ‘Flowers,’ Signed, Image 24in x 20in. Chamberlain’s image.

Outstanding 19th Century Italian Hand-Carved Wood Sculpture 'Figure Seated on Dragon' with Pedestal, Overal 53 1/2in h., 24in wide. Chamberlain's image.

Outstanding 19th Century Italian Hand-Carved Wood Sculpture ‘Figure Seated on Dragon’ with Pedestal, Overal 53 1/2in h., 24in wide. Chamberlain’s image.

George III Green Lacquer Long-Case Clock, Signed on Face 'Robert Gratrese, London,' Circa 1770, 91in h., 19 ½in w., 9in deep. Chamberlain's image.

George III Green Lacquer Long-Case Clock, Signed on Face ‘Robert Gratrese, London,’ Circa 1770, 91in h., 19 ½in w., 9in deep. Chamberlain’s image.

Pair Outstanding “Tiffany & Company” Candlestick Lamps, Each Signed on Base and Shade 'LCT Favrile,' Very Good Condition, 12in high, 7 ½in diameter. Chamberlain's image.

Pair Outstanding “Tiffany & Company” Candlestick Lamps, Each Signed on Base and Shade ‘LCT Favrile,’ Very Good Condition, 12in high, 7 ½in diameter. Chamberlain’s image.

Montmorenci Stair Hall at Winterthur, elegantly decked out for the holidays with garlands, poinsettias and other Christmas decorations. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

Winterthur opens holiday show with focus on lights

Montmorenci Stair Hall at Winterthur, elegantly decked out for the holidays with garlands, poinsettias and other Christmas decorations. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

Montmorenci Stair Hall at Winterthur, elegantly decked out for the holidays with garlands, poinsettias and other Christmas decorations. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

GREENVILLE, Del. (AP) – The Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library in Delaware is giving visitors an early look at Christmas and the history behind light displays.

The museum that once was Henry Francis du Pont’s country mansion has opened its annual holiday decorations display. The show had a soft opening Saturday and will run through Jan. 5.

The News Journal reports this year’s “Yuletide at Winterthur” show celebrates holiday lighting traditions, such as the Swedish-American tradition of decorating a tin candelabra with fringed paper in the early 20th century.

Winterthur has made a specialty in its celebration of American Christmas traditions as a museum of decorative arts.

___

Information from: The News Journal of Wilmington, Del., http://www.delawareonline.com

#   #   #

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Montmorenci Stair Hall at Winterthur, elegantly decked out for the holidays with garlands, poinsettias and other Christmas decorations. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

Montmorenci Stair Hall at Winterthur, elegantly decked out for the holidays with garlands, poinsettias and other Christmas decorations. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

The famed Winterthur Dried Flower Tree's first appearance was in 1978, the same year of the first Yuletide at Winterthur. It has been part of Winterthur's Christmas theme ever since, with decorations that change every year. Many visitors come to Winterthur especially to see this tree. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

The famed Winterthur Dried Flower Tree’s first appearance was in 1978, the same year of the first Yuletide at Winterthur. It has been part of Winterthur’s Christmas theme ever since, with decorations that change every year. Many visitors come to Winterthur especially to see this tree. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

There are so many visual delights to enjoy at Winterthur, especially during the Christmas holidays. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

There are so many visual delights to enjoy at Winterthur, especially during the Christmas holidays. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

A giant live Christmas tree is erected every year in the Museum Conservatory at Winterthur, in keeping with a practice started by Winterthur's founder Henry Francis du Pont. Du Pont would always buy a live tree from a local farm, a tradition that is followed to this day. Image courtesy of Winterthur.

A giant live Christmas tree is erected every year in the Museum Conservatory at Winterthur, in keeping with a practice started by Winterthur’s founder Henry Francis du Pont. Du Pont would always buy a live tree from a local farm, a tradition that is followed to this day. Image courtesy of Winterthur.