Texas A&M University expands liberal arts program

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (AP) – Texas A&M University is expanding its College of Liberal Arts by about 10 percent, leading to the largest hiring campaign in the program’s history.

The Bryan Eagle reports the college wants 19 new tenured professors and another 15 assistant professors. College dean Jose Luis Bermudez says the staff will expand from about 330 to 364 people and ultimately he hopes to have more than 400 on his staff.

Bermudez says all the departments will grow. He plans to spend about $3.5 million to fill the posts and plans to have the staff in place by the 2014 academic year.

Bermudez says the hires will lower the college’s current 17-1 student-to-teacher ratio, allowing it to “give students individual attention and to be more active participants in class.”

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Information from: The Eagle, http://www.theeagle.com

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Ryan O’Neal accused as Warhol painting trial opens

Original Polaroid print of Farah Fawcett by Andy Warhol. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Dreweatts and Bloomsbury.

Original Polaroid print of Farah Fawcett by Andy Warhol. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Dreweatts and Bloomsbury.

LOS ANGELES (AFP) – Ryan O’Neal snatched an Andy Warhol portrait of his ex-lover Farrah Fawcett from her home shortly after she died, even though he knew the work was not his, lawyers claimed Monday.

But as a long-awaited trial opened in Los Angeles, a lawyer for the veteran actor claimed he was the rightful owner of the painting, with an estimated value of up to $12 million.

The University of Texas, where the “Charlie’s Angels” star studied as a young woman, sued O’Neal in August 2011 after the disputed canvas was spotted in the actor’s home during an episode of reality TV show “Ryan and Tatum: The O’Neals.”

The university says Fawcett bequeathed all her artwork to her alma mater when she died, and it insists the Warhol painting should be displayed in a museum next to a near-identical portrait of the late actress.

The university’s lawyer, David Beck, told a Los Angeles jury that O’Neal removed the work from Fawcett’s Wilshire Boulevard condominium shortly after she died of cancer on June 25, 2009, aged 62.

“We need your help to resolve a dispute as to who really owns this Warhol painting,” he said in his opening statement in the LA Superior Court.

Fawcett “had possession and control of these two paintings on the day she died and for years before that,” the university’s lawyer said, claiming O’Neal knew that when he drove away with the disputed canvas.

“He didn’t tell anyone what he was going to do, and he didn’t tell anyone what he had done,” Beck said.

But O’Neal’s attorney Martin Singer said the university was trying to take away the one portrait the 72-year-old actor has of “the love of his life, Farrah Fawcett.”

“One iconic portrait of Farrah Fawcett is not enough,” he told the six-man, six-woman jury, referring to the Warhol near-duplicate the university already has.

While the university says the portrait is worth about $12 million, O’Neal’s lawyer estimated its value at just under $1 million, adding: “The University of Texas should have been satisfied with what they got.”

Fawcett was born in Texas and went to college there for three years, but left without graduating after being “discovered” and moving to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career.

But she remained loyal to her alma mater. “Farrah never forgot where she came from,” Beck said.

Outlining his case, the university’s lawyer said the creator of a reality show called “Chasing Farrah,” Craig Nevius, will testify about overhearing a conversation between O’Neal and Fawcett after she was diagnosed with cancer.

“I want something to remember you by … How about giving me one of those Warhols?” O’Neal asked Fawcett, according to Beck, who said the question proved that the actor knew both portraits belonged to Fawcett.

But O’Neal’s lawyer said Warhol gave one portrait to Fawcett and the other to O’Neal.

The actor kept the painting from 1980-98, turning it over to Fawcett only after they temporarily split, because he did not feel comfortable about other female friends seeing it at his home, said Singer.

The couple got back together in 2001 after O’Neal was diagnosed with leukemia. The portrait went back and forth between their homes, but O’Neal decided to leave it at her home when she became seriously ill, he said.

The trial continues Tuesday.

Click to view an image of Warhol’s painting of Farrah Fawcett on the Blanton Museum of Art’s website:

http://blantonmuseum.org/works_of_art/exhibitions/about_face_multimedia/warhol_umlauf

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Frederick Frieseke, 'On the Beach (Girl in Blue),' est. $600,000-$800,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Frederick Frieseke’s On the Beach leads Heritage Dec. 5 auction

Frederick Frieseke, 'On the Beach (Girl in Blue),' est. $600,000-$800,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Frederick Frieseke, ‘On the Beach (Girl in Blue),’ est. $600,000-$800,000. Heritage Auctions image.

NEW YORK – Frederick Frieseke’s masterpiece On the Beach (Girl in Blue) is expected to bring $600,000+ in Heritage Auctions’ Dec. 5 American Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture Signature® Auction, part of a two-day presentation of fine and decorative arts in New York, starting with Tiffany, Lalique & Art Glass Dec. 4 and the inaugural Art of New York Signature® Auction also on Dec. 5. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Frieseke’s On the Beach is being offered at auction from a private collection following a century of appearing in public exhibits and publications, said Brian Roughton, Director of American and European Art.

“This is a very important transition piece for Frieseke,” Roughton said. “It marks a movement away from the use of tonal “color fields” and the start of painting en plein air and employing natural sunlight on his female models.”

Among the historic and important works in the auction is Torch Bearers by Anna Hyatt Huntington, a heroic monument and the most significant work by the artist to come to market. The monument is expected to bring $400,000+ and is offered to benefit the Discovery Museum and Planetarium of Bridgeport, Conn., with proceeds to directly benefit science and engineering programs and exhibits.

Roman Bronze Works was hired to cast the work in bronze in 1963, an undertaking which took months to complete. “Torch Bearers symbolizes the passing of the torch of civilization and progress from one generation to the next,” said Aviva Lehmann, Director of American Art at Heritage’s New York location. “There are only four other known examples of ‘Torch Bearers’ in existence, with the other examples, cast in aluminum rather than in bronze , located in Havana, Cuba, at the University of Madrid in Spain, the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, and the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, Virginia.”

Additional highlights include Lucinda, Mexican Girl, 1916 by Robert Henri, which could sell for $400,000+. Purchased the year it was finished and passed down through the family to the current owner, the work was initially exhibited in 1916 and 1917 during the height of Henri’s success as the leader of the avant-garde Ash Can School.

Another highly anticipated painting is A Summer Vacation, by Edward Henry Potthast, which is expected to sell for $150,000+. Perros-Guirec, Côtes du Nord, France, by Childe Hassam, is expected to hammer for $100,000+.

Bathers by Max Weber exemplifies the artist’s work during the pivotal period from 1909 to 1912, when he transitioned from his early Fauvist compositions to his mature Cubist style. Painted in 1910, two years after Weber returned to New York from his studies in Europe, the work retains the foundation of his European training, but the contorted figures and flattened space embody the fundamental roots for his Cubist exploration. It could sell for $60,000+.

The auction also includes an important private collection of 20 bronzes by Charles Cary Rumsey, led by Study for a Centaur, circa 1914, which may sell for $5,000+. The full size massive bronze titled The Centaur is installed in front of the Buffalo & Erie County Historical Society Museum on Elmwood Avenue in Buffalo, New York.

A second important collection offered in the American auction includes 43 magnificent hand-colored engravings from John James Audubon’s ornithological magnum opus, The Birds of America; from Original Drawings, led by a plate for Pine Finch (Plate CLXXX from The Birds of America) 1833, expected to bring a combined $80,000+.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

Fireworks, Bridge at Vernon France by Theodore Earl Butler. Estimate: $25,000+.

Allegheny at Night by Aaron Henry Gorson. Estimate: $20,000+.

Madame LaFarge et ses Animal Sauvage by Orville Bulman. Estimate: $15,000+.

Garden Bust with Pedestal by Gaston Lachaise. Estimate: $15,000+.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Frederick Frieseke, 'On the Beach (Girl in Blue),' est. $600,000-$800,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Frederick Frieseke, ‘On the Beach (Girl in Blue),’ est. $600,000-$800,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Anna Hyatt Huntington, 'Torch Bearers,' est. $400,000-$600,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Anna Hyatt Huntington, ‘Torch Bearers,’ est. $400,000-$600,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Robert Henri, 'Lucinda, Mexican Girl,' est. $400,000-$600,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Robert Henri, ‘Lucinda, Mexican Girl,’ est. $400,000-$600,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Edward Henry Potthast, 'A Summer Vacation,' est. $150,000-$200,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Edward Henry Potthast, ‘A Summer Vacation,’ est. $150,000-$200,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Childe Hassam, 'Perros-Guirec, Cotes du Nord, France,' est. $100,000-$150,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Childe Hassam, ‘Perros-Guirec, Cotes du Nord, France,’ est. $100,000-$150,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Max Weber, 'Bathers,' est. $60,000-$80,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Max Weber, ‘Bathers,’ est. $60,000-$80,000. Heritage Auctions image.

Main characters from the 1986-1994 hit BBC-TV series 'Lovejoy,' L to R: Dudley Sutton ('Tinker Dill'), Ian McShane ('Lovejoy'), Chris Jury ('Eric Catchpole') and Phyllis Logan ('Lady Jane Felsham'). Copyrighted promotional photo used here to illustrate the persons and subject covered in the article. No free equivalent exists; fair use under United States Copyright Law.

Could Lovejoy be re-emerging from the antiques closet?

Main characters from the 1986-1994 hit BBC-TV series 'Lovejoy,' L to R: Dudley Sutton ('Tinker Dill'), Ian McShane ('Lovejoy'), Chris Jury ('Eric Catchpole') and Phyllis Logan ('Lady Jane Felsham'). Copyrighted promotional photo used here to illustrate the persons and subject covered in the article. No free equivalent exists; fair use under United States Copyright Law.

Main characters from the 1986-1994 hit BBC-TV series ‘Lovejoy,’ L to R: Dudley Sutton (‘Tinker Dill’), Ian McShane (‘Lovejoy’), Chris Jury (‘Eric Catchpole’) and Phyllis Logan (‘Lady Jane Felsham’). Copyrighted promotional photo used here to illustrate the persons and subject covered in the article. No free equivalent exists; fair use under United States Copyright Law.

LONDON (ACNI) – The hit BBC series Lovejoy, which followed the escapades of a roguish English antiques dealer played by Ian McShane, isn’t exactly back on the table – but it hasn’t been ruled out, either.

In a recent interview with the British publication Radio Times, McShane was asked about the possibility of reviving Lovejoy and told the interviewer: “Sky (TV) talked about it last year. I said ‘If you’re serious about it, why not make it about Lovejoy’s daughter this time? And maybe I could do guest appearances on an antique Zimmer frame (walker). That’d be terrific.’”

It’s unlikely that the character Lovejoy will one day have a chance to rekindle the arms-length onscreen spark with Lady Jane Felsham that viewers so enjoyed. Scottish actress Phyllis Logan, who played the down-to-earth aristocrat Felsham, has since won international acclaim for her portrayal of Mrs. Hughes, the housekeeper on Downton Abbey.

McShane hasn’t been resting on his laurels, either. He’s been in constant demand since Lovejoy ended its hugely successful eight-year run in 1994. In the United States, he is perhaps best known for the role of historical figure Al Swearengen in the HBO series Deadwood, for which he won the 2005 Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Television Drama. He was also nominated for at the 2005 Emmy Award and Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Within the science fiction community McShane is best known for playing the character Robert Bryson, Ph.D. in Babylon 5: The River of Souls.

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Dutch police handout photo of Pablo Picasso's 'Tete d'Arlequin,' one of the paintings stolen in a daring art heist in the Netherlands. This particular artwork may have been incinerated by the mother of the perpetrator, in an effort to destroy incriminating evidence.

BULLETIN: Dutch art heist thief to serve six years, eight months in prison

Dutch police handout photo of Pablo Picasso's 'Tete d'Arlequin,' one of the paintings stolen in a daring art heist in the Netherlands. This particular artwork may have been incinerated by the mother of the perpetrator, in an effort to destroy incriminating evidence.

Dutch police handout photo of Pablo Picasso’s ‘Tete d’Arlequin,’ one of the paintings stolen in a daring art heist in the Netherlands. This particular artwork may have been incinerated by the mother of the perpetrator, in an effort to destroy incriminating evidence.

BUCHAREST, Romania – (AFP) – A Romanian court Tuesday handed a man who stole seven masterpieces from a Dutch museum a jail term of six years and eight months although the paintings’ fate remains unknown.

The 29-year-old Radu Dogaru, who admitted masterminding the spectacular three-minute heist of works by Picasso, Monet and Gauguin in October 2012, was not present in court for the verdict.

“Radu Dogaru will serve six years and eight months in jail,” Judge Adrian
Ioan Chitoiu said.

One of Dogaru’s accomplices, Eugen Darie, who drove him to and from the
Rotterdam museum, was also sentenced to six years and eight months in jail.

Among the paintings stolen were Picasso’s “Tete d’Arlequin,” Monet’s
“Waterloo Bridge” and “Femme Devant une Fenetre Ouverte, dite La Fiancee” by
Paul Gauguin.

The missing works are feared destroyed after Dogaru’s mother, who is also
facing trial, said she had torched them in a bid to destroy evidence against
her son.

She later retracted her statement, but experts from Romania’s National
History Museum said ashes retrieved from her stove included the remains of
three oil paintings and nails from frames used before the end of the 19th
century.

A separate investigation into the possible destruction of the artwork is
under way.

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To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

Unseen Lennon drawing in Nov. 28 Dreweatts & Bloomsbury sale

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

LONDON – A previously unpublished self-portrait by John Lennon is among lots in Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions sale of Important Books and Manuscripts, Thursday, November 28. LiveAuctioneers will provide the Internet live-bidding services for the sale.

The drawing is one of two sketched for the book Grapefruit, written by Yoko Ono and published in the UK by Peter Owen. The second is a portrait of Ono in ink on paper and they will be sold together with the famous manuscript text that was used as the introduction for the book. It starts: ‘Hi my name is John Lennon/ I’d like you to meet Yoko Ono.’ The three pieces are estimated to sell for £4,000 – 6,000.

Publisher Peter Owen is reported as saying: “I liked John Lennon, he was helpful and did a few drawings for us, but she sat there with a big hat on eating caviar out of a jar with a kitchen spoon and she didn’t offer us any and was very unpleasant. She used to phone me at midnight to discuss her book. My daughter Antonia suggested some years ago, what about reprinting Grapefruit? And I said, I’m not reprinting that rubbish.”

Being sold alongside these designs is a scarce first English edition of Grapefruit. Printed in 1970 it is signed by both Yoko Ono and John Lennon. The book is estimated at £1,500-£2,000.

Probably the finest set of first editions of all seven Harry Potter novels ever to be offered at auction is estimated to sell for £30,000 – 40,000. The books are all in pristine condition, signed by the author and are accompanied by seven pieces of original artwork by artists Thomas Taylor, Cliff Wright and Giles Greenfield.

An extremely rare first edition of the Charles Dickens novel Great Expectations is one of only 1,000 copies, published in three volumes, in 1861. The work was first printed without illustrations as 36 weekly instalments in the Victorian periodical, All the Year Round. Dickens initially planned to issue Great Expectations in monthly numbers but sales of All the Year Round were suffering.

In a letter written by Dickens to his friend John Forster on the 4th October 1860 he says, “…called a council of war at the office on Tuesday [presumably 2 October 1860]. It was perfectly clear that the one thing to be done was, for me to strike in. I have therefore decided to begin the story as of the length of The Tale of Two Cities on the first of December — begin publishing, that is. I must make the most I can out of the book. You shall have the first two or three weekly parts to-morrow. The name is Great Expectations. I think a good name?” The majority of copies went to circulating libraries making this book, in its original binding, an extremely rare find on the open market. It is estimated at £18,000-£22,000.

A copy of The Daily News, No.1, printed on 21 January, 1846 is a very scarce and unusual piece of Dickensiania. Dickens had long maintained the ambition of founding a leading liberal newspaper, in part as a rival to the right-wing Morning Chronicle. Dickens said: “The Principles advocated by The Daily News will be Principles of Progress and Improvement; of Education, Civil and Religious Liberty, and Equal Legislation; Principles, such as its conductors believe the advancing spirit of the time requires.” The paper was not an immediate success and Dickens later handed the reigns over to his friend John Forster. The auction house can trace only one other copy sold at auction and have estimated the present example at £600-£800.

Written by William Wordsworth when he stayed in Bath in 1841, an autograph manuscript poem of four lines dated ‘Bath 28th April 1841,’ was written for the marriage of his daughter, Dora on the 11th May. Late in life, Wordsworth articulated most clearly the Miltonic belief that poets could act as effectively in matters of the spirit as those who were canonically ordained to the work as is displayed in this poem. It reads:

“Though Pulpits and the Desk may fail / To reach the hearts of worldly men / Yet may the grace of God prevail / And touch them through the Poet’s pen”

This rare example of Wordsworth’s personal writing to his family is estimated to sell for £2,000-£3,000.

Significant scientific works in the sale include a first edition of perhaps the most important medical text of the Middle Ages: Abu ‘Ali al-Husayn ibn ‘Abdallah ibn-Sina[Liber Canonis]. Written in original Arabic text by Avicenna and printed in Italy, it is based on the views of Galen, Hippocrates and Aristotle, as well the observations of Avicenna himself and other Muslim physicians. The writings formed a compendium of Greek and Muslim medical knowledge and remained the basic medical reference work in the Islamic world until the nineteenth century. The Arabic types used in the book were designed by Robert Granjon for the Typographia Medicea, set up by Ferdinando de’ Medici at the behest of Pope Gregory XIII for printing in Arabic and other oriental languages. The book is estimated at £7,000-£10,000.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

To be auctioned Nov. 28, 2013 at Drewatts & Bloomsbury. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

Bono (L) and Chris Martin perform onstage during Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. The piano was subsequently auctioned for $1.9 million. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

RED Auction raises $26.2M to fight AIDS in Africa

Bono (L) and Chris Martin perform onstage during Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. The piano was subsequently auctioned for $1.9 million. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

Bono (L) and Chris Martin perform onstage during Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. The piano was subsequently auctioned for $1.9 million. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

NEW YORK – On Saturday night, November 23rd, at Sotheby’s New York gallery, a standing-room only crowd helped raise more than $26 million for The Global Fund to fight AIDS in Africa. The star-studded audience gathered for The (RED) Auction celebrating design and innovation, which had been curated by Sir Jonathan Ive and Marc Newson in collaboration with musician and activist Bono.

The sale exceeded all expectations totaling more than $13 million, which was matched by The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The high-energy salesroom saw a remarkable three lots bring more than $1.5 million, including the two items designed in their entirety by Jony and Marc: a unique Leica Digital Rangefinder Camera, which sold for $1.8 million and a unique aluminum desk produced by Neal Feay Studio, which brought $1.7 million.

Throughout the evening, the crowd of more than 1,000 guests, including The Edge, Chelsea Clinton, Helena Christensen, Meg Ryan, Jenna and Barbara Bush; Hayden Panettiere, Larry Gagosian, Dieter Rams, Gayle King, and Mario Batali, was treated to a number of spectacular surprises. Before auctioneer Oliver Barker opened bidding on Lot 12, the Steinway & Sons unique “Red Pops for (RED)” Parlor Grand Piano, Coldplay’s Chris Martin took to the stage to sing Perfect Day and Beautiful Day with Bono. The performance inspired more than a dozen bidders to compete for the piano, which was finally won by philanthropist Stewart Rahr for $1.9 million.

Later in the evening, Lot 23, the Azzedine Alaïa pink couture long ruffle dress, was revealed in the salesroom worn by supermodel Christy Turlington before it sold to applause for $149,000. The final surprise of the evening came at the end of the auction when the Gretsch Electromatic “(RED) Zero Generation” Bono “Signature” Guitar was added to the auction and sold for $250,000.

After the final fall of the hammer, guests made their way to Sotheby’s spectacular 10th floor galleries to be entertained at the after party by Nile Rodgers and Chic, as well as Angelique Kidjo.

Bono commented, “Jony and Marc are the Beatles and Stones of the design world. The collection they put together should’ve been in a museum but instead they sold it off to buy medicines for those who can’t afford them but whose lives depend on them. The money raised is a lifeline, literally, for so many people, but nights like this also serve as a reminder of the historical opportunity we have to end AIDS. We are at a tipping point in the history of this tiny little virus that has wreaked so much havoc. We have to make sure the Global Fund has the money it needs or we could fail.”

Sir Jonathan Ive, Senior Vice President of Design at Apple, said, “It’s not every day that you get to curate a collection with your best friend and sell it off to help a lot of people. It’s been thrilling to contribute to the fight against AIDS in this way – by simply immersing ourselves in what we love: good design.”

“The best and most successful design demonstrates humanity and a sense of care for others,” said Marc Newson. “What could be more fitting than to have the opportunity to use the best of design to help continue the fight against AIDS. Thank you Bono, thank you (RED). It’s been an honor and a thrill.”

Mark Dybul, Executive Director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria said, “Because the US and UK governments have challenge grants, you can add 43% to the total raised tonight, bringing it to $37.46 million. I am very grateful to all the people involved in this auction for the generosity, creativity and passion that created not only amazing objects but contributed to the future of millions of people that have been affected by HIV/AIDS.”

Oliver Barker, Deputy Chairman of Sotheby’s Europe and the evening’s auctioneer, said, “This is the second time that we have had a fruitful collaboration with (RED) and we are absolutely thrilled with the results of tonight’s sale.”

(RED) has raised more than $215 million for The Global Fund to Fight AIDS to support HIV/AIDS grants in Ghana, Lesotho, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, Kenya and Tanzania. Global Fund grants that (RED) supports have impacted more than 14 million people with prevention, treatment, counseling, HIV testing and care services.

Online: www.red.org and www.sothebys.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Bono (L) and Chris Martin perform onstage during Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. The piano was subsequently auctioned for $1.9 million. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

Bono (L) and Chris Martin perform onstage during Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. The piano was subsequently auctioned for $1.9 million. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

(L-R) Marc Newson, Bono and Jony Ive attend Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for (RED).

(L-R) Marc Newson, Bono and Jony Ive attend Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for (RED).

Actress Hayden Panettiere attends Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for (RED)

Actress Hayden Panettiere attends Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for (RED)

Nile Rodgers performs onstage at the After Party for Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

Nile Rodgers performs onstage at the After Party for Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

Jenna Bush Hager (L) and Barbara Bush attend Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for (RED).

Jenna Bush Hager (L) and Barbara Bush attend Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for (RED).

Model Christy Turlington attends Jony And Marc's (RED) Auction at Sotheby's on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

Model Christy Turlington attends Jony And Marc’s (RED) Auction at Sotheby’s on November 23, 2013 in New York City. Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for (RED).

Official portrait of Mao Zedong attributed to Zhang Zhenshi and a committee of artists. This version hung at Tiananmen Gate prior to about 1967.

Mao envelope to Bo’s father auctioned for $1M in China

Official portrait of Mao Zedong attributed to Zhang Zhenshi and a committee of artists. This version hung at Tiananmen Gate prior to about 1967.

Official portrait of Mao Zedong attributed to Zhang Zhenshi and a committee of artists. This version hung at Tiananmen Gate prior to about 1967.

BEIJING (AFP) – A handwritten envelope sent by Communist China’s founder Mao Zedong to the father of fallen politician Bo Xilai and another military leader has fetched more than $1 million at a Beijing auction.

The envelope, inscribed in black brushstrokes ‘To Mr Fu Yisheng and Mr Bo Yibo” by Mao, sold for 6.55 million yuan ($1.08 million) on Sunday, the China Guardian auction house said on its website.

The document contained in the envelope was not included, in compliance with government regulations against selling leaders’ letters.

Bo was a high-ranking revolutionary general who fought both the Nationalists and Japanese before being jailed and tortured in the 1960s during Mao’s Cultural Revolution.

After Mao died and reformist leader Deng Xiaoping took over, Bo Yibo was rehabilitated and became one of the most powerful men in China, a “party immortal” who retained influence over state affairs through the 1990s.

“The envelope was issued by the People’s Revolutionary Military Committee of the Central People’s Government. It is rare and preserved well,” China Guardian said in a description.

The committee existed in the early years of the People’s Republic, which was founded in 1949, and preceded what is now China’s Central Military Commission.

Bo Xilai was sentenced to life in jail for corruption in September.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Official portrait of Mao Zedong attributed to Zhang Zhenshi and a committee of artists. This version hung at Tiananmen Gate prior to about 1967.

Official portrait of Mao Zedong attributed to Zhang Zhenshi and a committee of artists. This version hung at Tiananmen Gate prior to about 1967.

2013 Christmas ornament incorporating the image of a painting by former President George W. Bush. Image courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

George W. Bush the painter offers Christmas tree ornament

2013 Christmas ornament incorporating the image of a painting by former President George W. Bush. Image courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

2013 Christmas ornament incorporating the image of a painting by former President George W. Bush. Image courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

DALLAS (AP) – Former President George W. Bush has used his newly publicized love of painting to create a bird image for a 2013 commemorative Christmas ornament.

Bush, who lives in Dallas, appeared on NBC’s The Tonight Show with Jay Leno last week to show his art and talk about how much he enjoys painting.

The framed metal ornament features what appears to be the bright red image of a cardinal sitting on a branch.

The item lists for $29.98 on the website of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas. The art is described as an “untitled work.”

The holiday ornament can be purchased with red or green packaging.

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Online:

http://shop.bushpresidentialcenter.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=GWBPC13-OrnamentR

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 


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2013 Christmas ornament incorporating the image of a painting by former President George W. Bush. Image courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

2013 Christmas ornament incorporating the image of a painting by former President George W. Bush. Image courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Dutch, 1577-1640) painting of St. Peter as Pope with the pallium and the Keys to Heaven. Painted between 1610-1612. From the permanent collection at The Prado in Madrid.

Vatican unveils bone fragments said to be St. Peter’s

Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Dutch, 1577-1640) painting of St. Peter as Pope with the pallium and the Keys to Heaven. Painted between 1610-1612. From the permanent collection at The Prado in Madrid.

Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Dutch, 1577-1640) painting of St. Peter as Pope with the pallium and the Keys to Heaven. Painted between 1610-1612. From the permanent collection at The Prado in Madrid.

VATICAN CITY (AP) – The Vatican publicly unveiled a handful of bone fragments purportedly belonging to St. Peter on Sunday, reviving the scientific debate and tantalizing mystery over whether the relics found in a shoe box truly belong to the first pope.

The nine pieces of bone sat nestled like rings in a jewel box inside a bronze display case on the side of the altar during a Mass commemorating the end of the Vatican’s yearlong celebration of the Christian faith. It was the first time they had ever been exhibited in public.

Pope Francis prayed before the fragments at the start of Sunday’s service and then clutched the case in his arms for several minutes after his homily.

No pope has ever definitively declared the fragments to belong to the Apostle Peter, but Pope Paul VI in 1968 said fragments found in the necropolis under St. Peter’s Basilica were “identified in a way that we can consider convincing.”

Some archaeologists dispute the finding.

But last week, a top Vatican official, Archbishop Rino Fisichella, said it almost doesn’t matter if archaeologists one day definitively determine that the bones aren’t Peter’s, saying Christians have prayed at Peter’s tomb for two millennia and will continue to, regardless.

“It’s not as if pilgrims who go to the altar (of Peter’s tomb) think that in that moment in which they profess their faith that below them are the relics of Peter, or of another or another still,” he told reporters. “They go there to profess the faith.”

The relics were discovered during excavations begun under St. Peter’s Basilica in the years following the 1939 death of Pope Pius XI, who had asked to be buried in the grottoes where dozens of popes are buried, according to the 2012 book by veteran Vatican correspondent Bruno Bartoloni, “The Ears of the Vatican.”

During the excavations, archaeologists discovered a funerary monument with a casket built in honor of Peter and an engraving in Greek that read “Petros eni,” or “Peter is here.”

The scholar of Greek antiquities, Margherita Guarducci, who had deciphered the engraving continued to investigate and learned that one of the basilica workers had been given the remains found inside the casket and stored them in a shoe box kept in a cupboard. She reported her findings to Paul VI who later proclaimed that there was a “convincing” argument that the bones belonged to Peter.

Top Vatican Jesuits and other archaeologists strongly denied the claim, but had little recourse.

“No Pope had ever permitted an exhaustive study, partly because a 1,000-year-old curse attested by secret and apocalyptic documents, threatened anyone who disturbed the peace of Peter’s tomb with the worst possible misfortune,” Bartoloni wrote.

The Vatican newspaper, l’Osservatore Romano, published excerpts of the book last year, giving his account a degree of official sanction.

In 1971, Paul VI was given an urn containing the relics, which were kept inside the private papal chapel inside the Apostolic Palace and exhibited for the pope’s private veneration each June 29, for the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul. Sunday marked the first time they were shown in public.

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Follow Nicole Winfield at www.twitter.com/nwinfield

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Dutch, 1577-1640) painting of St. Peter as Pope with the pallium and the Keys to Heaven. Painted between 1610-1612. From the permanent collection at The Prado in Madrid.

Sir Peter Paul Rubens (Dutch, 1577-1640) painting of St. Peter as Pope with the pallium and the Keys to Heaven. Painted between 1610-1612. From the permanent collection at The Prado in Madrid.