Newcomb College bud vase, decorator Marie De Hoa LeBlanc, potter Joseph Meyers; circa 1907, white clay body with blue, green and yellow glossy glaze with daffodil decoration. Impressed on bottom NC, JM, W; marked in blue MHLeB, BZ-90. 6 3/4in h x 2 3/4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Quinn's Auction Galleries Image.

Quinn’s to auction 1,000 pieces of American art pottery Dec. 7

Newcomb College bud vase, decorator Marie De Hoa LeBlanc, potter Joseph Meyers; circa 1907, white clay body with blue, green and yellow glossy glaze with daffodil decoration. Impressed on bottom NC, JM, W; marked in blue MHLeB, BZ-90. 6 3/4in h x 2 3/4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Quinn's Auction Galleries Image.

Newcomb College bud vase, decorator Marie De Hoa LeBlanc, potter Joseph Meyers; circa 1907, white clay body with blue, green and yellow glossy glaze with daffodil decoration. Impressed on bottom NC, JM, W; marked in blue MHLeB, BZ-90. 6 3/4in h x 2 3/4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Quinn’s Auction Galleries Image.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. – Collectors should be delighted with the art pottery collection of William S. Lieth set to be auctioned by Quinn’s Auction Galleries on Saturday, Dec. 7. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Lieth has amassed one of the largest and most diverse collections of Cowan pottery by any private collector. The 500-plus piece collection includes one of the only 25 “Eve” sculptures ever made by R. Guy Cowan of Cowan Pottery. “Eve” was created by Cowan in 1928. Just three years later, in 1931, Cowan Pottery went out of business. The sculpture is decorated in terra-cotta glaze and estimated to bring $2,000-$4,000. Featured as well is a pair of metallic elephant bookends estimated between $400 and $600. These bookends feature a rare bronze metallic glaze used by Cowan Pottery. Also included are works by Cowan Pottery’s Thelma Frazier Winter, Margaret Postgate, Walter Sinz and Alexander Blazys. R. Guy Cowan founded Cowan Pottery in northeastern Ohio in 1912.

Some of the most desirable items in the sale will be the seven pieces by the famed Biloxi potter George Ohr. Included is one of Ohr’s famous lobed bowls he nicknamed his “Mud Babies.” The form demonstrates a refined clay with collapsed folds in a green glaze. Ohr’s impressed signature, “G.E. Ohr, Biloxi, Miss,” is on the bottom beneath the remnants of an uncontrolled glaze (est. $3,000-$5,000).

The second-largest part collection features incredible works from Rookwood Pottery. Included are works dating back to 1881 including a pitcher created by Maria Longworth Nichols in 1882. The decoration features a scene of an owl perched on a tree branch eating his caught dinner with a fork (est. $1,500-$2,000). Also featured are works by Rookwood artist Kataro Shirayamadani. Most notable is his 1894 vase decorated in Rookwood’s standard glaze with a foliate design (est. $1,500-$2,000). Other works include forms by Anna Marie Valentien, Sara Sax, Matthew A. Daly, Elizabeth Lincoln and Sally Coyne. Maria Longworth Nichols founded Rookwood Pottery Co. in Cincinnati in 1880.

Lieth certainly could not have completed his collection without a few pieces of Newcomb College, pottery from the women’s college of Tulane University in New Orleans. The Newcomb selection includes a bud vase created by Joseph Meyer and decorated by Marie De Hoa LeBlanc. The decoration features a white clay body with a blue, green and yellow glossy glaze with a daffodil pattern (est. $3,000-$4,000). Other works include pieces by Ada Witt Lonnegan, Mazie Teresa Ryan, Maude Robinson, Sadie Irvine and Lillian Ann Guedry. Newcomb College was founded by Josephine Louise Newcomb in 1886.

No American art pottery collection would be complete without Roseville and this collection will feature some of the hardest to find patterns and pieces that collectors still seek despite its decline in popularity in recent years. The 120-plus pieces of Roseville feature patterns like Ferrella, Monticello and Futura.

The auction will begin at 11 a.m. Eastern.

For additional details on any lot in the sale call 703-532-5632 or e-mail info@quinnsauction.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Newcomb College bud vase, decorator Marie De Hoa LeBlanc, potter Joseph Meyers; circa 1907, white clay body with blue, green and yellow glossy glaze with daffodil decoration. Impressed on bottom NC, JM, W; marked in blue MHLeB, BZ-90. 6 3/4in h x 2 3/4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Quinn's Auction Galleries Image.

Newcomb College bud vase, decorator Marie De Hoa LeBlanc, potter Joseph Meyers; circa 1907, white clay body with blue, green and yellow glossy glaze with daffodil decoration. Impressed on bottom NC, JM, W; marked in blue MHLeB, BZ-90. 6 3/4in h x 2 3/4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$4,000. Quinn’s Auction Galleries Image.

George Ohr small lobed and folded bowl, green glaze. Impressed on bottom: G. E. Ohr, Biloxi, Miss. 1 1/2in h. x 4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$5,000 Quinn's Auction Galleries image.

George Ohr small lobed and folded bowl, green glaze. Impressed on bottom: G. E. Ohr, Biloxi, Miss. 1 1/2in h. x 4in dia. Estimate $3,000-$5,000 Quinn’s Auction Galleries image.

Cowan pottery figure of Eve, circa 1928, terra-cotta glaze, felt on bottom, 13 1/4in. Estimate $2,000-$4,000. Quinn's Auction Galleries image.

Cowan pottery figure of Eve, circa 1928, terra-cotta glaze, felt on bottom, 13 1/4in. Estimate $2,000-$4,000. Quinn’s Auction Galleries image.

Rookwood vase with decoration by Kataro Shirayamadani, 1894. Standard glaze tall vase with raised floral and foliate design. Impressed with ROOKWOOD 1894, 742D, and artist's mark. 12 1/2in h. Estimate $1,500-$2,000. Quinn's Auction Galleries Image.

Rookwood vase with decoration by Kataro Shirayamadani, 1894. Standard glaze tall vase with raised floral and foliate design. Impressed with ROOKWOOD 1894, 742D, and artist’s mark. 12 1/2in h. Estimate $1,500-$2,000. Quinn’s Auction Galleries Image.

Two flags that stood in the White House Oval Office of President John F. Kennedy were auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $425,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

JFK rocking chair, Oval Office flags earn $500K at Heritage auction

Two flags that stood in the White House Oval Office of President John F. Kennedy were auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $425,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Two flags that stood in the White House Oval Office of President John F. Kennedy were auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $425,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

DALLAS (AFP) – A rocking chair used by president John F. Kennedy at the White House and two flags from his office drew more than $500,000 from a collector, Heritage Auctions said Sunday.

They were among some 228 items linked to the former president put under the hammer late Saturday in Dallas, on the 50th anniversary of JFK’s assassination in that city. LiveAuctioneers provided the Internet live-bidding services for the sale.

The two flags — an American flag and one with the Presidential Seal — were sold for $425,000, four times their pre-auction estimate, Heritage said in a statement.

The rocking chair sold for $87,500, also well above the pre-auction estimate of $50,000.

The items were owned by Dean William Rudoy, a volunteer in Kennedy’s 1960 presidential campaign who collected memorabilia of the slain president over the past 50 years.

The flags and rocking chair were bought by a collector from the US Southwest who “thought it important that these two lots stay together,” said Tom Slater, historical auctions director at Heritage.

He attributed the high price to the “affection and regard” people hold for JFK and to the fact that “presidential flags of any kind are tremendously sought after by collectors.”

The cushioned rocking chair was stationed in the office of Kennedy’s personal secretary, Evelyn Lincoln.

But it was often brought into the Oval Office so that Kennedy, who suffered from chronic back pain, could use it during his meetings and long hours at work.

The two flags, which were positioned behind his desk, were given to Kennedy’s secretary five days after the president’s death, at the request of his widow, Jacqueline Kennedy.

Kennedy was assassinated at the age of 46 on November 22, 1963, less than three years after taking office.

The 50th anniversary of his death prompted numerous events in the US in recent weeks, including a relatively modest ceremony in Dallas on Friday.

His killer, 24-year-old Lee Harvey Oswald, was arrested less than three hours after the shooting. He was shot to death on live television two days later as he was being transferred to the county jail.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Two flags that stood in the White House Oval Office of President John F. Kennedy were auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $425,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Two flags that stood in the White House Oval Office of President John F. Kennedy were auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $425,000. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

President John F. Kennedy's rocking chair, which he used in the Oval Office of the White House, was auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $87,500. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Heritage Auctions.

President John F. Kennedy’s rocking chair, which he used in the Oval Office of the White House, was auctioned by Heritage on Nov. 23, 2013 for $87,500. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers and Heritage Auctions.

Self-portrait by Van Dyck, 1640-1 © Philip Mould & Co

National Portrait Gallery appeal aims to keep Van Dyck art in UK

Self-portrait by Van Dyck, 1640-1 © Philip Mould & Co

Self-portrait by Van Dyck, 1640-1 © Philip Mould & Co

LONDON – Britain’s National Portrait Gallery (NPG) and the Art Fund today launched an appeal to raise £12.5 million to secure the last self-portrait of Sir Anthony Van Dyck. The painting has been in a British private collection for nearly 400 years but has been sold to a private collector who now wishes to take it abroad. This is the only chance a museum or a gallery in the United Kingdom has of acquiring the masterpiece, the NPG said in a press release.

The National Portrait Gallery has an initial three months to acquire Van Dyck’s exceptional Self-Portrait (1640-1), following a temporary Government export bar (issued on November 14, 2013) to prevent it from being taken overseas. The largest campaign in the gallery’s history, £1.2 million has already been raised including a grant of £500,000 towards the acquisition (as well as a further £150,000 to support a tour of the painting) from the Art Fund and £700,000 from the Gallery’s Portrait Fund and acquisition budget. The portrait goes on show at the Gallery from today.

Sir Anthony Van Dyck’s last self-portrait is a work of huge international importance and the only portrait of the artist made during his time in Britain ever likely to be made available for acquisition by a British public collection. Given its key place in British art and history, the Gallery, with the support of the Art Fund, plans to display the portrait both at its London home and, from early 2015, at partner museums and galleries around the country.

This enigmatic portrait dates from the end of Van Dyck’s life and presents an intimate image of an artist at work. He shows himself apparently in the act of painting, his hand raised in the process of applying paint to a canvas just out of sight. For today’s viewer, it conveys a sense of direct engagement with the artist as an individual, despite the passage of almost 400 years.

As well as enriching its present holding of three works by the artist, this Van Dyck painting, would make a significant addition to the National Portrait Gallery’s striking collection of self-portraits. These include works by Reynolds, Zoffany, Hogarth and Stubbs and, amongst twentieth-century and contemporary artists, Gwen John, Barbara Hepworth, Frank Auerbach, L S Lowry, Julian Opie, Gillian Wearing, Lucian Freud and David Hockney.

The frame of this painting, crested with the sunflower motif associated with the artist, is also of outstanding importance. Its unusually elaborate and exuberant carving has led some commentators to suggest that it was made much later than the painting, but recent research shows that it is almost certainly contemporary with the painting, and is likely to have been influenced by Van Dyck himself and designed with his involvement.

Sandy Nairne, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, London, said, “Van Dyck is one of the greatest artists to have worked in Britain. No other artist has had such a dramatic impact on British portraiture. He decisively turned it away from the stiff, formal approach of Tudor and Jacobean painting, developing a distinctive fluid, painterly style that was to dominate portraiture well into the twentieth century. It is very rare to have the opportunity to make a painting as important as Van Dyck’s last self-portrait available to everyone in Britain.”

Stephen Deuchar, Director of the Art Fund, said: “I urge you to help support the fundraising appeal to bring this extraordinary work permanently into the public realm. It is undoubtedly one of the finest and most important self-portraits in the history of British art, and the National Portrait Gallery’s collection provides the perfect context for its display.”

Artist Julian Opie said: “Although not large, this is a loud and dramatic painting. You see Van Dyck as the artist utterly confident and masterful with whipping brushstrokes of glistening paint. He is also the subject, witty, lively, a little cocky and very present. This is such a focused painting powerfully evoking a turbulent era. Nearly four hundred years on and it sparkles with life and light.”

Artist Gillian Wearing said: “This is a fantastic and evocative Van Dyck self portrait painting, that would enrich our whole culture if it can be made available to the public. We see Van Dyck painting his own portrait, looking at himself through a mirror. Or perhaps he is suggesting that we are the sitters as we look at him in the eye so directly? Museums have very few opportunities to acquire works of such importance, and this Van Dyck Self-portrait would be a legacy for many generations to come if the National Portrait Gallery is able to acquire it.”

Born in Antwerp in 1599, Van Dyck was an artistic prodigy who worked as an assistant to Peter Paul Rubens. He came to Britain in 1632 at the invitation of King Charles I, making London his home until his death in 1641. Charles I was Van Dyck’s most famous patron, rewarding him with a knighthood and the title of Principal Painter. Van Dyck established himself at the heart of the English court, producing magnificent portraits of the royal family and many courtiers. However, beneath the shimmering surface of the court was a sense of growing unease. The late 1630s were a time of political upheaval and by the end of 1642 civil war had broken out in Scotland and England. Within a year of producing this portrait Van Dyck was dead, buried in Old St Paul’s Cathedral with the epitaph:”Anthony Van Dyck – who, while he lived, gave to many immortal life.”

Donations to the National Portrait Gallery’s Van Dyck Self-Portrait Appeal can be made online at www.savevandyck.org.

Checks made payable to the National Portrait Gallery can be sent to Save Van Dyck, Development Department, National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London, WC2H 0HE.

Donate by text: Text VanDyck to 70800 to give £5.

Van Dyck’s Self-portrait (1640-1) is displayed adjacent to the Seventeenth-Century Galleries on the Second Floor of the National Portrait Gallery, London, from today. Admission free.

Should the Van Dyck self-portrait be acquired by the NPG, there will be a three-year nationwide tour to Turner Contemporary, Margate; Manchester Art Gallery, Dulwich Picture Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne; and The Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh.

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Lot 529: Ruth Asawa, Untitled. Price realized: $627,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Rago auctions Ruth Asawa wire sculpture for $627,750

Lot 529: Ruth Asawa, Untitled. Price realized: $627,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 529: Ruth Asawa, Untitled. Price realized: $627,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

NEW JERSEY – A Ruth Asawa woven wire mobile with five lobes, measuring 61 inches tall sold for $627,750 at Rago’s Nov. 16 fine art auction, setting a record for her like-size, multi-lobed work.

According to Artnet.com, there has been only one other sale at auction since the artist’s August death. It took place on Nov. 12 in New York, when a larger 78-inch seven-lobed work sold for $389,000.

LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

All prices quoted include buyer’s premium.

“The Asawa record is attributable to a number of market factors, from the beauty of her body of work to provenance to her recent death,” said Meredith Hilferty, director of fine art at Rago Arts and Auction Center. “In the final analysis, good is good and this is an impeccable thing. Still, I would hate for it to completely overshadow the many other successes in the sale, from op art to pop prints. I’d like to personally thank all our buyers and consignors, with special thanks to Steve Andersen for entrusting us with his personal collection of prints and original works.”

The auction totaled $2,607,313, inclusive of premium, with 73 percent of the 579 lots finding buyers. The postwar and contemporary art session totaled $2.2 million, well over the $1.9 million high estimate.

The top lots in the postwar and contemporary art session were:

  1. 529 Ruth Asawa, Untitled: $627,750
  2. 611 Julio Le Parc, Serie 3 D N° 1: $87,500
  3. 571 Richard Anuszkiewicz, Crimson Sanctuary: $75,000
  4. 574 Julian Stanczak, Summaries of Light: $68,750
  5. 553 Sol LeWitt, Two works of art: Set 223 and Untitled: $62,500
  6. 576 Richard Anuszkiewicz, Feast of the Sun and the Moon: $56,250
  7. 596 Friedel Dzubas, Royal Skin: $50,000
  8. 550 Roy Lichtenstein, Shipboard Girl: $46,875
  9. 646 Andy Warhol, Howdy Doody: $33,750
  10. 540 Roy Lichtenstein, On: $30,000
  11. 579 Julian Stanczak, Passing Through: $30,000

The 19th/20th century American and European Art session totaled $403,813, inclusive of premium, falling short of a low estimate of $574,700. Leading works in this category were:

  1. 4 Frederick William MacMonnies, Pan of Rohallion: $53,125
  2. 122 Romare Bearden, Lonely Beach: $18,750
  3. 21 Arthur Lismer, Untitled: $17,500
  4. 102 Joseph Barrett, Yellow House on the Delaware: $17,500
  5. 129 Andre Brasilier, Marcilly Village de Touraine: $17,500
  6. 90 Charles F. Ramsey, Untitled: $12,500
  7. 112 Clark Hulings, The Grain Merchant: $12,500
  8. 46 Jean Louis Chauvin, Maternite: $8,750
  9. 69 Ida Wells Stroud, A Hillside – Clara’s Garden: $8,750
  10. 93 Lloyd Raymond Ney, Composition No. 10: $8,750

Consignments are now being accepted for Rago’s May 2014 Fine Art auctions and all of Rago’s Spring 2014 auctions: 609-397-9374 or email info@ragoarts.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Lot 529: Ruth Asawa, Untitled. Price realized: $627,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 529: Ruth Asawa, Untitled. Price realized: $627,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 611: Julio Le Parc, ‘Serie 3 D N° 1.’ Price realized: $87,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 611: Julio Le Parc, ‘Serie 3 D N° 1.’ Price realized: $87,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 571: Richard Anuszkiewicz, ‘Crimson Sanctuary.’ Price realized: $75,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 571: Richard Anuszkiewicz, ‘Crimson Sanctuary.’ Price realized: $75,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 574: Julian Stanczak, ‘Summaries of Light.’ Price realized: $68,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 574: Julian Stanczak, ‘Summaries of Light.’ Price realized: $68,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 4: Frederick William MacMonnies, ‘Pan of Rohallion.’ Price realized: $53,125. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 4: Frederick William MacMonnies, ‘Pan of Rohallion.’ Price realized: $53,125. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 122: Romare Bearden, ‘Lonely Beach.’ Price realized: $18,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 122: Romare Bearden, ‘Lonely Beach.’ Price realized: $18,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 21: Arthur Lismer, Untitled. Price realized: $17,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 21: Arthur Lismer, Untitled. Price realized: $17,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 102: Joseph Barrett, ‘Yellow House on the Delaware.’ Price realized: $17,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 102: Joseph Barrett, ‘Yellow House on the Delaware.’ Price realized: $17,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

The styles of Hitchcock chairs have changed little in 195 years. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Copake Auction Inc.

Hitchcock Chair makes a comeback under new ownership

The styles of Hitchcock chairs have changed little in 195 years. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Copake Auction Inc.

The styles of Hitchcock chairs have changed little in 195 years. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Copake Auction Inc.

WINSTED, Conn. (AP) – Hitchcock Chair may not be the furniture juggernaut it once was but it is gradually making a comeback.

Now run by the owners of Still River Antiques, which bought the Hitchcock name in 2010, the nearly 200-year-old Riverton-based company has received its largest order of chairs since going back into operation.

Co-owner Rick Swenson said a group of investors contacted him just before Labor Day about a new restaurant they were building in Carlsbad, Calif. It’s called the Green Dragon Tavern and Museum and it’s modeled after a historic Boston bar of the same name.

The Boston Tea Party was planned at the original Green Dragon Tavern and Paul Revere was sent from there for his famous ride to Lexington. Historians call it the “headquarters of the revolution.” One of the investors, Bruce Bartlett, is originally from the Boston area. Swenson said Bartlett is an avid collector of Revolutionary War memorabilia and much of that collection will be on display in the museum.

The investors ordered 152 Hitchcock chairs. The largest order Swenson and his partner, Gary Hath, had up to that point was eight. The order also came after business had struggled for most of the year.

“It was a struggle just to meet payroll,” Swenson said.

The order has been split into two parts, with the first 77 chairs expected to go out this week. The chairs are black with the front of the top rail of each chair stenciled with a patriotic image, such as the pilgrims landing at Plymouth Rock in 1620, the Boston Tea Party of 1773 and Paul Revere’s ride in 1775.

Swenson said the images were part of the inventory when he and Hath bought the Hitchcock brand. There are hundreds of stencils, all made by Hitchcock employees, but the patriotic ones apparently weren’t used too often, he said.

John Lek, the general manager and senior vice president of the tavern, said he and his partners were aware of the Hitchcock brand and contacted the business because they believed Hitchcock would make the authentic-looking New England-style chairs they wanted.

“They were on the spot in terms of meeting our needs from a service standpoint,” Lek

Lek said the business representatives of the restaurant have not decided on a design for the remaining 75 chairs but he figures it will most likely be another patriotic theme with possibly the restaurant’s logo. Lek said he hopes the restaurant will open by Jan. 1.

While Hitchcock Chair has grown from four to 14 employees in less than three years, Swenson said he has not needed to hire any additional workers for the restaurant project. About 40 percent of all work is outsourced to about a half dozen small longtime manufacturers around New England, making various components. Hitchcock in its prime did the same, he said.

Annual revenue is nearly $1 million but so are expenditures so profits thus far are small.

Hitchcock in its heyday in the 1970s and ’80s was a $20-million-a-year business making 400 chairs per day.

“My partner and I have been very careful about spending money,” Swenson said, adding that he and Hath are looking to buy some new equipment but are holding off for now. “We have no debt so on paper we’re profitable.”

They are working with the state Department of Economic and Community Development about expanding at some point but are “taking it slow,” Swenson said. Much of the manufacturing and assembly is now done at Whiting Mills, a former factory building at the corner of Whiting Street and Holabird Avenue that now houses some 30 to 40 tenants who are primarily artists and craftsmen. But they would like a space where all of the manufacturing, storage and loading docks are on the same floor.

“It is our intention to stay in Northwest Connecticut,” Swenson said, noting that its main retail store remains in the Riverton section of Barkhamsted with Still River Antiques.

Officials from both Winsted and Barkhamsted are tickled that Hitchcock is rebounding.

“It’s a wonderful success story,” Winsted Economic Development Commission Chairman Richard Labich said. “Any time you can attract a company in to our town that in two years has 14 employees, that’s the kind of operation that we’re looking for…Success attracts success.”

For Barkhamsted First Selectman Donald S. Stein, the return of Hitchcock is both a nod to the past and the future.

“It’s a big part of our heritage,” he said. “Anything that creates jobs in town, I’d love to see them expand and expand as much as the possibly can. They’re good people and they make a good product. The more they’re able to do, the happier we all are and the happier they are.”

While Hitchcock, founded in 1818, benefitted greatly from the post-World War II boom and the Colonial revival, Swenson said the company is now trying to capitalize on the market that is willing to pay a little more for “well-made, high-quality American-made furniture.” The average Hitchcock chair retails for $399.

Hitchcock recently opened a new showroom in Wilton that it shares with another Colonial-style furniture maker, Eldred Wheeler. Swenson said the original Hitchcock company had its own store in Wilton.

“It’s a good match for us because the lines are similar but we don’t directly compete,” he said of Eldred Wheeler, which makes primarily bedroom furniture.

Swenson said Hitchcock’s future success lies largely in selling its products wholesale. He said he wants to continue to partner with small mom-and-pop furniture stores, which would feature Hitchcock furniture on a section of their showroom floor.

“We’re starting to trend back toward the positive,” Swenson said. “We’ve got a lot more interest from other dealers that want to start buying wholesale so we’re looking to put out a sale representative that would cover New England.”

___

Online:

hitchcockchair.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-21-13 1547GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The styles of Hitchcock chairs have changed little in 195 years. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Copake Auction Inc.

The styles of Hitchcock chairs have changed little in 195 years. Image courtesy of LiveAucitoneers.com Archive and Copake Auction Inc.

The recreated version of the Rivera painting originally known as 'Man at the Crossroads.' Image by Gumr51. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Exhibit examines Diego Rivera’s lost NYC mural

The recreated version of the Rivera painting originally known as 'Man at the Crossroads.' Image by Gumr51. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The recreated version of the Rivera painting originally known as ‘Man at the Crossroads.’ Image by Gumr51. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington is opening a new exhibit exploring a famous artwork by Diego Rivera.

On Thursday, the center will open an exhibit focused on Rivera’s Man at the Crossroads, which was a large mural that was painted in New York’s Rockefeller Center. The painting was started in 1933 but was eventually destroyed amid disagreements between Rivera and the building’s management, in part because of the inclusion of communist revolutionary Vladimir Lenin.

The new exhibit is bringing Rivera’s original sketches for the painting from a museum in Mexico City. The exhibit will also include documents, letters and photographs that have never been seen outside of Mexico to examine the story behind Rivera’s work.

Bank of America funded a restoration of Rivera’s original sketches in Mexico City.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-20-13 0803GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The recreated version of the Rivera painting originally known as 'Man at the Crossroads.' Image by Gumr51. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The recreated version of the Rivera painting originally known as ‘Man at the Crossroads.’ Image by Gumr51. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Rare 1893 Edison cylinder #694 performed by the black vocal group 'The Unique Quartette,' sung acapella. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co.

Saco River to auction 1893 recording of black quartet Nov. 23

Rare 1893 Edison cylinder #694 performed by the black vocal group 'The Unique Quartette,' sung acapella. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co.

Rare 1893 Edison cylinder #694 performed by the black vocal group ‘The Unique Quartette,’ sung acapella. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co.

BIDDEFORD, Maine (AP) – One of two copies of the oldest known recording of a black vocal group in the U.S. is up for auction – a recording so rare and delicate that the auctioneer doesn’t dare try to play it.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding for Saturday’s auction, which begins at 1 p.m. Eastern.

The 1893 recording of Mama’s Black Baby Boy by the Unique Quartet pre-dates vinyl recordings. The song was recorded on a wax-covered cylinder using technology invented by Thomas Edison. It can only be played on a special cylinder player that was a predecessor to phonographs, which played flat, vinyl discs, said Troy Thibodeau, manager of Saco River Auction Co.

The 120-year-old recording, along with a second Unique Quartet song, Who Broke the Lock (on the Henhouse Door)? from 1896, came from a Portland collector who amassed 3,000 of the old cylinder recordings.

“They’re in fantastic shape,” Thibodeau said Wednesday, carefully showing off the smooth cylinder covered in brown wax on which the music resides in etched grooves. “All it takes is a little bit of heat or a little bit of cold, and these things are junk. So, for more than 100 years, someone really took care of these things and treasured them.”

Both cylinders are up for auction on Saturday, along with hundreds of other items, including a shirt belonging to George Armstrong Custer, the cavalry commander who died in 1876 while fighting Indians at Little Bighorn in Montana.

Cylinder recordings are becoming scarce, and recordings of black artists are rare.

There are so few cylinders that have the historical significance of the Unique Quarter recordings that it’s hard to know how much they might sell for. An appraiser believes they’ll go for $25,000 or more – apiece.

The cylinders rotate on a machine that looks like an early Victrola-style player. A needle fits in the wax grooves as the cylinder spins. Such players still exist, but the wax degrades with each playing.

Another black group, the Standard Quartet, is credited with making earlier cylinder recordings than the Unique Quartet, but none of those recordings exist today, said Bob Marovich, a gospel music historian in Chicago.

Marovich said he holds out hope that more of the old music could turn up. “Finding this one serves as a well of hope that maybe some more of them are out there,” he said in a telephone interview.

It’s startling how soon music can be lost.

Robert Darden, who’s working to save the music by digitizing existing vinyl recordings through the Black Music Restoration Project, estimates that 75 percent of gospel music recorded on vinyl from 1940 to 1970 has disappeared.

“All pre-digital black sacred music is at risk. The cylinders are made from pressed, hardened wax and grow brittle and chipped with age. Vinyl 78s, 45s and LPs were melted down and recycled as part of the war effort during World War II,” said Darden, who’s a professor at Baylor University in Texas.

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Online:

Auction house http://www.sacoriverauction.com/

Library of Congress recording of Mama’s Black Baby Boy http://bit.ly/1aGE69X

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Follow David Sharp on Twitter at https://twitter.com/David_Sharp_AP

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-11-20-13 2048GMT

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Rare 1893 Edison cylinder #694 performed by the black vocal group 'The Unique Quartette,' sung acapella. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co.

Rare 1893 Edison cylinder #694 performed by the black vocal group ‘The Unique Quartette,’ sung acapella. Image courtesy of Saco River Auction Co.

John F. Kennedy, 36th President of the United States, photographed on July 11, 1963 in the Executive Office of the White House. Photo by White House photographer Cecil Stoughton.

Solemn ceremony to mark 50th anniversary of JFK assassination

John F. Kennedy, 36th President of the United States, photographed on July 11, 1963 in the Executive Office of the White House. Photo by White House photographer Cecil Stoughton.

John F. Kennedy, 36th President of the United States, photographed on July 11, 1963 in the Executive Office of the White House. Photo by White House photographer Cecil Stoughton.

DALLAS (AP) — Fifty years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, thousands will mark the day with a solemn ceremony in Dealey Plaza, through which the president’s motorcade passed when shots rang out.

Friday’s event will feature brief remarks by the mayor, the tolling of church bells and readings from the president’s speeches by author David McCullough.

It’s a reverential approach that will be mirrored in Boston, where the JFK Library and Museum will open a small exhibit of never-before-displayed items from Kennedy’s state funeral and host a musical tribute that isn’t open to the public, and in Washington, where President Barack Obama will meet privately at the White House with leaders and volunteers from the Kennedy-established Peace Corps program.

The committee convened by current Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings to plan the city’s event wanted to focus “in a positive way more on the legacy of President Kennedy,” said Ron Kirk, a former mayor and member of the panel.

About 5,000 tickets were issued for the free ceremony in Dealey Plaza, which is flanked by the Texas School Book Depository building where sniper Lee Harvey Oswald perched on the sixth floor. Dealey Plaza Historic District was named a National Historic Landmark in 1993.

The U.S. Naval Academy Men’s Glee Club will perform in a nod to Kennedy’s military service and there will be an Air Force flyover. A moment of silence will be held at 12:30 p.m., when the president was shot.

Numerous events were held around Dallas this year to mark the milestone anniversary, including panels with those who were there that day, special concerts and museum exhibits.

As press aide for Gov. John Connally, Julian Read was in a media bus several vehicles behind the presidential limousine. After the gunshots, he watched as the vehicle, carrying the mortally wounded Kennedy and injured governor, sped away. Read released a book this year recounting his experience and has attended several of the events, which he called cathartic.

“Even though there are all those melancholy thoughts, the way it’s shaping up … gives me more of a comfort than any time since 1963,” said Read, who will be at the official ceremony Friday.

The Coalition on Political Assassinations, a group that believes Kennedy’s death was part of a conspiracy, usually gathers on the plaza’s “grassy knoll” for a moment of silence each Nov. 22. Since it’ll be blocked off this year, executive director John Judge — who first came to Dealey Plaza for the fifth anniversary of JFK’s death in 1968 — says he’s reached a “livable” agreement with the city.

The group — which plans to wear specially made T-shirts with an image of Kennedy’s head with a bullet hole and blood and the slogan “50 years in denial is enough” — will gather a few blocks away and move to the plaza after the official ceremony ends.

Also Friday, the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce will host a breakfast at the hotel where he gave his last speech and spent the final night of his life.

In Boston, the private musical tribute will feature Paul Winter, whose jazz sextet performed for Kennedy at the White House, along with a U.S. Navy choir and James Taylor. Other notable guests include Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, who is scheduled to read quotes from Kennedy’s speeches.

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Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


John F. Kennedy, 36th President of the United States, photographed on July 11, 1963 in the Executive Office of the White House. Photo by White House photographer Cecil Stoughton.

John F. Kennedy, 36th President of the United States, photographed on July 11, 1963 in the Executive Office of the White House. Photo by White House photographer Cecil Stoughton.

1932 Coca-Cola illuminating counter sign manufactured by Brunhoff, 14in, est. $4,500-$7,500. Morphy Auctions image.

Antique advertising, coin-ops usher in the holidays Dec. 6-7 at Morphy’s

1932 Coca-Cola illuminating counter sign manufactured by Brunhoff, 14in, est. $4,500-$7,500. Morphy Auctions image.

1932 Coca-Cola illuminating counter sign manufactured by Brunhoff, 14in, est. $4,500-$7,500. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – It pays to advertise, but as auction prices have shown over the past few years, it also pays to collect advertising. A steady stream of interested, new collectors continues to step up to join those who’ve long embraced this popular hobby, with the result being a symbiosis that works very well for all involved. As veteran collectors sell their pieces at auction to upgrade or finance upper-end acquisitions, newer collectors keep the marketplace buoyant at the entry level and mid range.

One of the most reliable sources for antique and vintage advertising – at a variety of price points – is Morphy Auctions in southeastern Pennsylvania. The company conducts several specialty sales per year devoted exclusively to advertising, with the next one slated for December 6-7, 2013. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

The 1,400-lot selection in the December event includes not only advertising and general store items, but also coin-op machines and occupational shaving mugs, the category that will open the sale.

The shaving mugs represent the third and final offering from the collection of the late Ray Jones, whose career in the US Navy influenced his love of military themes. Within the auction grouping are mugs emblazoned with images of a naval ship gunboat, $1,200-$1,500; a Civil War soldier standing next to a cannon and firearms, $1,500-$2,000; and a double-masted steam yacht, $1,200-$1,600.

More than 50 antique coin-op machines stand ready to accept pocket change from previewers. A Caille upright slot is expected to make $16,000-$24,000. Two Mills machines are estimated in the five figures, as well. An Automatic 5-cent slot could reach $10,000-$12,000; and a novelty “Electricity Is Life” arcade machine might spark a winning bid of $12,000-$15,000.

Next up will be 250 general store lots, led by a complete run of early dye and veterinary medicine cabinets, all in near-mint condition. The vet cabinets advertise the top three brands of their day: Dr. Daniels,’ Dr. Humphreys’ and Dr. Lesure’s.

Many outstanding signs await their turn in the spotlight. A coveted Soapine reverse-on-glass sign depicts a man scrubbing a smiling whale with the famous cleaning product introduced in 1827 in Providence, Rhode Island. Considered a New England classic, this sign is estimated at $8,000-$12,000. Another early prize is a colorful self-framed oval tin sign advertising John Bardenheier Wine & Liquor, estimate $4,000-$6,000.

There are 75 lots of tobacco tins and rare cigar cutters in the sale. A fine Union Leader Cut Plug Tobacco cardboard sign with a fantastic image of Uncle Sam reading The Naval Review is in near-mint condition and estimated at $4,000-$8,000. Top tins include examples that once held Exquisite Cut Plug Tobacco, est. $2,000-$3,000; and Continental Cubes Tobacco, $1,000-$1,500.

The opening session will wrap with a 100-lot single-owner collection of items advertising Whistle Soda. One of the largest known collections of its type, it is led by a beautiful sign depicting a boy and girl with glasses of Whistle soda. Estimate: $750-$1,500.

Most of day two will be dominated by America’s favorite soft drink, Coca-Cola. The long list of Coke-related highlights includes a 1941 aviation-theme festoon, $7,500-$10,000; a 1918 calendar, $5,000-$7,000; and a 1930s radio shaped like a Coke bottle, $3,500-$5,500. A 1932 illuminating counter sign manufactured by Brunhoff could fetch $5,000-$7,000; while a tin “Pick Up 12” reminder sign with Coke “button” is estimated at $2,500-$3,500.

The session is rounded out with an array of syrup dispensers and other soda-related pieces – surely enough to quench any enthusiast’s thirst for soda pop collectibles.

The Dec. 6-7 auction will commence at 9 a.m. Eastern Time on both days. For additional information on any lot in the sale, call 717-335-3435 or e-mail serena@morphyauctions.com.


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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


1932 Coca-Cola illuminating counter sign manufactured by Brunhoff, 14in, est. $4,500-$7,500. Morphy Auctions image.

1932 Coca-Cola illuminating counter sign manufactured by Brunhoff, 14in, est. $4,500-$7,500. Morphy Auctions image.

Soapine reverse-on-glass sign, 35 x 29in, est. $8,000-$12,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Soapine reverse-on-glass sign, 35 x 29in, est. $8,000-$12,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Rare 1941 Coca-Cola aviation festoon, 69 x 29in framed, est. $7,500-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Rare 1941 Coca-Cola aviation festoon, 69 x 29in framed, est. $7,500-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image.

1918 Coca-Cola calendar, matted and framed under glass, est. $5,000-$7,000. Morphy Auctions image.

1918 Coca-Cola calendar, matted and framed under glass, est. $5,000-$7,000. Morphy Auctions image.

1930s Coca-Cola bottle radio, lights up and operates, $3,500-$5,500. Morphy Auctions image.

1930s Coca-Cola bottle radio, lights up and operates, $3,500-$5,500. Morphy Auctions image.

Caille upright slot machine, 69in tall, oak case with antique copper finish, est. $16,000-$24,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Caille upright slot machine, 69in tall, oak case with antique copper finish, est. $16,000-$24,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Mills novelty ‘Electricity Is Life’ arcade machine, 77½in tall, est. $11,000-$15,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Mills novelty ‘Electricity Is Life’ arcade machine, 77½in tall, est. $11,000-$15,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Dr. Lesure’s Famous Remedies veterinary cabinet, oak with tin front, est. $3,000-$6,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Dr. Lesure’s Famous Remedies veterinary cabinet, oak with tin front, est. $3,000-$6,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Union Leader Cut Plug Tobacco cardboard sign, 42½ x 32¾in framed, est. $4,000-$8,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Union Leader Cut Plug Tobacco cardboard sign, 42½ x 32¾in framed, est. $4,000-$8,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Civil War soldier occupational shaving mug, est. $1,500-$2,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Civil War soldier occupational shaving mug, est. $1,500-$2,000. Morphy Auctions image.

‘The Attorney-General's Charges Against the late Queen,’ 1821, collection of charicatures. Price realized: £22,320 ($36,157). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

Albums drew high bids at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury, Nov. 7

‘The Attorney-General's Charges Against the late Queen,’ 1821, collection of charicatures.  Price realized: £22,320 ($36,157). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

‘The Attorney-General’s Charges Against the late Queen,’ 1821, collection of charicatures. Price realized: £22,320 ($36,157). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

LONDON – One of the most important albums of drawings by the celebrated 18th century caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson, Comparative Anatomy Resemblances between the Countenances of Men and Beasts (1822), sold for an outstanding £57,600 ($93,283) in Dreweatts & Bloomsbury’s auction “The Library of a Gentleman” on Nov. 7. It had been estimated at £10,000-£15,000. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The album of drawings and watercolors is one of only three known complete albums, and the only one in private hands. The other two are housed in the British Library and the Houghton Library. These albums, alongside numerous other loose studies in various collections, most notably in the Courtauld Institute of Art, show the interest Rowlandson had in the scientific developments of physiognomy and comparative anatomy, and how his humorous engagement with contemporary scientific thought influenced his drawings and watercolors (Lot 317).

An exceptional work of color plates and caricatures, George Moutard Woodward’s The Caricature Magazine, or Hudibrastic Mirror, was another highlight of the sale. This rare complete set of humorous and satirical caricatures comprised 385 plates and was in excellent condition. It realized £37,200 (Lot 271).

The Attorney-General’s Charges Against the late Queen (1821), another rare collection of caricatures this time aimed at Queen Caroline, included 49 hand-colored etched plates by Theodore Lane with contributions from brothers George and Robert Cruikshank. No copies were listed on COPAC, the national, academic and specialist library catalog. This collection achieved £22,320 (Lot 42) .

Two lots by William Heath were particularly sought after, generating much presale interest and a buzz in the saleroom. Theatrical Characters (lot 198) and Household Servants (lot 199), were two lots of rare suites of plates which realized £5,952 and £8,680 respectively.

Every single item sold and many realized exceptional prices, up to two or three times higher than estimate.

“We were all delighted with the result of the sale. It was testament to a collection of rare and desirable books, fresh to the market and in prime condition, put together over a number of years by a collector with taste and a very good eye,” said Rupert Powell, auctioneer and deputy chairman at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


‘The Attorney-General's Charges Against the late Queen,’ 1821, collection of charicatures.  Price realized: £22,320 ($36,157). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

‘The Attorney-General’s Charges Against the late Queen,’ 1821, collection of charicatures. Price realized: £22,320 ($36,157). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

‘Towlandson (Thomas), ‘Comparative Anatomy. Resemblances between the Countenances of Men and Beasts.’ Price realized: £57,600 ($93,283). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

‘Towlandson (Thomas), ‘Comparative Anatomy. Resemblances between the Countenances of Men and Beasts.’ Price realized: £57,600 ($93,283). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.