Diamond filigree ring sells for $6,000 at Cordier jewelry auction

Opal Victorian brooch, 8 carats. Price realized: $1,100. Cordier Auctions image.
Opal Victorian brooch, 8 carats. Price realized: $1,100. Cordier Auctions image.

Opal Victorian brooch, 8 carats. Price realized: $1,100. Cordier Auctions image.

HARRISBURG, Pa. – A 2.86-CTW diamond filigree ring in platinum sold for $6,000 while an 8-carat opal Victorian brooch in 14K gold drew $1,100 at Cordier Auctions’ jewelry, sterling, and coin auction on Dec. 8. LiveAuciotoneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

Other highlights were a 4-CTW diamond and sapphire Art Deco circle pin at $3,100 and a 114-piece Alvin sterling flatware set at $2,200. The 506-lot auction was held in the company’s auction house located at 1500 Paxton St. in Harrisburg.

The sale featured items from multiple consignors including a large local estate. Over 60 people were in attendance at the auction in addition to phone and absentee bidders, while 142 bidders were registered to bid via the Internet. Prices quoted are hammer prices.

Diamonds drew bids early in the auction as a 4-CTW diamond and sapphire circle pin in platinum sparked excitement in the room. After heavy bidding, the winner was in the room with a bid of $3,100, only slightly higher than the presale estimate. A 2.86-CTW diamond filigree ring in platinum also drew heavy bidding, once again the winner was in the room at $6,000, exceeding the estimate of $2,500-$4,500. A 1.03-carat diamond solitaire ring in 14K Gold also went to the room for $2,500, within estimate of $2,000-$3,000. A .62-CTW diamond engagement ring and wedding band in 14K gold hammered down to the room at $1,000, over the estimate of $500-$700.

Other gemstones garnered interest as well including a star sapphire and diamond ring in platinum that brought heavy bidding in the room; the ring hammered down at $1,600, well over the $200-$300 estimate. An 18K tourmaline fashion ring brought $700 on an estimate of $500-$700. An antique garnet & pearl filigree ring sold to an Internet bidder for $225, slightly over the estimate.

One highlight was an 8-carat opal Victorian brooch that saw heavy bidding before selling to an Internet bidder for $1,100 (estimated $450-$750). A 14K slide bracelet sold to the room for $1,200, just under the low estimate.

In coins and sterling, a set of Washington quarters saw heavy bidding before selling to the room for $500 (estimate $300-$400). A set of 100 Greatest Masterpiece Medals also drew attention, hammering down at $3,300 to a bidder in the room, just over the estimate. A 114-piece Alvin sterling flatware set in the Princess Eugene pattern sold for $2,200 to an Internet bidder, within the estimate.

Questions can be directed to info@cordierauction.com or by calling 717-731-8662.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Opal Victorian brooch, 8 carats. Price realized: $1,100. Cordier Auctions image.

Opal Victorian brooch, 8 carats. Price realized: $1,100. Cordier Auctions image.

Diamond and sapphire circle pin. Price realized: $3,100. Cordier Auctions image.

Diamond filigree ring, 2.86 total carat weight. Price realized: $6,000. Cordier Auctions image.

Diamond filigree ring, 2.86 total carat weight. Price realized: $6,000. Cordier Auctions image.

Set of 100 Greatest Masterpiece Medals. Price realized: $3,300. Cordier Auctions image.

Set of 100 Greatest Masterpiece Medals. Price realized: $3,300. Cordier Auctions image.

Rago estate jewelry, silver, coins auction takes in $3.8M

Lot 283 - Tiffany & Co. Japanesque mixed metal centerpiece. Price realized: $117,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.
Lot 283 - Tiffany & Co. Japanesque mixed metal centerpiece. Price realized: $117,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 283 – Tiffany & Co. Japanesque mixed metal centerpiece. Price realized: $117,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – Rago Arts and Auction Center ended the year in spectacular style with a three-day sale that totaled $3,814,469 (reflects buyer’s premium of 25 percent) for the 1,427 lots. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

“This weekend’s results speak to Rago’s strength with property other than the 20th century material for which David Rago is best known.” said Miriam Tucker, managing partner at Rago. “It was entirely satisfying to succeed for the Tenaglia family, whose property formed the nucleus of the auction. That property soared above its high estimate. The sales of silver from other consignors were very strong and we achieved fine prices in jewelry lots from contemporary to 19th century, Edwardian and ancient. We also sold historic firearms for the first time. Our sales grew across the board this year. The auctions that don’t feature 20th century design added $1 million in volume alone. We’re delighted and we’re accepting consignments.”

The top lot of Friday’s auction was a Tiffany & Co. Japanesque mixed metal centerpiece, estimated at $80,000-$120,000, which sold for $117,750.

Additional highlights of the silver, coins, currency and the Tony Tenaglia estate were:

  • 500 – Immense Gorham “Puritan” silver coffee pot: $18,750;
  • 227 – Tiffany & Co. coin silver revolving railroad cruet: $15,000;
  • 236 – Japanesque sterling and mixed metal coffeepot: $13,750;
  • 244 – Gorham Martele silver center bowl: $13,750;
  • 556 – Georg Jensen silver Acorn flatware service: $13,750;
  • 200 – Medallion silver tea /coffee service and compote: $11,875;
  • 194 – Eight-piece sterling Repousse coffee service: $10,000;
  • 243 – Gorham Martele .9584 silver loving cup: $9,375;
  • 187 – S. Kirk & Son coin silver water urn: $8,125.

Coins and currency, Dec. 6 highlights:

  • 634 – Morgan silver $1 partial set: $6,875;
  • 605 – U.S. gold and silver coins: $5,313;
  • 604 – 1882 $3 U.S. gold coin: $2,250;
  • 616 – World royalty and prominent figures: $2,250;
  • 600 – 1920 U.S. $20 gold coins: $2,000.

Estate of Tony Tenaglia, Dec. 7 highlights:

The top item of Saturday’s sale was lot 1238, a Myochin School articulated iron snake estimated at $8,000-$12,000, which sold for $195,750.

  • 1238 – Myochin School iron articulated snake: $195,750;
  • 1114 – Folk art figural walking stick: $38,750;
  • 1091 – Evgeny Alexandrovich Lanceray cossack on horseback: $32,500;
  • 1097 – Sir William Hamo Thornycroft, R.A. Teucer: $32,500;
  • 1547 – Persian saber: $25,000;
  • 1001– Ivory tusk and silver cigar cutter: $17,500;
  • 1258 – Pair of Famille Rose monumental palace vases: $12,500;
  • 1158 – After Auguste Rodin L’Eternal Printemps: $10,625;
  • 1164 – Etienne-Henri Dumaige two bronze sculptures: $9,375;
  • 1261a – Carpet figured with animals and calligraphic cartouches: $9,375.

Jewelry, watches, objets de vertu, gemstones Dec. 8:

  • 2425 – 9.04-carat radiant cut diamond ring: $60,000;
  • 2426 – 4.16-carat marquise cut diamond engagement ring: $40,625;
  • 2429 – sapphire and diamond platinum bracelet: $37,500;
  • 2430 – sapphire and diamond platinum necklace: $35,000;
  • 2421 – 2.25-carat diamond platinum ring: $30,000;
  • 2411 – French Art Deco diamond platinum strap bracelet: $28,750;
  • 2078 – suite of ancient hardstone intaglio jewelry: $21,250;
  • 2417 – diamond platinum fruiting vine dress clips: $18,750;
  • 2420 – Art Deco diamond platinum chain: $18,750;
  • 2419 – natural pearl and diamond belle epoque necklace: $17,500.

For details contact Rago Arts and Auction Center at 609-397-9374 or email info@ragoarts.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Lot 283 - Tiffany & Co. Japanesque mixed metal centerpiece. Price realized: $117,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 283 – Tiffany & Co. Japanesque mixed metal centerpiece. Price realized: $117,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 500 - Immense Gorham 'Puritan' silver coffeepot. Price realized: $18,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 500 – Immense Gorham ‘Puritan’ silver coffeepot. Price realized: $18,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1114 - Folk art figural walking stick. Price realized $38,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1114 – Folk art figural walking stick. Price realized $38,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1097 - Sir William Hamo Thornycroft 'Teucer' bronze. Price realized: $32,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1097 – Sir William Hamo Thornycroft ‘Teucer’ bronze. Price realized: $32,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1258 – Pair of Famille Rose monumental palace vases. Price realized: $12,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1258 – Pair of Famille Rose monumental palace vases. Price realized: $12,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Tiffany & Co. Renaissance Revival quatrefoil brooch with amethysts and diamonds: Price realized: $10,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Tiffany & Co. Renaissance Revival quatrefoil brooch with amethysts and diamonds: Price realized: $10,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 2425 – 9.04-carat radiant cut diamond ring. Price realized: $60,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 2425 – 9.04-carat radiant cut diamond ring. Price realized: $60,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 2430 – sapphire and diamond platinum necklace. Price realized: $35,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 2430 – sapphire and diamond platinum necklace. Price realized: $35,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1238 – Myochin School articulated iron snake. Price realized: $195,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Lot 1238 – Myochin School articulated iron snake. Price realized: $195,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Gallery Report: January 2014

 

Buckeye syrup dispenser, $114,000, Morphy Auctions

 

A Buckeye 5-Cent Root Beer soda fountain syrup dispenser with dancing satyrs sold for $114,000 at an Antique Advertising & Coin-Op Auction held Dec. 6-7 by Morphy Auctions in Denver, Pa. Also, a circa-1930s tri-fold cardboard cutout featuring two boys wooing a girl realized $38,400; a 1941 Coca-Cola aviation festoon, 69 inches by 29 inches, hit $21,600; a 1932 Coca-Cola illuminating counter sign made by Brunhoff rose to $20,400; and a Mills Novelty Electricity is Life arcade game made $19,200. Prices include a 20 percent buyer’s premium.

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Rago open house features talk by horologist Gregg Perry

Gregg Perry, horologist. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.
Gregg Perry, horologist. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.
Gregg Perry, horologist. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – Rago Arts and Auction Center will host an open house on Wednesday, Jan. 15, featuring a talk by horologist Gregg Perry on “The Evolution and Origin of Timekeeping and Its Keepers.” The open house will take place during the preview week for Rago’s Unreserved auction.

Perry will describe the journey through time that begins with the first nonmechanical timekeepers. Guests will hear how various trades, artists and craftsmen melded art and science to create clocks and watches for the affluent. Gregg will also discuss the role of clocks and watches in moving man toward what he describes as “the elusive goal of timekeeping, accuracy and chronological order.”

Gregg Perry received his horological training at the NAWCC School of Horology and the British Horological Institute, training in mechanism conservation at West Dean College in Great Britain, forensic conservation at the Campbell Center, as well as formal conservation and restoration training for furniture and wooden artifact at the École Bole/Louvre Musée in Paris. He is the first and only American to date to complete the Boulle program. Perry’s studio provides complete conservation, restoration and or repair of mechanisms and cases.

The auction house opens on Wednesday, Jan. 15, at noon. A reception begins at 5 p.m. Perry will speak at 6 p.m.

RSVP to 609-397-9374 ext. 119 or raac@ragoarts.com. If unable to RSVP in advance, please attend anyway; all are welcome.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Gregg Perry, horologist. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.
Gregg Perry, horologist. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Indiana picker finds jackpot in illegal casino chips

John Edward Ballard, who made a fortune by operating an illegal gambling business in French Lick, Ind., bought the West Baden Springs Hotel complex for $1 million in 1923. Built in 1901, the designated National Historic Landmark has been restored.
John Edward Ballard, who made a fortune by operating an illegal gambling business in French Lick, Ind., bought the West Baden Springs Hotel complex for $1 million in 1923. Built in 1901, the designated National Historic Landmark has been restored.
John Edward Ballard, who made a fortune by operating an illegal gambling business in French Lick, Ind., bought the West Baden Springs Hotel complex for $1 million in 1923. Built in 1901, the designated National Historic Landmark has been restored.

BEDFORD, Ind. (AP) – Lonnie Graves most often finds his old-time treasures at auctions, flea markets and resale shops. Like the vintage leather jacket he picked up for five bucks and sold for $75. Or the 1950s metal toy truck he paid $10 for as the lone auction bidder that just sold for $125.

“I like the unusual, and my passion is collecting and picking,” the Lawrence County resident told The Herald-Times. “It’s kind of my hobby, but also has become a way to make a living. I’m really a contractor, and I’ve been in the tree business for a long time.”

He grew up poor, surrounded by items from the past. “I’ve always been around old stuff, your butter churns, your crocks, things like that. I like old houses and what’s in them. Old cars. I’ve always picked and hoarded and collected and sold.”

In recent years, much of his selling has been done on eBay, the international Internet marketplace. And he recently made a purchase there that led him to possibly the best deal he has ever come across: more than 2,400 illegal casino chips from the Prohibition days, when drinking and gambling were banned and went underground.

The fancy crest-and-seal clay chips likely were manufactured by the U.S. Playing Card Co. They date back to the 1920s and were used at the illicit casino inside the old Brown Hotel in French Lick. The rich, famous and notorious traveled there by train to drink, gamble and socialize.

“Since casinos were illegal, they called them clubs, and Brown’s was one of those places where the politicians and people turned their eyes away,” Graves said.

The Brown Hotel casino thrived until the government shut it down in 1949.

Graves has long kept an eye out for old casino chips, especially illegal ones. Searching eBay one day not long ago, he saw some listed for sale that originated in French Lick. He bought 100 from the site, then called the seller to arrange to get them.

Turns out he did not have to go far, just to Paoli. “When I got there, I asked if he had any more, and he said yes – and came back around the corner with a whole big box full.” Graves bought them.

The man was selling the chips for Shauna Burton, the granddaughter of Floyd Earl and Mary Emily Burton. Back in the 1960s, when the Brown Hotel was being demolished, the couple ran the Star Store on Maple Street in downtown French Lick. The Burtons collected items from the rubble, including the cache of gambling chips, which they stored in their attic.

After her grandparents died, Shauna Burton inherited the chips. Graves bought them all. He would not say how much he paid, but said they could be worth as much as $100 each to the right buyer. “It was by chance and luck that I got them,” Graves said. “People are just now starting to get very interested in these. They are the modern-day silver dollar.”

Graves has a special interest in casino-related items and said he benefited by knowing the value of the chips others might not be aware of. “In this business, you always hope to find that certain item nobody else knows about,” he said.

Even though he collects such things to sell for a profit, he intends to hang on his stash of illegal gambling tokens for a while. For now, they are stored in a safe deposit box.

“These are a treasure, artifacts from the old illegal gambling days when the Ballards owned the casino and it was the place everyone went,” Graves said. “Right now, I am more concerned about preserving them. This was a precious find.”

___

Information from: The Herald Times, http://www.heraldtimesonline.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-23-13 1700GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


John Edward Ballard, who made a fortune by operating an illegal gambling business in French Lick, Ind., bought the West Baden Springs Hotel complex for $1 million in 1923. Built in 1901, the designated National Historic Landmark has been restored.
John Edward Ballard, who made a fortune by operating an illegal gambling business in French Lick, Ind., bought the West Baden Springs Hotel complex for $1 million in 1923. Built in 1901, the designated National Historic Landmark has been restored.

Son of former auto engineer is go-to guy for Studebaker parts

'Studebaker Authorized Service' porcelain sign. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pioneer Auction Service.
'Studebaker Authorized Service' porcelain sign. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pioneer Auction Service.
‘Studebaker Authorized Service’ porcelain sign. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pioneer Auction Service.

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) – Ed Reynolds remembers his father, a former Studebaker engineer, selling his Cruiser in 1964 after the automaker ended production here.

Reynolds’ father figured replacement parts would become scarce, and that would make the car difficult to maintain.

“It’s funny,” Reynolds told the South Bend Tribune. “Here I am, all these years later, selling Studebaker parts.”

Reynolds owns Studebaker International, which is the world’s largest supplier of Studebaker components.

The company is based in Greenfield, about 10 miles east of Indianapolis, but it also has a retail store and warehouse in the building where Studebaker made military trucks at 701 W. Chippewa Ave. in South Bend.

The 50,000-square-foot warehouse is filled with row after row of tall shelves that are stocked with everything from tiny nuts and bolts to heavy doors and trunk lids. Some of the components are remnants of the inventory made when Studebaker was still operating; other parts are reproductions.

Studebaker International’s store also sells collectibles such as stickers, pint glasses, posters and miniature toy cars. There are even Studebaker ornaments, greeting cards, giftwrap and bows for the holiday season.

The company’s product catalog, now at 353 pages, gets thicker each time a new edition is printed.

“I have found that anything I put the Studebaker name on is going to sell,” Reynolds said.

Reynolds grew up in Mishawaka and New Carlisle, but he started Studebaker International in the 1970s when he was living in Claremont, Calif., and teaching special education.

He couldn’t find a replacement mirror for a 1963 Avanti he was restoring, so he found a way to have the mirror’s components made and assembled it himself. Now his company sells more than 1,000 mirrors annually for Studebaker vehicles.

Reynolds opened a store in Long Beach, Calif., and then moved back to Indiana in 1999 after buying a Studebaker parts company that had a large inventory in Greenfield. He left California with four semi-truck loads of car parts.

He added 195 semi-truck loads to his inventory when he bought what remained of Studebaker Autoparts Sales Corp., or SASCO, in 2009. Those parts had been stored in the company’s engineering building, where his father had worked, along Sample Street in South Bend.

Studebaker International employs a dozen people in Greenfield and three in South Bend. Reynolds said he contracts with other companies to manufacture the reproduction parts, but his employees do some of the machining and cleaning for parts before shipping them to customers.

Reynolds said, “People have come to me and said, ‘Do you really make enough money selling Studebaker parts to make a living?’ I say, ‘Well, I have 15 people working for me, and none of us are going hungry.’”

He said love for Studebaker has endured, even though the company stopped making cars in the 1960s.

That interest isn’t confined to the Midwest either.

Studebaker International ships orders throughout the United States and abroad. It has a strong customer base in Australia.

The company is an important source for the 12,000 people who keep Studebakers road-worthy as members of the Studebaker Drivers Club.

Bob Halgren, a resident of La Mesa, Calif., and the advertising arbiter for the club’s monthly magazine, Turning Wheels, said the SASCO inventory likely would have been junked if Reynolds hadn’t bought it in 2009.

“I don’t know where we would be from a parts and maintenance perspective if he wasn’t around and hadn’t stepped up to buy SASCO,” Halgren said.

___

Information from: South Bend Tribune, http://www.southbendtribune.com

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-12-19-13 1525GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


'Studebaker Authorized Service' porcelain sign. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pioneer Auction Service.
‘Studebaker Authorized Service’ porcelain sign. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Pioneer Auction Service.