Heritage sells 1890 $1,000 treasury note for record $3.29M

This is known as the Grand Watermelon Note because the large zeros resemble watermelons. Heritage Auctions image.

This is known as the Grand Watermelon Note because the large zeros resemble watermelons. Heritage Auctions image.
This is known as the Grand Watermelon Note because the large zeros resemble watermelons. Heritage Auctions image.
DALLAS – The rarest and most famous of all U.S. currency notes, the legendary 1890 $1,000 treasury note, popularly referred to as the “Grand Watermelon note” – due to the design of the large zeroes on the reversed side of the bill, resembling watermelons – became the single most valuable piece of currency in existence when it sold for $3,290,000 on Friday, far exceeding its pre-auction estimate of $2 million.

It was sold by Dallas-based Heritage Auctions as part of the company’s Florida United Numismatics Convention Rare Currency Auction in Orlando. The sale was part of a series of auctions the firm conducted last week that have grossed more than $105 million total, the largest numismatic auction in history.

The last time this note was offered at auction was in 1970, where it brought $11,000.

“This note is an icon of American financial history – and is the only known example in private hands – we knew something extraordinary was possible,” said Dustin Johnston, director of rare currency at Heritage Auctions. “Collectors knew this was not a chance that was going to come around again anytime soon, and they bid accordingly. The result being that this beautiful little piece of paper is now the most valuable of its kind in the world and has a new chapter to add to its legend.”

The note sold to a private collector who wished to remain anonymous.

Also topping the seven-figure mark in the auction was a unique 1882 $500 Gold Certificate, which was also the subject of spirited bidding before it finished at $1,410,000.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


This is known as the Grand Watermelon Note because the large zeros resemble watermelons. Heritage Auctions image.
This is known as the Grand Watermelon Note because the large zeros resemble watermelons. Heritage Auctions image.
This 1890 $1,000 U.S. Treasury note is considered the most valuable piece of currency in the world, having sold for a record $3.29 million. Heritage Auctions image.
This 1890 $1,000 U.S. Treasury note is considered the most valuable piece of currency in the world, having sold for a record $3.29 million. Heritage Auctions image.

Met to reopen gallery with new name: Anna Wintour Costume Center

Anna Wintour at the Twenty8Twelve fashion show in London, September 22, 2009. Source: Anna Wintour & Alexa Chung. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Anna Wintour at the Twenty8Twelve fashion show in London, September 22, 2009. Source: Anna Wintour & Alexa Chung. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
Anna Wintour at the Twenty8Twelve fashion show in London, September 22, 2009. Source: Anna Wintour & Alexa Chung. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
NEW YORK—Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, announced today that the Museum will designate the space occupied by The Costume Institute as the Anna Wintour Costume Center. The complex has been completely redesigned and renovated and will reopen on May 8 with the inaugural exhibition Charles James: Beyond Fashion. The Anna Wintour Costume Center will house the Department’s exhibition galleries, library, conservation laboratory, research areas, and offices. The curatorial department itself will continue to be called The Costume Institute.

“Anna Wintour’s extraordinary advocacy and fundraising have made this state-of-the-art space a reality,” said Daniel Brodsky, the Museum’s Chairman. “She has the rare ability to rally diverse groups across a wide range of industries to support The Costume Institute so it can educate and inspire visitors from around the world.”

Ms. Wintour, Artistic Director of Condé Nast and Editor-in-Chief of Vogue, has been a Trustee of the Met since January 1999. In her role as benefit chair and fundraiser, Ms. Wintour has raised approximately $125 million for The Costume Institute. Her work has included co-chairing 15 benefits since 1995, helping to secure sponsorships and funding for exhibitions as well as for the two-year renovation and other projects.

“Through her bold leadership at the helm of the annual Costume Institute Benefit plus other significant fundraising, Anna has helped us realize a place where The Costume Institute can move into the future with the latest technology for creating immersive, cutting-edge exhibitions, developing new techniques for object conservation, and designing a customized collection storage facility,” said Mr. Campbell. “Her interest in our mission has allowed us to rise to new levels of growth and prominence. She is an exceptional benefactor, advocate, and friend.”

The Anna Wintour Costume Center will include The Costume Institute’s 4,200-square-foot main showcase – the Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery – which features a flexible design that lends itself to frequent transformation, a zonal sound system, innovative projection technology, and wireless connectivity. The Center also includes the Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery, which will orient visitors to The Costume Institute’s exhibitions and holdings; a state-of-the-art costume conservation laboratory; an expanded study/storage facility that will house the combined holdings of the Met and the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection; and The Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library, one of the world’s foremost fashion libraries.

Funding for the renovation also includes a landmark gift of $10 million from Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch along with $1 million commitments from Janet and Howard Kagan and the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation.

The Costume Institute was previously refurbished in 1992. The last exhibition in its galleries was blog.mode: addressing fashion which closed in April 2008. The Charles James exhibition will also be on view in the Museum’s first-floor exhibition galleries from May 8 through August 10.

Founded in 1937 as The Museum of Costume Art, it was incorporated and renamed as The Costume Institute and became a part of the Metropolitan Museum in 1946. It now contains a collection of fashionable dress and regional costumes from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, dating from the 17th century to the present. In January 2009, The Brooklyn Museum transferred its costume collection, amassed over more than a century, to The Costume Institute, where it is known as the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The combined collection of more than 35,000 pieces constitutes one of the largest, most comprehensive costume collections in the world, offering an unrivaled timeline of Western fashion history.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Anna Wintour at the Twenty8Twelve fashion show in London, September 22, 2009. Source: Anna Wintour & Alexa Chung. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.
Anna Wintour at the Twenty8Twelve fashion show in London, September 22, 2009. Source: Anna Wintour & Alexa Chung. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

US returns missing ancient sculptures to India

This 11th century yellow sandstone statue of the deity Rajasthan is in the collection of the Museum fur Indische Kunst, Berlin-Dahlem. May 2006 photo by Gryffindor.

This 11th century yellow sandstone statue of the deity Rajasthan is in the collection of the Museum fur Indische Kunst, Berlin-Dahlem. May 2006 photo by Gryffindor.
This 11th century yellow sandstone statue of the deity Rajasthan is in the collection of the Museum fur Indische Kunst, Berlin-Dahlem. May 2006 photo by Gryffindor.
NEW YORK (AFP) – The United States returned to India Tuesday three ancient sculptures that had fallen into the hands of traffickers, following a month of tense ties triggered by the arrest of an Indian diplomat in New York.

Relations between India and the United States were strained last month after authorities arrested Devyani Khobragade, a New York consular official, over treatment of her domestic servant.

In a deal between the two countries, Khobragade was allowed to return to India last week just as a grand jury indicted her on two counts.

India’s consul general in New York, Dnyaneshwar Mulay, refused to acknowledge any link between the issues.

But he expressed deep gratitude to U.S. authorities for the return of the sculptures and hailed what he called strong bilateral ties.

James Dinkins, executive associate director of Homeland Security Investigations, also thanked India for its “excellent cooperation.”

“The excellent international cooperation between the United States and India led to the recovery and return of these priceless antiquities,” Dinkins said.

“The pilfering of a nation’s cultural patrimony cannot and will not be tolerated.”

The sandstone sculptures, dating from the 11th or 12th century, are worth an estimated $1.5 million, had been offered for sale in the United States, officials said.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This 11th century yellow sandstone statue of the deity Rajasthan is in the collection of the Museum fur Indische Kunst, Berlin-Dahlem. May 2006 photo by Gryffindor.
This 11th century yellow sandstone statue of the deity Rajasthan is in the collection of the Museum fur Indische Kunst, Berlin-Dahlem. May 2006 photo by Gryffindor.

Interior antiques abound in Dreweatts & Bloomsbury sale Jan. 28-29

A hallway view of the John Penrose home shows some of the furnishings that will be sold at the Dreweatts & Bloomsbury auction Jan. 28-29. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

A hallway view of the John Penrose home shows some of the furnishings that will be sold at the Dreweatts & Bloomsbury auction Jan. 28-29. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

A hallway view of the John Penrose home shows some of the furnishings that will be sold at the Dreweatts & Bloomsbury auction Jan. 28-29. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

NEWBURY, England – An eclectic selection of interior antiques belonging to art and antiques dealer John Penrose will be sold at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions Donnington Priory saleroom in their two-day “Interiors, Glass and Ceramics” sale on Tuesday, Jan. 28, and Wednesday, Jan. 29. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding both days.

A striking pair of antler electroliers, in the 19th century style, is among the varied private collection belonging to Penrose. At the turn of the century, electroliers quickly replaced gasoliers as electricity began to light the homes of Britain. In an 1891 book Mrs J.E.H Gordon described this new lighting as: “showing up every wrinkle and line in the face. No one over the age of 18 should be asked to sit beneath such a light!” The pair of electroliers is estimated to achieve £500-£700 [Lot 286].

Penrose describes his personal taste as “wide-ranging,” as can be seen from in the pieces offered in the sale. From the Georgian period is a mahogany dressing table produced in the manner of Gillows of London and Lancaster. Gillows, founded by Robert Gillow in 1730, developed a national and then international reputation for quality furniture, outlasting the famous furniture producers of the time, Chippendale and Sheraton. The table, circa 1825, is estimated at £600-£800 [Lot 328].

Penrose has been collecting and dealing in art and antiques for more than 50 years, while writing about and advising clients on the renovation and decoration of period homes. His art gallery, The Dollar Street Gallery, was based in a Georgian townhouse in Cirencester. As chairman of UK-based charity The Discerning Eye since 2007, Penrose currently supports the organization in its aim to encourage a wider understanding and appreciation of the visual arts.

Elsewhere in the sale, from a separate collection, is an early 19th century chamberlain’s Worcester armorial part dessert service from Nunney Court, formerly the residence of Rob Walker, owner of Formula One’s highly successful Rob Walker Racing team. The service, circa 1800, is estimated at £2,500-£3,500 [Lot 22].

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A hallway view of the John Penrose home shows some of the furnishings that will be sold at the Dreweatts & Bloomsbury auction Jan. 28-29. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

A hallway view of the John Penrose home shows some of the furnishings that will be sold at the Dreweatts & Bloomsbury auction Jan. 28-29. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Collectors take aim at rare Colt pistols, Jan. 11 at Morphy’s

Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.
Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy’s Jan. 11 Firearms sale, anchored by a fine 35-year private collection, grossed $1.8 million and was 100% sold, according to the central Pennsylvania auction company’s CEO, Dan Morphy. Two desirable Colt pistols shared top-lot honors in the 633-lot sale, knocking down $96,000 each. All prices quoted in this report are inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium.

“We knew from the amount of interest shown prior to the sale that it would probably end up being our most successful Firearms sale ever, and that’s exactly what happened,” said Morphy. “There were 2,800 registered bidders, 150 of them in the gallery, which was standing room only. Several of the country’s biggest firearms buyers were bidding, either in person or over the phones, and there were more Internet bidders [through LiveAuctioneers] than we’ve ever had for any Morphy’s gun sale. If I could describe their bidding style as a whole, I’d say it was very confident. It’s been our experience that whenever genuinely rare firearms appear in the marketplace, bidders don’t hesitate. They go for it.”

And “go for it” they did when Lot 146, a Colt production Model 1909 .45 caliber trial pistol, #11 of only 22 manufactured, opened for bidding. Accompanied by a Colt letter of authenticity, it soared to an above-estimate final price of $96,000. A second Colt .45 pistol, entered as Lot 162 and described as a “very early production with Serial #10 and United States Property on the frame,” also achieved $96,000, easily surpassing its $10,000-$20,000 estimate.

Making it a Colt trifecta at the top of prices realized, a Colt production Model 1910 9.8mm test pistol, the first of only four produced for government trials, was offered together with a very scarce box of 9.8mm Colt ammunition. Entered as Lot 147, it secured a winning bid of $90,000.

Lot 154, a .45 caliber Singer .45 caliber pistol was marked “US Property” and “Model 1911A1 U.S. Army.” A rare gun to find on the open market, it sold for $78,000 against an estimate of $15,000-$25,000.

Lot 396, a New Haven Arms production lever-action .41 caliber carbine – a short musket or rifle historically used by cavalry – exhibited a pre-Civil War magazine-loader design that influenced later Henry and Winchester lever-action rifles and carbines. “Firearms of this type are very rarely encountered on the market,” said Morphy Auctions’ general manager, Kris Lee. That statement was borne out by the price realized: $40,800 against an estimate of $15,000-$25,000. Another noteworthy rifle of the antebellum era was Lot 301, a rare Smith-Jennings .54 caliber model with a serial number of 115, achieved $34,800 – more than three times its high estimate.

Lot 389, a handsome Winchester 1886 45/90 caliber WCF Sporting Rifle with a full magazine in its octagon barrel, retained a Winchester letter of authentication and sold well above estimate for $16,200.

A Webley World War I production of the Webley-Fosbery Model 1914 .455 caliber Cordite automatic revolver was entered as Lot 114 and came with a leather holster engraved “Glen C. Holland, Gordon Highlanders,” referring to the famous Scottish Highlands regiment. Estimated at $8,000-$10,000, the antique weapon reached $18,000 at auction.

An unusual entry, Lot 305 consisted of an original armory crate containing 20 Model 1884 “trapdoor” rifles with bayonets in very good to fine condition. The consignor had purchased the crate of weapons from the Montana National Guard. It was offered complete with inserts used to protect the firearms during shipment. The lot was bid to an above-estimate price of $34,800.

“We were extremely pleased with the response to this sale,” said Kris Lee. “Buyers drove and flew in three weeks prior to the sale to preview the collection privately. The week of the auction was so busy we had to race to keep up with the requests for condition reports, questions and showings. It was a great sign that the sale was going to be a success.”

Lee said that after the event concluded, the feedback was “overwhelmingly positive…Many buyers were first-time bidders with us, and they were impressed with our operation and the quality of what we were selling.”

Morphy Auctions’ next Firearms sale will be held on July 19, with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers. Consignments will be accepted until May 12. For additional information, contact Kris Lee at Morphy Auctions by calling 717-335-4570 or emailing kris@morphyauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Morphy’s Jan. 11 Firearms sale, complete with prices realized, at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Crate of 20 Model 1884 .45/.70 caliber ‘trapdoor’ rifles previously purchased from Montana National Guard, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

New Haven Arms production lever-action .42 caliber Volcanic carbine, pre-Civil War magazine loader, $40,800. Morphy Auctions image.

New Haven Arms production lever-action .42 caliber Volcanic carbine, pre-Civil War magazine loader, $40,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Smith-Jennings .54 caliber rifle, pre-Civil War, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Smith-Jennings .54 caliber rifle, pre-Civil War, $34,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Webley-Fosbery Model 1914 .455 caliber Cordite automatic revolver previously owned by a member of the Gordon Highlanders regiment (Scotland), $18,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Webley-Fosbery Model 1914 .455 caliber Cordite automatic revolver previously owned by a member of the Gordon Highlanders regiment (Scotland), $18,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Winchester production of the Model 1866 .45/.90 caliber WCF Sporting Rifle, with Winchester letter of authenticity, $16,200. Morphy Auctions image.

Winchester production of the Model 1866 .45/.90 caliber WCF Sporting Rifle, with Winchester letter of authenticity, $16,200. Morphy Auctions image.

Colt production Model 1909 .45 caliber trial pistol, Serial #11 of 22 made, with Colt letter of authenticity, $96,000. Morphy Auctions image.
Colt production Model 1909 .45 caliber trial pistol, Serial #11 of 22 made, with Colt letter of authenticity, $96,000. Morphy Auctions image.
Colt production Model 1911 .45 caliber pistol, Serial #10, marked ‘United States Property,’ with Colt letter of authenticity, $96,000. Morphy Auctions image.
Colt production Model 1911 .45 caliber pistol, Serial #10, marked ‘United States Property,’ with Colt letter of authenticity, $96,000. Morphy Auctions image.
Singer production Model 1911A1 .45 caliber pistol, marked ‘US Property,’ $78,000. Morphy Auctions image.
Singer production Model 1911A1 .45 caliber pistol, marked ‘US Property,’ $78,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Mount Washington museum getting extreme makeover

The Mount Washington Observatory summit weather station coated in a thick layer of rime ice, which forms when fog freezes. With an average annual temperature of just 27 degrees and cloud cover two-thirds of the time, Mount Washington has prolific rime icing much of the year. Mount Washington Observatory image.

The Mount Washington Observatory summit weather station coated in a thick layer of rime ice, which forms when fog freezes. With an average annual temperature of just 27 degrees and cloud cover two-thirds of the time, Mount Washington has prolific rime icing much of the year. Mount Washington Observatory image.
The Mount Washington Observatory summit weather station coated in a thick layer of rime ice, which forms when fog freezes. With an average annual temperature of just 27 degrees and cloud cover two-thirds of the time, Mount Washington has prolific rime icing much of the year. Mount Washington Observatory image.
NORTH CONWAY, N.H. (AP) – The Mount Washington Observatory plans to show its renovated museum on the New Hampshire mountaintop in June.

Extreme Mount Washington will show visitors what winter’s like at the mountain. Through hands-on, high-tech exhibits, the museum will present a sampling of the “World’s Worst Weather.”

Designed by Jeff Kennedy Associates of Somerville, Mass., the new museum will feature a user-controlled flat-panel display showing “clear day” views from the summit in all seasons; an interactive Snowcat simulator; and a recreation of the 1930s observatory, including the anemometer used to record the famous 231 mph wind.

Exhibit components are being constructed this winter, and will be transported to the summit for installation as soon as the Mount Washington Auto Road opens this spring.

“The new educational experience will share the science and excitement of this incredible place to guests of all ages in a modern, interactive format,” observatory executive director Scot Henley said. “It will be a showpiece for Mount Washington Observatory, Mt. Washington State Park, and the greater White Mountains region.”

Nearly $1 million has been raised for the project through more than 400 foundations, corporations, and individual Mount Washington Observatory members, donors and fans from across the country.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-01-11-14 1425GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Mount Washington Observatory summit weather station coated in a thick layer of rime ice, which forms when fog freezes. With an average annual temperature of just 27 degrees and cloud cover two-thirds of the time, Mount Washington has prolific rime icing much of the year. Mount Washington Observatory image.
The Mount Washington Observatory summit weather station coated in a thick layer of rime ice, which forms when fog freezes. With an average annual temperature of just 27 degrees and cloud cover two-thirds of the time, Mount Washington has prolific rime icing much of the year. Mount Washington Observatory image.
Mount Washington Observatory uses a 2-ton snowcat to access the peak in winter. The new museum will feature a snowcat simulator that invites summer visitors to 'pilot' the vehicle up the mountain. Each of these photos portrays the winter experience, which Extreme Mount Washington will convey to summer visitors. Mount Washington Observatory image.
Mount Washington Observatory uses a 2-ton snowcat to access the peak in winter. The new museum will feature a snowcat simulator that invites summer visitors to ‘pilot’ the vehicle up the mountain. Each of these photos portrays the winter experience, which Extreme Mount Washington will convey to summer visitors. Mount Washington Observatory image.
A Mount Washington Observatory scientist knocks ice off the instrument tower. The observatory station could not exist without staff, as the fragile instruments would be quickly destroyed without people to maintain them in the extreme conditions. Mount Washington Observatory image.
A Mount Washington Observatory scientist knocks ice off the instrument tower. The observatory station could not exist without staff, as the fragile instruments would be quickly destroyed without people to maintain them in the extreme conditions. Mount Washington Observatory image.
Summit visitors lean into the wind on the observation deck. The summit of Mount Washington experiences hurricane force winds about every other day on average during the winter, and winds at or about 100 miles per hour about every fourth day on average in the winter. Mount Washington Observatory image.
Summit visitors lean into the wind on the observation deck. The summit of Mount Washington experiences hurricane force winds about every other day on average during the winter, and winds at or about 100 miles per hour about every fourth day on average in the winter. Mount Washington Observatory image.

Impressionist masterworks donated to Denver museum

Claude Monet, 'Path in the Wheat Fields at Pourville,' 1882. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Claude Monet, 'Path in the Wheat Fields at Pourville,' 1882. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Claude Monet, ‘Path in the Wheat Fields at Pourville,’ 1882. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.

DENVER – The Denver Art Museum announced Monday the largest gift ever given to the museum. Denver-based philanthropist Frederic C. Hamilton, the museum’s chairman emeritus, bequeathed 22 impressionist masterworks from his private collection to the museum.

The artworks are currently on view at the museum in “Nature as Muse: Impressionist Landscapes from the Frederic C. Hamilton Collection and the Denver Art Museum,” part of the trio of exhibitions in “Passport to Paris.” This presentation, on view through Feb. 9, is the first time the collection has been exhibited publicly.

This capstone gift marks 35 years of Hamilton’s generous giving to the museum. Over the years, Hamilton has supported numerous endeavors and exhibitions, including the groundbreaking 2012 exhibition “Becoming Van Gogh,” and leading the fundraising effort for the $110 million Hamilton Building.

“The addition of these paintings to the Denver Art Museum collection is a pivotal moment in this institution’s history,” said Christoph Heinrich, museum director. “Frederic Hamilton’s generosity, vision and commitment to making Denver a destination for art are unparalleled and have forever changed the museum’s ability to deliver world-class exhibitions and programs.”

The gift includes a painting by Vincent van
Gogh, Edge of a Wheat Field with
 Poppies, the first Van Gogh artwork to
enter the museum’s collection; four works
 by the impressionist master Claude Monet
including Path in the Wheat Fields at the
 Pourville, 1882, and The Houses in the Snow, Norway, that illustrate a range of output during the peak of Monet’s career; three paintings by Eugène Boudin, the first by the artist to enter the museum’s collection, including Scene at the Beach in Trouville, 1881; along with paintings by Paul Cézanne, another first for the museum’s collection, Edouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, Camille Pissarro, Auguste Renoir and Alfred Sisley, as well as those of their American contemporaries William Merritt Chase and Childe Hassam.

The addition of these 22 works elevates the museum’s holdings of impressionist works to one of the best in the Western United States.

“Collecting these paintings has been a joy for the past four decades and I am happy to know that future generations of visitors to the Denver Art Museum will be able to enjoy them as much as I have,” Hamilton said. “It is my hope that this gift will make the museum’s collection an even greater resource to everyone who lives in or visits our great city.”

Hamilton served as chairman of the Denver Art Museum board of trustees from 1994–2013 and played a pivotal role in the successful expansion of the museum campus with the 146,000-square-foot addition by Daniel Libeskind, which opened in 2006. The building, which bears Hamilton’s name, will house the collection in a dedicated installation space when the works arrive permanently.

Throughout his tenure, Hamilton has spearheaded two major endowment campaigns for the Denver Art Museum, growing those assets to more than $100 million. In addition to his contribution and support of the Hamilton Building, he also led a multi-million dollar renovation of the North Building in 1997 that resulted in the reinstallation of the American and European art and western American art collection galleries.

A pioneer in America’s oil industry, Hamilton founded Hamilton Oil Corp. in the late 1960s, built it into an international oil company and also formed a domestic gas company, both of which he merged into a major integrated oil company in the mid-1980s. He is now chairman of Hamilton Companies LLC, which is active in venture capital, private equity, oil and gas, real estate and acquisitions operations. He is on the National Petroleum Council and a director of the American Petroleum Institute. In addition to his commitment to the DAM, Hamilton serves as a member of the Trustee’s Council of the National Gallery of Art and trustee emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution, both in Washington, D.C.

For museum information, call 720-865-5000 or visit www.denverartmuseum.org.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Claude Monet, 'Path in the Wheat Fields at Pourville,' 1882. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Claude Monet, ‘Path in the Wheat Fields at Pourville,’ 1882. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Eugene Boudin, 'Le Havre, Anchored Vessels in the Harbor,' about 1868-1872. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Eugene Boudin, ‘Le Havre, Anchored Vessels in the Harbor,’ about 1868-1872. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Vincent van Gogh, 'Edge of a Wheat Field with Poppies,' 1887. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.
Vincent van Gogh, ‘Edge of a Wheat Field with Poppies,’ 1887. Bequest of Frederic C. Hamilton.

Midwest Auction Galleries bills Jan. 25 sale as its most important

Emile Munierm, ‘Portrait de Marie-Louise.’ Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Emile Munierm, ‘Portrait de Marie-Louise.’ Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Emile Munierm, ‘Portrait de Marie-Louise.’ Midwest Auction Galleries image.

OXFORD, Mich. – Midwest Auction Galleries will hold its most important auction to date Saturday, Jan. 25, beginning at 10 a.m. Eastern. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.com.

The main feature of this auction is renowned French painter Émile Munier’s Portrait de Marie-Louise, an oil painting depicting the artist’s daughter, conserved and authenticated.

From the same Birmingham, Mich., estate come exemplary paintings by artists Daniel Ridgway Knight, Frédéric Soulacroix, Luis Alvarez, Franz Xaver Wolf and Franz Xaver Simm. Along with a pair of Russian Imperial porcelain urns are several examples of hand-painted porcelain, Bohemian cut-to-clear glass, vintage clothing and various antiques.

Asian works include a Qing dynasty full-tip rhinoceros horn carving, porcelain and bronze vessels, Indo-Persian swords, carved jade, agate, jadeite and ivory items.

The remainder of the auction is composed of an eclectic mix of fine art, antiques and collectibles, including a vintage 1952 Moss midget racer, a Rault Art Deco leaded glass table screen, an African Congo Kuba Bwoom mask and a jeweler’s electric store sign.

For details phone 248-236-8100 or email sales@midwestauctioninc.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Emile Munierm, ‘Portrait de Marie-Louise.’ Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Emile Munierm, ‘Portrait de Marie-Louise.’ Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Rhinoceros horn carving, Qing Dynasty, 19th century. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Rhinoceros horn carving, Qing Dynasty, 19th century. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Frederic Soulacroix oil painting on canvas. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Frederic Soulacroix oil painting on canvas. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Moss midget racer, 1952. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Moss midget racer, 1952. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Pair Russian Imperial porcelain and bronze mounted vases. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Pair Russian Imperial porcelain and bronze mounted vases. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Chinese Ming or Qing carved celedon jadeite vase. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Chinese Ming or Qing carved celedon jadeite vase. Midwest Auction Galleries image.

Griffin Gallery to present fresh take on watercolor

Amy Park, 'Concrete and Glass Midtown East,' watercolor on paper, 32 x 22 inches. Copyright Griffin Gallery.

Amy Park, 'Concrete and Glass Midtown East,' watercolor on paper, 32 x 22 inches. Copyright Griffin Gallery.
Amy Park, ‘Concrete and Glass Midtown East,’ watercolor on paper, 32 x 22 inches. Copyright Griffin Gallery.
LONDON – West London’s Griffin Gallery is challenging the traditional preconceptions of watercolor in their new exhibition “Water + Colour,” running from Feb. 13 to March 14.

From award-winners to international exhibitors, nine artists from major institutions all over the world have been hand picked by Becca Pelly-Fry, director of the Griffin Gallery, to showcase new contemporary techniques in watercolor. This selling group exhibition showcases work using the breadth and variety of contemporary water-based color, including ink, watercolor and acrylic.

Watercolor is often seen as a difficult and unpredictable medium, best suited to delicate landscape paintings, mainly due to its translucency and ability to portray light. Educated at some of the best art institutions in the world, from the Royal College of Art to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, these artists have reworked this much-misunderstood medium to create surprising and spectacular contemporary artwork in a range of styles.

“Water + Colour” brings together accomplished and talented artists of all ages. American artists Kim McCarty, exhibitor in the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Laura Ball, who has work in the Denver Art Museum; Amy Park, an art scholar from the School of Art Institute of Chicago; and Emilie Clark, who won a residency at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens, come together with UK artists including; Peter Haslam-Fox, winner of the UK’s Young Artists Award; Barbara Nicholls, exhibitor in collections across London, Milan and Berlin; Freya Douglas-Morris, exhibitor in Italy, Spain and Germany and Stephanie Tuckwell, first prize winner for watercolors at the Royal West of England Academy for “Water + Colour.” Griffin Gallery is also showing the abstract work of Alf Löhr, an established German artist based mainly in London and recently appointed as a senior fellow at the University of Wales Institute of Cardiff.

“Griffin Gallery is proud to be inviting such a range of watercolor artists to exhibit their work. We are interested in demonstrating the properties of watercolor, and showing what is possible with the medium,” said Becca Pelly-Fry, whis is also curator of the exhibition. “These artists all exhibit great skill and dexterity with a medium that is traditionally seen as very difficult to master. What I like about the work on show here is that each artist really uses and makes the most of the unique qualities of watercolor.”

Griffin Gallery aims to showcase and support upcoming and undiscovered contemporary artists, and is excited to announce such an innovative exhibition exploring a much misunderstood contemporary medium. The gallery is an exciting art space located in West London at the head office of some of the world’s finest artist materials; Winsor & Newton, Liquitex and Conté à Paris. The gallery uses its independence to support emerging artists and explore the cutting edge of contemporary art and craftsmanship.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Amy Park, 'Concrete and Glass Midtown East,' watercolor on paper, 32 x 22 inches. Copyright Griffin Gallery.
Amy Park, ‘Concrete and Glass Midtown East,’ watercolor on paper, 32 x 22 inches. Copyright Griffin Gallery.

Guggenheim UBS Map Global Art Initiative launches in Singapore

Ho Tzu Nyen, The Cloud of Unknowing, 2011. Four-channel video installation, color, with sound, 17 min., edition 1/1. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.141 © Ho Tzu Nyen

Ho Tzu Nyen, The Cloud of Unknowing, 2011. Four-channel video installation, color, with sound, 17 min., edition 1/1. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.141 © Ho Tzu Nyen
Ho Tzu Nyen, The Cloud of Unknowing, 2011. Four-channel video installation, color, with sound, 17 min., edition 1/1. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.141 © Ho Tzu Nyen
SINGAPORE – ‘No Country: Contemporary Art for South and Southeast Asia’ is the first touring exhibition of the Guggenheim UBS MAP Global Art Initiative, a multi-year collaboration that charts contemporary art practices in three major geographic regions—South and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa. Presenting recent works by artists from the region, No Country introduces audiences to some of the most challenging and inventive voices in South and Southeast Asia today.

The exhibition premiered in New York at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (February 22–May 22, 2013) and is currently on view at the Asia Society Hong Kong Center through February 16, 2014. It will be presented in Singapore at the CCA—NTU Centre for Contemporary Art, a national research center of the Nanyang Technological University, located within a cluster of international art galleries at Gillman Barracks, Block 43 Malan Road, from May 10, 2014, to July 20, 2014.

Admission is free. Gallery Hours: Tues.-Sun. 12-7 pm; Fri., 12-9 pm; closed Mondays.

Visit the Guggenheim online at www.guggenheim.org.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ho Tzu Nyen, The Cloud of Unknowing, 2011. Four-channel video installation, color, with sound, 17 min., edition 1/1. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.141 © Ho Tzu Nyen
Ho Tzu Nyen, The Cloud of Unknowing, 2011. Four-channel video installation, color, with sound, 17 min., edition 1/1. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Guggenheim UBS MAP Purchase Fund 2012.141 © Ho Tzu Nyen