Pablo Picasso, 'Baigneuses au ballon,' 1928. Image courtesy of Moderna Musee.

Widow of media mogul donates 2 Picassos to Swedish museum

Pablo Picasso, 'Baigneuses au ballon,' 1928. Image courtesy of Moderna Musee.

Pablo Picasso, ‘Baigneuses au ballon,’ 1928. Image courtesy of Moderna Musee.

STOCKHOLM (AFP) – Stockholm’s Museum of Modern Art said Wednesday it had received a donation including two Picasso paintings from the widow of a Swedish media tycoon.

The gift comprises eight artworks donated in the last will of Elisabeth Bonnier, whose husband Gerard Bonnier (1917-1987) was for more than 30 years the head of the Bonnier group, publisher of three of the six national newspapers in the country.

Gerard Bonnier was a prominent art collector and had himself donated 23 pieces to the same museum, which are “the backbone” of its collection of early modernism, the institution said in a statement.

Among the eight pieces donated by his widow is Picasso’s painting Baigneuses au ballon, part of a series the artist painted during a stay in Dinard, France in the summer of 1928.

The second work by the Spanish master is a gouache called Deux personnages, from 1939.

The other six pieces are a painting (Otage) and an untitled sculpture by French artist Jean Fautrier, a gouache (Will weg, muss weinen) and a painting (Der Wald) by German artist Paul Klee, an oil on canvas (La Chope) by Spaniard Juan Gris and a marble titled Torse de femme by Frenchman Henri Laurens, all created in the first half of the 20th century.

“Art like this is practically impossible to buy nowadays, and it is a great privilege to experience such generosity. The donation is fantastic news to all art lovers in Sweden,” said Daniel Birnbaum, director of Stockholm’s Museum of Modern Art.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Pablo Picasso, 'Baigneuses au ballon,' 1928. Image courtesy of Moderna Musee.

Pablo Picasso, ‘Baigneuses au ballon,’ 1928. Image courtesy of Moderna Musee.

Gebr. Heubach 5636 ‘Laughing’ doll, 17in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Major collection to be sold at Morphy doll auction March 22

Gebr. Heubach 5636 ‘Laughing’ doll, 17in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Gebr. Heubach 5636 ‘Laughing’ doll, 17in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy Auctions’ March 22 Premier Doll Auction will showcase the multigenerational collection of the Foote family of Maryland. Doll collectors in the Washington, D.C., suburbs would be quite familiar with Iverna and Irving Foote, as they were active members of the Dollology Club and regular attendees at UFDC conventions and the Gaithersburg Doll Show.

LiveAuctioneers.com will facilitate Internet live bidding.

The Foote collection’s heritage traces back to Irving’s mother, Dorothy Budde Foote, who was from Medina, Ohio. She joined her first doll club in 1940, but her doll collecting started even earlier, with the acquisition of Oriental dolls she bought to use at her church Sunday School classes. Later, Dorothy’ became interested in antique dolls, after seeing a picture on the cover of Antiques magazine.

“Dorothy Foote was fortunate to be able to attend the first annual UFDC convention in 1950,” said Morphy Auctions’ doll consultant, Jan Foulke. “Her sister, Bertha Budde, took up doll dressing, so many of the dolls in the Foote collection were costumed by ‘Aunt Bea.’”

Dorothy Foote had five children. All of them shared in the dispersal of her collection when she died, but only two actively followed in her doll-collecting footsteps: her son, Irving, and her daughter, Dorothy Foote Mishler. Dorothy resides in Wooster, Ohio, and is still a member of UFDC.

Irving’s wife, Iverna, shared her husband’s interest in collecting. With the dolls Irving inherited as its foundation, Irving and Iverna built a remarkable and diverse collection with a strong emphasis on fine china dolls and wooden Schoenhut dolls and toys, but also including French bébés and fashion dolls; and early cloth, papier-mâché and parian dolls. The Footes often planned their vacations to include visits to doll and antique shops; auctions and conventions. Irving also enjoyed photography, and combined his two hobbies by photographing dolls and speaking to collector groups about how to take better pictures of their dolls.

The Foote family legacy has now entered its third generation through Irving and Iverna’s daughter, Mary Foote. An enthusiastic collector, Mary was initially encouraged by her grandmother, who gave her many dolls as gifts.

Irving Foote passed away in 2004, and at age 94, Iverna has now moved to an assisted-living facility where space to display her treasured dolls is very limited. Mary has chosen some of her parents’ dolls for her own collection, and other Foote family members have selected dolls as mementos. The remainder of the Foote collection will be offered to doll collectors around the world on March 22 at Morphy’s.

Complementing the Foote family dolls will be an extensive private collection from Europe that reflects the owner’s love of children. The grouping is highlighted by an impressive selection of Kathe Kruse dolls that represents the entire spectrum of Kruse’s career, including wistful Doll I models, smiling “Schlenkerchen,” sleeping and awake “Sand Babies,” and a boxed “Hampelchen.”

Saucy and mischievous googlies abound, representing such makers as Kestner, Heubach, Marseille, K & R, SFBJ and Hertel Schwab. Not to be overlooked is a wide variety of Gebr. Heubach characters that reveal a gamut of emotions, from pouting to laughing; and several elusive SFBJ 252 pouty toddlers. K & R characters are represented by no fewer than 12 different models – with many multiples – including desirable “pouties.” Happy toddlers and babies by various German factories add a touch of idealism to this group.

From Maryland, comes a group of antique dollhouses and miniatures, including a rare Tynietoy farmhouse and a lovely selection of Tynietoy furniture. Other consignments from around the United States bring the auction total to about 700 lots.

For additional information on any lot in the sale, contact Jan Foulke by emailing janfoulke@aol.com.

Morphy’s March 22 Premier Doll Auction will commence at 9 a.m. Eastern Time.

For details call Morphy’s at 717-335-3435.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Gebr. Heubach 5636 ‘Laughing’ doll, 17in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

 

Gebr. Heubach 5636 ‘Laughing’ doll, 17in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Izannah Walker 18in cloth doll, pre-patent model, Central Falls, RI, circa 1850. Est. $9,000-$12,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Izannah Walker 18in cloth doll, pre-patent model, Central Falls, RI, circa 1850. Est. $9,000-$12,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Schoenhut (Philadelphia) ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’ set, est. $700-$900. Morphy Auctions image.

 

Schoenhut (Philadelphia) ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb’ set, est. $700-$900. Morphy Auctions image.

17in Simon & Halbig IV doll, 17in. Est. $7,000-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image.

 

17in Simon & Halbig IV doll, 17in. Est. $7,000-$10,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Bru Brevete doll, 13in., est. $12,000-$15,000. Morphy Auctions image.

 

Bru Brevete doll, 13in., est. $12,000-$15,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Kathe Kruse ‘Hampelchen’ XIIH doll, est. $2,500-$3,500. Morphy Auctions image.

 

Kathe Kruse ‘Hampelchen’ XIIH doll, est. $2,500-$3,500. Morphy Auctions image.

Jumeau triste bébé , 26in, with signed Jumeau shoes, est. $15,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image.

 

Jumeau triste bébé , 26in, with signed Jumeau shoes, est. $15,000-$20,000. Morphy Auctions image.

Papier-mâché lady with exposed ears and molded barrette, 20½ in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

Papier-mâché lady with exposed ears and molded barrette, 20½ in, est. $1,200-$1,800. Morphy Auctions image.

JDK 221 googly doll, est. $3,000-$4,000. Morphy Auctions image.

 

JDK 221 googly doll, est. $3,000-$4,000. Morphy Auctions image.

‘Morning Glory’ china lady doll, 19in, est. $3,000-$4,000. Morphy Auctions image.

 

‘Morning Glory’ china lady doll, 19in, est. $3,000-$4,000. Morphy Auctions image.

'Selbstbildnis als Soldat' (Self-portrait as a Soldier) by Ludwig Kirchner, 1915 © Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

National Portrait Gallery launches ‘Great War in Portraits’

'Selbstbildnis als Soldat' (Self-portrait as a Soldier) by Ludwig Kirchner, 1915 © Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

‘Selbstbildnis als Soldat’ (Self-portrait as a Soldier) by Ludwig Kirchner, 1915 © Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

LONDON – The National Portrait Gallery stages the first national exhibition of the First World War centenary commemorations this week. “The Great War in Portraits,” which runs Feb. 27 through June 15, marks the start of a four-year public program at the gallery of displays and events, and workshops for young people.

The exhibition strikingly brings together for the first time German expressionist masterpieces by Lovis Corinth and Max Beckmann and Ludwig Kirchner’s painting Selbstbildnis als Soldat (Self-portrait as a Soldier) with Harold Gillies’ rarely shown photographs of facially injured soldiers from the Royal College of Surgeons.

Showing how World War I was depicted and reported with a degree of visual detail unprecedented in the history of conflict, the exhibition includes photography and film as well as formal portraits. Rather than presenting a military history of the war, the gallery aims to focus on its human aspect, concentrating on the way the Great War was represented through portraits of those involved, an approach never previously adopted.

“The Great War in Portraits” takes an international perspective. As well as iconic portraits of Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen and Winston Churchill, the exhibition reflects the war experience of those from all social classes who served from throughout the Commonwealth.

Highlights also include Jacob Epstein’s The Rock Drill, one of the great early modernist works related to the War; a contrasted pairing of British and German films devoted to the Battle of the Somme never previously seen together; and a rare photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont depicting a deserted, battle-scarred landscape. The only work in the exhibition not to depict people, this poignant image is, in effect, a portrait of absence.

Starting with the eve of war, the exhibition includes imposing formal portraits of the heads of state of the participating nations, evoking those countries that would be drawn into the conflict in 1914. Such grand images are brought into sharp contrast with an understated press photograph of a pathetic-looking Gavrilo Princip, the 19-year-old student whose opportunistic assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, on June 28, 1914 precipitated the war.

“The Great War in Portraits” shows how, following the declarations of war throughout Europe, power devolved from the heads of state to the military leaders of each country. Power-portraits of Haig, Blumer, Foch, Hindenburg and others, are contrasted with portraits of the “followers,” by Sickert, Orpen and other war artists.

In the central section titled “The Valiant and the Damned,” portraits of Victoria Cross holders, medal-winners, heroes and aces are shown juxtaposed with depictions of those whose lives were marked in different ways: casualties, those disfigured by wounds, prisoners of war, and those shot at dawn for cowardice. The idealized language of formal portraits, used as celebration and eulogy, is brought into violent discord with those images, such as notably a selection of Henry Tonks’s pastels of servicemen grotesquely disfigured by wounds, that reveal individual suffering and the human cost of war.

An installation of 40 photographs in a regular grid formation presents a range of protagonists from medal winners and heroes to the dead and the executed, interspersed with artists, poets, memoirists and images representing the roles played by women, the home front and the Commonwealth.

Key loans have been secured from Imperial War Museums, Tate, Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus und Kunstbau, Munich, Allen Memorial Art Museum, the Royal Airforce Museum, Hendon, Oberlin College, Ohio, The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge and the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.

The exhibition and the Gallery’s First World War activities are part of First World War Centenary, the national partnership of commemorative events www.1914.org .


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


'Selbstbildnis als Soldat' (Self-portrait as a Soldier) by Ludwig Kirchner, 1915 © Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

‘Selbstbildnis als Soldat’ (Self-portrait as a Soldier) by Ludwig Kirchner, 1915 © Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio.

Wilfred Owen by John Gunston, 1916 © National Portrait Gallery, London.

Wilfred Owen by John Gunston, 1916 © National Portrait Gallery, London.

Tricia Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Image courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Tricia Paik named curator of contemporary art at IMA

Tricia Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Image courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Tricia Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Image courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – As a curator at the St. Louis Art Museum, Tricia Paik kept tabs on her peers at the Indianapolis Museum of Art and even traveled to Indianapolis in 2012 to check out the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park – the site west of the IMA known as “100 Acres.”

“I made a pilgrimage specifically to Indianapolis to visit 100 Acres park,” Paik told The Indianapolis Star during a phone interview. “I was so impressed by what I saw.”

Future installations at 100 Acres are in the hands of Paik, announced Monday as the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s new curator of contemporary art.

Paik brings to Indianapolis a resume highlighted by work at New York’s Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She’s exiting the St. Louis museum, where she helped launch that museum’s outdoor Sculpture Garden in the role of associate curator of modern and contemporary art.

The Sculpture Garden in St. Louis opened with “Stone Sea,” a 2012 commission by Andy Goldsworthy. IMA’s 100 Acres opened in 2010 and includes work by Los Carpinteros, Alfredo Jaar and Atelier Van Lieshout.

Paik, a 44-year-old native of Santa Monica, Calif., was a research assistant in the Met’s modern art department in the late 1990s. She worked at MoMA from 2000 to 2008, where she shepherded a high-profile exhibition of Georges Seurat drawings.

She said her time at MoMA continues to influence her work as a curator. Paik said the esteemed museum represents “just excellence across the board, whatever the projects were. Just really high standards of how you develop an exhibition to catalog production to exhibition design.”

With Paik’s hiring, IMA director and CEO Charles Venable has filled all curator positions on staff.

Amid an exodus of curators that followed Venable’s hiring in August 2012, the contemporary art department lost two leaders. Lisa Freiman, senior curator and chairwoman of the contemporary art department, left in May to become director of the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University. Sarah Urist Green, curator of contemporary art, left in September to launch online video series The Art Assignment for PBS.

“I’m confident that (Paik’s) proven deep art historical knowledge and her dedication to contemporary artists, academic scholarship and community engagement will build upon the museum’s already robust contemporary art program and help move us forward in new and exciting ways,” Venable said in a statement.

In St. Louis, she oversaw recent exhibition “Postwar German Art in the Collection” and the 2013 installation of Yoko Ono’s “Wish Tree.”

“I’m first and foremost a trained art historian,” said Paik, a Dartmouth College graduate who earned both master’s and doctorate degrees from New York University. “What I endeavor to do with contemporary art is to look toward the future, but also look back to the past. To show our audiences how contemporary art fits in a trajectory of artistic production over the decades and centuries and across cultures.”

Earlier this month, the IMA hired Scott Stulen as the museum’s first-ever curator of audience experiences and performance. His track record at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis includes the surprise success of the Internet Cat Video Festival, which brought 10,000 people together in a field in 2012 and then 11,000 paying customers at the 2013 Minnesota State Fair.

Paik said she looks forward to working with Stulen. Museums need to develop engaging programming “that doesn’t sacrifice quality or rigor or substance,” Paik said.

Paik said she plans to join the IMA staff this summer, after she gives attention to a writing project.

___

Information from: The Indianapolis Star, http://www.indystar.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-25-14 1506GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Tricia Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Image courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Tricia Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Image courtesy of Indianapolis Museum of Art.

St. Peter's Square colonnades. Image by MarkusMark. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

St. Peter’s colonnade unveiled after 5-year restoration

St. Peter's Square colonnades. Image by MarkusMark. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

St. Peter’s Square colonnades. Image by MarkusMark. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

VATICAN CITY (AFP) – Scaffolding around the famous 17th-century marble colonnade on St. Peter’s Square designed by architect and sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini was taken down this week following a five-year restoration.

The columns around the Vatican square where Pope Francis addresses pilgrims have regained their original splendor – in time for the sainthood ceremony for late popes John Paul II and John XXIII in April.

“The restoration consisted of cleaning all the surfaces and reviewing and strengthening reliefs and above all statues, often detached, broken and in several cases threatening to fall,” said Antonio Paolucci, director of the Vatican Museums who has overseen the restoration.

“Various protective systems and anti-bird systems have also been put in place so as to guarantee the future conservation of the entire complex,” he was quoted as saying by the Vatican’s Osservatore Romano daily.

The colonnade consists of 284 columns and 140 statues.

The 787-foot-wide plaza was built using 44,000 cubic meters of travertine marble under Pope Alexander VII between 1656 and 1673.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


St. Peter's Square colonnades. Image by MarkusMark. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

St. Peter’s Square colonnades. Image by MarkusMark. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

Ansel Adams exhibition at Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis

Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

INDIANAPOLIS – Before he became known as the creator of some of the most influential photographs ever taken, Ansel Adams was a restless teenager with a simple Kodak camera. It was a 1916 family vacation in the Yosemite Valley that focused his inner lens, putting Ansel on the path that sealed his destiny. At Yosemite, he took snapshots of the majestic beauty of the landscape and found the inspiration that led him to introduce the world to photography as art. On March1, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art will open “Ansel Adams” – a collection of more than 80 of this legendary photographer’s personally chosen photographs.

The photographs in “Ansel Adams” focus largely on the vast spaces of the American West, ranging from Yosemite to the Pacific Coast, the Southwest, Alaska, Hawaii and the Northwest. Referred to as The Museum Set, this lifetime portfolio includes many of Adams’ most famous and best-loved photographs, including architectural studies, portraits and magnificent landscapes. Film clips in the gallery will give perspective to the artist’s life, helping visitors understand how he worked and what inspired him. The images are joined by vintage prints from a private collection – including representations from Adams’ first published portfolios from the late 1920s.

“Ansel Adams” was drawn together by guest curator Jonathan Spaulding, Ph.D., whose 1995 book Ansel Adams and the American Landscape is considered the leading biography on the famed photographer and environmentalist. According to Spaulding, Adams legacy is more than a body of beautiful black-and-whites.

“Adams changed how we think and how we act,” writes Spaulding. “Across the arc of his life, one thing remained constant: to express through his art the forms and moods and ancient forces of our small planet, our only home in a vast universe.”

The museum will host documentaries, programs, intimate talk-backs with Adams’ family members, photography lessons and lectures focused on Adams and his place in the environmental movement.

“In our 25 years as a cultural cornerstone in Indianapolis, one of the shows I hear people ask about again and again is Ansel Adams,” said Eiteljorg President and CEO, John Vanausdall. “When we brought this exhibit here, back in 2001, the lines ran outside the door. We’re happy to answer the community’s call to bring back Ansel for five months instead of two.”

“Ansel Adams” will be featured in the Eiteljorg’s main exhibition hall until Sunday, Aug. 3. The Eiteljorg hopes this exhibit will leave a lasting impression with visitors, educating them about Ansel’s impact on their lives.

“From the family pictures in your album at home, to the selfies you post on Facebook and Instagram, the influence of photography is everywhere you look,” said Eiteljorg vice president and chief curatorial officer, James Nottage. “This exhibit could inspire the next Ansel Adams, just like Yosemite inspired a teenager to change the world of photography nearly 100 years ago.”

In addition to “Ansel Adams,” the Eiteljorg Museum is hosting another stunning exhibition of black-and-white photography: “Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo.”

The Eiteljorg 25th anniversary is presented by Oxford Financial. “Ansel Adams” is co-presented by Capitol Group and Eli Lilly and Co.

Ansel Adams opening weekend schedule:

Friday, Feb. 28, 7 p.m., “Ansel Adams” preview party, $45 members, $55 nonmembers.

Saturday, March 1, 1:30 p.m., “A Conversation with Michael Adams.”

The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art is located in Downtown Indianapolis, White River State Park, at 500 W. Washington St. For general information about the museum and to learn more about exhibits and events, call 317-636-WEST (9378) or visit www.eiteljorg.org.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder.

Uruguayan artist Carlos Paez Vilaro. Image by Wagner T. Cassimiro 'Aranha.' This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

In Memoriam: Uruguayan artist Carlos Paez Vilaro, 90

Uruguayan artist Carlos Paez Vilaro. Image by Wagner T. Cassimiro 'Aranha.' This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Uruguayan artist Carlos Paez Vilaro. Image by Wagner T. Cassimiro ‘Aranha.’ This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) – Carlos Paez Vilaro, a self-trained painter, sculptor, screenwriter, musician and architect who championed Afro-Uruguayan Candombe music and dance, created colorful murals in dozens of cities around the world, and built a huge “living sculpture” that became an iconic 50-room hotel, died on Monday. He was 90.

Paez Vilaro’s son, known as “Carlitos,” said the prolific artist died at home in Casapueblo, the sprawling four-star hotel outside Punta del Este that included his workshop and a museum. The white building includes unusual organic forms that bring to mind Salvador Dali’s labyrinthine home on the Costa Brava of Spain, or some of Antoni Gaudi’s buildings in Barcelona.

Paez Vilaro worked until his dying day, and “was lucid, impeccable, a model for everyone,” the son told Uruguay’s Channel 12.

Only nine days earlier, the artist banged his drums and marched with his beloved “Llamadas” group, the most traditional of Uruguay’s carnival culture, in which Afro-Uruguayans and whites wearing blackface dance to the rhythms of Candombe, a music brought by slaves from Africa.

Paez Vilaro, who was white, was born in Montevideo on Nov. 1, 1923. As a young man, he immersed himself in the culture of black Uruguayans, whose traditions would inspire much of his life’s work. Candombe was socially unacceptable in the 1940s, and is celebrated in Uruguay now thanks in no small measure to Paez Vilaro’s art and advocacy.

One of Paez Vilaro’s most difficult times came in the winter of 1972, when a plane carrying his son Carlitos and other members of his Uruguayan rugby team crashed high in the Chilean Andes. Authorities eventually abandoned the search, but Paez Vilaro never gave his son up for dead. Finally, after 72 days, the painter’s son was found among the 16 survivors whose ordeal was retold in the movie Alive.

The artist’s huge, colorful murals can still be appreciated in dozens of public buildings around the world, from the headquarters of the Organization of American States in Washington to Argentina’s National Library in Buenos Aires. Convinced that color can relieve pain, he painted numerous murals in hospitals, including Chile’s Hospital de San Fernando and Georgetown University Hospital in the U.S.

He also got a screenwriting credit for Batouk, a documentary about African dance that closed the 1967 Cannes Film Festival.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-24-14 1817GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Uruguayan artist Carlos Paez Vilaro. Image by Wagner T. Cassimiro 'Aranha.' This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Uruguayan artist Carlos Paez Vilaro. Image by Wagner T. Cassimiro ‘Aranha.’ This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions sold this rare architectural eight-day longcase clock by Joseph Knibb for £542,000 ($899,341). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury to sell early long case clock March 11

Joseph Knibb long case clock. Estimate: £80,000-£120,000 ($133,455-$200,182). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

Joseph Knibb long case clock. Estimate: £80,000-£120,000 ($133,455-$200,182). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

LONDON – One of the most important early English long case clocks to come on to the market in the last 10 years will be sold at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ sale of fine clocks, barometers and scientific instruments on Tuesday, March 11.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Bought by the existing owners great grandfather from Evesham, Worcestershire in around 1894, and the clock appears to have survived relatively untouched, and is offered for the first time on the open market.

The clock is possibly the earliest long case clock made by Joseph Knibb, one of the most well-known English clockmakers of the Restoration period, Knibb. It belongs to a group of less than half a dozen surviving examples made before he moved to London in 1670. As the clock was made in Oxford it is could also be the earliest long case clock made anywhere outside of London.

Knibb is famous for the ingenuity of his approach, as well as for the high quality of his work. This particularly early example displays an architecturally perfect and elegant case and an exquisitely engraved dial, with decoration directly comparable to that seen on another clock by Joseph Knibb, created while he was in Oxford.

The movement is closely related to others by the famous contemporary clock makers Ahasuerus Fromanteel and Edward East, who were both living and working in London, prior to 1670. This supports the theory that Knibb spent time in London before he moved in 1670, and was greatly influenced by his peers. This exceptional example (Lot 143) is estimated to sell for £80,000-£120,000 ($133,455-$200,182).

A second piece by the brother of Joseph Knibb, John Knibb, is also certain to attract some attention from collectors. Circa 1685, the rare and possibly unique diamond-shaped wall timepiece is signed by Knibb, who also resided in Oxford and took over Joseph’s Oxford workshops when he moved to London in 1670. Only a handful of these small diamond-shaped clocks by various makers are known, all of which were made between 1670 and 1740. The clock (Lot 144) is estimated at £8,000-£12,000 ($13,348-$20,022).

Among a good selection of carriage clocks is a fine example of a Victorian gilt brass mounted ebonized giant carriage clock with push-button hour repeat. A particularly fashionable form of clock it was made by Dent of London, the makers of the clock for St. Stephens’s tower which houses Big Ben. In 1852 Edward Dent successfully tendered to make the “great clock” for the New Palace of Westminster. The clock was completed by 1859, apparently at a financial loss to the firm, however, it ensured that Dent became a household name synonymous with fine clockmaking. Unfortunately, Dent did not live to see the installation of the clock as he died in 1853. Made in 1857-58 this carriage clock has survived in fine original condition and is estimated to sell for £8,000-£12,000 (Lot 78).

Elsewhere in the sale is a Renaissance timepiece of a type that is rarely seen for sale by auction in the UK. The German gilt copper and brass crucifix clock is attributed to German-born Hans Schlottheim, who is known for producing numerous important clocks and complex automata including, in 1577, the first public quarter-striking clock to be installed in his place of residence, Augsburg. In 1582 he made an impressive architectural musical trumpeter automaton for Duke Wilhelm V of Bavaria, which is now housed in the Kunsthistoricshes Museum, Vienna. He is best known in the UK for his creation of the famous “nef” or galleon automaton clock, which now resides in the collection of the British Museum, having been donated by Octavius Morgan in 1866. The crucifix clock (lot 136) is estimated to sell for £800-£1,200 ($1,335-$2,000).

A selection of more than 50 horological books at the beginning of the sale includes a group of rare works relating to “dialing,” the science of laying out and making of sundials. This section is highlighted by a first edition, two-volume work dated 1609 and titled Bladgrave, John The Art of Dyalling. One of the earliest books in English on dialing, it is estimated to realize £600-800 (Lot 8).

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Joseph Knibb long case clock. Estimate: £80,000-£120,000 ($133,455-$200,182). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

Joseph Knibb long case clock. Estimate: £80,000-£120,000 ($133,455-$200,182). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

German gilt copper and brass crucifix clock is attributed to Hans Schlottheim. Estimate: £800-£1,200 ($1,335-$2,000). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

German gilt copper and brass crucifix clock is attributed to Hans Schlottheim. Estimate: £800-£1,200 ($1,335-$2,000). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury image.

Oil on paper work by Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) titled ‘Abstraction.’ Estimate: $50,000-$70,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Elite Decorative Arts to sell paintings, Asian works March 15

Oil on paper work by Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) titled ‘Abstraction.’ Estimate: $50,000-$70,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on paper work by Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) titled ‘Abstraction.’ Estimate: $50,000-$70,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. – Original works by major listed artists such as Willem de Kooning, Chaim Soutine and Angel Botello, plus Chinese objects and other Asian antiques, will headline an estates auction slated for Saturday, March 15, by Elite Decorative Arts.

The auction will contain more than 350 lots and feature fine Chinese carvings and works of art, fine decorative arts and Asian works. Start time will be 1 p.m. Eastern. Internet live bidding will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

An original oil painting on cardstock board by the Russian-born French painter Chaim Soutine (1893-1943), titled Road to the Village, is expected to hit $60,000-$80,000. The signed painting, depicting a village scene, measures 24 inches by 18 inches and is mounted in a wood frame. Soutine made major contributions to the Expressionist movement while living in Paris.

Certain to challenge the Soutine work for top lot of the sale is an oil on paper painting by the Dutch-American artist Willem de Kooning (1904-1997). The diminutive abstract oil, fittingly titled Abstraction, is 9 3/4 inches by 12 3/4 inches. It is signed and framed and should sell for $50,000-$70,000. De Kooning was an Abstract Expressionist and New York School painter.

A bronze sculpture of a seated girl by the Spanish-born Puerto Rican artist Angel Botello (1913-1986), titled Nina Peinandose, has an estimate of $15,000-$25,000. The sculpture, numbered 3/6 and signed to verso, is mounted on a white marble base and stands 30 1/4 inches tall. Botello led an active and prolific life, working in Spain, France, Puerto Rico and Haiti.

One of the rare and unusual items in the sale is Chinese but it’s definitely not an antique. It is a space-flown HN-3 stamped Duralumin strut from a Chinese rocket ship, weighing about 8 pounds (est. $10,000-$15,000).

A star of the jewelry category is a 14K white gold ring with a natural oval cabochon cut jadeite stone, about 4.82 carats, GIA-certified (est. $8,000-$12,000).

A pair of Meiji period (1886-1912) finely crafted Japanese silver Wisteria vases depicting raised enamel birds and flowers, 4 3/4 inches tall, should command $5,500-$6,500, while a large Chinese porcelain antique famille rose fish bowl, circa Guangxu period (1875-1908), with painted orange fish, is expected to breeze to $3,000-$5,000.

One lot that will no doubt have heads scratching – and paddles waving – is a 19th century American oil on panel painting depicting a woman in a light green dress with a hat, seated on the floor and looking at a glass vase (est. $8,000-$12,000). It bears the signature of Mary Cassatt, but there is no way to know for sure if Cassat rendered it.

Other anticipated top achievers include a beautiful platinum bracelet featuring a dazzling center deep blue sapphire weighing approximately 2 carats and set with numerous diamonds (est. $2,000-$3,000); and a Stephen Nelson & Daniel Gaumer art glass vase dated 1988 and having a free form ruffle design, 14 1/4 inches in height (est. $1,500-$2,000).

For details or to inquire about consigning items to an Elite Decoratieve Arts auction, call 561-200-0893 or send an e-mail inquiry to info@eliteauction.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Oil on paper work by Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) titled ‘Abstraction.’ Estimate: $50,000-$70,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Oil on paper work by Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) titled ‘Abstraction.’ Estimate: $50,000-$70,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Beautiful Chinese carved lavender jadeite Guanyin group. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Beautiful Chinese carved lavender jadeite Guanyin group. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Bronze sculpture by Angel Botello (1913-1986) of a seated girl, 29 inches tall. Estimate: $15,000-$25,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Bronze sculpture by Angel Botello (1913-1986) of a seated girl, 29 inches tall. Estimate: $15,000-$25,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Large Guangxu famille rose porcelain fish bowl with painted orange fish. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Large Guangxu famille rose porcelain fish bowl with painted orange fish. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Stunning 14kt white gold ring with 4.82-carat jadeite stone and diamonds. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Stunning 14kt white gold ring with 4.82-carat jadeite stone and diamonds. Estimate: $8,000-$12,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Rare and important Chinese space-flown HN-3 stamped Duralumin strut. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Rare and important Chinese space-flown HN-3 stamped Duralumin strut. Estimate: $10,000-$15,000. Elite Decorative Arts image.

Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History in Brussels. Image by Marc Ryckaert. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

WWI centenary exhibition recalls German occupation of Belgium

Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History in Brussels. Image by Marc Ryckaert. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History in Brussels. Image by Marc Ryckaert. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

BRUSSELS, Belgium (AFP) – An ambitious government-funded exhibition that opened in Brussels on Tuesday is designed to raise awareness to the living conditions faced by Belgians during the country’s often brutal occupation by Germany in World War I.

Curators of the exhibition at Belgium’s Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and Military History say they have deliberately attempted to move the focus away from the bloody legacy of World War I battlefields in Flanders.

“Our intention was not so much to deal with the war itself, but to see the war as the cradle of the 20th century,” said Israeli historian Elie Barnavi, one of the consultants who worked on the exhibition.

While the appalling conditions of trench warfare do feature in the exhibition, there is also a section dedicated to the letters of Belgians who lived through both the war and Germany’s invasion and occupation of Belgium between 1914 and 1918.

“You encounter words like ‘homeland,’ ‘honor,’ ‘faith’ and ‘hope,'” said Henri Dupuis, another of the exhibition’s curators.

“A lot of (Belgians) went on to die with these words on their lips and today we have to ask the question: why?” Dupuis said.

Germany’s 1914 invasion of Belgium, which had been a neutral country, is estimated to have led directly to the death of more than 6,000 Belgian civilians, compared with just over 40,000 troops in the trenches.

The exhibition, called “14-18: It’s Our History,” is part of Belgium’s World War I Centenary commemorations and has received funding from Belgium’s federal and regional governments.

Belgium’s defence minister, Pieter De Crem, said the main goal of the exhibition was to keep alive the memory of civilian suffering in time of war.

“(Our) citizens were the victims of chemical weapons and hunger and hardship constituted a part of everyday life,” De Crem said.

Among the exhibits are everyday items used by Belgians to survive under occupation, as well as a replica of an “American shop,” which sold products obtained from U.S. aid packages sent to Belgium.

The exhibition – www.expo14-18.be – runs at the imposing Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History until April 2015.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History in Brussels. Image by Marc Ryckaert. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History in Brussels. Image by Marc Ryckaert. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.