One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden's postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten.

Soccer fans snap up Sweden’s Ibrahimovic postage stamps

One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden's postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten.

One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden’s postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten.

STOCKHOLM (AFP) – Sweden’s postal service on Thursday began selling stamps featuring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic, drawing strong interest from fans as well as collectors.

“We have sold 5 million stamps in advance and that is a lot,” Posten’s head of stamps, Britt-Inger Hahne, told news agency TT.

Out of the five stamps, three are from the Sweden-England friendly in November 2012 when the Swedish star scored four times to give his side a 4-2 win, saving his most spectacular goal – an outrageous long-range bicycle kick – for last.

“The French are particularly interested. One customer ordered 1,500 packages … for his French friends,” Hahne said in a statement.

“Zlatan has a unique position on the pitch, among his fans and now also on the stamps,” she added.

“It’s a great honor,” Ibrahimovic said in a statement released by the postal service in November last year.

“Personally, I mostly receive bills and they rarely have any pretty stamps. Maybe that will change now,” he added.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden's postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten.

One of the stamps in a new series issued by Sweden’s postal service honoring Paris Saint-Germain striker Zlatan Ibrahiovic. Photo: Posten.

KPM porcelain plaque, ‘Solitude.’ Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Rago’s Great Estates Auction tops high estimate at $1.3M

KPM porcelain plaque, ‘Solitude.’ Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

KPM porcelain plaque, ‘Solitude.’ Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

LAMBERTVILLE, N.J. – Rago Arts and Auction Center’s Great Estates auction on March 22 edged past its high estimate with a total of $1,339,063 in sales.

Internet bidding was facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

“This was a classic estate auction with exceptional property from private homes, estates and collections, priced reasonably,” said Tom Martin, who directed the sale. “That’s a formula for success. It’s also clear to me that more buyers than ever before look to Rago for beautiful traditional furnishings, carpets, silver, American, Continental, and Asian fine and decorative art. We have top-notch property in house already for the next auction in September and we are looking for more.”

Almost all categories performed well in the March 22 auction save for a somewhat disappointing showing by coins. Some of the strongest results in the auction were achieved by Asian lots, the hammer exceeding the high estimate by 37 percent overall. The top lot of the auction was Asian: a Chinese nephrite jade four-panel screen for $58,750.

Russian pieces brought spirited bidding. As a result, a Russian Imperial Porcelain Factory military plate sold at $35,000 and a Russian Imperial Glass Factory (attr.) amethyst glass beaker at $3,625.

Fine art did well overall, with several paintings and sculptures significantly exceeding their high estimates. Lot 132, a bronze and ivory sculpture of a young woman attributed to Demetre Chiparus, sold for $18,750.

The selling prices of porcelain plaques were stellar. Most hammered at or above high estimate, notably lot 71, a KPM porcelain plaque titled Solitude, which sold for $20,000. Lot 90, a pair of Meissen pate sur pate covered urns, also sold very well at $16,250.

Traditional furnishings finished close to high estimate, with several outstanding pieces, such as lot 196, a Chippendale chest of drawers for $16,250, and lot 243, a Chippendale walnut corner cabinet for $21,250.

Rugs and tapestries were also successful, finishing at high estimate. Noteworthy ephemera includes lot 615, a presidential autograph album at $27,500, and lot 616, a signed H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds first edition for $15,000, sought after by museums, bookstores and private collectors.

Rago Auctions will hold the next Great Estates Auction on Sept. 14. Consignments are now being accepted for all auctions: phone 609-397-9374 or email info@ragoarts.com.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


KPM porcelain plaque, ‘Solitude.’ Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

KPM porcelain plaque, ‘Solitude.’ Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Chinese nephrite jade four-panel screen. Price realized: $68,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Chinese nephrite jade four-panel screen. Price realized: $68,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Russian Imperial Porcelain Factory military plate. Price realized: $35,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Russian Imperial Porcelain Factory military plate. Price realized: $35,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Presidential autograph album, includes signatures of George Washington, James Madison and James Monroe. Price realized: $27,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Presidential autograph album, includes signatures of George Washington, James Madison and James Monroe. Price realized: $27,500. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Chinese altar table. Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Chinese altar table. Price realized: $20,000. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Demetre Chiparus (attr.), bronze and ivory sculpture of a young woman. Price realized: $18,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Demetre Chiparus (attr.), bronze and ivory sculpture of a young woman. Price realized: $18,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Pair of Meissen pate sur pate covered urns. Price realized: $16,250. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Pair of Meissen pate sur pate covered urns. Price realized: $16,250. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Mario Joseph Korbel bronze sculpture of a draped nude. Price realized: $13,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

Mario Joseph Korbel bronze sculpture of a draped nude. Price realized: $13,750. Rago Arts and Auction Center image.

The 'Pit Crew' is a group of volunteers who work every Monday conserving the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s world renowned collection. There is also a group of volunteers that now work Thursday evenings. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

Auto museum’s Pit Crew keeps classic cars humming

The 'Pit Crew' is a group of volunteers who work every Monday conserving the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s world renowned collection.  There is also a group of volunteers that now work Thursday evenings. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

The ‘Pit Crew’ is a group of volunteers who work every Monday conserving the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s world renowned collection. There is also a group of volunteers that now work Thursday evenings. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

AUBURN, Ind. (AP) – When a head gasket wears out in a classic car, the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum doesn’t take it the nearest repair shop.

It calls in the Pit Crew.

The Pit Crew is an all-volunteer force that takes care of the more than 120 cars in the museum’s collection. As on the NASCAR circuit, the Pit Crew readies automobiles, but this race is one of automotive permanency.

Registrar and volunteer manager Lindsay Wharton said the museum has nearly 100 volunteers, including a dedicated group of 15 men in the Pit Crew.

“The Pit Crew keeps the museum going,” Wharton told The Star. “They’ll keep the cars alive for the next 200 years.”

Repairs range from simple to difficult, from inflating tires to changing a head gasket.

To join the Pit Crew, the men are required to have a mechanical background or experience with cars. The Pit Crew meets every Monday to work on projects. Somewhere in that time, Wharton said, they always find time to break for lunch.

Most of the men are retired, but some still work full-time jobs. The crew added another work session on Thursday evenings for those who work days and enjoy volunteering at the museum.

The group’s legendary leader, John Rosener, is the longest-serving volunteer at the museum. He joined 20 years ago when he saw an ad in the paper. Retired, he thought volunteering would be a good idea.

“He can know what’s wrong with a car by listening to it,” Wharton said. Rosener has another hidden skill, fixing clocks.

Rosener, along with the late Paul Casebere, started the Pit Crew in 2007. The museum’s newest building, the Collection Conservation Center, was dedicated in their honor in 2012. The center is where the Pit Crew works to restore and maintain automobiles. It also has gallery space for educational events.

Andy LaRowe, another volunteer, used to work at the museum in his youth. Today, he works at Steel Dynamics and makes time to volunteer.

The men in the Pit Crew are there, Wharton said, because “They love old cars.”

When the museum receives a donated car, the Pit Crew prepares it for storage. All fluids inside the car are drained, and the battery is removed. If fluids remain in the car, it will cause deterioration.

The museum’s curator, Aaron Warkentin, said it’s important to keep cars in running condition to preserve the automotive heritage. Warkentin said he doesn’t want the museum to be viewed as a static collection of cars.

“We’re not a car collection,” Warkentin said. “It’s a museum about society and how it influenced the make of the cars.”

___

Information from: The (Auburn, Ind.) Star,http://www.dekalbstar.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-24-14 1419GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


The 'Pit Crew' is a group of volunteers who work every Monday conserving the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s world renowned collection.  There is also a group of volunteers that now work Thursday evenings. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

The ‘Pit Crew’ is a group of volunteers who work every Monday conserving the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s world renowned collection. There is also a group of volunteers that now work Thursday evenings. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

The 'Pit Crew' works on a 1919 Dodge Brothers car that has since become the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s 'Photo Car Exhibit.'  With a mural of the Auburn Automobile Co. building as background, guests have their photos taken in the car. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

The ‘Pit Crew’ works on a 1919 Dodge Brothers car that has since become the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum’s ‘Photo Car Exhibit.’ With a mural of the Auburn Automobile Co. building as background, guests have their photos taken in the car. Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

Students on a study trip to the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum in the photo car that was professionally restored by the “Pit Crew.”  Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

Students on a study trip to the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum in the photo car that was professionally restored by the “Pit Crew.” Photo Credit: Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum.

German ready to return Nazi-looted art to Jewish owners

BERLIN (AFP) – An elderly German recluse is prepared to return precious paintings stolen by the Nazis from Jewish families including a priceless Matisse, his spokesman said.

Cornelius Gurlitt, 81, had stashed around 1,400 long-lost works by European masters in his Munich apartment and more than 200 paintings and sketches in a home in Salzburg, Austria.

The spectacular Munich hoard was discovered by German authorities by chance in 2012 and only came to public attention in a magazine article published in November.

His spokesman said that Gurlitt had ordered his legal team to hand back works believed to have been stolen or extorted from Jewish families as part of the systematic looting of art collections by Nazis during World War II.

“Should there be the well-founded suspicion that works are looted art then please give them back to their Jewish owners,” Gurlitt told his lawyer, according to a statement by his spokesman Stephan Holzinger, confirming media reports.

Henri Matisse’s Sitting Woman will be the first work returned, Holzinger said, to the heirs of renowned Paris art collector Paul Rosenberg.

The painting shows a stout, dark-haired woman in a floral dress sitting in a chair in a room with vibrant wall coverings.

The Nazis stole the work from Rosenberg and it was kept for a time in the vast looted art collection of Hermann Goering, the Gestapo secret police founder and air force chief.

“We are very confident about reaching a deal on the return in the coming days,” Holzinger told AFP.

Gurlitt’s father Hildebrand acquired the paintings in the 1930s and 1940s, when he worked as an art dealer tasked by the Nazis with selling stolen works and art the Hitler regime deemed “degenerate.”

A task force appointed to research the origins of the Gurlitt works says it suspects that 458 were stolen or extorted from Jewish owners under Hitler.

It says 380 other pieces are believed to have been confiscated as part of a campaign against what the Nazis considered “degenerate” art, mainly from public collections and museums.

Germany came under fire for long keeping the Gurlitt find under wraps and faces renewed pressure over its post-World War II restitution efforts.

Lawmakers are currently debating a law to ditch a 30-year statute of limitations that has provided cover for people in possession of contested artwork.

Australia's first banknote. Image courtesy of Noble Numismatics.

Australia’s first banknote earns $310,000 at auction

Australia's first banknote. Image courtesy of Noble Numismatics.

Australia’s first banknote. Image courtesy of Noble Numismatics.

SYDNEY (AFP) – The only surviving example of Australia’s first official banknote exceeded expectations when it was auctioned for Aus$334,000 ($310,000), officials said Thursday.

The 10 shilling note – one of 100 issued in 1817 by the Bank of New South Wales (now called Westpac) on the day it opened – attracted bids from around the world, said Jim Noble of Noble Numismatics, which handled the sale.

“It’s a record for a colonial banknote,” he told AFP. “It will stay in Australia (but) I’ve no idea what the gentleman who bought it plans to do; he’s a high up executive in a big organization.”

The auction price easily exceeded its Aus$250,000 estimate, with Noble attributing the interest to its unique historical value.

“It’s the only one of its kind, even Westpac does not have one,” Noble said.

Noble said the note was discovered in a private collection in Scotland in 2005, with Scots-born former New South Wales governor Lachlan Macquarie or one of his staff thought to have taken it there.

It was later bought by a private collector who sold it at Wednesday night’s auction.

Macquarie arrived in Sydney at the end of 1809 to be confronted by a colony in crisis with no stable monetary system since the First Fleet landed in 1788.

As the new governor, he was given extensive powers to reshape the colony, but despite this his first request to London to establish a bank was rejected.

In 1812, to alleviate the shortage of currency, he imported Ł10,000 in Spanish coins from India and in 1813 manufactured and issued the “Holey Dollar” – one of which sold at auction for a world-record Aus$495,000 last year.

But it was not sufficient and in 1816 he revived his plan for a bank, this time getting London’s approval, and on April 8, 1817 the Bank of New South Wales opened for business.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Australia's first banknote. Image courtesy of Noble Numismatics.

Australia’s first banknote. Image courtesy of Noble Numismatics.

Photograph of John Coltrane performing at the Sutherland Lounge, Chicago, 1960 signed. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Harrison Auctions.

John Coltrane’s tenor sax joins Smithsonian jazz collection

Photograph of John Coltrane performing at the Sutherland Lounge, Chicago, 1960 signed. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Harrison Auctions.

Photograph of John Coltrane performing at the Sutherland Lounge, Chicago, 1960 signed. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Harrison Auctions.

WASHINGTON (AP) – One of John Coltrane’s tenor saxophones is joining the jazz collection at the Smithsonian.

Coltrane’s son, Ravi Coltrane, has donated one of his father’s three principal tenor saxophones to the National Museum of American History. The donation Wednesday marked the 50th anniversary of John Coltrane’s masterpiece composition A Love Supreme.

The museum says jazz photographer Chuck Stewart also is donating some rare and never displayed photographs from the recording session for A Love Supreme. The images come from long-forgotten negatives of photographs taken in 1964. Stewart is known for his images of jazz culture and notable musicians.

The manuscript for A Love Supreme is going on display in the museum’s “American Stories” exhibit through June 17. It’s considered one of the great jazz compositions of all time.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-26-14 1425GMT

 

 

 

This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc.

Volunteer’s Red Cross collection on view at Mich. museum

This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc.

This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc.

BATTLE CREEK, Mich. (AP) – An organization known for sending volunteers on far-flung missions to help others is the focus of a new exhibit at Battle Creek’s natural history museum.

On the basement level of Kingman Museum, a collection of items from the long history of the American Red Cross has been cultivated from the Calhoun and Branch County Red Cross chapter and Battle Creek resident JoAnn King, according to the Battle Creek Enquirer.

King came to the museum recently and saw many of the Red Cross collectibles she’s gathered over her more than 30 years as a volunteer in display cases and hanging on walls.

King said she liked what she saw.

“It’s in my bedroom, on various shelves, walls, wherever,” King said of her collection’s normal home. “I’m just happy that somebody else will get to see it, and maybe it will prompt them to give them blood.”

March 15 was the first day the temporary exhibit was on display for the public. It will be on exhibit through Saturday, when the museum will host Red Cross staff members who will give presentations during the museum’s hours of noon through 4 p.m.

For King, the story of the organization that’s had a presence in Calhoun County for 98 years is a somewhat personal one. In fact, she still volunteers today, although she said her fellow volunteers at hospitals usually just let her do some paperwork or transport prescriptions.

King said she’s been collecting since her volunteer work began over three decades ago, in the Red Cross Bicycle Corps. Her work then moved to blood services and hospitals, and now is just in the latter.

Now, she’s amassed an impressive collection full of memories.

“I have a doll,” King said. “She has a little Scottie in front of her and it was from a cover of the Liberty magazine during the Second World War. A friend found the doll, then she was lucky enough to find the magazine for me.”

Another item is a photograph of a mother and her two daughters who were Red Cross volunteers, women King worked with and who were neighbors of hers.

In one corner of the exhibit area, King’s blue uniform and tan hat, bearing the well-known symbol of the organization, are under glass.

There are other items from both King and the local Red Cross office that are more modern. A cell phone, from before the era of smart phones, can be found there, a museum piece on its own. A Minimates action figure, a toy known for bringing superheroes and movie monsters to plastic life, bears the Red Cross on its chest.

If this exhibit brings awareness of the local importance of Red Cross to people, then the exhibit has done its job as far as Branch Manager for Calhoun County and Branch County Katy Lagoni is concerned.

“This chapter here has a long history of serving this community and we’re proud that we’re still doing it today,” Lagoni said.

It’s easy to think of Red Cross volunteers working in the wake of tsunamis, earthquakes and other disasters, but there’s a lot to do at home as well, according to Lagoni.

“We’re responding certainly weekly to house fires and other disasters that families need help with relief and recovery from,” Lagoni said. “We offer a variety of services on a regular basis, from health and safety classes, to babysitting classes, to water safety.”

Lagoni also pointed to the organization’s work helping members of the Armed Forces during when they leave on missions and when they return, as well as working with families on disaster preparation.

When people do need the services of the Red Cross, Lagoni said it can change their lives. When it does leave a lasting impression, that’s when people – even volunteers – can get the bug to start collecting memorabilia.

“People are fanatical about it, and rightly so,” Lagoni said.

Kingman Museum Education and Outreach Manager Kelly VanRyswyk said including something like the Red Cross collection among its animals, planetarium shows and human biology exhibits is part of Kingman’s mission.

“It’s educational and touches ages in a whole span,” VanRyswyk said. “It also involves people like Mrs. King who are gracious enough to give us their things to display.”

For King, whose personal items are on display, there’s only one way to describe how she feels about the exhibit.

“It makes me feel great,” King said. “I’m real happy to share.”

___

Information from: Battle Creek Enquirer, http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-26-14 1333GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc.

This World War I Red Cross poster will be offered in a May 3 auction by Poster Connection Inc. Image courtesy of Poster Connection Inc.

The 'Charging Bull' has been behind a barrier for 2 1/2 years. Image by Andreas Horstmann, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

NYC police free Wall Street Charging Bull sculpture

The 'Charging Bull' has been behind a barrier for 2 1/2 years. Image by Andreas Horstmann, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The ‘Charging Bull’ has been behind a barrier for 2 1/2 years. Image by Andreas Horstmann, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

NEW YORK (AP) – New York City’s Wall Street bull has been freed from his corral.

The New York Post reports that police removed the barricades surrounding the Charging Bull sculpture on Tuesday.

The bull had been penned in since September 2011, when police feared the sculpture would be targeted by Occupy Wall Street protesters.

The New York Police Department says security around the bull will be assessed on a day-to-day basis.

The bull has long been popular with tourists who like to snap photos with the 31/2-ton bronze sculpture. On Wednesday morning, they were doing just that as uniformed officers stood by nonchalantly.

___

Online:

Charging Bull webcam: http://chargingbull.com/video.html

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-03-26-14 1334GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The 'Charging Bull' has been behind a barrier for 2 1/2 years. Image by Andreas Horstmann, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The ‘Charging Bull’ has been behind a barrier for 2 1/2 years. Image by Andreas Horstmann, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The sale will feature two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases, including this example. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Crescent City has collecting categories covered April 12-13

The sale will feature two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases, including this example. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

The sale will feature two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases, including this example. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

NEW ORLEANS – Two paintings by Louisiana folk artist Clementine Hunter, two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases, a pair of huge American Renaissance Revival gold leaf and gesso pier mirrors, a pair of large cut crystal chandeliers, a 1911 Steinway baby grand piano and rare 19th century Russian icons will all be sold April 12-13 at Crescent City Auction Gallery.

The auction will bgin at 9 a.m. Central Time both days. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

Nearly 1,400 lots will come up for bid, in the categories Crescent City Auction Gallery has become renowned for throughout the South: original artworks (much of it by noted regional artists), period American and European furniture, pottery pieces, sterling silver, estate jewelry, antique lamps and lighting, Mardi Gras collectibles, Asian items and fine decorative accessories.

Works by Clementine Hunter (1887-1988) are must-haves for serious collectors of American folk art, and this sale has two examples, both oils on board. One was executed around 1970 and is titled Chopping Cotton. It measures 15 1/4 inches by 19 1/4 inches and is artist signed. The other, also circa 1970, is titled Funeral Procession. It’s 11 3/4 inches by 15 3/4 inches and is artist signed.

Two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases will come up for bid. The first, made in 1931, is of tapered form, with floral decorations. It stands 9 1/4 inches tall. The second was made in 1929 and is diminutive – just 2 1/4 inches tall. It boasts moss and oak decoration in colors of pink and grey.

About 10 lots of rare and highly collectible Russian icons will come under the gavel. One of the lots is a multiple Deisis set of three icons from the 19th century. Each depicts a religious figure: the Virgin Mary, Jesus Christ and John the Baptist. All are presented on curved wood panels with silvered and brass oklads. Each measures 23 inches tall by 17 1/2 inches wide.

The pair of monumental American Renasissance Revival gold leaf and gesso pier mirrors were made circa 1870, possibly by L. Uter of New Orleans. The mirrors, 157 1/2 inches tall, sit over stepped shaded marble top pier tables that stand 15 1/2 inches tall by 64 1/2 inches wide. Also sold will be a late 19th century French Louis XVI-style carved giltwood mirror in the baroque taste.

The scarce pair of cut crystal and glass 12-light chandeliers, made in the 20th century, are impressive at 58 inches in height and 37 inches in diameter. The Steinway ebonized baby grand piano is a 1911 Model M (serial #149791), on cabriole legs to scrolled toes. Estate jewelry pieces will feature antique gold bangle bracelets, contemporary diamonds, rubies, sapphires and pearls.

Returning to artwork, four pieces are worthy of mention, two by American artists and two by Europeans. Mississippi folk artist William Tolliver (1951-2000) is represented by an oil on canvas titled Jazz Duo. Robert Rucker (1932-2001), the Louisiana landscape artist whose style combined realism and impressionism, is in the auction with a watercolor, Last Catch of the Day.

Arnold Turtle (1892-1954) was a British-born marine, landscape and still life painter who moved to the U.S. in his mid-20s. His signed watercolor titled Old Absinthe House (28 inches by 21 3/4 inches) will be offered. Not much is known about the Italian sculptor Ambrogio Colombo (1821-1855), but his bronze work titled Woman Riding a Goat is bound to attract keen bidder interest.

Furniture highlights include a Renaissance Revival carved walnut half tester bed, made circa 1880 and massive at 117 inches tall by 57 1/2 inches wide by 78 inches deep. Also selling will be a French classical mahogany faux rosewood marble-top pedestal table, made in the 19th century and standing 29 inches tall and with a diameter of 38 1/2 inches.

Estate silver will include a French four-piece first standard (95 percent silver) tea and coffee service of amphora form, made in the 19th century and consisting of a coffeepot, teapot, creamer and covered sugar, for a total troy weight of 68.85 ounces; and a pair of Continental Louis XVI-style carved rhodonite (a manganese inosilicate) and silver compotes, from the early 19th century.

Also set to be sold April 12-13 will be a fine French boulle inlaid brass bound cave a liqueur (highly decorative lockable liqueur box), circa 1870, with eight gilt decorated decanters and 16 gilt decorated liqueur glasses. Mardi Gras collectibles will feature 23 bulletins, including one titled Flight of Fancy from 1909 (Comus); and two rare Rex ducal badges from 1897 and 1899.

The Saturday session will offer lots 1-850 and include the Mardi Gras memorabilia, plus around 20 lots of 18th and 19th century Chinese furniture pieces. The Sunday session will feature lots 851-1,382.

For details contact Crescent City Auction Gallery at 504-529-5057 or e-mail them at info@crescentcityauctiongallery.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


The sale will feature two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases, including this example. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

The sale will feature two Newcomb College matte glaze baluster vases, including this example. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Two original oil on board paintings by the renowned Louisiana folk artist Clementine Hunter, including this work, will be sold. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

 

Two original oil on board paintings by the renowned Louisiana folk artist Clementine Hunter, including this work, will be sold. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Monumental American Renaissance Revival gold leaf and gesso pier mirrors, circa 1870. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

 

Monumental American Renaissance Revival gold leaf and gesso pier mirrors, circa 1870. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Early Steinway ebonized baby grand piano on cabriole legs to scrolled toes, made in 1911. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

 

Early Steinway ebonized baby grand piano on cabriole legs to scrolled toes, made in 1911. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Around 10 lots of rare and highly collectible 19th century Russian icons will be sold. These three will be offered as one lot. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Around 10 lots of rare and highly collectible 19th century Russian icons will be sold. These three will be offered as one lot. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Rare pair of large, cut crystal and glass 12-light chandeliers, made in the 20th century, 58 inches tall. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Rare pair of large, cut crystal and glass 12-light chandeliers, made in the 20th century, 58 inches tall. Crescent City Auction Gallery image.

Ceremonial Scythian helmet made from gold. Image courtesy of Allard Pierson Museum.

Dutch museum faces dilemma over Crimean artifacts

Ceremonial Scythian helmet made from gold. Image courtesy of Allard Pierson Museum.

Ceremonial Scythian helmet made from gold. Image courtesy of Allard Pierson Museum.

THE HAGUE – Curators at an Amsterdam museum have been left with a political dilemma over priceless gold artifacts on loan from Crimea: Do they go to Kiev or to Moscow once the exhibition ends?

The Allard Pierson Museum’s exhibition began last month, before Russia annexed Crimea, and features objects discovered in tombs dating back to the seventh century on loan from five Ukrainian museums – four of them in Crimea.

The absorption – which is not recognized by Western states – has left the museum with a “very complex legal issue,” said Yasha Lange, spokeswoman for Amsterdam University which owns the museum.

“Who owns the objects?” Lange asked. “The art objects will remain in the Netherlands until the exhibition ends, but given the political changes, we’re now checking to whom we should give them.”

The Allard Pierson has now turned to the Dutch foreign ministry for an opinion, Lange said, adding the museum was in “constant contact” with Kiev and Moscow on the issue.

The exhibits include a scabbard and a ceremonial Scythian helmet made from gold, as well as a lacquered box, originally from China, which in Roman times found its way to Crimea via the Silk Road.

“The exhibition casts new light on the Scythians, Goths and Huns, for centuries dismissed as little more than ‘barbarians,'” the museum said in a press release.

The exhibition ends on May 18.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Ceremonial Scythian helmet made from gold. Image courtesy of Allard Pierson Museum.

Ceremonial Scythian helmet made from gold. Image courtesy of Allard Pierson Museum.