A German stained glass panel, F.X Zettler, Munich, 1920s, depicting an armored knight on horseback under a Renaissance arch, inscribed ‘Zettler’ lower right, 51 x 36 cm/20 x 14in, est. £300-£400. Thomas Del Mar image

Thomas Del Mar to auction armor from famed John W. Higgins collection

A German stained glass panel, F.X Zettler, Munich, 1920s, depicting an armored knight on horseback under a Renaissance arch, inscribed ‘Zettler’ lower right, 51 x 36 cm/20 x 14in, est. £300-£400. Thomas Del Mar image

A German stained glass panel, F.X Zettler, Munich, 1920s, depicting an armored knight on horseback under a Renaissance arch, inscribed ‘Zettler’ lower right, 51 x 36 cm/20 x 14in, est. £300-£400. Thomas Del Mar image

LONDON – On May 7th, Thomas Del Mar Ltd, in association with Sotheby’s and with Internet live bidding through LiveAuctioneers, will sell a selection of superior-quality antique armor acquired during the 1920s-1950s by industrialist John Woodman Higgins (1874–1961). It is the second such deaccession from the Higgins collection to be auctioned by Thomas Del Mar.

John Woodman Higgins made his fortune from the Worcester Pressed Steel Company, a Massachusetts firm founded in 1905. From 1927, Higgins decided to collect antique arms and armor seriously, with a view toward filling a museum he was building to showcase the uses of steel throughout the centuries. Correspondence of that year to French dealer Louis Bachereau noted: “I am compiling a considerable collection of antique armor and arms, also including statues, portraits, tapestries and stained glass showing men on horses in armor, flags, pennants, chain mail coats, shields, pole arms, etc.”

Higgins went on to build a collection that numbered more than 5,000 pieces of armor, arms and related objects. In 1931, the Higgins Armory Museum, a novel steel and glass building housing the extensive collection, was opened to the public in Worcester, Massachusetts.

The American Armor Craze:

The first half of the 20th century was a time when romantic tales of chivalry and courtly love captured the imagination of American collectors. In addition to John Woodman Higgins, other collectors included newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, telegraph mogul Clarence Mackay and cigarette maker Rutherfurd Stuyvesant. Their main artistic interests were the Gothic Revival, ancestral castles and medieval works of art including armor.

The collecting of arms and armor became highly competitive; European collections were broken up and handled by the eminent dealers of the day such as Jacques Seligmann and Joseph Duveen. In addition, there were the great influences of scholars like Bashford Dean, who became the first curator of arms and armor at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Over time, the Higgins Armory collection was refined, and with the benefit of modern scholarship and museology, the decision has been made to further refine the collection and integrate the core collection into the Worcester Art Museum. The deaccession process has occurred in two main phases: the first phase culminated in a 100% sold auction in 2013 conducted by Thomas Del Mar Ltd (in association with Sotheby’s). The final single-owner sale from the Higgins collection is the one slated for May 7.

More than 300 lots represent European and Japanese full armors, helmets and individual elements of armor, such as breastplates and gauntlets. There also will also be edged weapons and firearms; pictures, stained glass, sculpture and antiquities. As with the first sale, this will provide a unique opportunity to acquire armor that, in almost every case, has a pedigree dating back to Higgins’ purchases in the second quarter of the 20th century.

Highlights include a boy’s armor Higgins purchased from the William Randolph Hearst collection, a German fluted full armor in the so-called Maximillian fashion, an etched Italian full armor, and a very rare half armor for a Polish winged hussar.

For additional information about the May 7 auction, contact Thomas Del Mar Ltd by calling 011 44 207 602 4805 or emailing enquiries@thomasdelmar.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


A German stained glass panel, F.X Zettler, Munich, 1920s, depicting an armored knight on horseback under a Renaissance arch, inscribed ‘Zettler’ lower right, 51 x 36 cm/20 x 14in, est. £300-£400. Thomas Del Mar image

A German stained glass panel, F.X Zettler, Munich, 1920s, depicting an armored knight on horseback under a Renaissance arch, inscribed ‘Zettler’ lower right, 51 x 36 cm/20 x 14in, est. £300-£400. Thomas Del Mar image

Grouping of European armor from 16th-19th centuries, with estimates from £5,000 to £30,000. Thomas Del Mar image

Grouping of European armor from 16th-19th centuries, with estimates from £5,000 to £30,000. Thomas Del Mar image

Painted limestone figure of St Eligius, perhaps Lorraine, early 16th century; the saint modeled as a blacksmith shoeing the partial leg of a horse, his anvil resting on a pedestal hung with tools, plinth titled ‘St Eloi,’
110 cm/43¼in high.
Provenance
William Randolph Hearst. Est. £3,000-£4,000. Thomas Del Mar image

Painted limestone figure of St Eligius, perhaps Lorraine, early 16th century; the saint modeled as a blacksmith shoeing the partial leg of a horse, his anvil resting on a pedestal hung with tools, plinth titled ‘St Eloi,’
110 cm/43¼in high.
Provenance
William Randolph Hearst. Est. £3,000-£4,000. Thomas Del Mar image

19th-century boy’s armor in 16th-century German style, ex collection of William Randolph Hearst. The tall armor is a composite South German cap-a-pie field armor, partly Nuremberg, circa 1540.  Est. £15,000- £20,000. Thomas Del Mar image

19th-century boy’s armor in 16th-century German style, ex collection of William Randolph Hearst. The tall armor is a composite South German cap-a-pie field armor, partly Nuremberg, circa 1540. Est. £15,000- £20,000. Thomas Del Mar image

A stained glass panel of St Adrian of Nicomedia, probably Flemish or German, early 16th century and later. 186.5 x 59 cm. See Detroit Institute of Art, Accession No. 58.111 for what appears to be a companion window depicting St. Wenceslas. Est. £1,000-£2,000. Thomas Del Mar image

A stained glass panel of St Adrian of Nicomedia, probably Flemish or German, early 16th century and later. 186.5 x 59 cm. See Detroit Institute of Art, Accession No. 58.111 for what appears to be a companion window depicting St. Wenceslas. Est. £1,000-£2,000. Thomas Del Mar image

A steel target with embossed decoration, 19th century, after an Italian original of the mid-16th century made for the Emperor Charles V. Est. £1,500-£2,000. Thomas Del Mar image

A steel target with embossed decoration, 19th century, after an Italian original of the mid-16th century made for the Emperor Charles V. Est. £1,500-£2,000. Thomas Del Mar image

Japanese armor (Tosei Gusoku), Edo period. Est. £1,500-£2,000. Thomas Del Mar image

Japanese armor (Tosei Gusoku), Edo period. Est. £1,500-£2,000. Thomas Del Mar image

The Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 Cobra Jet sold at the Larry A. Brown estate auction Friday. Image courtesy Ron Gilligan Auctioneering.

Rare Ford Mustang sells at Pa. auction for $280,000

The Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 Cobra Jet sold at the Larry A. Brown estate auction Friday. Image courtesy Ron Gilligan Auctioneering.

The Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 Cobra Jet sold at the Larry A. Brown estate auction Friday. Image courtesy Ron Gilligan Auctioneering.

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) – A central Pennsylvania man has made the winning bid on an rare muscle car that set the auction world buzzing.

The Centre Daily Times said George Cowfer of Clearfield County paid $280,000 for the 1969 Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 Cobra Jet at an auction Friday. That’s considerably more than the $200,000 the car was expected to fetch.

The car’s former owner died last fall. He bought it the Mustang at a Centre County dealership but logged only 8,500 miles before garaging it for 40 years.

State College-based auctioneer Ron Gilligan said the GT500 is one of only 1,534 made. The car still has its factory-installed belts, hoses, spark plugs and wiring.

Gilligan said there was so much interest in the car that the traffic crashed his website.

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Information from: Centre Daily Times, http://www.centredaily.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-25-14 1854GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 Cobra Jet sold at the Larry A. Brown estate auction Friday. Image courtesy Ron Gilligan Auctioneering.

The Ford Shelby Mustang GT500 Cobra Jet sold at the Larry A. Brown estate auction Friday. Image courtesy Ron Gilligan Auctioneering.

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Image by Bs0u10e01. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Egypt recovers pharaonic artifacts looted in uprising

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Image by Bs0u10e01. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Image by Bs0u10e01. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

CAIRO (AFP) – Egypt has recovered 10 pharaonic artifacts, including a gilded wooden Tutankhamun statue, looted during the 2011 uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak, the antiquities ministry said Tuesday.

The pieces were taken from the famed Egyptian Museum near Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Jan. 28, 2011, when protesters calling for Mubarak’s overthrow drove his feared security forces from the streets.

Along with the Tutankhamun statue, which will be restored by Egyptian experts, two statues of Queen Nefertiti’s children were also recovered, according to antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim.

Authorities also recovered a stone likeness of Tutankhamun as a young boy that had been broken off of a larger statue showing him in the arms of a goddess.

One missing artifact was found in Belgium and eight others in the United States, state news agency MENA quoted the ministry as saying.

A total of 54 artifacts went missing from the museum when looters broke in during the uprising, mainly treasures from the era of pharaohs Tutankhamun and Akhenaton. Thirty-five of the pieces have since been recovered.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Image by Bs0u10e01. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Image by Bs0u10e01. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

French map by Charles Louis Minard, 1855, sold for £5,208 ($8,763). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

1855 French map climbs to £5,208 at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

French map by Charles Louis Minard, 1855, sold for £5,208 ($8,763). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

French map by Charles Louis Minard, 1855, sold for £5,208 ($8,763). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

LONDON – A map by Charles Louis Minard, sold for £5,208 ($8,763) in Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions sale of maps and atlases alongside a private collection of cartographic curiosities on April 25 at their saleroom, in London’s Mayfair. LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

Carte Figurative et Approximative des Tonnage des Merchandies qui ont circulé en 1855, was a schematic map of the rail and canal routes throughout France and was scaled according to the volume of traffic on each route.

Charles Joseph Minard, 1781-1870, was a pioneer in the use of information graphics, and is considered one of the founders of modern graphic design for conveying statistical information. His work in this field increased significantly following his retirement as superintendent of the Ecole Nationale de Ponts et Chaussées, and inspector of the Corps des Ponts in 1851.

In his article The Thematic maps of Charles Joseph Minard Arthur H. Robinson says about Minard’s work: “The 51 cartes figuratives that come from his fertile mind and adept hand show a combination of cartographic ingenuity and concern with the graphic portrayal of statistical data that was almost unique during the central portion of the century.” The work doubled its presale estimate of £2,000-4,000 selling for £5,208 [Lot 395].

Also attracting fierce bidding was a Russian serio-comic map of Europe dating from 1883 by V.C. Editor K.I. Kordig, which sold for £3,224 ($5,424). Although satirical maps have a long history that stretches back to the medieval period and Munster’s Geographica, 1540, it was with the outbreak of World War I that the genre became a media sensation, and increasingly popular as a collectible. This example is printed on a cotton handkerchief, surrounded by declamatory text panels and a title cartouche that translates as Contemporary Map of Europe [Lot 258].

A private collection of cartographic curiosities attracted interest with globe timepieces ticking up top prices. A French enamel, gilt-brass and rouge marble eight-day globe timepiece, circa 1890, sold for £3,472 ($5,842) [Lot 45] and a brass patent Empire Clock, a globe timepiece with eight-day movement hidden within the pedestal and inscribed “The Empire Clock, Cable, Patent 19460,” sold for £2,976 ($5,007) [Lot 46].

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


French map by Charles Louis Minard, 1855, sold for £5,208 ($8,763). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

 

French map by Charles Louis Minard, 1855, sold for £5,208 ($8,763). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

Russian serio-comic map of Europe dating from 1883 by K.I. Kordig, printed on a handkerchief. Price realized: £3,224 ($5,424). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

 

Russian serio-comic map of Europe dating from 1883 by K.I. Kordig, printed on a handkerchief. Price realized: £3,224 ($5,424). Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions image.

The former Fairbanks city hall building currently houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. Image by Durkeeco. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Historic Fairbanks city hall could become a distillery

The former Fairbanks city hall building currently houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. Image by Durkeeco. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

The former Fairbanks city hall building currently houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. Image by Durkeeco. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) – The old Fairbanks city hall could become a distillery under a plan that seems to have the support of city council.

The building has previously also housed a fire station and a community museum. Now, the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports that Patrick Levy, of Fairbanks Distilling Co., says he hopes to be making whisky, vodka or gin within six months.

He still has to buy the city-owned building first, not to mention persuade the borough to designate it a manufacturing zone.

It would be the sixth distillery in Alaska. The Fairbanks City Council passed a nonbinding resolution in support of the plan last week.

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Information from: Fairbanks (Alaska) Daily News-Miner, http://www.newsminer.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-27-14 2104GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The former Fairbanks city hall building currently houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. Image by Durkeeco. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

The former Fairbanks city hall building currently houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. Image by Durkeeco. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Dishes rescued from the Arabia steamboat. Image by Johnmaxmena2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Pittsburgh museum exhibits sunken Missouri River trove

Dishes rescued from the Arabia steamboat. Image by Johnmaxmena2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Dishes rescued from the Arabia steamboat. Image by Johnmaxmena2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

PITTSBURGH (AP) – More than 300 steamboats, including some built in Pittsburgh, have sunk in the treacherous waters of the Missouri River.

Visitors to the Senator John Heinz History Center now have a chance to see the remains of and cargo from one of those doomed vessels. Almost 2,000 artifacts are part of a new exhibit, “Pittsburgh’s Lost Steamboat: Treasures of the Arabia.”

Those items are among more than a million objects retrieved from the mud 45 feet below a Kansas cornfield.

Not only the sunken boat but some of its cargo came from Pittsburgh factories and workshops. Andrew Masich, president of the history center, said those items help tell the story of the region in the 19th century.

“These objects are a time capsule from when Pittsburgh was the Gateway to the West,” he said.

Masich and Leslie Przybylek, the history center’s lead curator for the “Treasures” exhibit, conducted a tour Thursday. They were accompanied by members of the Hawley and Mackey families, who located and recovered the sunken ship.

The vessel sank Sept. 5, 1856, in the Missouri River near Kansas City, taking down 200 tons of cargo and a mule. The animal was the disaster’s only victim. All 130 passengers and crew members were rowed to shore.

After the river shifted, the steamboat and its contents were buried deep under farmland in a watery, air-free grave on the Kansas side of the waterway.

The location had been known for years, and there had been previous efforts to salvage items. The two families obtained rights to recover the boat and its contents and began their work in 1988.

That work involved simply (well, not so simply because it was 45 feet underground) digging a big pit, and bringing everything out. They kept the items they found wet and cold, using, among other things, large freezers from a restaurant commissary belonging to one of the families, until they could be conserved. Many items still await treatment.

That anaerobic environment preserved many items made of wood, metal, porcelain and glass. Bottles of champagne, jars of pickles and vials of perfume were among the items recovered and found to be in good condition.

“I’m not a judge of champagne,” Bob Hawley said of his taste of the ancient bubbly. “It wasn’t bad, but I wouldn’t go across the street for it.”

His partner, Jerry Mackey, said the pickle he tried was “very sweet but not real crispy.”

Containers filled with scent fared well. “The perfume still smelled,” Joan Mackey, Jerry’s wife, said. “That surprised me.”

The 8,000-square-foot show is being presented in partnership with the Arabia Steamboat Museum in Kansas City, Mo., where many similar items are on permanent display. The museum was opened in 1991 by the Hawley and Mackey families.

Locally, visitors enter through a mock cornfield where the well-preserved remains of the boat and its cargo were recovered. The Arabia was one of many vessels built in a shipyard in Brownsville and finished in Pittsburgh. For the next three years it served frontier communities along the Ohio, Mississippi, and Missouri rivers.

The exhibit at the history center will include tall display cases filled with hundreds of recovered objects that range from axes and boots to saws and woolen jackets. Visitors also will get a sense of what items looked like when family members recovered them from the muck below the cornfield.

Those objects include a keg of Pittsburgh-made nails that melded together into brown, spiky lump of metal and mud.

“Treasures of the Arabia” will feature interactive stations where young visitors can try their hands at piloting a steamboat or identifying different goods carried on the ship.

The exhibit also has a link to “Bloody Kansas” in the years just before the Civil War. Items on display will include one of the 1853 model Sharps carbines that an abolitionist organization sought to bring into Kansas aboard the Arabia. The boxes full of guns were labeled “machinery” and “tools.”

The weapons were discovered and removed from the steamboat before it sank.

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Online:

http://bit.ly/1nyHDQa

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Information from: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, http://www.post-gazette.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-28-14 1414GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Dishes rescued from the Arabia steamboat. Image by Johnmaxmena2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Dishes rescued from the Arabia steamboat. Image by Johnmaxmena2. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

 

Bell & Howell 240 model 16mm movie camera, circa 1957, used by Orson Welles in 1962 to film his documentary 'The Land of Don Quixote.' Heritage Auctions image.

Orson Welles’ movie camera sells for $37,500 at Heritage

Bell & Howell 240 model 16mm movie camera, circa 1957, used by Orson Welles in 1962 to film his documentary 'The Land of Don Quixote.' Heritage Auctions image.

Bell & Howell 240 model 16mm movie camera, circa 1957, used by Orson Welles in 1962 to film his documentary ‘The Land of Don Quixote.’ Heritage Auctions image.

NEW YORK (AP) – Scripts for Citizen Kane, Orson Welles’ camera and a cigar ashtray were among the late director’s belongings sold at a New York auction.

LiveAuctioneers.com facilitated Internet live bidding.

Sixty-seven lots fetched $180,000 at Heritage Auctions on Saturday.

Margaret Barrett, Heritage’s director of entertainment-linked auctions, called the items “a piece of cinema royalty.”

Two dozen pages of scripts for the 1941 masterpiece `Citizen Kane‘ went for $15,000, far surpassing the $2,000 presale estimate.

Welles’ old 16mm Bell & Howell movie camera used to film a documentary in Spain sold for $37,500, against a $2,000 estimate.

And a silver-plated cigar ashtray Ernest Hemingway gave Welles fetched $5,000, six times the expected price.

Also on the block were memorabilia the director’s daughter, Beatrice Welles, kept for decades in Sedona, Ariz.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-04-27-14 2214GMT

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Bell & Howell 240 model 16mm movie camera, circa 1957, used by Orson Welles in 1962 to film his documentary 'The Land of Don Quixote.' Heritage Auctions image.

Bell & Howell 240 model 16mm movie camera, circa 1957, used by Orson Welles in 1962 to film his documentary ‘The Land of Don Quixote.’ Heritage Auctions image.

Attorney Dean Nicyper. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Art law expert Dean Nicyper to speak at Rago open house May 14

Attorney Dean Nicyper. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Attorney Dean Nicyper. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Lambertville, N.J. – The Rago Arts and Auction Center hosts an open house on Wednesday, May 14, featuring attorney Dean Nicyper presenting “Buyer Beware/Seller Beware: Authentication and Consignment Risks and Rewards” at 6 p.m. The talk takes place during the preview week for Rago’s Fine Art Auctions.

Many sellers are entirely unaware of the risks they may be taking in the art world. Similarly, buyers may be surprised by some details of the risks to which they may be exposed, despite the adage, buyer beware. Nicyper’s lecture will address many of those risks by citing actual events in the art world and identifying certain rewards that may exist on the other side of the transaction.

Dean Nicyper is a partner at Flemming Zulack Williamson Zauderer LLP and chair of the Art Law Committee of the Association of the Bar for the City of New York. Among his clients in the specialty of art law, Nicyper has successfully represented one of the two largest art auction houses for over 15 years in dozens of lawsuits. He has covered a broad range of art law related issues, such as authenticity of works of art, art fraud, auction law, consignment obligations and the rights and obligations of parties in loan transactions where works of art have been pledged as collateral.

Nicyper also has represented artists and their families and foundations, art dealers and agents, art collectors and art appraisers in many art-related disputes. He was lead counsel in the initial cases uncovering the two largest art fraud scandals in the past 15 years. In his capacity as chair of the Art Law Committee of the Association of the Bar for the City of New York, he has provided the leadership that resulted in the drafting and enactment of New York legislation detailing the rights and obligations of dealers and artists in art consignment relationships. He is co-author of a bill currently before the New York State Legislature designed to constrain frivolous lawsuits against scholars and authenticators who speak their mind.

The auction house opens on Wednesday, May 14, at noon. A reception begins at 5 p.m. Nicyper will speak at 6 p.m.

RSVP to 609-397-9347 ext. 119 or raac@ragoarts.com. Those who don’t RSVP may attend; all are welcome.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Attorney Dean Nicyper. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Attorney Dean Nicyper. Image courtesy Rago Arts and Auction Center.

Partygoers at the Material Culture gallery in Philadelphia. Image courtesy of Material Culture

Pass it on: The party’s this Friday at Material Culture in Philly

Partygoers at the Material Culture gallery in Philadelphia. Image courtesy of Material Culture

Partygoers at the Material Culture gallery in Philadelphia. Image courtesy of Material Culture

PHILADELPHIA – If there’s one thing the team at Material Culture knows how to do – aside from producing top-notch auction events – it’s have a good time. Their cavernous space in the old Atwater Kent Radio Factory’s former train garage is made for music, and with the addition of a drop-dead fabulous on-site café/supper club called Baba Olga’s, Material Culture is fast becoming party central with Philly’s arts crowd.

Material Culture’s next excuse to get down and boogie comes this Friday, May 2nd, from 7 to 11 p.m., and all are invited. Dubbed the “First Friday of May Party,” the evening will be highlighted by live entertainment from The Mighty Manatees – yes, dancing is encouraged – refreshments and a fantastic pre-auction exhibition of art from the Kristina Barbara Johnson Estate.

The wonderfully diverse Johnson collection includes more than 1,000 items from such categories as folk and outsider art; fine and decorative art; antiques, furnishings, garden art and décor, Americana, illustration art, Asian art and much more.

Admission to the preview party is free and open to everyone, including children when accompanying their parent. Baba Olga’s will be serving from 7-10 p.m. – note: it’s a BYOB. The first 200 partygoers will receive a free catalog for the Sunday, May 4 auction, which will be available to online bidders the world over through LiveAuctioneers.

Material Culture is located at 4700 Wissahickon Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19144. Enter from 2680 S. Abbottsford Ave. or 2781 Roberts Ave.

Questions? Call Material Culture at 215-438-4700 or email auctions@materialculture.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Partygoers at the Material Culture gallery in Philadelphia. Image courtesy of Material Culture

Partygoers at the Material Culture gallery in Philadelphia. Image courtesy of Material Culture

This 1911 touring Cadillac has won first prize in virtually every car meet competition it has been entered in. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

Preston Evans sale features early autos, motorcycles May 17

This 1911 touring Cadillac has won first prize in virtually every car meet competition it has been entered in. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

This 1911 touring Cadillac has won first prize in virtually every car meet competition it has been entered in. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

LIBERTY, S.C. – An astounding 67-year collection of early cars and motorcycles – which include a 1902 Oldsmobile Model R curved-dash runabout, a 1911 touring Cadillac, a 1920 Indian Scout and a 1942 Harley-Davidson, plus many car and motorcycle parts and accessories and antiques and collectibles in various other categories – will all be auctioned the by Preston Evans Opportunities. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding for the May 17 auction.

The sale represents the museum-quality lifetime collections of Remy and Betty Baker, gathered over the course of nearly seven decades and now being offered to the collecting public. Remy was a serious collector of early, pre-1930 cars and motorcycles. Other collections included toys, magic and movie posters and beautiful home furnishings. Jukeboxes, vending machines and arcade items will also be sold.

“We have known Remy and Betty for decades and we are honored the family has chosen us to dispose of the many special items from their home and museum,” said Preston Evans of Preston Evans Opportunities, the Newnan, Ga.-based auction firm conducting the sale, which will take place at 517 Flat Rock Road in Liberty, S.C.

The Saturday auction has a start time of 9 a.m., and will feature Remy’s many early cars and motorcycles, plus many other other automotive and motorcycle parts and accessories. Brass accessories for cars will be offered on Saturday morning. “It is staggering the sheer number of parts and accessories we have in this auction,” Evans said.

Other rare vehicles (in addition to the aforementioned early cars) will include 1924 Hupmobiles (Models R13 and R14), a 1921 Nash Touring Model 41, 1919 and 1921 Chevrolet 490 touring cars, a 1926 Chevrolet series V, a 1905 Armac cycle car, a 1934 three-wheel open roadster, a 1946 Midget Racer, and a 1912 Ford T truck, fully restored and with a mock-up of a calliope.

The antique motorcycles, in addition to the already named 1942 Harley Davidson and 1920 Indian Scout, will also feature a 1912 belt-drive Yale, Harley Hummers and more. As if the auction wasn’t already packed with top-shelf merchandise, Evans will personally be adding lots from his museum in Warm Springs, Ga. These will include some rare vintage motorcycles.

The 1911 touring Cadillac is a prime example of a restored luxury vehicle, from the very infancy of the automotive industry in this country. The car reflects advances made in the nascent years of luxury car development. It is one of only a few known to exist and was intended as a show car. It is the best in class at virtually every regional car meet that Remy and Betty Baker bring it to.

Features include a chauffeur’s compartment with rich walnut dashboard, fitted with the original Cadillac speedometer/odometer and Sessions clock; a passenger compartment with beveled glass, walnut burl and rich fabric; a brass tube and trumpet-style intercom system, for talking to the chauffeur; a crystal flower vase; ladies’ cosmetics holders; draperies; and pull-down shades.

Some mystery and intrigue surround the 1902 Oldsmobile Model R curved-dash runabout. A 1946 Jubilee tag identified the vehicle as being from 1898 which, if that were true, would make it one of the earliest known examples of an Oldsmobile in existence – a rare prototype. But experimental models dating back that far typically don’t have a curved dashboard, like this one.

Plus, the vehicle being sold has replacements parts from as much later on as 1904 (plus other replacement parts), and the crank is out of place for an 1898 model. However, the grandson of Arthur J. Hodge claims that his grandfather was gifted the car in 1931 by H.H. Walker, and that he (Walker) had been given the car prior to that by R.E. Olds, the founder of Olds Motor Works.

It is true that Walker and Olds knew each other. Walker, a highly qualified mechanical engineer, owned a wagon plant and he rented several properties to General Motors in the 1920s. It’s even possible that he was given the car by Olds, for whatever reason. But because that can’t be verified and because of the replacement parts, it is safe to call it a 1902 Oldsmobile.

Admission to the auction is $10 (or the purchase of a catalog; to purchase a printed catalog, send $10 to Preston Evans Opportunity Auctions, 31 Redbud Trail, Newnan, GA 30263).

For more information about the auction, call 770-502-0026 or 678-296-3326.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


This 1911 touring Cadillac has won first prize in virtually every car meet competition it has been entered in. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

This 1911 touring Cadillac has won first prize in virtually every car meet competition it has been entered in. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

It's hard to imagine this gorgeous Harley-Davidson motorcycle was made way back in 1942, but it was. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

It’s hard to imagine this gorgeous Harley-Davidson motorcycle was made way back in 1942, but it was. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

This fully restored 1920 Indian motorcycle, rare and in excellent riding condition, will be sold. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

This fully restored 1920 Indian motorcycle, rare and in excellent riding condition, will be sold. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

Betty Baker collected old jukeboxes like this beautiful Wurlitzer, toys, magic and movie posters, arcades and vending machines, home furnishings and more. Preston Evans Opportunities image.

Betty Baker collected old jukeboxes like this beautiful Wurlitzer, toys, magic and movie posters, arcades and vending machines, home furnishings and more. Preston Evans Opportunities image.