Photo by Diacritica, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Prosecutors seek prison for NYC art dealer, gambler Nahmad

Photo by Diacritica, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Photo by Diacritica, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NEW YORK (AP) – A tabloid photo of a wealthy Manhattan art scion cheering at a New York Knicks game has come into play in his sentencing in an illegal gambling case.

The photo, published in the New York Post last year shortly after the arrest of Hillel “Helly” Nahmad, shows him wearing a cap with a playing card on it and sitting courtside next to his high-powered defense attorney, Benjamin Brafman. Spike Lee is a seat away.

The scene suggests that Nahmad was “making light of the seriousness of the gambling charges,” prosecutors wrote in submissions in advance of Nahmad’s sentencing Wednesday afternoon in federal court in Manhattan. They are seeking a minimum of a year behind bars for Nahmad.

In its papers, the defense conceded that Nahmad was an “inveterate gambler” who began betting on the Knicks — and mostly losing — at age 14. But the papers sought to portray him as a minor player in the gambling scheme, and as an otherwise law-abiding and widely respected art dealer who deserves only probation instead of prison time.

Nahmad, 35, pleaded guilty late last year to charges he helped run an illegal sports betting business that was exposed by an investigation of a sprawling scheme by Russian-American organized crime enterprises. He was among more than 30 people named in indictments alleging a plot to launder at least $100 million in illegal gambling proceeds through hundreds of bank accounts and shell companies in Cyprus and the United States.

The gambling ring catered mostly to super-rich bettors in Russia. But it also had tentacles in New York City, where it ran illegal card games that attracted professional athletes, film stars and business executives, prosecutors said. Some of the defendants are professional poker players.

Nahmad comes from an art-dealing clan whose collection includes 300 Picassos worth $900 million, according to Forbes. He also is known for socializing with Hollywood luminaries like Leonardo DiCaprio.

Prosecutors had alleged that, along with laundering tens of millions of dollars, Nahmad committed fraud by trying to sell a piece of art for $300,000 that was worth at least $50,000 less. He was required to turn over the painting to the government as part of a $6.4 million judgment.

So far, 28 people have pleaded guilty.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Photo by Diacritica, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Photo by Diacritica, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Margot Fonteyn’s Swan Lake bodice designed by Carl Toms. PFC Auctions image.

Margot Fonteyn’s ballet costumes taking a bow at auction

Margot Fonteyn’s Swan Lake bodice designed by Carl Toms.  PFC Auctions image.

Margot Fonteyn’s Swan Lake bodice designed by Carl Toms. PFC Auctions image.

GUERNSEY, UK – Two costumes worn by the great ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn are being offered by PFC Auctions. Bidding on the two items, each estimated at £5,000, will close on Wednesday, May 7.

The most important item is Fonteyn’s Swan Lake bodice designed by Carl Toms. The pale soft net bodice, decorated with costume jewelry, has a handwritten label the reads, “FONTEYN Prologue.”

The beautifully crafted bodice was worn by the ballerina in her unforgettable 1963 performance of Swan Lake.

Also offered is a Romeo and Juliet skirt designed by Nicholas Georgiadis of white silk organza decorated with fine gold thread and decoration.

The fine and delicate skirt worn by Fonteyn in 1965’s Romeo and Juliet recalls her stunning partnership with Rudolf Nureyev, in what is regarded as the greatest ballet duo of all-time.

Nureyev and Fonteyn are rumoured to have been lovers off-stage. The electricity between the pair kept audiences enraptured, despite Fonteyn being 20 years older than Nureyev. She had been performing Swan Lake since 1938, the year he was born.

Both costumes originate from the personal collection of Hetty Baynes-Russell – former ballet dancer, actress and wife of the late British film director Ken Russell.

“Margot Fonteyn was the stuff of legend, both in her ballet career and personal life. These rare costumes are a fantastic reminder of her career,” said Paul Fraser, founder of PFC Auctions.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Margot Fonteyn’s Swan Lake bodice designed by Carl Toms.  PFC Auctions image.

Margot Fonteyn’s Swan Lake bodice designed by Carl Toms. PFC Auctions image.

The skirt worn by Fonteyn in the the 1965 production of Romeo and Juliet. PFC Auctions image.

The skirt worn by Fonteyn in the the 1965 production of Romeo and Juliet. PFC Auctions image.

Portrait of Golden Age comics artist and former Mad Magazine editor Al Feldstein, for Michael Netzer's 'Portraits of the Creators Sketchbook.' Copyrighted image of painting by Michael Netzer is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

In Memoriam: Al Feldstein, 88, former editor of Mad Magazine

Portrait of Golden Age comics artist and former Mad Magazine editor Al Feldstein, for Michael Netzer's 'Portraits of the Creators Sketchbook.' Copyrighted image of painting by Michael Netzer is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Portrait of Golden Age comics artist and former Mad Magazine editor Al Feldstein, for Michael Netzer’s ‘Portraits of the Creators Sketchbook.’ Copyrighted image of painting by Michael Netzer is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NEW YORK – Before “The Daily Show,” ”The Simpsons” or even “Saturday Night Live,” Al Feldstein helped show America how to laugh at authority and giggle at popular culture.

Millions of young baby boomers looked forward to that day when the new issue of Mad magazine, which Feldstein ran for 28 years, arrived in the mail or on newsstands. Alone in their room, or huddled with friends, they looked for the latest of send-up of the president or of a television commercial. They savored the mystery of the fold-in, where a topical cartoon appeared with a question on top that was answered by collapsing the page and creating a new, and often, hilarious image.

Thanks in part to Feldstein, who died Tuesday at his home in Montana at age 88, comics were more than escapes into alternate worlds of superheroes and clean-cut children. They were a funhouse tour of current events and the latest crazes. Mad was breakthrough satire for the post-World War II era — the kind of magazine Holden Caulfield of “The Catcher In the Rye” might have read, or better, might have founded.

“Basically everyone who was young between 1955 and 1975 read Mad, and that’s where your sense of humor came from,” producer Bill Oakley of “The Simpsons” later explained.

Feldstein’s reign at Mad, which began in 1956, was historic and unplanned. Publisher William M. Gaines had started Mad as a comic book four years earlier and converted it to a magazine to avoid the restrictions of the then-Comics Code and to persuade founding editor Harvey Kurtzman to stay on. But Kurtzman soon departed anyway and Gaines picked Feldstein as his replacement. Some Kurtzman admirers insisted that he had the sharper edge, but Feldstein guided Mad to mass success.

One of Feldstein’s smartest moves was to build on a character used by Kurtzman. Feldstein turned the freckle-faced Alfred E. Neuman into an underground hero — a dimwitted everyman with a gap-toothed smile and the recurring stock phrase “What, Me Worry?” Neuman’s character was used to skewer any and all, from Santa Claus to Darth Vader, and more recently in editorial cartoonists’ parodies of President George W. Bush, notably a cover image The Nation that ran soon after Bush’s election in 2000 and was captioned “Worry.”

“The skeptical generation of kids it shaped in the 1950s is the same generation that, in the 1960s, opposed a war and didn’t feel bad when the United States lost for the first time and in the 1970s helped turn out an Administration and didn’t feel bad about that either,” Tony Hiss and Jeff Lewis wrote of Mad in The New York Times in 1977.

“It was magical, objective proof to kids that they weren’t alone, that … there were people who knew that there was something wrong, phony and funny about a world of bomb shelters, brinkmanship and toothpaste smiles. Mad’s consciousness of itself, as trash, as comic book, as enemy of parents and teachers, even as money-making enterprise, thrilled kids. In 1955, such consciousness was possibly nowhere else to be found.”

Feldstein and Gaines assembled a team of artists and writers, including Dave Berg, Don Martin and Frank Jacobs, who turned out such enduring features as “Spy vs. Spy” and “Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions.” Fans of the magazine ranged from the poet-musician Patti Smith and activist Tom Hayden to movie critic Roger Ebert, who said Mad helped inspire him to write about film.

“Mad’s parodies made me aware of the machine inside the skin — of the way a movie might look original on the outside, while inside it was just recycling the same old dumb formulas. I did not read the magazine, I plundered it for clues to the universe,” Ebert once explained.

“The Portable Mad,” a compilation of magazine highlights edited by Feldstein in 1964, is a typical Mad sampling. Among its offerings: “Some Mad Devices for Safer Smoking” (including a “nasal exhaust fan” and “disposable lung-liner tips”); “The Mad Academy Awards for Parents” (one nominee does her “And THIS is the thanks I get!” routine); “The Lighter Side of Summer Romances;” and “Mad’s Teenage Idol Promoter of the Year” (which mocks Elvis Presley and the Beatles).

Under Gaines and Feldstein, Mad’s sales flourished, topping 2 million in the early 1970s and not even bothering with paid advertisements until well after Feldstein had left. The magazine branched out into books, movies (the flop “Up the Academy”) and a board game, a parody of Monopoly.

But not everyone was amused.

During the Vietnam War, Mad once held a spoof contest inviting readers to submit their names to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover for an “Official Draft Dodger Card.” Feldstein said two bureau agents soon showed up at the magazine’s offices to demand an apology for “sullying” Hoover’s reputation. The magazine also attracted critics in Congress who questioned its morality, and a $25 million lawsuit in the early 1960s from music publishers who objected to the magazine’s parodies of Irving Berlin’s “Always” and other songs, a long legal process that was resolved in Mad’s favor.

“We doubt that even so eminent a composer as plaintiff Irving Berlin should be permitted to claim a property interest in iambic pentameter,” Judge Irving Kaufman wrote at the time.

By Feldstein’s retirement, in 1984, Mad had succeeded so well in influencing the culture that it no longer shocked or surprised: Circulation had dropped to less than a third of its peak, although the magazine continues to be published in local editions around the world.

Feldstein moved west from the magazine’s New York headquarters, first to Wyoming and later Montana. From a horse and llama ranch north of Yellowstone National Park, he ran a guest house and pursued his “first love” — painting wildlife, nature scenes and fantasy art and entering local art contests. In 2003, he was elected into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame, named for the celebrated cartoonist.

Born in 1925, Feldstein grew up in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. He was a gifted cartoonist who was winning prizes in grade school and, as a teenager, at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. He got his first job in comics around the same time, working at a shop run by Eisner and Jerry Iger. One of his earliest projects was drawing background foliage for “Sheena, Queen of the Jungle,” which starred a female version of Tarzan.

Feldstein served in the military at the end of World War II, painting murals and drawing cartoons for Army newspapers. After his discharge, he freelanced for various comics before landing at Entertainment Comics, whose titles included Tales From the Crypt, Weird Science and Mad. Much of Entertainment Comics was shut down in the 1950s in part because of government pressure, but Mad soon caught on as a stand-alone magazine, willing to take on both sides of the generation gap.

“We even used to rake the hippies over the coals,” Feldstein would recall. “They were protesting the Vietnam War, but we took aspects of their culture and had fun with it. Mad was wide open. Bill loved it, and he was a capitalist Republican. I loved it, and I was a liberal Democrat.”

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AP writer Matthew Brown in Billings, Montana contributed to this report.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Portrait of Golden Age comics artist and former Mad Magazine editor Al Feldstein, for Michael Netzer's 'Portraits of the Creators Sketchbook.' Copyrighted image of painting by Michael Netzer is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Portrait of Golden Age comics artist and former Mad Magazine editor Al Feldstein, for Michael Netzer’s ‘Portraits of the Creators Sketchbook.’ Copyrighted image of painting by Michael Netzer is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Man pleads guilty in theft of museum statue in Missouri

INDEPENDENCE, Mo. (AP) – An Independence man has pleaded guilty for his role in the theft of a 6-foot bronze statue from a museum.

Thirty-seven-year-old Jeremy Ratliff will be sentenced June 13 after pleading guilty this month to felony stealing. He was one of three men charged in the June 2013 theft of the Pioneer Woman statue from the National Frontier Trails Museum.

One of the men has been sentenced to seven years in prison and the other has not yet pleaded.

The life-sized statue of a woman with a baby in one arm and a bucket in the other weighed 1,000 pounds.

The Independence Examiner reports Ratliff and another defendant tried to sell the bronze from the statue at a Kansas City recycling center but workers there refused to take it.

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Information from: The Examiner, http://www.examiner.net

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Painted walls in the burial chamber of KV62 (Tutankhamun's Tomb) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. Photo taken by Hajor, December 2002, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Egypt opens replica of King Tut’s tomb

Painted walls in the burial chamber of KV62 (Tutankhamun's Tomb) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. Photo taken by Hajor, December 2002, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Painted walls in the burial chamber of KV62 (Tutankhamun’s Tomb) in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings. Photo taken by Hajor, December 2002, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

LUXOR, Egypt (AP) – Egypt on Wednesday inaugurated an exact replica of the tomb of King Tutankhamun in the desert valley where many of its ancient pharaohs were buried, aiming to protect the 3,300-year-old original from deterioration caused by visiting tourists.

The facsimile, in an underground chamber not far from the original in the Valley of the Kings, recreates the tomb down to minute detail. Spanish and Swiss experts recreated the elaborate wall murals using a 3D scanning technology. In the middle of the burial chamber stands a rectangular rock setting where in the original King Tut’s sarcophagus and mummy once rested.

In a hall between the burial chamber and an antechamber hang photos and explanations of the discovery of the tomb and its treasures in 1922 by British archaeologist Howard Carter.

Egyptian tourism officials, who unveiled the replica Wednesday alongside foreign dignitaries, are hoping the exhibit will help revive a tourism industry that has been heavily battered by the country’s unrest since the 2011 uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

A pillar of the Egyptian economy, tourism plunged by more than 30 percent in 2011 and, after slowly building back the following year, was heavily hit again by a wave of violence surrounding the military’s ouster last summer of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. Tourism officials have said revenues in the first three months of this year fell 43 percent from the same period in 2013, down to around $1.3 billion.

The 18th Dynasty King Tut has long been a major draw of tourists to Egypt _ both his tomb in the Valley of the Kings on the western bank of the Nile opposite the southern city of Luxor, and the golden treasures uncovered in it, most of which are now in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

But the tomb has suffered from the crowds of tourists descending into it over the years. Tourists’ breath damages the ancient stone and murals, and its walls expand and contract with changing temperatures, causing paint to flake off and opening fractures that dust enters, experts say.

“These tombs were never built to be visited, they were built to last for eternity,” said Adam Lowe, of the Factum Foundation, a Madrid-based conservation organization that created the facsimile in collaboration with Zurich-based Society of the Friends of the Royal Tombs in Egypt and the Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities ministries.

“They lasted very successfully for 3,300 and in the 90 years since it has been open, it suffered a great deal,” Lowe told The Associated Press. “All of the attempts to try and conserve it create more problems.”

For the time being, the original Tut tomb will remain open, but tourism authorities are aiming to reduce visitors and steer them toward the replica, said Mohammed Osman, vice president of the Chamber of Tourist Companies. Ticket prices for the replica will be 50 Egyptian pounds, around $7, half the price for visiting the original, he said.

Egyptian Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim and Lowe said facsimiles will also be made of the tombs of the pharaoh Seti I and Nefertari, a wife of the pharaoh Ramses the Great, both currently closed to the general public.

Experts carried out the copying work on the original in 2009 and the building of the replica in Madrid was finished in 2011, but delivery was delayed several times by Egypt’s tumultuous political conditions, Lowe said.

“We are here to celebrate but also to send a message that this area is a wonderful place to visit, and now with this tomb in place, it becomes an even more interesting place to visit for tourists,” James Moran, ambassador of the European Union, said at the opening ceremony. The EU helped in transport of the replica to Egypt.

Osman said he hoped the ceremony — which was attended by 20 ambassadors — will send “a reassuring message that Egypt is safe” and encourage a return of tourists.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Painted walls in the burial chamber of KV62 (Tutankhamun's Tomb) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. Photo taken by Hajor, December 2002, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Painted walls in the burial chamber of KV62 (Tutankhamun’s Tomb) in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings. Photo taken by Hajor, December 2002, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The most famous structure within Bellevue Avenue's National Historic Landmark District in Newport is The Breakers, the summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, located in Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It was built in 1893, added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. Photo by Matt H. Wade, a k a UpstateNYer, and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Antique car museum approved in Newport

The most famous structure within Bellevue Avenue's National Historic Landmark District in Newport is The Breakers, the summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, located in Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It was built in 1893, added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. Photo by Matt H. Wade, a k a UpstateNYer, and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The most famous structure within Bellevue Avenue’s National Historic Landmark District in Newport is The Breakers, the summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, located in Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It was built in 1893, added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. Photo by Matt H. Wade, a k a UpstateNYer, and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

NEWPORT, R.I. (AP) – An antique car museum has gotten the OK to open in Newport.

The Newport Daily News reports that the city Zoning Board of Review on Monday approved a permit that will allow the museum to open in a well-known historic building on Bellevue Avenue near the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

Turner Scott, an attorney for the firm that owns the property, says they own at least 100 antique cars. The plan is to have 14 cars on display at the museum at any given time.

The building is in the Bellevue Avenue National Historic Landmark District. It was designed by New York architect Bruce Price, who also designed the famous Château Frontenac in Quebec City.

The building is currently being renovated and restored.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Image of The Breakers has been kindly provided by Matt H. Wade of Matt Wade Photography. To see his entire portfolio, visit http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Images_by_UpstateNYer.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The most famous structure within Bellevue Avenue's National Historic Landmark District in Newport is The Breakers, the summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, located in Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It was built in 1893, added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. Photo by Matt H. Wade, a k a UpstateNYer, and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The most famous structure within Bellevue Avenue’s National Historic Landmark District in Newport is The Breakers, the summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II, located in Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It was built in 1893, added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. Photo by Matt H. Wade, a k a UpstateNYer, and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Group Material, 'Timeline: A Chronicle of Intervention in Central and Latin America,' 1984 © Group Material.

Exhibit at Tate examines US intervention in Central America

Group Material, 'Timeline: A Chronicle of Intervention in Central and Latin America,' 1984 © Group Material.

Group Material, ‘Timeline: A Chronicle of Intervention in Central and Latin America,’ 1984 © Group Material.

LONDON — The complicated history of foreign intervention in Central America is considered in “A Chronicle of Interventions” at Tate Modern through July 13. The show includes the work of seven international contemporary artists and an archival display of Group Material’s seminal installation “Timeline: A Chronicle of US Intervention in Central and Latin America.”

The exhibition will explore how historical events have influenced artists including the opening of the Panama Canal and U.S. occupation of the Canal Zone; the monoculture economy of Central America and the devastation left by the United Fruit Co.; and U.S. involvement in the coup d’état of Guatemala’s socialist government.

Archival material from “Timeline: A Chronicle of U.S. Intervention in Central and Latin America” will begin the exhibition. First presented in PS1 New York in 1984, the installation charted over 160 years of foreign intervention in the region. Three decades after the work was first shown, this exhibition will reveal how histories of intervention continue to be a concern for a younger generation of artists, showcasing work by Humberto Vélez, Michael Stevenson, Oscar Figueroa, Andreas Siekmann, Regina José Galindo, Naufús Ramirez-Figueroa and José Castrellón.

Humberto Vélez’s film The Last Builder, 2008 refers to 19th century U.S. colonialism in Panama and to the building of the Panama Canal. The country is also the focus of Michael Stevenson’s abstract film Introducción a la Teoría de la Probailidad, 2008, which charts the last shah of Iran’s exile in Panama through the eyes of his bodyguard.

Two artists will address the history of the United Fruit Co., an American corporation that gained huge influence over the so-called “banana republics” in the first half of the 20th century. A new two-part commission by Andreas Siekmann will map out the monoculture economy of the region, while Oscar Figueroa’s Deméritos, 2013, makes visible the way the company controlled workers’ movement. In this video work, Figueroa makes a 3,275-meter line along the Turrialba railway, using a blue plastic material which is traditionally used to wrap bunches of bananas.

Works by Regina José Galindo and Naufus Ramírez Figueroa center on the history of Guatemala. In Tierra, 2013, Galindo makes reference to the victims of the dictator Rios Monttís, while Figueroa’s A Brief History of Architecture in Guatemala, 2010, uses performance to represent Guatemalan architectural history. His performance work shows dancers in costumes representing different architectural styles, which eventually disintegrate as they dance to a traditional marimba melody.

The exhibition will also include work by the photographer José Castrellón, who portrays the cultural changes taking place in Panama today. His project Kuna Metal, 2013, explores the appropriation of heavy metal music by the indigenous Kuna people.

“Project Space: A Chronicle of Interventions” is curated by Shoair Mavlian at Tate Modern and Inti Guerrero, TEOR/éTica, San Jose, where the exhibition will travel later this year. The curatorial exchange is supported by Tate International Council with the collaboration of Gasworks.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Group Material, 'Timeline: A Chronicle of Intervention in Central and Latin America,' 1984 © Group Material.

Group Material, ‘Timeline: A Chronicle of Intervention in Central and Latin America,’ 1984 © Group Material.

Enzo Mari, pottery centerpiece, produced by Danese, 1973, 11.6 x 11.6 inches, 1.8 inches high. Estimate: 3,000-3,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Made in Italy furnishings to be featured at Nova Ars sale May 6

Enzo Mari, pottery centerpiece, produced by Danese, 1973, 11.6 x 11.6 inches, 1.8 inches high. Estimate: 3,000-3,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Enzo Mari, pottery centerpiece, produced by Danese, 1973, 11.6 x 11.6 inches, 1.8 inches high. Estimate: 3,000-3,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

ASTI, Italy – An important collection of modern Italian design and decorative arts of 20th century will be sold by Nova Ars Auction on Tuesday, May 6. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

The auction will consist of 104 lots of ceramics, furniture, lamps, chandeliers and glass works. Many Italian designers will be represented, from Mari to Mangiarotti, from Munari to Colombo, from Gio Ponti to Sarfatti, as well as other talents from different countries.

Highlight pieces include a Geo Ponti and Richard Ginori china tea set by Pittoria di Doccia, circa 1925; four 12-inch-square appliques of Murano glass by Venini, circa 1960; a Carlo Nason ceiling lamp of chromed metal and blown glass produced by Mazzega, 1969; an Enzo Mari plastic centerpiece produced by Danese, 1968; and an Enzo Mari pottery centerpiece produced by Danese in 1973.

Nova Arts Auction specializes in contemporary art, modernism and design made in Italy in the 20th century. The auction will begin at 9:30 a.m. Pacific Time.

For details contact Valeria Vallese by email: valeria@novaars.net, e.art.auctions@gmail.com or phone +39 328 9667353.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Enzo Mari, pottery centerpiece, produced by Danese, 1973, 11.6 x 11.6 inches, 1.8 inches high. Estimate: 3,000-3,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

 

Enzo Mari, pottery centerpiece, produced by Danese, 1973, 11.6 x 11.6 inches, 1.8 inches high. Estimate: 3,000-3,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Gio Ponti, Richard Ginori china tea set by Pittoria di Doccia consisting of six cups, six small plates, teapot, sugar bowl and milk jug, circa 1925. Estimate: 1,300-1,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

 

Gio Ponti, Richard Ginori china tea set by Pittoria di Doccia consisting of six cups, six small plates, teapot, sugar bowl and milk jug, circa 1925. Estimate: 1,300-1,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Venini, four appliques model Patchwork. Varnished metal structure with Murano blown glass, brass, circa 1960, 12 x 12 inches. Estimate: 2,000-3,000 euros. Nova Ars image.

 

Venini, four appliques model Patchwork. Varnished metal structure with Murano blown glass, brass, circa 1960, 12 x 12 inches. Estimate: 2,000-3,000 euros. Nova Ars image.

Enzo Mari, plastic centerpiece, model Adal, Danese, 1968. Estimate: 1,200-1,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Enzo Mari, plastic centerpiece, model Adal, Danese, 1968. Estimate: 1,200-1,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Carlo Nason, Mazzega ceiling lamp, chromed metal, blown glass, 1969, 20 inches high x 23 1/2 inches wide. Estimate 1,300-1,500 euros. Nova Ars image.

Self-portrait by Sir Anthony Van Dyck, 1640-41 © Philip Mould & Co.

Van Dyck self-portrait will remain in Great Britain

Self-portrait by Sir Anthony Van Dyck, 1640-41 © Philip Mould & Co.

Self-portrait by Sir Anthony Van Dyck, 1640-41 © Philip Mould & Co.

LONDON – The National Portrait Gallery and Art Fund’s fundraising campaign to help the gallery acquire Van Dyck’s last Self-portrait (1640-1) has been successful thanks to a major grant of £6,343,500 from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

This substantial support follows the success of a public appeal involving 10,000 individuals donating over £1.44 million in addition to £1.2 million from two generous private trusts and £1.35 million from the Art Fund and National Portrait Gallery’s funds.

In total, £10 million has been raised to purchase the portrait, and a further £343,000 to support a national tour of the painting (including £150,000 from the Art Fund). The extraordinary generosity of so many individuals and trusts makes this one of the most successful campaigns for a work of art of the last 100 years.

The portrait will remain on display at the gallery until Aug. 31 before research and conservation work are undertaken. The painting will embark on a nationwide tour to six museums and galleries from January 2015.

The Save Van Dyck campaign originally needed to raise £12.5 million to prevent the work from going overseas, but once the application for an export licence was withdrawn in March 2014, and a revised price of £10 million was agreed, there was an improved chance of ensuring that the portrait remained on public display forever.

The portrait will embark on a three-year nationwide tour starting at Turner Contemporary, Margate before going on to Manchester Art Gallery, Dulwich Picture Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and The Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh.

The campaign began with an initial £1.2 million raised from the gallery and the Art Fund including a grant of £500,000 towards the acquisition from the Art Fund (with an additional £150,000 offered toward a nationwide tour of the painting) and £700,000 from the gallery’s Portrait Fund and acquisition budget.

Since then there has been a pledge of £1 million from The Monument Trust (the largest single gift to the campaign prior to the Heritage Lottery Fund grant) and a six-figure pledge from the Garfield Weston Foundation, The campaign has also received multiple five-figure gifts from an anonymous American supporter, who has significantly boosted funds at each crucial stage of the campaign.

Van Dyck’s exceptional Self-portrait (1640-1) has been in British private collections for nearly 400 years but was sold to a private collector who wished to take it abroad. The National Portrait Gallery was given an initial three months to acquire the painting, priced at £12.5 million, following a temporary Government export bar (issued on Nov. 14, 2013) to prevent it from being taken overseas. That export bar expired on Feb. 14 and was extended to July 13 before the buyer withdrew and the export bar was halted on March 26.

Sir Anthony Van Dyck’s last self-portrait is a work of huge international importance. It presents an intimate image of an artist at work, apparently in the act of painting, his arm raised in the process of applying paint to a canvas just out of sight. For today’s viewer, it conveys a sense of direct engagement with the artist as an individual, despite the passage of almost 400 years.

 

Born in Antwerp in 1599, Van Dyck was an artistic prodigy who worked as an assistant to Peter Paul Rubens. He came to Britain in 1632 at the invitation of King Charles I, making London his home until his death in 1641. Charles I was Van Dyck’s most famous patron, rewarding him with a knighthood and the title of Principal Painter. Van Dyck established himself at the heart of the English court, producing magnificent portraits of the royal family and many courtiers. However, beneath the shimmering surface of the court was a sense of growing unease. The late 1630s were a time of political upheaval and by the end of 1642 civil war had broken out in Scotland and England. Within a year of producing this portrait Van Dyck was dead, buried in Old St Paul’s Cathedral with the epitaph: “Anthony Van Dyck – who, while he lived, gave to many immortal life.”

 

 

 

Diese seltene Schule von Steiff mit reizvollen winzigen Details wie z.B. ein funktionierender Abakus und eine Kreidetafel. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Auktionsgespraeche: Ladenburger

Diese seltene Schule von Steiff mit reizvollen winzigen Details wie z.B. ein funktionierender Abakus und eine Kreidetafel. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Diese seltene Schule von Steiff mit reizvollen winzigen Details wie z.B. ein funktionierender Abakus und eine Kreidetafel. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

LADENBURG, Deutschland –
 Mitzuerleben wie ein Museum schließt, ist nie ein freudvolles Ereignis. Aber als Katharina Engels die Türen Ihres Puppen- und Spielzeugmuseums in Rothenburg ob der Tauber im Januar schloss, erwies sich das als der erfreuliche Höhepunkt für Ihr Lebenswerk. Über 30 Jahre lang teilte sie Ihr Fachwissen über und Zuneigung für Spielzeug mit mehr als 2 Millionen Besuchern. Jetzt war es an der Zeit, ihre Favoriten ein letztes Mal mit Sammlern zu teilen, welche diese genauso hoch schätzen würden, wie sie selbst.

Für Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen, mit welchen Engels zum Aufbau ihrer Sammlung eng zusammen arbeitete, markierte 2014 einen eigenen Meilenstein – 25 Jahre erfolgreich im Geschäft. Obwohl Auktionshäuser in den USA und Asien Interesse daran hatten, Engels Sammlung zu versteigern, wählte sie für die Durchführung des Verkaufs ihren zuverlässigen Freund Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Mehr als 1.300 Posten wurden an ein wertschätzendes Publikum versteigt, darunter auch eine seltene Schule des deutschen Spielzeugherstellers Steiff. Die entzückenden Schulbänke, Lehrbücher und rundgesichtigen Schülerpuppen steigerten sich vom Eröffnungsangebot von 2.800 € auf einen Endpreis von 15.500 €.

Posten 1144 war ein atemberaubendes Puppenhaus dekoriert wie ein Wiener Kaffeehaus im Stil des Biedermeier mit gotischen Details. Das Cafe war komplett mit kuchengefüllten Glasvitrinen und Gastpuppen in ihrer original 1880er Ausstattung. Die Gebote stiegen schnell von 3.800 € auf 16.500 € Verkaufspreis.

Großes Interesse wurde für einen Humpty Dumpty Circus des in die USA ausgewanderten Spielzeugherstellers Schoenhut gezeigt. Das bunte Zelt und die dazugehörigen Figuren inklusive eines “starken Mannes”, Elefanten und Clowns brachte 8000 €.
Ladenburger Eigentümer und Auktionator, Götz Seidel, war erfreut, das 25jährige Firmenjubiläum dadurch markieren, Frau Engels ein letztes Mal zu bedienen zu können. www.SpielzeugAuction.de

Auktionshaus Kaupp, Sulzburg, läutet im 20igsten Jahr ihres Bestehens mit einem zweiteiligen Jubiläumsverkauf am 27. und 28. Juni auf Schloss Sulzburg. Gegründet 1994 in Staufen, hat sich Kaupp einen Ruf als Auktionator für Gemälde von Carl Spitzweg geschaffen. Aber in jüngster Zeit haben sie auf ihren Kunst- und Antiquitätenverkäufen auch herausragende zeitgenössische Kunst angeboten.

”Kaupp Modern” am 27. Juni setzt genau das mit Arbeiten, wie beispielsweise von Lyonel Feinigers skizzenhafter “Standansicht mit Kirche” in Wasserfarben fort; einem spontanen Stück in Pastell und Tinte von Hans Hartung und dem Super-8 Film und Band “Der Tisch”, geschossen von Dietmar Kirves, eine Arbeit von Joseph Beuys und seinen Studenten in Düsseldorf, 1968, erfassend.

Das Anwesen des Barons Ruprecht Böcklin zu Böcklinsau, den letzten Besitzer des Schlosses Balthasar in Rust ist ein absoluter Höhepunkt bei “Kaupp Premium” am 28. Juni. Zahllose Möbelstücke und Sammlerobjekte aus dem Barock und frühen Barockperioden werden auf den Markt gebracht.
Sie vereinigen eine jetzt schon reiche Auswahl an Handwerkskunst, Antiquitäten inklusive Jugendstil und Art Deco sowie Gemälde aus dem 16. bis 19. Jahrhundert.
Kaupps zweitägiger Jubiläumsverkauf wird auch eine Auswahl von Schmuck und Uhren beinhalten, wie auch asiatische, afrikanische und ausländische Kunst. www.kaupp.de

Zur Feier ihrer 125jährigen Familiengeschichte als Auktionäre ist die Münzenhandlung Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger in ein neues, geräumiges Quartier im Pranner-Plenum umgezogen, den früheren Sitz des bayrischen Landesparlaments in München. Das Auktionsunternehmen, welches auf Münzen, Medaillen und Altertümer spezialisiert ist, kauft und verkauft auch Goldbarren.
Hirsch Eigentümerin, Dr. Francisca Bernheimer, kann ihre Traditionslinie als Auktionatorin bis zu ihrem Großvater, Konsul Otto Bernheimer, zurückverfolgen, welcher Geschäftsführer der Kunstauktion “Haus Bernheimer” war, gegründet 1864. Ihr Vater, Dr. Ludwig Bernheimer, war ebenfalls Geschäftsführer des Unternehmens.

1888 führte der Urgroßonkel von Dr. Francisca Bernheimer, Otto Helbing, seine erste Auktion durch. Leider musste seine Firma aufgrund der politischen Entwicklung am Vorabend des 2. Weltkrieges die Pforten schließen. Das Familienmitglied Gerhard Hirsch eröffnete 1953 einen gewerblichen Handel mit Antiquitäten und seltenen Münzen unter seinem eigenen Namen. Dr. Francisca Bernheimer, eine Nichte Gerhard Hirschs, übernahm das Geschäft 1982 nach dem Tod ihres Onkels. Das Unternehmen führt 4 Auktionen pro Jahr durch, dann jeweils im Februar, Mai, September und November. Für weitere Details besuchen Sie bitte www.CoinHirsch.de.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Diese seltene Schule von Steiff mit reizvollen winzigen Details wie z.B. ein funktionierender Abakus und eine Kreidetafel. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Diese seltene Schule von Steiff mit reizvollen winzigen Details wie z.B. ein funktionierender Abakus und eine Kreidetafel. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Dieses liebevoll detaillierte Wiener Cafe, nur 69x57 cm groß, Posten Nr. 1144 in den Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen, stieg vom Eröffungsgebot 3.800 € auf 16.500 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Dieses liebevoll detaillierte Wiener Cafe, nur 69×57 cm groß, Posten Nr. 1144 in den Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen, stieg vom Eröffungsgebot 3.800 € auf 16.500 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Jeder liebt Zirkus. Dieser, von Spielzeughersteller Schoenhut, wurde für 8.000 € verkauft. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Jeder liebt Zirkus. Dieser, von Spielzeughersteller Schoenhut, wurde für 8.000 € verkauft. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Ladenburger Spielzeugauktionen.

Dieser eckiger Wasserkühler von Lyonel Feininger, 1955, wird bei Kaupp Moderner Verkauf erscheinen und hat einen Mindestpreis von 50.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Dieser eckiger Wasserkühler von Lyonel Feininger, 1955, wird bei Kaupp Moderner Verkauf erscheinen und hat einen Mindestpreis von 50.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Spontan und struppig, mit eindringlichen Farben, ist diese typische Arbeit in Pastel und Tinte von Hans Hartung. Mindestpreis 50.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Spontan und struppig, mit eindringlichen Farben, ist diese typische Arbeit in Pastel und Tinte von Hans Hartung. Mindestpreis 50.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Diese unbetitelte Bronzeskulptur von dem italienischen Transavantgarde Künstler Mimmo Paladino, ist die zweite von vier Versionen dieser geisterähnlichen Figur. Mindestpreis 13.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Diese unbetitelte Bronzeskulptur von dem italienischen Transavantgarde Künstler Mimmo Paladino, ist die zweite von vier Versionen dieser geisterähnlichen Figur. Mindestpreis 13.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Der griechische Künstler Jannis Kounellis, einer der Gründer der Arte Povera Bewegung, ist bekannt für seine Arbeiten mit natürlichen und industriellen Materialien. Das 1989er Werk ist entworfen aus Stahl, Glas, Kohle sowie menschlichem Haar und hat einen Mindestpreis von 40.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Der griechische Künstler Jannis Kounellis, einer der Gründer der Arte Povera Bewegung, ist bekannt für seine Arbeiten mit natürlichen und industriellen Materialien. Das 1989er Werk ist entworfen aus Stahl, Glas, Kohle sowie menschlichem Haar und hat einen Mindestpreis von 40.000 €. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Einbezogen in die ausländichen Gemälde bei der Kaupp Jubiläumsauktion ist das seltene bunte und aufwändige Gemälde

Dieser eiserne rote und grüne Drachenteller ist das Highlight bei Kaupps Auktion asiatischer Stücke. Dieser Teller aus der Zhenghde Periode stellt einen Drachen mit 5 Klauen dar, welcher nur der Nutzung durch den Kaiser und seinen höchsten Beamten vorbehalten war. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.

Dieser eiserne rote und grüne Drachenteller ist das Highlight bei Kaupps Auktion asiatischer Stücke. Dieser Teller aus der Zhenghde Periode stellt einen Drachen mit 5 Klauen dar, welcher nur der Nutzung durch den Kaiser und seinen höchsten Beamten vorbehalten war. Foto mit freundlicher Genehmigung von Auktionshaus Kaupp.