Michelangelo's 'Madonna of the Steps,' marble relief, circa 1491. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Michelangelo exhibition lauds ‘universal artist’

Michelangelo's 'Madonna of the Steps,' marble relief, circa 1491. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Michelangelo’s ‘Madonna of the Steps,’ marble relief, circa 1491. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

ROME (AFP) – A Michelangelo exhibition opened in Rome on Tuesday, highlighting the Renaissance master as a “universal artist” who brought his own brand of mysticism to a variety of art forms.

The show starts off with Madonna of the Steps – a relief sculpture made by Michelangelo at the age of 15.

It brings together 150 works – busts, sketches, statues and oil paintings – by Michelangelo and his contemporaries.

Michelangelo Buonarroti was born in Arezzo in central Italy in 1475 and learned his craft as a painter and sculptor in the workshop of Domenico and Davide Ghirlandaio in Florence.

Lorenzo de Medici became his patron but the young Michelangelo had to move to Rome in 1496 when the city was swept by turmoil following the Florentine duke’s death.

Michelangelo worked for six popes and became ever closer to his Christian faith in his old age as seen in the numerous “Crucifixions” and “Resurrections” in the exhibition.

The show at the Capitoline Museums runs until Sept. 14.

 

 

Anne Bancroft (1931-2005) and Patty Duke (1946- ) both autographed this 8-by-10 sepia tone photograph, a movie still from their 1962 film 'The Miracle Worker.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and The Written Word Autographs.

Actress Patty Duke released from Omaha hospital

Anne Bancroft (1931-2005) and Patty Duke (1946- ) both autographed this 8-by-10 sepia tone photograph, a movie still from their 1962 film 'The Miracle Worker.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and The Written Word Autographs.

Anne Bancroft (1931-2005) and Patty Duke (1946- ) both autographed this 8-by-10 sepia tone photograph, a movie still from their 1962 film ‘The Miracle Worker.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and The Written Word Autographs.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Oscar-winning actress Patty Duke has been released from an Omaha hospital and plans to resume her speaking tour.

Bruce Crawford, who helped organize a screening of The Miracle Worker with Duke, tells the Omaha World-Herald the actress left the Nebraska Medical Center Sunday after being treated for irritable bowel syndrome.

Crawford says Duke’s husband, Michael Pearce, told him Sunday that she was feeling fine.

Before Duke sought treatment, the 67-year-old spoke at the movie screening Friday at Omaha’s Joslyn Art Museum. Crawford says Duke even signed autographs for 90 minutes after the movie.

The Miracle Worker tells the story of tutor Anne Sullivan’s efforts to teach a young Helen Keller, who became deaf and blind at 19 months.

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Information from: Omaha World-Herald, http://www.omaha.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-25-14 2203GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Anne Bancroft (1931-2005) and Patty Duke (1946- ) both autographed this 8-by-10 sepia tone photograph, a movie still from their 1962 film 'The Miracle Worker.' Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and The Written Word Autographs.

Anne Bancroft (1931-2005) and Patty Duke (1946- ) both autographed this 8-by-10 sepia tone photograph, a movie still from their 1962 film ‘The Miracle Worker.’ Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com and The Written Word Autographs.

Joshua Fry Speed (1814-1882) interment, along with wife Fanny Henning Speed at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Ky. Speed was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln from his days in Springfield, Ill., where Speed was a partner in a general store. Image by Brian S. Bush. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Ohio woman finds studying tombstones a lively pastime

Joshua Fry Speed (1814-1882) interment, along with wife Fanny Henning Speed at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Ky. Speed was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln from his days in Springfield, Ill., where Speed was a partner in a general store. Image by Brian S. Bush. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Joshua Fry Speed (1814-1882) interment, along with wife Fanny Henning Speed at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Ky. Speed was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln from his days in Springfield, Ill., where Speed was a partner in a general store. Image by Brian S. Bush. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) – Beth Santore shares what she has learned from her lifelong fascination with gravestones to help other people understand what they find in cemeteries.

Santore, 33, became fascinated with the artwork and carvings on headstones when she and her sister would play in a cemetery as children, the Lincoln Journal Star reported.

“My sister and I were years and years younger than our cousins. The family reunions were torture,” Santore said. “So my sister and I would walk up the hill to the cemetery (behind the park) and play.”

Since then, Santore has visited more than 1,400 cemeteries to learn more about the symbolism, artwork and lore.

“There are always mysteries in the cemetery,” Santore said. “Solving them is a lot of fun.”

Recently, she visited Lincoln from her home in Columbus, Ohio, and led a symposium for over 60 people on gravestone symbolism. Santore works as an information technology specialist, but she spends much of her vacation and free time exploring cemeteries.

She even has her GPS system set to alert her whenever she’s near a cemetery.

Santore said she’s always learning more about the symbols carved into gravestones and their meaning. Sometimes the carvings offer the only clues about the life someone lived.

One gravestone Santore pointed out in Lincoln featured a three-link chain that signified the man was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and a wreath that symbolizes victory over death.

Santore said it’s also interesting to see trends in gravestone styles from different periods of history. For instance in the 1920s, gravestones that looked like a broken tree trunk were popular to symbolize a life cut short.

The laser etching techniques available today are allowing new possibilities. Even photographs can be carved into stone with lasers.

Santore said some modern gravestones are even being decorated with QR codes that would allow someone with a smartphone to easily connect to a website.

“Although cemeteries are obviously connected to death, that’s not the main reason I visit them,” she said “I like walking through them to see all the different symbols, art, architecture – not to mention all the history.”

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Information from: Lincoln Journal Star, http://www.journalstar.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-25-14 2353GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Joshua Fry Speed (1814-1882) interment, along with wife Fanny Henning Speed at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Ky. Speed was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln from his days in Springfield, Ill., where Speed was a partner in a general store. Image by Brian S. Bush. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Joshua Fry Speed (1814-1882) interment, along with wife Fanny Henning Speed at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Ky. Speed was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln from his days in Springfield, Ill., where Speed was a partner in a general store. Image by Brian S. Bush. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

'A Plan of the New Fort at Pitts-Burgh,' drawn by cartographer John Rocque and published in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Group gets a look at old manuscripts in Pittsburgh

'A Plan of the New Fort at Pitts-Burgh,' drawn by cartographer John Rocque and published in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

‘A Plan of the New Fort at Pitts-Burgh,’ drawn by cartographer John Rocque and published in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

PITTSBURGH (AP) – George Washington wrote “with the greatest concern” to report a surrender at the forks of the Monongahela. Stephen Foster sketched Old Kentucky Home diagonally in looping script as he jotted down song lyrics. And Charles Darwin dashed off a note asking for distilled water needed for a photography project.

Those fragments of history – and many other original manuscripts – were on display Thursday in a half-dozen of the city’s museums and libraries as part of the annual meeting of the Manuscript Society.

“Pittsburgh is rich in all sorts of historical treasures that the average person doesn’t know Pittsburgh has,” said Charlotte Tancin, librarian at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University.

A bounty of historical documents in Oakland were on display Thursday, from the earliest known example of Johann Sebastian Bach’s hand at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh to a special 1792 printing of the Bill of Rights at the Posner Center at CMU to Foster’s original sketchbook at Stephen Foster Memorial Hall.

“Within a mile or two, you have all these fantastic repositories that hold key historical treasures,” said Michael Dabrishus, assistant university librarian for the University of Pittsburgh. “Not just for Pittsburgh and Allegheny County but for our nation’s history.”

In some cases, American and local history overlap.

The Hillman Library at Pitt put together a display Thursday for the Manuscript Society of the Darlington Collection, focusing on works collected in the 19th century by William Darlington concerning early American history and westward exploration. The exhibit is now open to the public, and will be until September.

Behind a glass case, visitors can view a 1754 letter from George Washington – on a yellowed piece of paper but written in script clear as day – describing an unfortunate surrender of a small fort at the forks of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers. Another letter from Washington’s travel companion Christopher Gist describes Washington falling off his raft into the Monongahela as they attempted to cross the river.

Darlington also commissioned exact replicas to be drawn of early maps of the Pittsburgh region, including one used by Washington.

The Manuscript Society is a group of collectors, librarians and archivists dedicated to the study of original documents. The group has been meeting since 1948 in locations ranging from Ann Arbor, Mich., to Estonia, but this is its first visit to Pittsburgh. Once called the National Society of Autograph Collectors, the group changed its name in 1952 to reflect its broad focus.

And while Pittsburgh’s historical documents aren’t necessarily hidden, many collections are tucked away from most foot traffic. The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, for example, is located on the quiet fifth floor of CMU’s Hunt Library. The institute is home to the collection of Rachel McMasters Miller, who began collecting botanical manuscripts at age 15 and went on to marry Alcoa chairman Roy Arthur Hunt.

The Hunt Library was constructed in 1960 to provide a home for the botanical collection, after the Hunts spurned offers from Yale University and Cornell University in order to keep the collection in Pittsburgh. At Hunt’s direction, the building was sheathed in Alcoa aluminum – with even the cabinets in the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation made of aluminum anodized to look like bronze.

On a table there Thursday lay one of the earliest Western documents indicating an interest in botany – a passage about herbs written on animal skins from about 1150. On the other end of the table, an elaborately drawn and illustrated gardener’s diploma marked graduation after years of study for a German gardener in 1741.

And on a ledge nearby, a note written and signed by Charles Darwin, asking an unknown recipient to bring him distilled water.

The displays were to continue Friday and Saturday, and the group was to view manuscripts in the collection of Pittsburgh Post-Gazette publisher John Robinson Block, as well as items at the Heinz History Center and documents at Fallingwater.

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Online:

http://bit.ly/1kwxYa9

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Information from: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, http://www.post-gazette.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-05-23-14 1517GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


'A Plan of the New Fort at Pitts-Burgh,' drawn by cartographer John Rocque and published in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

‘A Plan of the New Fort at Pitts-Burgh,’ drawn by cartographer John Rocque and published in 1765. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

British officials pledge to restore fire-damaged art school

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

GLASGOW, Scotland (AFP) – Firefighters said Saturday they had managed to save 90 percent of the world-renowned Glasgow School of Art designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, after a blaze tore through it.

Despite initial fears that the building had been destroyed in the fire on Friday, most of the building was saved and 70 percent of its contents were protected, fire chiefs said.

The British government has pledged to help meet the cost of restoring one of Scotland’s most cherished buildings.

All students and staff were safely evacuated from the century-old building, officials said, after the fire sent smoke and flames billowing out of the windows.

Several students were in tears as the fire raged through the building.

Smoke was still rising from the building on Saturday.

The fire was started by a projector which exploded in the basement, according to eyewitnesses cited by the BBC.

The Royal Institute of British Architects described the damage as “an international tragedy.”

Around 20,000 visitors from around the world visit the Mackintosh building each year, according to the school’s website.

Speaking in Glasgow, Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander said: “It’s a hugely important building not just for Glasgow and Scotland but for the whole of the United Kingdom.

“I can tell you that the UK Government will be willing to make a significant financial contribution towards the cost of rebuilding.”

He said the contribution could run into the “millions.”

Glasgow-born architect and designer Mackintosh (1868-1928) was a leading exponent of Art Nouveau and his distinctive lines and style of lettering remain influential today.

He won a competition to design the building in 1897 and it took around a decade to complete.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Vincent van Gogh, 'Still Life of Oranges and Lemons with Blue Gloves,' 1889, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

Mellon bequest of 62 rare works arrives at National Gallery of Art

Vincent van Gogh, 'Still Life of Oranges and Lemons with Blue Gloves,' 1889, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

Vincent van Gogh, ‘Still Life of Oranges and Lemons with Blue Gloves,’ 1889, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

WASHINGTON – An astonishing 62 rare works by Vincent van Gogh, Winslow Homer, Claude Monet, Georges Seurat, and others have arrived at the National Gallery of Art, Washington. They were bequeathed to the gallery by renowned philanthropist, art collector, and founding Gallery benefactor Paul Mellon (1907–1999), subject to a life estate in his wife, arts patron Rachel Lambert Mellon (1910–2014), who died on March 17.

The paintings, sculptures and works on paper then released were among the 110 works of art bequeathed to the Gallery by Paul Mellon that remained in his wife’s care after his death on Feb. 1, 1999.

A highlight of the bequest is another major painting by Van Gogh: Still Life of Oranges and Lemons with Blue Gloves (1889). Currently undergoing conservation treatment, the painting will be on view June 7 in the Gallery’s West Building, French Galleries, with Van Gogh’s renowned The Postman Joseph Roulin (1889), on loan from the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands.

The Postman Joseph Roulin, who Van Gogh made famous through a series of portraits, will hang alongside the Gallery’s own Roulin’s Baby (1888), the portrait of the postman’s daughter Marcelle as an infant. Though painted within a year of each other, this is the first time these versions of the works will be shown together, along with other related works by Van Gogh.

“Paul Mellon was one of the greatest philanthropists of our time, and his donations of art to the National Gallery of Art are unsurpassed. Paul and Bunny Mellon left an extraordinary legacy, that we plan to honor with an exhibition in 2016,” said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art. Exhibition details will be announced at a later date.

During her lifetime, Rachel Lambert Mellon had released 48 works of art to the Gallery. Among the most recent of these is Vincent van Gogh’s mesmerizing Green Wheat Fields, Auvers (1890), which went on view in December 2013 for the first time since 1966.

Still Life with Bottle, Carafe, Bread, and Wine (c. 1862–1863) by Claude Monet is an intimate painting of a subject not usually associated with the artist. One of Monet’s earliest known paintings, the Mellons’ purchase of this work reflects their thoughtful and deeply personal approach to collecting art.

The Riders (c. 1885) by Edgar Degas depicts a group of jockeys on horseback, a subject favored by both Degas and Paul Mellon, a renowned racing enthusiast. This large, vibrantly colored canvas is an extraordinary complement to the many Degas waxes and drawings on the same subject, donated by Mellon in his lifetime. The Gallery has the world’s third largest collection of works by Degas and, thanks to Mellon, the world’s greatest collection of this artist’s sculpture made during his lifetime.

Twelve exquisite oil sketches by Georges Seurat join four paintings and one drawing in the Gallery’s permanent collection. “Seurat died young and his body of work is relatively small compared to his impressionist and post-impressionist counterparts,” said Kimberly A. Jones, associate curator of French paintings. “These new works vastly enhance our holdings and position the Gallery as one of the strongest collections of his work in the United States.”

Among the nine American paintings in the bequest, two works by Winslow Homer – The Flirt (1874), a study for the Gallery’s Breezing Up, and School Time (c. 1874) – constitute especially important additions to the collection. A significant group of still lifes – two remarkable works by Raphaelle Peale and three by John Frederick Peto – strengthen the Gallery’s holdings in that genre. The bequest also included a major group of seven Homer drawings and watercolors, the most notable being Rustic Courtship (1874) and The Berry Pickers (1873), as well as a rare pastel on canvas by William Merritt Chase, Gathering Flowers, Shinnecock, Long Island (c. 1897).

The artists represented in this bequest include: Jean-Baptiste Greuze (1725–1805), Raphaelle Peale (1774–1825), Titian Ramsay Peale (1799–1885), Pierre-Jules Mêne (1810–1879), Eugène Boudin (1824–1898), Emmanuel Fremiet (1824–1910), Camille Pissarro (1830–1903), Edouard Manet (1832–1883), Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Henri Fantin-Latour (1836–1904), Winslow Homer (1836–1910), Claude Monet (1840–1926), Berthe Morisot (1841–1895), Auguste Renoir (1841–1919), René Pierre Charles Princeteau (1844–1914), William Merritt Chase (1849–1916), Jean-Louis Forain (1852–1931), Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890), John Frederick Peto (1854–1907), Maurice Brazil Prendergast (1858–1924), Georges Seurat (1859–1891), Pierre Bonnard (1867–1947), Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956), Maurice de Vlaminck (1876–1958), Raoul Dufy (1877–1953), Paul Klee (1879–1940), Georges Braque (1882–1963), André Dunoyer de Segonzac (1884–1974), Roger de La Fresnaye (1885–1925), René Magritte (1898–1967), and Alexander Calder (1898–1976).


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Vincent van Gogh, 'Still Life of Oranges and Lemons with Blue Gloves,' 1889, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

Vincent van Gogh, ‘Still Life of Oranges and Lemons with Blue Gloves,’ 1889, oil on canvas, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

Grayware headpot, Late Mississippian, 600 B.P., Golden Lake Site, Mississippi County, Arkansas, $78,000. Morphy Auctions image

Prehistoric blade commands $276K at Morphy’s May 17 auction

Grayware headpot, Late Mississippian, 600 B.P., Golden Lake Site, Mississippi County, Arkansas, $78,000. Morphy Auctions image

Grayware headpot, Late Mississippian, 600 B.P., Golden Lake Site, Mississippi County, Arkansas, $78,000. Morphy Auctions image

DENVER, Pa. – Morphy’s May 17 auction may have gotten off to a “rocky” start, but that was just fine with bidders, since prehistoric stone artifacts were exactly what they came to buy. The 190-lot auction that featured blades, bannerstones, arrowheads and points of tremendous rarity chalked up a healthy $661,000 (all prices quoted inclusive of 20% buyer’s premium). LiveAuctioneers provided the Internet live bidding for the sale.

The top 10 was led by the exceptional Ross Blade, an exotic flint specimen from the Woodland period, Hopewell phase (2000-1500 B.P.). Crafted to a very high standard, the translucent sunset orange blade measuring 8 1/8 inches would have been reserved for only the elite of Hopewellian society, said Morphy’s Prehistoric Americana expert John Mark Clark.

“The Ross Blade is likely the most beautiful, and largest, known example of its type in private hands,” said Clark. “Legend has it that this blade traveled from the Midwest – probably southern Illinois – all the way to Utah, where it was found during the restoration of an antique truck. The blade had been wrapped in a shirt and stashed inside a door panel. It made its way back to the Midwest, where it ended up being one of few things that survived a massive house fire. That’s why the blade is known to collectors as ‘The Survivor.’” At Morphy’s auction, the Ross Blade reached the upper end of its estimate range, selling for $276,000.

Two other blades achieved top-10 status. A translucent sugar quartz Clovis point from the Early Paleolithic Period (11500-10000 B.P.) was discovered near Buckhart Township in Fulton County, Illinois. Its distinctive white tip was part of the craftsman’s design plan, Clark said, and because it is so unusual, it was chosen for inclusion on the Paleo poster created by Pete Bostrum, Lithic Casting Lab, Troy, Illinois. “The ‘Bostrum blessing’ is given to only the finest of specimens,” Clark noted. Against a $45,000-$60,000 estimate, the point realized $69,000. Not far behind was a corner notch blade of Missouri origin, from the Archaic Period (7500-4000 B.P.). With provenance from several well-known early collections, the 7-inch blade described in Morphy’s catalog as “museum grade” sold for an above-estimate price of $64,800.

Having a gemstone-like color, a ferruginous quartz hourglass bannerstone of the Late Archaic Period (4000-3000 B.P.) was bid to $39,000 against an estimate of $20,000-$30,000; while two discoidal game stones – believed to have been playing pieces for “chunkey” hoop-and-stick games enjoyed by North America’s indigenous population – were in great demand with bidders. A flint discoidal specimen from the Mississippian Period (1000-5000 B.P.), found in Dickson County, Tennessee, surpassed its high estimate to settle at $33,000. Another discoidal highlight from Tennessee – dating to the same general timeframe – was crafted of finely grained quartzite. It changed hands at Morphy’s for $39,000.

One of the most compelling objects in the sale was a grayware headpot discovered at the Golden Lake Site in Mississippi County, Arkansas. Featured in Dr. James F. Cherry’s epic 1990 book dedicated to headpots, the vessel is described by the author as having “an unusual occipital bun…multiple ear piercings, a pierced forelock tab, and a highly burnished finish…with no restoration, [which is] almost unheard of…” The pot was offered together with two X-rays confirming its solid, untouched condition; a copy of Dr. Cherry’s book, and two collector journals depicting the vessel that is known as the Ray Pohler Headpot. It garnered a winning bid of $78,000, just shy its high estimate.

“This was our second auction of North American artifacts and arrowheads, and it proved without a doubt that there is a large and dedicated following for prehistoric specimens. We will continue to develop the Prehistoric Americana division at Morphy’s and offer our ironclad policy of backing the authenticity of each item sold,” said Dan Morphy, president and founder of Morphy Auctions.

Quality consignments are currently being accepted for Morphy’s next American Artifact and Arrowhead Auction. To discuss a consignment, contact John Mark Clark by calling 931-237-3646 or emailing markclarksville@live.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog for Morphy’s May 17 auction, complete with prices realized, online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

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Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Grayware headpot, Late Mississippian, 600 B.P., Golden Lake Site, Mississippi County, Arkansas, $78,000. Morphy Auctions image

Grayware headpot, Late Mississippian, 600 B.P., Golden Lake Site, Mississippi County, Arkansas, $78,000. Morphy Auctions image

Ross blade, Woodland period, Hopewell phase, 8 1/8 inches long, $276,000. Morphy Auctions image

Ross blade, Woodland period, Hopewell phase, 8 1/8 inches long, $276,000. Morphy Auctions image

Translucent sugar quartz Clovis point, early Paleolithic, Fulton County, Illinois, $69,000. Morphy Auctions image

Translucent sugar quartz Clovis point, early Paleolithic, Fulton County, Illinois, $69,000. Morphy Auctions image

Earl Townsend’s monumental 7in Corner Notch Blade, Archaic, 7500-4000 B.P., Missouri origin, $64,800. Morphy Auctions image

Earl Townsend’s monumental 7in Corner Notch Blade, Archaic, 7500-4000 B.P., Missouri origin, $64,800. Morphy Auctions image

Ferruginous quartz hourglass bannerstone, Late Archaic period, 4000-3000 B.P., $39,000. Morphy Auctions image

Ferruginous quartz hourglass bannerstone, Late Archaic period, 4000-3000 B.P., $39,000. Morphy Auctions image

Flint discoidal, Mississippian period, 1000-5000 B.P., Dickson County Tennessee, $33,000. Morphy Auctions image

Flint discoidal, Mississippian period, 1000-5000 B.P., Dickson County Tennessee, $33,000. Morphy Auctions image

Double-cupped discoidal, Mississippian period, 1100-600 B.P., Hamilton County (Chattanooga), Tennessee, $39,000. Morphy Auctions image

Double-cupped discoidal, Mississippian period, 1100-600 B.P., Hamilton County (Chattanooga), Tennessee, $39,000. Morphy Auctions image

Nebo axe, speckled granite, Middle Archaic period, 7500-4000 B.P., Louis County, Iowa, $11,400. Morphy Auctions image

Nebo axe, speckled granite, Middle Archaic period, 7500-4000 B.P., Louis County, Iowa, $11,400. Morphy Auctions image

An exceptional salesman’s sample of a Kochs barber chair sold for $42,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

Miniature barber chair sells at $42,000 clip in VCA auction

An exceptional salesman’s sample of a Kochs barber chair sold for $42,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

An exceptional salesman’s sample of a Kochs barber chair sold for $42,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

LAS VEGAS – Proving a continued demand for “not the things people need, but the things they want,” Victorian Casino Antiques hosted another fast-paced, fun auction inside its Las Vegas showroom May 2-4, where 2,500 live and remote bidders competed to lay claim to more than 1,800 antique radios, slot machines, arcade games, gas and oil collectibles, advertising art and more. The sale totaled $1 million. LiveAuctioneers.com provided Internet live bidding.

The highlight of the three-day event was the intense bidding for an exceptional salesman’s sample barber chair manufactured by Theo A. Kochs of Chicago. This beautiful, fully detailed scale model sold for $42,000 to the top bidder.

Another standout item that attracted serious attention during “3 Days in May” was a five-cent Victor Novelty Works cast-iron tabletop gambling machine from approximately 1907. The rare coin-op – only two or three are known to exist today – commanded more than $32,000 at the auction.

Along with other gambling machines such as the 1939 five-cent O.D. Jennings escalator bell slot that sold for $4,200, vintage advertising art and displays also continued to be popular among bidders. A classic Pepsi-Cola metal floor display rack for bottle cartons – including 13 early six-pack carriers – achieved $15,000. A surprisingly intact Eveready batteries store display with moving parts sold for $5,700, and a rare Harley Davidson Motorcycles 5-gallon motor oil can brought $6,000.

Among the more than 500 lots of antique toys up for bid were some excellent specimens such as a French-made, 21-inch Alfa Romeo pressed-steel race car that hammered at $4,800 and a 22-inch German Guntherman “Silver Bullet” tin windup race car that sold for $2,400.

Proving that not even an auction is over until the fat lady sings, a buxom, life-size, animatronic talking “Laffing Sal” carnival figure closed out the weekend by singing all the way to the bank to the tune of $9,775.

VCA recently acquired the William A. Harrah Antique Gambling Machine Collection, which features one of the largest concentrations of upright single- and double-wheel slot machines in the world. This unique assemblage of vintage trade stimulators, floor consoles and assorted memorabilia from Harrah’s world-famous casinos – totaling more than 75 pieces – will be up for bid at VCA’s next multi-day auction event, taking place at the Las Vegas showroom Oct. 10-12.

Click here to view the fully illustrated catalog for this sale, complete with prices realized.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


An exceptional salesman’s sample of a Kochs barber chair sold for $42,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

 

An exceptional salesman’s sample of a Kochs barber chair sold for $42,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

Guntherman 'Silver Bullet' tin windup race car. Price realized: $2,400. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

 

Guntherman ‘Silver Bullet’ tin windup race car. Price realized: $2,400. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

Harley Davidson 5-gallon metal motor oil can. Price realized: $6,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

Harley Davidson 5-gallon metal motor oil can. Price realized: $6,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

Mechanical Eveready batteries store display. Price realized: $5,700. Victorian Casino Antiques image.v

Mechanical Eveready batteries store display. Price realized: $5,700. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

This Victor Novelty Works five-cent cast-iron tabletop gambling machine, circa 1907, topped $32,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

This Victor Novelty Works five-cent cast-iron tabletop gambling machine, circa 1907, topped $32,000. Victorian Casino Antiques image.

 

 

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Fire wrecks historic Scottish art school

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

GLASGOW (AFP) – A blaze ripped through one of the world’s top art schools in the Scottish city of Glasgow Friday, damaging a historic building designed by the architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

All students and staff were safely evacuated from the Glasgow School of Art, officials said, after the fire sent smoke and flames billowing into the air.

Several people were in tears as they watched the inferno rage through the century-old building, whose alumni include “Doctor Who” actor Peter Capaldi.

“Awful to see destruction of this iconic building and students’ work,” Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond said.

The cause of the fire was not immediately clear.

Glasgow-born architect and designer Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928) was a leading exponent of Art Nouveau, whose distinctive lines and lettering remain influential.

He won a competition to design the building in 1897 and it took around 10 years to complete but is now a landmark in the city, with special government-protected status.

Around 20,000 visitors from around the world visit the Mackintosh building each year, according to the school’s website.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

The front (north) facade of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s Glasgow School of Art on Renfrew Street, Garnethill in Glasgow, Scotland. Taken by Finlay McWalter on May 7, 2004. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Zulu War Casualty Medal awarded to Pvt. John Jones, H Company, 1st/24th (Warwickshire) killed in action at Isandhlwana on Jan. 22, 1879. Estimate: £7,000-£8,000, $11,815-$13,502. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Poignant items in ranks of Baldwin & Sons military sale May 29

Zulu War Casualty Medal awarded to Pvt. John Jones, H Company, 1st/24th (Warwickshire)  killed in action at Isandhlwana on Jan. 22, 1879. Estimate: £7,000-£8,000, $11,815-$13,502. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Zulu War Casualty Medal awarded to Pvt. John Jones, H Company, 1st/24th (Warwickshire) killed in action at Isandhlwana on Jan. 22, 1879. Estimate: £7,000-£8,000, $11,815-$13,502. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

LONDON – In the year of the World War I centenary and the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the annual collaboration between Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions and A.H. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. offers medals, orders, decorations and militaria in the Military Sale on Thursday, May 29, at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ London saleroom in Mayfair.

LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding.

A unique collection of approximately 45 original signatures of Great War and late 19th century Victoria Cross recipients is a poignant piece in the sale. Likely to have been collected at a reunion of the recipients during the 1920s, the collection is presented in an autograph album with related newspaper cuttings. It is estimated at £1,000-1,200 [Lot 348].

Another fascinating group is a rare Suffragette WSPU “Hunger Strike” medal and World War I campaign group of four awarded to Gertrude Lowy (later Salaman). The eldest daughter of an influential Jewish family in North London that fervently supported the fight for equality and the WSPU cause, Gertrude Lowy was arrested for militancy and smashing windows in London’s West End on March 4, 1912, being sentenced to two-months of hard-labor as punishment. During World War I she enlisted with the Voluntary Aid Detachment and served as a radiographic assistant in Italy until 1919, being also awarded the Italian War Merit Cross. The group is estimated at £8,000-10,000 [Lot 134].

Additional highlights

– German wheel-lock sporting carbine, 17th century, with a 63cm (25.2 inches) swamped sighted barrel engraved with the maker’s name over the breech [Lot 243, est. £8,000-10,000].

– Zulu War Casualty Medal awarded to Pvt. John Jones, H Company, 1st/24th (Warwickshire) Foot, killed in action at Isandhlwana on Jan. 22, 1879 [Lot 43, est. £7,000-8,000].

– Boer War and World War I DSO and “1914” MC Group of six awarded to Lt. Col. Francis Lane Congreve, Home Guard, late 120th Battery, 27th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. A scion of the highly distinguished Congreve Family, he was the youngest brother of the Boer War “Colenso” VC winner Gen. Sir Walter Norris Congreve, and uncle of World War I “Longueval” VC winner William “Billy” La Touche Congreve. Francis was himself one of the very first recipients of the “new” award of the Military Cross in January 1915 [Lot 1, est. £4,000-6,000].

– World War II German Army BMW R35 motorcycle of standard production specification engine block no. 313017 in good restored running order, complete with original brown leather saddlebags [Lot 463, est. £5,000-7,000].

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Zulu War Casualty Medal awarded to Pvt. John Jones, H Company, 1st/24th (Warwickshire)  killed in action at Isandhlwana on Jan. 22, 1879. Estimate: £7,000-£8,000, $11,815-$13,502. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Zulu War Casualty Medal awarded to Pvt. John Jones, H Company, 1st/24th (Warwickshire) killed in action at Isandhlwana on Jan. 22, 1879. Estimate: £7,000-£8,000, $11,815-$13,502. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Restored World War II German Army BMW R35 motorcycle. Estimate: £5,000-£7,000, $8,439-$11,815. A.H. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.
Approximately 45 signatures of World War I and late 19th century Victoria Cross recipients in an album with related newspaper clippings. Estimate: £1,000-£1,200, $1,688-$2,025. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Approximately 45 signatures of World War I and late 19th century Victoria Cross recipients in an album with related newspaper clippings. Estimate: £1,000-£1,200, $1,688-$2,025. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Rare Suffragette WSPU 'Hunger Strike' medal and World War I campaign group of four awarded to London resident Gertrude Lowy, who served as a radiographic assistant in Italy during the war. Estimate: £8,000-£10,000, $13,502-$16,878. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.

Rare Suffragette WSPU ‘Hunger Strike’ medal and World War I campaign group of four awarded to London resident Gertrude Lowy, who served as a radiographic assistant in Italy during the war. Estimate: £8,000-£10,000, $13,502-$16,878. Bladwin & Sons Ltd. image.