One of the tanks from Diane Dever and Jonathan Wright's installation 'Pent Houses,' created for Folkestone Triennial 2014.

VIDEO: UK artist Jonathan Wright gets tanked for Folkestone Triennial

One of the tanks from Diane Dever and Jonathan Wright's installation 'Pent Houses,' created for Folkestone Triennial 2014.

One of the tanks from Diane Dever and Jonathan Wright’s installation ‘Pent Houses,’ created for Folkestone Triennial 2014.

FOLKESTONE, England – Britain’s coolest, edgiest, most innovative public art project, the Folkstone Triennial, will open to the public on Saturday, August 30th and run through Sunday, November 2nd. Held every three years in Folkestone, on the southeastern coast of England, the event invites artists to use the town as their “canvas,” utilizing public spaces to create striking new works that reflect issues affecting both the town and the world beyond.

Some of today’s most imaginative artists are set to take part, including Jonathan Wright, whose long list of awards and distinctions includes a coveted residency at Verbier 3-D Sculpture Park in Switzerland.

At the Folkestone Triennial 2014, visitors will be able to see a series of five sculptures called the Pent Houses, which Wright created in collaboration with Irish-born artist Diane Dever.

Each of the five sculptures is different from the others, and all are based loosely on the water towers that used to be such a common sight above the streets of New York. The sculptures have been placed along the line of the hidden waterways of the Pent Stream, mapping its course under the streets of East Folkestone by placing waters towers above ground. These waterways were the foundation of Folkestone’s past prosperity, creating the harbor which attracted the initial human settlement, and providing not only fresh water to its inhabitants but also, in the post medieval period, a source of power for industrial mills. As a result of the search for building land near the city center, the streams were culverted in the nineteenth century, and today the water flows untapped, unused and unseen from the hills to the outflow at Folkestone Harbour.

In the current climate of increased awareness about the pressures on natural resources and the associated costs, flowing water is once again seen as a precious asset, and in many places canals and urban waterways are being opened up and revitalized as parks or cycle paths. The presence of water increases the value of real estate, wherever in the world: this is the sly allusion made in the punning title Pent Houses.

Pent House 1 is placed near the former public baths and the Silver Spring bottling company. It also carries a Plimsol Line marking – Plimsol is one of Folkestone’s more famous sons. Pent House 2 stands at the site of the bridge over the Pent at the highest tidal point of the stream, the top end of the former harbor. Pent House 5 stands over the outflow of the stream into the present day harbor, and has an audio component.

Dever works across many media and disciplines to explore ideas that lie at the intersections of public, private and liminal space. Her work seeks to provoke insight into how urban space is experienced, quantified, produced and understood. A native Londoner, Wright is fascinated by the fabric of modernity and the mysterious, seemingly functionless structures that surround us in modern society. His constructed works embody the mechanics of a modern society, which he encourages one to look at afresh. Both Dever and Wright live and work in Folkestone.

On Thursday evening, Aug. 28, Wright will be interviewed by BBC Television.

Click to view a video interview with Jonathan Wright and Diane Dever as they prepare their installation:

http://vimeo.com/104527351


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


One of the tanks from Diane Dever and Jonathan Wright's installation 'Pent Houses,' created for Folkestone Triennial 2014.

One of the tanks from Diane Dever and Jonathan Wright’s installation ‘Pent Houses,’ created for Folkestone Triennial 2014.

Jonathan Wright and Diane Dever, discussing their collaborative work 'Pent Houses.'

Jonathan Wright and Diane Dever, discussing their collaborative work ‘Pent Houses.’

The Old State House, constructed between 1833-1842, in Little Rock, Ark., is the oldest surviving state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. It is now a museum. Image by Wasted Time R (talk) at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Old State House to mend Arkansas’ first ladies’ gowns

The Old State House, constructed between 1833-1842, in Little Rock, Ark., is the oldest surviving state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. It is now a museum. Image by Wasted Time R (talk) at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

The Old State House, constructed between 1833-1842, in Little Rock, Ark., is the oldest surviving state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. It is now a museum. Image by Wasted Time R (talk) at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – The exhibition of Arkansas’ first ladies’ gowns at the Old State House Museum is to temporarily close, starting Sept. 7.

The museum said Tuesday that the closure is necessary so the gowns can be assessed for conservation.

In recent weeks, the museum staff noticed some of the garments were deteriorating and two of them were immediately removed from display.

Officials say the assessment will be conducted by Textile Conservation Services, which will work with the museum staff to develop a conservation strategy.

The first ladies’ gowns collection was the first exhibit to showcase Arkansas history at the Old State House Museum, debuting in 1955.

The gowns exhibit opened in 1955 and the oldest dress is from 1889. That gown belonged to Mary Kavanaugh Oldham Eagle, the wife of Gov. James Philip Eagle.

Until the exhibit closes, museum patrons can see 28 of the 30 gowns that make up the display.

Other textile collections curated by the Museum include Civil War flags and quilts sewn by black Arkansans.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-26-14 1819GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Old State House, constructed between 1833-1842, in Little Rock, Ark., is the oldest surviving state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. It is now a museum. Image by Wasted Time R (talk) at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

The Old State House, constructed between 1833-1842, in Little Rock, Ark., is the oldest surviving state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. It is now a museum. Image by Wasted Time R (talk) at en.wikipedia. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

A photo of British novelist and essayist George Orwell and a signed, typed letter. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and PBA Galleries.

India to turn George Orwell’s birthplace into museum

A photo of British novelist and essayist George Orwell and a signed, typed letter. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and PBA Galleries.

A photo of British novelist and essayist George Orwell and a signed, typed letter. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and PBA Galleries.

PATNA, India, (AFP) – India on Thursday began work to restore the dilapidated house where Animal Farm and 1984 author George Orwell was born and turn it into a museum.

Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair on June 25, 1903 in Motihari, a tiny town in the impoverished eastern Indian state of Bihar, near the border with Nepal.

His father, Richard W. Blair, worked at the time as an agent in the opium department of the Indian Civil Service during the height of British rule over the subcontinent.

The family’s simple white colonial bungalow had been left to fall into ruins until the Bihar authorities decided to renovate it in a 6 million rupees ($100,000) project.

“Finally, work on the development of Orwell’s birthplace in Bihar’s Motihari town began,” Bihar’s Art and Culture Minister Vinay Bihari told AFP.

“It will become an asset of our heritage,” he added, saying he hoped it would be a tourist draw.

The Bihar government announced a makeover of the site in 2009, but nothing was done.

Last year, local officials caused consternation among Orwell fans when they said the land attached to the house would be developed in memory of independence hero Mahatma Gandhi.

But on Thursday it emerged that the Gandhi memorial would sit alongside the Orwell museum.

Orwell, who lived in Motihari for a year as a child before leaving for England, wrote admiringly of Gandhi in his 1949 essay Reflections on Gandhi.

But he also criticized his famously spartan lifestyle.

“No doubt alcohol, tobacco and so forth are things that a saint must avoid, but sainthood is also a thing that human beings must avoid,” Orwell wrote.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


A photo of British novelist and essayist George Orwell and a signed, typed letter. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and PBA Galleries.

A photo of British novelist and essayist George Orwell and a signed, typed letter. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and PBA Galleries.

A passport photo showing George Orwell during his time in Burma in the 1920s, when her worked for the British government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

A passport photo showing George Orwell during his time in Burma in the 1920s, when her worked for the British government. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Roman Vishniac (1897-1990), 'Cracow,' gelatin silver print. Photographer's credit backstamp and titled 'Cracow' in Vishniac's hand on verso. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Kestenbaum & Co.

US archive of pre-Holocaust photos to go public

Roman Vishniac (1897-1990), 'Cracow,' gelatin silver print. Photographer's credit backstamp and titled 'Cracow' in Vishniac's hand on verso. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Kestenbaum & Co.

Roman Vishniac (1897-1990), ‘Cracow,’ gelatin silver print. Photographer’s credit backstamp and titled ‘Cracow’ in Vishniac’s hand on verso. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Kestenbaum & Co.

NEW YORK (AP) – A vast U.S. archive of photographs of pre-Holocaust Eastern European Jewish life is being made available to the public and researchers.

The International Center of Photography in New York and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday announced the joint creation of a digital database to facilitate access to photographer Roman Vishniac’s archive.

Vishniac was a Russian-born Jew who moved to Berlin in 1920. He documented the rise of Nazi power and its effect on Jewish life in Central and Eastern Europe.

The International Center of Photography said it believes the project “represents a new model for digital archives” and it’s excited to bring Vishniac’s collection to a wider audience.

“Our shared goal is to make the images available for further identification and research, deepening our knowledge of Vishniac’s work and the people and places he recorded in his images,” said the center’s executive director, Mark Lubell.

The database includes all of Vishniac’s 9,000 negatives, most of which have never before been printed or published.

The photography center and the museum are asking scholars and the public to help identify the people and places depicted in the images.

The Holocaust Memorial Museum’s director of collections, Michael Grunberger, said he hoped Vishniac’s work would inspire new generations to learn more about the late photographer and Holocaust history.

“This project will introduce many people to one of the 20th century’s pre-eminent photographers while greatly increasing our understanding of his subjects,” Grunberger said.

___

Online:

International Center of Photography: http://vishniac.icp.org

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: http://ushmm.org/vishniacg

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-27-14 0116GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Roman Vishniac (1897-1990), 'Cracow,' gelatin silver print. Photographer's credit backstamp and titled 'Cracow' in Vishniac's hand on verso. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Kestenbaum & Co.

Roman Vishniac (1897-1990), ‘Cracow,’ gelatin silver print. Photographer’s credit backstamp and titled ‘Cracow’ in Vishniac’s hand on verso. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and Kestenbaum & Co.

Facades in the downtown historic district of New Harmony, Ind. Image by Timothy K. Hamilton Creativity + Photography. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Archaeology Month to focus on Indiana’s utopian societies

Facades in the downtown historic district of New Harmony, Ind. Image by Timothy K. Hamilton Creativity + Photography. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Facades in the downtown historic district of New Harmony, Ind. Image by Timothy K. Hamilton Creativity + Photography. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – This year’s Indiana Archaeology Month in September will focus on utopian communities that settled in the state.

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology says at least three utopian communities settled in southwestern Indiana in the early 19th century.

A religious group known as the Shakers established the community of Busro or West Union in Knox County. The religious Harmonie Society, also called the Harmonists, and later the secular Owenites formed settlements at New Harmony in Posey County.

The DNR says archaeological investigations have revealed a great deal about how people lived in such communal societies.

A variety of events are held every year by universities, museums, other organizations and individuals for Archaeology Month.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-27-14 0740GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Facades in the downtown historic district of New Harmony, Ind. Image by Timothy K. Hamilton Creativity + Photography. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Facades in the downtown historic district of New Harmony, Ind. Image by Timothy K. Hamilton Creativity + Photography. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Democratic party poster from the 1952 presidential campaign for Adlai Stevenson. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Lincoln library plans Adlai Stevenson family exhibit

Democratic party poster from the 1952 presidential campaign for Adlai Stevenson. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Democratic party poster from the 1952 presidential campaign for Adlai Stevenson. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) – Officials at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum are planning an exhibit featuring former Gov. Adlai Stevenson II and his family’s political dynasty.

The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency has hired a company to create exhibits that could coincide with the 50th anniversary of Stevenson’s death, the (Decatur) Herald & Review reported.

Stevenson’ son, former U.S. Sen. Adlai Stevenson III of Illinois, donated papers, memorabilia and objects that the Evanston-based design firm Teller Madsen will use in the exhibit.

It’s also likely to include information on former Vice President Adlai Stevenson I. He served as the nation’s 23rd vice president in the 1890s.

“The quality of material available for creating an exhibition is very, very high,” said Greg Koos, executive director of the McLean County Museum of History in Bloomington.

Koos said it’s historically important because the Stevenson family played an important role in local, national and international politics.

Stevenson II served one term as the governor of Illinois and four years as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. He also ran for president twice, in 1952 and 1965.

Artifacts for the exhibit could also come from Stevenson collections at Illinois State University and the McLean County Museum of History.

Teller Madsen has put together Stevenson II exhibits at his home near Libertyville. The firm will receive nearly $20,000 for its contract, which runs through the beginning of next year.

The newspaper reports the exhibit’s opening date wasn’t available Monday.

___

Information from: Herald & Review,http://www.herald-review.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-26-14 1844GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Democratic party poster from the 1952 presidential campaign for Adlai Stevenson. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Democratic party poster from the 1952 presidential campaign for Adlai Stevenson. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

'58 Ford Edsel Citation convertible. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and RM Auctions.

‘Edsel King’ clearing 2,300 cars from his North Dakota lot

'58 Ford Edsel Citation convertible. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and RM Auctions.

’58 Ford Edsel Citation convertible. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com Archive and RM Auctions.

BEULAH, N.D. (AP) – After the crushers move out, LeRoy Walker, the “Edsel King,” will be car poorer and cash richer.

For decades, the rural Beulah man has operated a salvage yard tucked out of sight on hills tiered to the level in an old lignite mine north of Beulah.

Today, he has 2,600 vehicles lined up in rows out there in the hills, a neat and orderly operation, as far as salvage yards go.

Just over a week ago, he signed a deal with BF Salvage, of Minot, to crush and remove 2,300 of those vehicles for an amount he says is not the $1 million he’s been offered before, but comes pretty close.

“I’ll invest it and live off the interest,” he figures.

It’s not a bad ending for a man who, since 1957, has made a living buying junked or wrecked vehicles and “parting them out,” as it’s said in the salvage trade, along with repairs.

He loved drag racing, enduro races and demolition derbies, and competed and traveled all over the region and country, the Bismarck Tribune reported.

“It’s been a great life. I’ve seen a lot of places and got to do what I liked,” Walker said. And, he said, the income was good enough. “My stomach didn’t growl much,” he said.

He and the buyer, Tom Boe, went through the yard recently and counted the inventory. A bright orange “S” spray painted on the windshield marks the cars Walker wants left behind.

Those are interesting old collectibles, ones still intact enough to have value, or ones he hopes to still restore himself someday.

And it goes without saying that his collection of 200 Edsels – the largest collection anywhere, he says – isn’t going anywhere.

He’s obsessed with the Edsel, a car only briefly manufactured by Ford Motor Co.

One, a 1958 Edsel Citation convertible, painted its original buttery yellow with chrome and black accents, is beautifully restored and in storage out at his place.

Walker, 73, who’s got a bad hip and other health issues, said a guy called him last week and offered him $50,000 for it. No deal, Walker said. He’s not ready to sell. Not yet. He’s got more miles to go.

He bought his first Edsel in 1962 and his last one just last summer, a ’59 station wagon from a guy in South Dakota. He loves their big steady motors and smooth wide ride.

“A few are still hiding around, but they’re getting pretty scarce,” he said.

Word’s out that Walker’s yard will be cleaned out soon, and he said a lot of people have come through in the past few weeks looking for a certain part or piece, or maybe a whole rig they ought to buy and pull on home before it’s crushed and gone forever.

It’s always been a pretty busy place, between salvage and repair work in his shop. “A lot of people heard about me just word-of-mouth,” he said.

Steve Gowin of Hazen, a customer and friend, said local car club members depend on Walker as quick source for a needed part.

“He’s unique. He’s not only a student of the Ford, but of every car and he’s memorized universally used parts. When you need something, he grabs a 5/8-inch wrench and drives out there and gets it with one wrench. I’d need a whole toolbox and a hammer. I’ve never seen anything like it. He’ll leave a large void there,” Gowin said.

Walker said it will be hard to see some of those cool old Jeeps, Studebakers and Internationals get flattened like a metal pancake and tossed onto a semi.

“But if I sell it to someone to restore, or he takes it and scraps it, what’s the difference? I still get paid,” he said.

He favors old American-made cars himself, the ones still fully metal that weigh 3,700 pounds, compared to late model Chevy Impala that tips the scales at 2,000 pounds.

Boe, the buyer, said the crushed cars will be shipped all over to places like Tennessee and Denver, where they’ll be shredded and shipped to mills to become metal beams and other products.

Boe said it won’t take him long to crush the vehicles – two weeks maybe. “I’ve got a place to haul ’em. I just need the trucks.” He said he’ll use some oil field back hauls to get the metal moved out.

He said scrap metal is still valuable, but not like it was a few years back when China was so heavy into the buy market, and labor and fuel costs eat into his bottom line. “It’s big dollars. I take in a lot of money, but a lot goes out,” he said.

Boe said he’ll leave the salvage yard looking good when he’s done, and Walker says he’ll finally get all of his Edsels in one area, instead of some here and some there on his 37 acres.

Walker doesn’t get around as well as he used to, but he can still work hard and he plans to keep going on his own projects.

“I get up at 7 a.m. and work until 10 p.m. I can still do it, but I run out of gas,” he said.

___

Information from: Bismarck Tribune, http://www.bismarcktribune.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-26-14 2001GMT

 

 

 

The Indiana Bicentennial Train touring the Hoosier state. Indiana Historical Society image.

Bicentennial Train rolling out Indiana history

The Indiana Bicentennial Train touring the Hoosier state. Indiana Historical Society image.

The Indiana Bicentennial Train touring the Hoosier state. Indiana Historical Society image.

COLUMBUS, Ind. (AP) – A new traveling exhibit will make its first stop by rail in Columbus next month leading up to Indiana’s 200th birthday in 2016.

The Indiana Historical Society’s Indiana Bicentennial Train will stop at the Bartholomew County 4-H Fairgrounds from Sept. 18 to 20.

Lynn Lucas, Columbus Area Visitors Center executive director, said the train visit will be great for residents young and old to learn about Indiana’s history.

“Nationally, we see this trend of several generations doing things together. This is a wonderful example of a grandfather taking his grandchildren or mom and dad taking the kids,” she told The Republic. “Even if you’re not from Indiana, and you’re living in the area, why not teach your kids about the area?”

Through the Indiana Historical Society’s extensive visual and archival collections, the free traveling exhibit will consist of Indiana history in the 20th century, Indiana today and what the state might be like in the future.

The exhibit focuses on Indiana’s history in transportation, land use, talent and community and is set up in three of The Next Indiana’s freight cars.

Southside Elementary School teacher Becky Williams said she will be taking her class to check out the exhibit to encourage her students to think about Indiana’s history in a new way.

“For the fifth- and sixth-graders, it will be a review for them and also helps foster that passion for the state,” she said.

“This state has a lot to offer. I keep trying to instill that passion.

“Any time you can offer your kids a hands-on experience, especially with history, I think it is valuable,” she said.

Williams’ students have been learning about Indiana railroads and their effect on the state’s economy in anticipation of the Bicentennial Train’s arrival.

She is encouraging students to prepare questions for a historical interpreter who will talk about Hoosier life over the years.

The train’s visit will incorporate a temporary train depot set up where the public can take part in educational activities, learn about local history and watch performances from historic interpreter Kevin Stonerock as he portrays Daniel Morgan Cook in the year 1916.

The tour is in partnership with the Indiana Rail Road Co. and Norfolk Southern Corp. The Bicentennial Train will travel to Jasper, Terre Haute and Bargersville after its stop in Columbus.

A pop-up market to purchase Indiana and bicentennial-related items from the Indiana Historical Society also will be available. The historical society is sponsoring the traveling exhibit.

Anna Barnett, education manager for the Bartholomew County Historical Society, said the point of the mobile exhibit is to get residents in Bartholomew County excited about their Hoosier heritage.

“I think they’re hoping to teach people about Indiana’s rich history and help people understand what’s made our state so great,” she said. “I think it’s also to help build excitement about the bicentennial. It’s the first bicentennial activity.”

Most of the exhibits will have information about areas throughout the state, but Barnett said there will be information that is just about Bartholomew County.

The Bartholomew County Historical Society and the Yellow Trail Museum will have a joint community tent with hands-on natural history artifacts displays for guests to learn about what life was like in Bartholomew County 200 years ago.

A Bartholomew County Historical Society interpreter will greet the train when it arrives to describe how Bartholomew County changed through the 19th century and to talk about the future.

Guests who visit the Columbus depot will be invited to design a town flag, mark their “Indiana-versary” on a timeline provided by Indiana Humanities and vote for their favorite Hoosier innovation. The Columbus depot tents will contain displays, demonstrations and presentations from local organizations that highlight each community’s offerings and opportunities.

“There are many photographs around the state, including some from Bartholomew County, within the train,” Barnett said. “There will be games and activities for them to learn about our county. There will be opportunities for local organizations like the historical society to have specific things from our county.”

Indiana historian James Madison will be at the Columbus stop in the late afternoon of Sept. 18 to talk about and sign his new book, Hoosiers: A New History of Indiana.

The Next Indiana bicentennial train originally was known as the Indiana History Train and stopped in Columbus in 2004 with a “Faces of Lincoln” exhibit, drawing 2,654 guests, and again in 2006 with “The Faces of the Civil War” exhibit, drawing 2,883 guests.

“We’ve had the train every time it has stopped. They’ve had excellent response from our community,” Barnett said. “Logistically, we have a wonderful place for it. It’s hard to find a place to stop where it doesn’t impede train traffic.”

The Indiana History Train traveled the state of Indiana from 2004 to 2008 before being renamed as the Next Indiana train and launched in 2013.

Since 2004, the train had more than 57,000 guests. In 2013, the train stopped in Kokomo, New Haven, Valparaiso and Delphi and had 13,165 visitors.

___

Information from: The Republic, http://www.therepublic.com/

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-08-26-14 1409GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


The Indiana Bicentennial Train touring the Hoosier state. Indiana Historical Society image.

The Indiana Bicentennial Train touring the Hoosier state. Indiana Historical Society image.

A Carltonware pottery ‘Guinness’ toucan advertising table lamp. The inscription around the base reads: ‘How Grand to be a Toucan, Just think what Toucan can do if he can say as you can Guinness is Good for You.’ The zoo figures lampshade is also original. It sold for £170. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Miscellaneana: Guinness advertising items

A Carltonware pottery ‘Guinness’ toucan advertising table lamp. The inscription around the base reads: ‘How Grand to be a Toucan, Just think what Toucan can do if he can say as you can Guinness is Good for You.’ The zoo figures lampshade is also original. It sold for £170. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

A Carltonware pottery ‘Guinness’ toucan advertising table lamp. The inscription around the base reads: ‘How Grand to be a Toucan, Just think what Toucan can do if he can say as you can Guinness is Good for You.’ The zoo figures lampshade is also original. It sold for £170. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

LONDON – The Business Manager (Mrs. P) went to Dublin and, to coin that well-known t-shirt phrase, all I got was a lousy bar of chocolate. Oh, and a bag of roasted peanuts, although to be fair, both were flavored, oddly enough, with the distinctive taste of the world’s most famous stout. I prefer it out of a glass.

No trip to the fair city would be complete without a visit to Arthur Guinness’ St. James’s Gate brewery. It’s the first stop on the hop on/off tour bus, but it serves the world’s most expensive pint: the 18 euro entry (£14.32, $23.73) gets you a “free” one. Worse still, she felt not enough is made of its history or the great advertising campaigns that put the brand where it is today.

So, by way of redressing the balance, I thought I’d raise a glass in celebration of the raft of Carlton pottery toucan pub lamps, zoo animals, pub jugs and ashtrays we collectors cherish and the man from whose imagination it all sprang: the graphic artist John Gilroy. (1898-1998).

John Thomas Young Gilroy (1898-1985) was born in Whitley Bay on Tyneside into a family of eight children. His father, John William, was a marine landscape painter and technical draughtsman, and by the age of 15, young John was contributing artwork to the local newspaper, the Newcastle Evening Chronicle.

He subsequently won a scholarship to art school at Durham University, but on the outbreak of World War I, he joined the Royal Field Artillery, serving in France, Italy and Palestine.

After the war, Gilroy accepted a place at the Royal College of Art, and after winning several more scholarships to further his education there, he was invited to stay on to teach.

His introduction to Guinness began in 1925, when he joined the advertising agency S.H. Benson Ltd.

Gilroy’s versatility and technical skills were remarkable. He had the ability to flit with ease from intricate pen-and-ink drawings – as featured in the Guinness Doctors’ Christmas books of the 1930s (now highly prized by collectors) – to the expansive canvas of the poster.

He was as happy painting murals as he was greeting cards, but he also had a reputation as an accomplished landscape and portrait painter.

His work was exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy, and his sitters included several members of the Royal Family, Sir Winston Churchill and Rupert Guinness, Lord Iveagh II.

However, Gilroy will be best remembered for his Guinness posters and press advertisements, of which he created well over 100 in a 35-year period.

Among them are two of the most enduring advertising images ever crafted: the “Guinness for Strength” workman casually carrying a steel girder on his head, and the impudent sea lion making off with the zookeeper’s pint in the “My Goodness, my Guinness” poster.

The inherent humor was, of course, achieved by simple exaggeration: after supping a glass of Guinness, you could apparently lift huge metal girders, pull a horse along in a cart or chop down a tree with the single blow of an ax.

The antics of the harassed zookeeper and his mischievous charges are said to have been inspired by a visit Gilroy made to a Bertram Mills Circus in Olympia, although his sketches and studies of the various animals were made at London Zoo.

The red-faced mustachioed zookeeper was apparently a caricature of the artist himself.

The first poster in the highly sucessful campaign was launched in 1935, and featured a sea lion making off with a pint of Guinness perched on its nose.

It provided the basis for innumerable variants which saw the hapless keeper pitting his wits against kangaroos, ostriches, pelicans, gnus and lions, all determined to hijack his precious pint.

An interview for Guinness Time, the company’s house magazine, which appeared in 1952, gave an insight into Gilroy’s humor.

He said: “The hoardings are the Museum of the Masses. They hoard the art treasures of the man in the street. But the man in the street is usually in a hurry to catch a bus or to avoid being caught by a bus; he has no time for contemplation.

“My posters, therefore, are a kind of aesthetic meal in a minute. A man may whizz by on a motorbike or in a Black Maria and yet absorb one of my posters. Why? Because my posters are like a certain self-made man – they have no background.”

For pottery manufacturer Carlton, the opportunity to immortalize Gilroy’s characters was heaven sent. The pottery was established in 1890 following the partnership forged between James Frederick Wiltshaw and J.A. and H.T. Robinson.

The business began producing decorative earthenware at their factory, the Carlton Works in Copeland Street, Stoke-on-Trent.

The firm was first registered in 1893 and the trade name Carlton Ware was adopted in the following year. However, it went into receivership in 1931 and merged with Birks, Rawlins & Co. Ltd. the following year.

Renamed Carlton Ware in 1957, the firm was purchased first by Arthur Wood & Son (Longport) in 1966 and then by County Potteries in 1987, going into voluntary liquidation in 1991.

The name then remained dormant until 1997 when Francis Joseph acquired it together with a small number of molds and a few preproduction models, which continue to be made.

Guinness turned to Carlton in 1955 and the Toucan bar lamp was the first of a steady stream of figures and model groups to roll off the production line.

Today, the lamp changes hands for up to £500 … if it’s genuine. Fakes of the same thing, priced around £75-£100, are in truth worthless. The giveaway is the fake has no hole in the bird’s head for the light fitting, while the frothy head on the pint of Guinness is much shallower than the original.

The drayman pulling his horse and its cart is one of the rarest Carlton figures, but again fakes are commonplace. The original has a small figure of a ladybird climbing up the side of the cart, but not the fake.

Fake zoo figures include the ostrich, which has a white face and a black lump in its throat where the glass is lodged – both should be pink; the tortoise with a froth-free glass on its back and a missing foot; and the penguin, which lacks the ”Draught Guinness” lettering on its chest and the wrong color beak and eyes.

So be careful out there.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


A Carltonware pottery ‘Guinness’ toucan advertising table lamp. The inscription around the base reads: ‘How Grand to be a Toucan, Just think what Toucan can do if he can say as you can Guinness is Good for You.’ The zoo figures lampshade is also original. It sold for £170. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

A Carltonware pottery ‘Guinness’ toucan advertising table lamp. The inscription around the base reads: ‘How Grand to be a Toucan, Just think what Toucan can do if he can say as you can Guinness is Good for You.’ The zoo figures lampshade is also original. It sold for £170. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Guinness For Strength, as proved by this drayman capable of pulling his own cart with its horse as a passenger. Note the ladybird on the back of the cart. Made in about 1957, it sold for £260. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Guinness For Strength, as proved by this drayman capable of pulling his own cart with its horse as a passenger. Note the ladybird on the back of the cart. Made in about 1957, it sold for £260. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Left, a Carltonware pottery three-piece Guinness advertising condiment set decorated with the toucan and worded in orange ‘My Goodness – My Guinness,’ next to a matching stilton cheese dish and cover. The pink luster plates are worded ‘Oh Lovely Guinness! Oh Guinness My Love, What a Wonderful Guinness You Are!’ As an auction lot, they would be estimated at £150-200. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Left, a Carltonware pottery three-piece Guinness advertising condiment set decorated with the toucan and worded in orange ‘My Goodness – My Guinness,’ next to a matching stilton cheese dish and cover. The pink luster plates are worded ‘Oh Lovely Guinness! Oh Guinness My Love, What a Wonderful Guinness You Are!’ As an auction lot, they would be estimated at £150-200. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

A collection of six Carltonware pottery Guinness ‘Zoo Series’ figures. They sold for £190. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

A collection of six Carltonware pottery Guinness ‘Zoo Series’ figures. They sold for £190. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

The Guinness Storehouse museum in St. James’s Gate does have a display of original Gilroy poster artwork. This is how Gilroy’s famous ‘Girder Man’ was conceived.

The Guinness Storehouse museum in St. James’s Gate does have a display of original Gilroy poster artwork. This is how Gilroy’s famous ‘Girder Man’ was conceived.

The Guinness Storehouse museum in St. James’s Gate does have a display of original Gilroy poster artwork. This is how Gilroy’s famous ‘Girder Man’ was conceived.

The Guinness Storehouse museum in St. James’s Gate does have a display of original Gilroy poster artwork. This is how Gilroy’s famous ‘Girder Man’ was conceived.

Naturally being an Irish pottery manufacturer, Wade was quick to get in on the act, producing a series of Guinness advertising whimsies. This group of four sold for £40. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Naturally being an Irish pottery manufacturer, Wade was quick to get in on the act, producing a series of Guinness advertising whimsies. This group of four sold for £40. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

All manner of Guinness memorabilia abounds to delight collectors. This lot comprised two sets of six ‘Zookeeper Series’ waistcoat buttons, two pocket watches, lapel badges and an ingenious toastmaster’s gavel, which sold together for £130. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

All manner of Guinness memorabilia abounds to delight collectors. This lot comprised two sets of six ‘Zookeeper Series’ waistcoat buttons, two pocket watches, lapel badges and an ingenious toastmaster’s gavel, which sold together for £130. Photo: The Canterbury Auction Galleries.

Large Chinese cloisonne enamel charger. I.M. Chait image.

Asian art, antiques highlight I.M. Chait auction Sept. 7

Large Chinese cloisonne enamel charger. I.M. Chait image.

Large Chinese cloisonne enamel charger. I.M. Chait image.

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – I.M. Chait Gallery / Auctioneers will conduct an Asian arts and antiques auction Sunday, Sept. 7. The auction will begin at 11 a.m. Pacific. LiveAuctioneers.com will provide Internet live bidding for the 550-lot sale.

The auction will feature:

– Numerous snuff bottles including glass, hardstone and jade etc. from a Northern California collection;

– Chinese porcelains including “eggshell,” Famille Rose, monochrome glazes etc. from local collections;

– Numerous Chinese cloisonne enamel vessels and covered boxes from a Nevada collection;

– Chinese ink and color scrolls, including landscapes, figures, flowers, etc. from various collections;

– Large group of various carved wood African masks;

– Numerous Neolithic and early Chinese pottery from the Tom D. Williams collection of Indianapolis, Ind.

For details contact I.M. Chait Gallery / Auctioneers, email chait@chait.com or phone 310-285-0182.

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.

I.M. Chait image.