Plantation house at Carter's Grove near Williamsburg, Va. Image by Melissa Wilkins. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Historic Va. plantation sold to Chicago businessman

Plantation house at Carter's Grove near Williamsburg, Va. Image by Melissa Wilkins. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Plantation house at Carter’s Grove near Williamsburg, Va. Image by Melissa Wilkins. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Carter’s Grove, a Virginia plantation with ties to the earliest English settlers, has been sold for $7.2 million to a Chicago businessman and preservationist, according to Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

The sale to Samuel M. Mencoff includes the 18,700-square-foot mansion, 400 acres with a commanding view of the James River and 76 adjoining acres, according to the foundation that operates Colonial Williamsburg. The property is 8 miles southeast of Williamsburg.

Mencoff, who did not immediately return a telephone message left by The Associated Press, is a respected preservationist who has restored properties in the Midwest and in Newport, R.I., the foundation said.

“Sam Mencoff is superbly qualified to be the steward of this important property,” Colin G. Campbell, president and chief executive officer of the foundation, said in a statement.

The Rockefeller Foundation donated the property to Colonial Williamsburg in 1969 and it was open to tourists until 2003.

In 2007, Halsey Minor, a dot-com entrepreneur from Charlottesville, purchased Carter’s Grove for $15.3 million. He planned to live there and use the property and its stables as a thoroughbred horse farm. But Minor lost his riches in the recession and he never lived at Carter’s Grove. He filed for personal bankruptcy in 2013.

Carter’s Grove was put up for auction in May. Only the foundation submitted a bid. Hours later, it said it would put the property on the market.

The property was first settled by English colonists in the early 1600s, and is only miles from Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement. Digs on the property have also found evidence of strong links to native populations.

The mansion, which is considered one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the nation, was built in 1755. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Mencoff purchased Carter’s Grover under a Delaware limited liability company, Carter’s Grove Associates LLC.

In a statement provided by the foundation, Mencoff called Carter’s Grove a treasure “chronicling the history of the New World.”

“My team and I look forward to working closely with Colonial Williamsburg to preserve this important piece of our national heritage for generations to come,” Mencoff said.

A conservation easement protects the plantation’s historic and archaeological resources in perpetuity.

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Steve Szkotak can be reached on Twitter at http://twitter.com/sszkotakap .

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-19-14 1658GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Plantation house at Carter's Grove near Williamsburg, Va. Image by Melissa Wilkins. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Plantation house at Carter’s Grove near Williamsburg, Va. Image by Melissa Wilkins. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Frank Wilbert Stokes (American, 1858-1955), oil-on-canvas laid to board, Dirigible Norge on its historic 1926 flight over the North Pole, 11 5/8 x 15 5/8 inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

N.J. regional fine art collection headlines Sterling’s Oct. 15 auction

Frank Wilbert Stokes (American, 1858-1955), oil-on-canvas laid to board, Dirigible Norge on its historic 1926 flight over the North Pole, 11 5/8 x 15 5/8 inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

Frank Wilbert Stokes (American, 1858-1955), oil-on-canvas laid to board, Dirigible Norge on its historic 1926 flight over the North Pole, 11 5/8 x 15 5/8 inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

CLOSTER, N.J. – Collectors are constantly on the lookout for artworks that are genuinely fresh to the market. Sterling Associates of Bergen County, New Jersey, will answer the marketplace call for new discoveries on Wednesday, Oct. 15 with a 550-lot Fine Art Auction sourced primarily from a single-owner collection. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

Approximately 450 of the paintings to be offered are from Frank (“Ted”) Davis, a long-time New Jersey resident who has decided to downsize his holdings. An additional 100 artworks have been consigned to the sale by other collectors from the New Jersey/New York/Connecticut tri-state area.

“Because Mr. Davis has lived in New Jersey for so many years, he has a fondness for our regional art and the scenery it depicts,” said Sterling Associates’ owner, Stephen D’Atri. “But his collection goes well beyond his own generation. He built onto an already existing family collection of quality art. Most of the works are 20th century, including some from the early 1900s, but the majority would be classified as contemporary.”

In addition to paintings, the auction selection includes bronzes and other sculptures. Among the sculptors represented are three leading lights of 19th- and early 20th-century France: Auguste Moreau (1834-1917), Pierre-Jules Mene (1810-1879) and Emmanuel Fremiet (1824-1910). A highlight is Mene’s lively bronze sculpture titled “Arab Falconer.” Standing 31 inches high by 28 inches wide, the tableau consists of the title figure on a trotting horse, his right arm aloft with a falcon perched on his hand.

The top lot of the sale, Lot 361, is not a sculpture, but an 8½- by 12-inch (sight) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) etching titled “Two Sculptors Before a Statue.” From the Vollard Suite, it is artist-signed at the bottom and has two documented watermarks.

Among the featured American paintings is an artist-signed Emile Albert Gruppe (1896-1978) impressionistic winter marine landscape. The 9½- by 11½-inch oil on board depicts boats in a harbor flanked by snow-capped houses and other buildings.

Another American highlight is “It’s Pretty Far,” an oil-on-canvas by the accomplished and well-exhibited East Coast artist Nathalie Vogel (b. 1980-), who is known for her “liquid women.” The featured work measures 48 by 66 inches and depicts a nude female in a relaxed pose near an ocean shoreline.

Former book and magazine illustrator Walter Rane’s (b. 1949-) “Linseed Oil and Spirits” showcases the American artist’s exceptional gift for light and composition. The 14- by 24-inch oil on board brings to life a table filled with the artist’s tools – brushes in containers, bottles of cleaning solution, a casually placed cotton rag, etc.

A vibrant oil on canvas by H. Gordon Wang (Chinese/Canadian, 1959-) depicts a garden setting with profusely flowering shrubs and white wicker furniture beneath a pergola. As suggested by the title – “Tea Time” – the table is set with a teapot and cups, as though awaiting guests on a lazy summer afternoon. The signed work measures 29½ by 39½ inches.

The centerpiece of the sale is a collection of six paintings by Frank Wilbert (F.W.) Stokes (1858-1955). An American artist who studied under Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Stokes perfected his technique in Paris at L’Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux-Arts, Academie Colarossi and Academie Julian. Both classically trained and a master impressionist, he developed a specialty in arctic and Antarctic scenes, which he painted from first-hand experience during the numerous historical polar expeditions in which he took part, from 1886 through 1926. A number of Stokes paintings are held in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s collection.

Among the Stokes artworks to be auctioned is an oil-on-canvas laid to board whose subject is the Dirigible Norge on its headline-making 1926 flight over the North Pole, with heavily clad figures looking on from a frigid landscape. It measures 11 5/8 inches by 15 5/8 inches. A second Stokes auction selection is an arctic land- and seascape, signed at bottom left and measuring 14 by 9¼ inches.

Adding to their already considerable cachet, the Stokes polar-expedition paintings are accompanied by fascinating written provenance from the Stokes family: copies of letters sent to F.W. Stokes by Admiral Richard E. Byrd, and an Acting Secretary of the Smithsonian. The original letters were written during the timeframe 1926 through 1930.

“We’re very pleased to have such a fine selection of art available for our October 15th auction. The quality is excellent throughout,” said D’Atri. “And it’s especially exciting to be able to offer the Stokes paintings. There’s so much interest worldwide in the early polar expeditions, but there are very few opportunities to acquire art related to any of those milestone expeditions, especially by an artist who was there in person.”

There are many ways to participate in Sterling Associates’ October 15, 2014 Auction, but the company conducts its auctions a bit differently than most.

“All bidding is conducted remotely, but we’re very much a permanent brick-and-mortar company where anyone can come in to inspect the goods,” said D’Atri. “It will be run exactly like a live auction, but without a live audience.”

The Wednesday, Oct. 15 auction will commence at 5 p.m. Eastern Time. The live gallery preview is from 10-3 on Oct. 8, 9, 10 and 13, 14, 15; or by appointment. The gallery is located at 70 Herbert Ave., Closter, NJ 07624. Bidders may participate live online or absentee through LiveAuctioneers.com.

For additional information on any item in the auction or to reserve a phone line, call 201-768-1140 or e-mail sterlingauction@optimum.net.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

#   #   #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


Frank Wilbert Stokes (American, 1858-1955), oil-on-canvas laid to board, Dirigible Norge on its historic 1926 flight over the North Pole, 11 5/8 x 15 5/8 inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

Frank Wilbert Stokes (American, 1858-1955), oil-on-canvas laid to board, Dirigible Norge on its historic 1926 flight over the North Pole, 11 5/8 x 15 5/8 inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

Frank Wilbert Stokes (American, 1858-1955), oil on canvas, Arctic land/seascape, SLL, 14 x 9¼ inches (sight). Sterling Associates image
Pierre-Jules Mene (French, 1810-1879), ‘Arab Falconer,’ patinated bronze sculpture, signed ‘PJ Mene,’ 31 inches high by 28 inches wide. Sterling Associates image

Pierre-Jules Mene (French, 1810-1879), ‘Arab Falconer,’ patinated bronze sculpture, signed ‘PJ Mene,’ 31 inches high by 28 inches wide. Sterling Associates image

Nathalie Vogel (American, b. 1980-), ‘It’s Pretty Far,’ oil on canvas, 48 x 66 inches. Sterling Associates image

Nathalie Vogel (American, b. 1980-), ‘It’s Pretty Far,’ oil on canvas, 48 x 66 inches. Sterling Associates image

H. Gordon Wang (Chinese/Canadian, b. 1959-), ‘Tea time,’ oil on canvas, SLL, 29½ x 39½ inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

H. Gordon Wang (Chinese/Canadian, b. 1959-), ‘Tea time,’ oil on canvas, SLL, 29½ x 39½ inches (sight). Sterling Associates image

Emile Albert Gruppe (American, 1896-1978), winter landscape, oil on board, SLL, 9½ x 11½ inches. Sterling Associates image

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981 tecnica mista su tela, bastoni, bottiglie e tubi al neon, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Il mercato dell’arte in Italia: Mario Merz a Londra

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981 tecnica mista su tela, bastoni, bottiglie e tubi al neon, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981 tecnica mista su tela, bastoni, bottiglie e tubi al neon, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

LONDRA – Dal 26 settembre all’8 novembre la galleria Pace di Londra dedica una mostra a Mario Merz, realizzata in collaborazione con la Fondazione Merz di Torino, con opere dagli anni ’60 al 2003, anno della scomparsa dell’artista. È la prima a Londra da 20 anni a questa parte. Per l’occasione Pace pubblica anche un catalogo con le opere in mostra e materiali d’archivio. Auction Central News ha intervistato al riguardo Tamara Corm, direttrice da Pace a Londra.

Come mai avete deciso di dedicare una mostra a Mario Merz?

Mario Merz non ha avuto una mostra in Gran Bretagna per più di venti anni. Era tempo di riportarlo a Londra. Stiamo lavorando a stretto contatto con la Fondazione Merz per mettere in piedi questa mostra ed è un onore lavorare con loro. Abbiamo incontrato Beatrice Merz e c’era l’opportunità e il bisogno di una mostra di Mario Merz a Londra – dal punto di vista storico, estetico e commerciale.

Come mai non c’è stata una mostra di Merz a Londra per così tanti anni?

È difficile da dire, ma c’è sicuramente una rinascita dell’Arte Povera in questo momento grazie alla recente dOCUMENTA (13), curata da Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, una degli esperti di Arte Povera, poi la mostra di Giuseppe Penone a Versailles, ecc. Noi stiamo organizzando una piccola retrospettiva alla nostra galleria al 6 di Burlington Gardens, nel cuore di Mayfair, visitata dalla maggior parte dei collezionisti.

Ci può dire di più dell’ultima mostra a Londra nel 1993?

Era la mostra di Anthony d’Offay, presentata nel 1993 quando Merz era ancora vivo. Come la nostra mostra, presentava un igloo. La nostra esposizione presenta un igloo tripla che è l’ultimo realizzato e combina tutti gli elementi del linguaggio artistico di Merz. Merz ha iniziato a costruire igloo nel 1968 utilizzando una varietà di materiali, e questo in particolare unisce molti di questi oggetti naturali e industriali – per esempio metallo, neon, morsetti, argilla, vetro e pietra – nella sua struttura tripartita.

Com’è nata la collaborazione con la Fondazione Merz?

Abbiamo annunciato la collaborazione con la Fondazione Merz a Frieze l’anno scorso e ora stiamo allestendo questa piccola retrospettiva. Beatrice Merz sta supervisionando questa mostra con noi e siamo lieti che stia accadendo. Per ora ci stiamo concentrando su questa mostra che coinciderà con Frieze Art Fair e Frieze Masters – e parteciperemo a entrambe le fiere quest’anno.

Le opere in mostra saranno in vendita? Qual è il price range?

Sì, assolutamente. I prezzi sono su richiesta.

Qual è la provenienza delle opere?

Prevalentemente collezioni private europee e americane e anche dalla collezione Merz.

Come si è sviluppato il mercato di Merz negli ultimi anni?

È un buon momento per l’Arte Povera. Mario Merz è il padre fondatore, il punto di riferimento, quindi ha senso per noi mostrare le sue opere. Siamo conosciuti per la qualità museale delle nostre mostre e questa è una di esse. Merz ha avuto impatto su molti altri artisti di oggi, su coloro che hanno continuato il movimento dell’Arte Povera, e altri ancora.

E rispetto agli altri rappresentanti dell’Arte Povera?

Mario Merz è ancora sottovalutato. Per quanto concerne gli altri artisti dell’Arte Povera, è difficile a dirsi.

Quali sono le opere più richieste e perché?

Gli igloo e i Fibonacci sono i pezzi salienti di questa mostra perché colpiscono l’immaginario di tutti. C’è molta richiesta al riguardo. È interessante notare che in questa mostra sono incluse anche sculture e opere su carta che esprimono alcuni dei suoi motivi più duraturi. La mostra è su entrambi i piani della galleria con molto da scoprire o riscoprire.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981 tecnica mista su tela, bastoni, bottiglie e tubi al neon, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981 tecnica mista su tela, bastoni, bottiglie e tubi al neon, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Spostamenti della terra e della luna sull'asse,’ 2003 triplo igloo, tubi di metallo, vetro, pietra, neon, morsetti, argilla. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Spostamenti della terra e della luna sull’asse,’ 2003 triplo igloo, tubi di metallo, vetro, pietra, neon, morsetti, argilla. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Piume sulle tavole,’ 1991 dipinto su tela, neon, argilla, 295 x 780 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Piume sulle tavole,’ 1991 dipinto su tela, neon, argilla, 295 x 780 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1970. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1970. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1973. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1973. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981 tecnica mista su tela, bastoni, bottiglie e tubi al neon, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Art Market Italy: Mario Merz in London

Mario Merz, 'Igloo con vortice,' 1981, mixed media on canvas, sticks, bottles and neon tube, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981, mixed media on canvas, sticks, bottles and neon tube, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

LONDON – From Sept. 26 to Nov. 8, Pace Gallery in London dedicates an exhibition to Italian artist Mario Merz. The show, staged in collaboration with the Fondazione Merz in Turin, includes works from the 1960s to 2003, when the Arte Povera artist died. It is the first Merz exhibition in London for more than 20 years. For the occasion, Pace also publishes a catalog of the works on display and archival materials. Auction Central News spoke about it with Tamara Corm, director at Pace London.

How did it come that you decided to dedicate an exhibition to Mario Merz?

Mario Merz hasn’t had a UK private gallery exhibition in over 20 years. It was time to bring him back to London. We’re working closely with the Merz Foundation to stage this exhibition and it’s an honor to work with the foundation. We met Beatrice Merz and there was an opportunity and a need for a Mario Merz show in London, historically, aesthetically and commercially.

How did it come that Merz has not had an exhibition in London for so many years?

It’s hard to say but there’s definitely a resurgence of Arte Povera right now with the recent dOCUMENTA (13) curated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, one of the experts on Arte Povera, Giuseppe Penone’s exhibition at Versailles etc. We’re staging a small retrospective at our gallery at 6 Burlington Gardens, in the heart of Mayfair where most of the collectors come.

Can you tell us more about his last exhibition in London in 1993?

It was Anthony d’Offay’s exhibition, presented in 1993, and Merz was still alive. Like our exhibition, his featured one igloo. Our exhibition features a triple igloo, which is the last ever made, and it combines all the elements from Merz’s artistic language. Merz began constructing igloos in 1968 using a variety of materials, and this particular one combines many of these earthen and industrial objects—metal rods, neon, clamps, clay, glass and stone—in its tripartite structure.

How was the collaboration with the Merz Foundation born?

We announced the collaboration with the Merz Foundation at Frieze last year and we’re now staging this small retrospective. Beatrice Merz is supervising this exhibition with us and we’re delighted it’s happening. Right now, we’re focusing on this show, which will coincide with Frieze Art Fair and Frieze Masters – we’ll be at both fairs this year.

Are the works on show for sale? What is the price range of the works?

Yes, it’s a selling exhibition for sure. Any interested clients should get in touch with us regarding prices.

What is the provenance of the works?

Mainly European and American private collections as well as the from the Merz Collection.

How has Merz’s market developed in the last years?

It’s a good moment for Arte Povera. Mario Merz is the founding father, the reference so it makes sense for us to show his works. We’re known for museum-quality exhibition and this is one of them. He had an impact on so many other artists today, on those who continued the Arte Povera movement, and on many others.

And in comparison to the other representatives of Arte Povera?

Mario Merz is still undervalued. As far as other Arte Povera artists, it’s hard to say.

Which are the most requested works and why?

The igloos and the Fibonacci are highlights of this exhibition because they strike something in everyone’s mind. People ask a lot about them. It’s interesting to note in this exhibition that sculptures and works on paper that express some of his most enduring motifs are also included. The show is on both floors of the gallery so plenty to discover or rediscover.


ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Mario Merz, 'Igloo con vortice,' 1981, mixed media on canvas, sticks, bottles and neon tube, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Igloo con vortice,’ 1981, mixed media on canvas, sticks, bottles and neon tube, 280 x 270 x 50 cm. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Piume sulle tavole,’ 1991, paint on canvas, neon, clay 295 x 780 cm overall. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, ‘Piume sulle tavole,’ 1991, paint on canvas, neon, clay 295 x 780 cm overall. Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1970, Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1970, Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1973, Courtesy Pace London.

Mario Merz, 1973, Courtesy Pace London.

1951 Ford Country Squire “Woody” station wagon. Morphy Auctions image

Morphy’s Classic & Collectible Car Auction debut set for Oct. 11

1951 Ford Country Squire “Woody” station wagon. Morphy Auctions image

1951 Ford Country Squire “Woody” station wagon. Morphy Auctions image

DENVER, Pa. – Classic car buffs have yet another compelling reason to visit Pennsylvania in October, traditionally a month for automobile shows, swap meets and country cruises amid spectacular fall foliage. A week after the Fall Carlisle show concludes, and on the closing day of the Antique Automobile Club of America’s Eastern Regional Fall Meet 2014 in Hershey, Morphy’s will conduct its first-ever Classic and Collectible Automobile Auction. Internet live bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers.

The Oct. 11 event, which will be held at Morphy’s headquarters in Denver, Pa., will usher in a new era for the Lancaster County-based company. The sale will feature a superb boutique selection of fully vetted, premium-quality motor vehicles, spanning a timeline that starts with luxury cars of the Art Deco era and concludes with trendy muscle cars of the 1960s.

“We’ve taken a different approach with our Classic Car auctions,” said Morphy’s founder and CEO Dan Morphy. “Rather than conducting large-scale car auctions on a monthly basis, we decided to focus on just the cream of the crop – a smaller number of cars that are fresh to the market and truly qualify as ‘special.’”

One of the top prizes in the auction is a 1953 Corvette, #44 of the 300 models that left Chevrolet’s Flint, Michigan factory in the all-American sports car’s inaugural year. Dressed in Polo White with red interior, the classy convertible has been in the hands of its current owner for the past 44 years and underwent a fully documented concourse restoration at the esteemed Tony’s Corvette Shop in Gaithersburg, Maryland. A well-pampered vehicle, it has clocked only 45,000 miles on its odometer.

Another coveted Corvette in the sale is a 1967 model in Sunfire Yellow with black vinyl interior. Perhaps the finest 1967 big-block, air-conditioned survivor of its type, this ’vette has a powerful 427-cubic-inch, 390-horsepower engine. With only 40,000 miles, the factory red-line-tire car retains nearly all of its original components.

Also manufactured in 1967 – a banner year for American classics – a Ford Mustang GTA 2+2 Fastback introduced a longer, wider coupe design that rendered a sleek look of motion while standing still. One of fewer than 1,000 GT 2+2s in Candy Apple Red, it boasts a 289 8-cylinder engine and all the bells and whistles collectors desire. Sold new for less than $4,000, this eye-grabbing beauty is worth more than 10 times that amount today.

Turning back the clock to the 1950s, Morphy’s will start the decade with a restored ’51 Ford Country Squire “Woody.” Just add surfboard! The two-door wagon features many components designed for ultimate pleasure driving. It has a modern LT1 engine, 3:70 locking gears, 4L6OE transmission, headers and a Fatman front end. Of course, it has a powerful air-conditioning system for keeping cool on hot summer days.

One of the greatest gifts ever to arrive on U.S. shores from England – other than the Beatles – was the 1952 Jaguar XK120. Although the XK120 had a mere six-year production run, it foretold the future for Jaguar and blazed the trail for other sporty Jags that would follow, including the legendary XKE (E-Type). The XK120 in Morphy’s sale, one of only 12,000 made, is an exquisite survivor. With a stunning silver-finished exterior, black canvas top and red English leather interior, the roadster stands the test of time and remains an elite acquisition for any classic-car collection, with current values nearing the six-figure mark.

Among collectible pickup trucks, few models are more desirable than those produced by Chevrolet in the early 1950s. Morphy’s will offer a 1953 Chevy pickup with the “Advanced Design” front end that was available only from 1947 through 1955. The ’53 also represented the final year for the 216-cubic-inch inline 6-cylinder engine. Everything about this meticulously restored investment vehicle spells “” It looks just as it would have on the day it left Chevrolet’s Van Nuys, California assembly line.

Last among the highlight cars from the fabulous ’50s is a 1955 Porsche Speedster, one of fewer than 1,200 believed to have been made in 1954 and ’55, combined, for Europe and the USA. Impeccably restored in classic black, with matching top and interior, the showpiece Speedster in Morphy’s sale has traveled less than 50,000 miles. An iconic convertible with the sleekest design of its decade, the Porsche Speedster has enjoyed a cult following since the day of its release, and the one to be auctioned is as pristine as any available in today’s marketplace.

Nothing says “quality” like the name Ferrari, and Morphy’s premiere automotive auction will offer just that level of perfection in the form of a red 1987 Ferrari Testarossa. The Pininfarina-designed sports car – the successor to the Ferrari Belinetta Boxer – has a 12-cylinder mid-engine and rear-wheel-drive layout that keeps the center of gravity in the middle of the car, thereby increasing stability and improving the car’s cornering ability.

Dan Morphy noted that each car accepted for the October 11th auction was vetted, top to bottom, by Tom Hathazy, a highly experienced automotive professional who heads Morphy’s Classic Car division.

“We’re very proud of the entries in our October 11th auction premiere and believe the event will be an exciting start for our newest division,” said Morphy. “We’re not changing the way we do business – quite the contrary. We’re taking the same marketing expertise and customer service that we’ve developed over the past ten years and applying it to classic cars. It’s a more personal approach, and we believe both consignors and bidders will respond very positively to this method.”

The auction will begin at 12 noon Eastern Time. For additional information on any car in the sale, call 717-335-3435 or email info@morphyauctions.com.

View the fully illustrated catalog and sign up to bid absentee or live via the Internet at www.LiveAuctioneers.com.

# # #

View the fully illustrated catalog and register to bid absentee or live via the Internet as the sale is taking place by logging on to www.LiveAuctioneers.com.


ADDITIONAL LOTS OF NOTE


1951 Ford Country Squire “Woody” station wagon. Morphy Auctions image

 

1951 Ford Country Squire “Woody” station wagon. Morphy Auctions image

1953 Chevrolet Corvette convertible, Polo White with red interior. Morphy Auctions image

1953 Chevrolet Corvette convertible, Polo White with red interior. Morphy Auctions image

1967 Corvette, Sunfire Yellow with black vinyl interior, 427 big-block engine. Morphy Auctions image

1967 Corvette, Sunfire Yellow with black vinyl interior, 427 big-block engine. Morphy Auctions image

1967 Ford Mustang GTA 2+2 Fastback, 289 8-cylinder engine. Morphy Auctions image

 

1967 Ford Mustang GTA 2+2 Fastback, 289 8-cylinder engine. Morphy Auctions image

1953 Chevrolet pickup truck, 216-cubic-inch inline 6-cylinder engine. Morphy Auctions image

1953 Chevrolet pickup truck, 216-cubic-inch inline 6-cylinder engine. Morphy Auctions image

1955 Porsche Speedster convertible. Morphy Auctions image

 

1955 Porsche Speedster convertible. Morphy Auctions image

1952 Jaguar XK120, silver-finished exterior, black canvas top and red English leather interior. Morphy Auctions image

 

1952 Jaguar XK120, silver-finished exterior, black canvas top and red English leather interior. Morphy Auctions image

 

David Bowie, photographed during the 1987 Glass Spider Tour. Photo by Elmar J. Lordemann, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0-de via Wikimedia Commons

Chicago museum only US site for David Bowie exhibit

David Bowie, photographed during the 1987 Glass Spider Tour. Photo by Elmar J. Lordemann, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0-de via Wikimedia Commons

David Bowie, photographed during the 1987 Glass Spider Tour. Photo by Elmar J. Lordemann, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0-de via Wikimedia Commons

CHICAGO (AP) – An art exhibition chronicling the five-decade career of musician David Bowie opens Tuesday at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, the only U.S. stop on its schedule.

“David Bowie is” features more than 400 items including photography, album artwork, handwritten lyrics, original fashions, set designs and rare performance material.

Bowie, one of music’s great chameleons, has adopted and discarded personas as he moved through musical styles during his career – from folk-rock to glam to soul to electronica.

The exhibit includes body suits Bowie wore as “Ziggy Stardust” and the Union Jack coat that he and the late fashion designer Alexander McQueen made for the Earthling album cover in 1997.

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London organized the exhibit, which runs in Chicago through Jan. 4. The exhibition previously was shown in London, Toronto, Sao Paulo and Berlin. After Chicago, it travels to Paris, the Netherlands and Melbourne, Australia.

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Online: http://www2.mcachicago.org/exhibition/david-bowie-is/

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-09-23-14 0004GMT


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


David Bowie, photographed during the 1987 Glass Spider Tour. Photo by Elmar J. Lordemann, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0-de via Wikimedia Commons

David Bowie, photographed during the 1987 Glass Spider Tour. Photo by Elmar J. Lordemann, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0-de via Wikimedia Commons

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother.' Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dorothea Lange photos on display at Fenimore Art Museum

Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother.' Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dorothea Lange’s ‘Migrant Mother.’ Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) – Iconic images from the Great Depression are on display in a Cooperstown museum’s exhibit featuring the work of a prominent American photographer.

More than 50 photographs taken by Dorothea Lange during the 1930s are on display at the Fenimore Art Museum through the end of the year.

Lange’s black-and-white photos of migrant workers, destitute farm families and Dust Bowl life have become part of the nation’s collective imagery of the Depression. Her work led to her employment with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Farm Security Administration, which hired photographers to document the struggles facing millions of Americans in rural areas.

Michelle Murdock, the museum’s director of exhibitions, will give a lecture on the exhibit on Wednesday.

The exhibit, titled “Dorothea Lange’s America,” runs through Dec. 31.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Dorothea Lange's 'Migrant Mother.' Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dorothea Lange’s ‘Migrant Mother.’ Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dorothea Lange, with Graflex camera in hand, in California. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Dorothea Lange, with Graflex camera in hand, in California. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Charioteer removed from Minn. Capitol to be restored

Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) – The golden sculpture atop Minnesota’s Capitol is temporarily losing a defining feature.

Crews used a crane Tuesday to remove the charioteer that is symbolically steering the golden horses. The figure that is part of the Quadriga sculpture is being sent off during repairs that will take about three months. It will be returned as weather permits.

The Quadriga has been a prominent fixture in front of the marble dome for more than 100 years. It has been refurbished at various points, but the charioteer figure is being removed so crews can fix corrosion at the base of the sculpture. While it’s down, the charioteer figure will be regilded.

Minnesota’s Capitol is several months into a $270 million renovation that will last until 2017.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Golden quadriga above the south entrance to the Minnesota Capitol. Image by Harvardton. This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

Da Vinci's unfinished 'Adoration of the Magi' prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Da Vinci’s unfinished masterpiece emerging in all its beauty

Da Vinci's unfinished 'Adoration of the Magi' prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Da Vinci’s unfinished ‘Adoration of the Magi’ prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

FLORENCE, Italy – The Adoration of the Magi, an unfinished masterpiece by Leonardo Da Vinci, is beginning to reveal its full beauty after years hidden under layers of grime.

Restorers working on the giant painting issued an update this week and revealed that they were three quarters of the way toward completing the cleaning of the huge (2.46 meters x 2.43 meters) tableau.

“The typical aerial perspective and atmosphere of Leonardo is already very obvious,” said Marco Ciatti, one of the officials overseeing the restoration.

The painting was the work of the young Leonardo and he abandoned it when he left for Milan in 1481. It has been in the hands of a Florentine laboratory since 2011 awaiting the start of restoration work that was preceded by a year of preparatory research.

“Elements that could only be seen via infrared are now visible to the naked eye,” said Ciatti, adding that the restorers were now much better able to understand how the artist had composed the work.

After the restoration of the painting is finished, the team will start work on the cracked frame with the aim of having it hanging in Florence’s Galleria degli Uffizi by the end of 2015.


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Da Vinci's unfinished 'Adoration of the Magi' prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Da Vinci’s unfinished ‘Adoration of the Magi’ prior to restoration. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

James Rosenquist, ‘Drawing on a Label, 1989, acrylic, pastel, pencil, charcoal, scroll of paper, and dirt on paper, 44 7/8 x 39 1/2 inches frame. Collection Perez Art Museum Miami, gift of Holding Capital Group Collection. Copyright James Rosenquist/Licensed by VAGA, New York, Photo: Sid Hoeltzell.

Pérez Art Museum Miami examines printmaking in US

James Rosenquist, ‘Drawing on a Label, 1989, acrylic, pastel, pencil, charcoal, scroll of paper, and dirt on paper, 44 7/8 x 39 1/2 inches frame. Collection Perez Art Museum Miami, gift of Holding Capital Group Collection. Copyright James Rosenquist/Licensed by VAGA, New York, Photo: Sid Hoeltzell.

James Rosenquist, ‘Drawing on a Label, 1989, acrylic, pastel, pencil, charcoal, scroll of paper, and dirt on paper, 44 7/8 x 39 1/2 inches frame. Collection Perez Art Museum Miami, gift of Holding Capital Group Collection. Copyright James Rosenquist/Licensed by VAGA, New York, Photo: Sid Hoeltzell.

MIAMI – Pérez Art Museum Miami recently opened an exhibition exploring the evolution of fine printmaking in the United States in the period following 1960. The exhibition features several important prints and multiples gifted to PAMM from Holding Capital Group Inc., including works by Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist.

These works will be augmented by additional prints and objects loaned from the Holding Capital Group collection, which has been carefully assembled over the last 30 years and illuminates the significance of printmaking within the contemporary art context. On view through March 1, “Beyond the Limited Life of Painting: Prints and Multiples from the Holding Capital Group” includes works by Ellsworth Kelly, Jane Hammond, Sol LeWitt, Elizabeth Murray, Isamu Noguchi, Kiki Smith, and Andy Warhol, among numerous others.

The exhibition examines more than 50 years of printmaking, tracing its historic importance to public debate in the 1930s and 1940s to its emergence as a valued artistic medium in the Pop Art Movement of the 1950s and 1960s and through to its role in today’s creative production. “Beyond the Limited Life of Painting” focuses in particular on the generation of artists in the postwar period, who rejected Abstract Expressionism and actively returned to representation. With the resurgence of the figure and a newfound interest among artists in “found” imagery, printmaking acquired a new critical utility. Many artists came to believe that traditional art forms such as painting could be made more meaningful through the reproduction and circulation of powerful images to an ever-growing audience, leveraging the medium as a fresh way to communicate with the public.

“The Holding Capital Group collection features an exceptional selection of prints from across the last several decades, showcasing the diversity of artists engaged with the medium. PAMM’s exhibition of these works offers an opportunity to shed further light on the development of printmaking and its position in the fine art lexicon,” said Thom Collins, PAMM’s director. “The principals at Holding Capital Group have generously gifted several important works to PAMM’s permanent collection—extending the depth and scope of our 20th-and 21st-century holdings—and have loaned an additional selection to help make this exhibition possible. We are grateful for their support and vision and look forward to sharing these works with our many audiences.”


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


James Rosenquist, ‘Drawing on a Label, 1989, acrylic, pastel, pencil, charcoal, scroll of paper, and dirt on paper, 44 7/8 x 39 1/2 inches frame. Collection Perez Art Museum Miami, gift of Holding Capital Group Collection. Copyright James Rosenquist/Licensed by VAGA, New York, Photo: Sid Hoeltzell.

James Rosenquist, ‘Drawing on a Label, 1989, acrylic, pastel, pencil, charcoal, scroll of paper, and dirt on paper, 44 7/8 x 39 1/2 inches frame. Collection Perez Art Museum Miami, gift of Holding Capital Group Collection. Copyright James Rosenquist/Licensed by VAGA, New York, Photo: Sid Hoeltzell.