Old building of the Nederlandsche Bank, now Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Copyrighted image used with permission of Amsterdam Municipal Department for the Preservation and Restoration of Historic Buildings and Sites (bMA)

Crimean museums launch legal bid in Holland to recover treasures

Old building of the Nederlandsche Bank, now Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Copyrighted image used with permission of Amsterdam Municipal Department for the Preservation and Restoration of Historic Buildings and Sites (bMA)

Old building of the Nederlandsche Bank, now Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Copyrighted image used with permission of Amsterdam Municipal Department for the Preservation and Restoration of Historic Buildings and Sites (bMA)

MOSCOW (AFP) – Four Crimean museums on Wednesday announced a joint legal bid to force a Dutch museum to hand back priceless treasures loaned to the institution shortly before Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

“On November 19, four Crimean museums filed a complaint before an Amsterdam court demanding that the Allard Pierson (museum) return their collection,” said the director of one of the four, Andrei Malgin of the Tavrida museum in Simferopol.

Amsterdam’s Allard Pierson museum in August decided not to return a historic collection of archeological artefacts on loan from the museums for an exhibition titled “The Crimea: Gold and Secrets from the Black Sea.”

With the museums, now under Russian authority, and Ukraine demanding the return of the works, The Allard Pierson feared a legal tussle.

Crimea was at the crossroads of ancient trade routes and the rich collection of items spanning the 2nd century BC to the late medieval era was loaned to the Amsterdam museum less than a month before Russia annexed Crimea in March, splitting it off from Ukraine.

Malgin told AFP that under international law “the objects on display must be returned to where they were discovered and where they were preserved … and that is the museums of Crimea.”

In a joint statement the four Crimea establishments said there could be no question of choosing between Kiev or Moscow.

“The museums of Crimea are the legal owners of the objects,” which have become “hostage of the political situation.”

The Netherlands, like its other allies in the West, does not recognize Russia’s March annexation.

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Old building of the Nederlandsche Bank, now Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Copyrighted image used with permission of Amsterdam Municipal Department for the Preservation and Restoration of Historic Buildings and Sites (bMA)

Old building of the Nederlandsche Bank, now Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Copyrighted image used with permission of Amsterdam Municipal Department for the Preservation and Restoration of Historic Buildings and Sites (bMA)

A group of stylish 20th century Lalique perfume bottles that would make great gifts and, perhaps, greater investments. The most valuable is the one shown at top right from the limited edition Ondines (Mermaid) collection of 1998. It sold for £280. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

Miscellaneana: Scent Bottles

A group of stylish 20th century Lalique perfume bottles that would make great gifts and, perhaps, greater investments. The most valuable is the one shown at top right from the limited edition Ondines (Mermaid) collection of 1998. It sold for £280. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

A group of stylish 20th century Lalique perfume bottles that would make great gifts and, perhaps, greater investments. The most valuable is the one shown at top right from the limited edition Ondines (Mermaid) collection of 1998. It sold for £280. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

LONDON – Calling all Christmas shoppers: if perfume, bubble bath or aftershave is on your list, remember that the packaging it comes in could be at least as important as the contents.

Once the last bubble in the final bathful has burst, what might once have been discarded would be better put into safekeeping. And if you’re buying for a canny collector, don’t be surprised if she, or he, keeps the contents intact. That’s a true investment strategy.

Two things helped us reach this conclusion: first, we saw a 1998 scent bottle complete with contents with an estimated value of £800-1,200 in a recent sale catalogue. It was made at the factory founded by master French glassmaker Réné Lalique. Then, out on our travels, we found a plastic Rupert Bear bubble bath container — probably some child’s Christmas present 30 years ago – on a collector’s table at an antiques fair. It was priced at £12.

Even the ubiquitous Avon range of toiletries has thrown up some highly collectible and sought-after bottles, notably those in the shape of such things as a golf bag and trolley, Pierrot and Pierrette, rabbit, oil lamp, train, or girl carrying flower basket. There are, no doubt, dozens of others. Although I only have the antiques fair vendor’s word for it, I am told the 1969 vintage Baseball Snoopy aftershave bottle can command a price of £45.

The word perfume comes from the Latin per fumum, “through smoke” and both woman and men have been adorning their bodies with the stuff since ancient Egyptian times.

To please the gods, the Greeks burned aromatic substances in their temples and wrapped their dead in heavily scented shrouds to prepare souls for eternity, or more likely to counteract the smell of decaying flesh.

Pottery scent containers survive from about 600 BC, while the Romans created glass bottles for cosmetic oils. The emperor Nero was a great fan of perfume. He had silver pipes installed in his palace so that his dinner guests could be sprayed with rosewater.

Perfume became popular in Britain as both a cosmetic luxury and for medicinal purposes. The Tudors dusted their hair with sweet-smelling powder to disguise body odor and to drive out lice, while during the Great Plague of 1664-65, pomanders filled with aromatic herbs and creams were carried to ward off germs.

In Renaissance Venice, small highly decorated glass scent bottles were made at the famous Murano glass factories, the most popular being those in colored glass decorated with millefiori and latticino (strands of contrasting coloured glass used as a trelliswork effect). In Bohemia (Germany) during the same period, bottles were made using white glass, decorated with gilding and enamels.

Gold and silver vinaigrettes containing sponges soaked in aromatic oils were popular in Britain but were replaced by pear-shape bottles in the 17th century made from colored and clear glass, enameled copper and gold.

Porcelain bottles made by the Chelsea factory and in neoclassical designs by Josiah Wedgwood were favorites until about 1785.

During the late 18th and throughout the 19th centuries, workers at Battersea, in London and Bilston, near Wolverhampton, and elsewhere in south Staffordshire and Birmingham all copied porcelain scent bottles in copper. The metal was rolled thinly, beaten into shape and then decorated in realistically colored enamels.

The bottles contained glass phials with stoppers to hold the perfume and were decorated with delicately painted flowers, landscapes and classical scenes, the artists Dovey and Hawksford being among the best known.

Novelty perfume bottles made to look like nuts or seashells are popular collectables today, although both porcelain and enamel bottles were faked by Samson in the late 19th century, which can catch out the unwary.

Silver-topped double-ended bottles, in colored glass, cranberry, amber and amethyst also appeared in large numbers, one end for perfume, the other for aromatic vinegar.

English glass makers at Stourbridge in the West Midlands and Nailsea in Bristol produced perfume bottles, the latter being best known for the famous Bristol blue glass.

However, it was the first decade of the 20th century that saw the appearance of the truly decorative glass scent bottle, due largely to innovative Réné Lalique and the “father” of the fragrance industry François Coty. A native of Corsica, Coty arrived in Paris in 1900 with no money but with the entrepreneurial flair to realize the potential of the business.

Until then, perfume had been made using purely natural ingredients by chemists who sold it in plain bottles with no labels only to those wealthy enough to afford it.

Coty spent two years learning the techniques of blending synthetic aromas to achieve the same results for half the price and, using borrowed money, established the House of Coty in 1905.

Lalique, then making a name for himself with stunningly original Art Nouveau glass jewelry and objets de vertu, had a shop nearby. Coty probably saw some of Lalique’s decorative flasks in the shop window and, in 1907, the perfumier commissioned him to design decorative stoppers and labels for his otherwise plain scent bottles.

Sadly, these early bottles are marked with only Coty’s name, although the Lalique designs and gold labels are unmistakable.

Such was their success, Coty commissioned large and impressive deluxe bottles from Lalique which were reserved for only his richest clients. They were intended to be a permanent feature of a lady’s dressing table and could be filled and refilled to special order.

Coty went on to capture the world market. Lalique also capitalized on the venture and quickly established a factory where scent bottles were mass-produced for most of the leading parfumeries.

It was the start of a multimillion-pound industry, the arrival of the age of packaging and the realisation that an elegant and decorative bottle was at least as important as its contents.

Most famous, perhaps, is the Chanel No 5 bottle created by Ernest Beaux in 1921, which has become an icon of 20th-century design and a symbol of elegant luxury everywhere.

The French glassmaking company Baccarat produced perfume bottles for parfumiers like Jean Patou, Elizabeth Arden, Guerlain and Lenthéric, while among other French designers of the period, Marius-Ernest Sabino is best-known, although much of his work was an imitation of Lalique.

At the top end of the collector’s market, 20th-century perfume bottles can fetch many thousands of pounds. At the other end of the scale, those novelty bottles once sold door to door by “Avon Calling” ladies in the Sixties and Seventies can still be picked up for small money.

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A group of stylish 20th century Lalique perfume bottles that would make great gifts and, perhaps, greater investments. The most valuable is the one shown at top right from the limited edition Ondines (Mermaid) collection of 1998. It sold for £280. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

A group of stylish 20th century Lalique perfume bottles that would make great gifts and, perhaps, greater investments. The most valuable is the one shown at top right from the limited edition Ondines (Mermaid) collection of 1998. It sold for £280. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

Modern Lalique perfume bottles clockwise from top left: Deux Coeurs (Two Hearts), which sold for £140; Les Elfes (The Elves), £260; Les Fees (The Fairies), £220; Papillion (Butterfly), £240: and Songe (Dream). £180. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

Modern Lalique perfume bottles clockwise from top left: Deux Coeurs (Two Hearts), which sold for £140; Les Elfes (The Elves), £260; Les Fees (The Fairies), £220; Papillion (Butterfly), £240: and Songe (Dream). £180. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

Large and small Masque de Femme perfume bottles, the larger from a limited edition of 50, produced in 1998. They sold for £800 and £100 respectively. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

Large and small Masque de Femme perfume bottles, the larger from a limited edition of 50, produced in 1998. They sold for £800 and £100 respectively. Photo Ewbank’s Auctioneers

Image courtesy of Lynden Pioneer Museum

Washington museum won’t give up guns after all

Image courtesy of Lynden Pioneer Museum

Image courtesy of Lynden Pioneer Museum

LYNDEN, Wash. (AP) – A small museum in northwestern Washington says it won’t be removing all of the weapons from its World War II exhibit, after all.

The Lynden Pioneer Museum had announced that because of concerns about the state’s new law requiring background checks for gun transfers, it was returning the 11 rifles it had on loan to their owners before the law takes effect next month.

Director Troy Luginbill said he was worried that the nonprofit museum would otherwise have to pay for background checks before it returned the weapons.

But The Bellingham Herald reports that after learning of the issue, the owners of a pawn shop in Bonney Lake offered to do any paperwork required to return the weapons.

“We’re just one of the little guys, helping another little guy,” said Melissa Denny, of Pistol Annie’s Jewelry and Pawn. “I don’t want them to lose their firearms.”

A few of the owners told Luginbill that they don’t want to undergo background checks to get their weapons back, so Luginbill is returning those guns by Dec. 3. But he said the museum should be able to keep at least six of them on display. Luginbill is giving the owners until Monday to decide whether they want their guns to remain in the exhibit, called “Over the Beach: The WWII Pacific Theater.”

The law, passed by voters this month as Initiative 594, was intended to close a loophole in the state’s background-check system. It requires background checks on all gun sales and transfers, including private transactions and many loans and gifts, with exceptions for transfers between family members.

The law also exempts antiques, but the museum’s rifles are too new to qualify. The definition includes only weapons produced before 1898.

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Information from: The Bellingham Herald, http://www.bellinghamherald.com

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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Image courtesy of Lynden Pioneer Museum

Image courtesy of Lynden Pioneer Museum

'Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,' said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie's.

Nobel Prize for James Watson’s DNA discovery headed to auction

'Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,' said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie's.

‘Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,’ said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie’s.

NEW YORK (AP) – The 1962 Nobel Prize James Watson won for his role in the discovery of the structure of DNA is going on the auction block.

The auctioneer says the gold medal could bring $2.5 million to $3.5 million on Dec. 4.

Christie’s says it’s the first Nobel medal to be offered at auction by a living recipient.

Watson made the 1953 discovery with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins.

He says part of the proceeds will go to the University of Chicago, Clare College Cambridge, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Long Island Land Trust and other local charities.

The auction also includes several Watson papers. Handwritten notes for his acceptance speech are estimated at $300,000 to $400,000.

Crick’s Nobel medal sold at Heritage Auctions for $2.2 million last year. He died in 2004.

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'Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,' said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie's.

‘Practically all the scientific disciplines in the life sciences have felt the great impact of your discovery,’ said Professor A. Engström upon presenting the 1962 Nobel Prize to James D. Watson (pictured left, Photo: Science Source ). Image provided by Christie’s.

Night view of the northern end of downtown Houston, a booming metropolis with a vibrant art scene. Wikimedia Commons image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Houston art official resigns amid artwork dispute

Night view of the northern end of downtown Houston, a booming metropolis with a vibrant art scene. Wikimedia Commons image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Night view of the northern end of downtown Houston, a booming metropolis with a vibrant art scene. Wikimedia Commons image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

HOUSTON (AP) – A Houston Arts Alliance official has resigned amid a dispute over planned artwork for a convention center.

The Houston First Corporation wants a piece of artwork for a new lobby being built at the George R. Brown Convention Center. The Houston Arts Alliance was managing the process on behalf of Houston First to choose an artist.

A five-member selection panel, organized by the alliance, picked Ed Wilson’s plan to build a hanging stainless steel sculpture of about 60 by 30 feet. Wilson said he learned last week the alliance’s civic art committee withdrew his commission for the $830,000 project amid concerns over the selection process.

“It seemed very irregular and very political,” Wilson told the Houston Chronicle.

Matthew Lennon, the alliance’s civic art and design director, resigned Saturday, saying he objected to how Wilson, alliance staff and the selection panel’s professionals were treated.

The civic art committee “is seeking to reject Ed Wilson of a fairly won commission,” Lennon said. “It feels like CAC doesn’t think locals are good enough, despite the mayor’s mandate to hire locals first.”

Alliance executive director Jonathon Glus said Wilson’s commission isn’t dead, but is still in the review process.

“This is a highly visible, important commission. We need to make sure it’s right,” Glus said. “The civic art committee asked at the last meeting to slow it down so they could make sure it’s the right piece and that we’ve got all the right policies and procedures in place.”

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Information from: Houston Chronicle, http://www.houstonchronicle.com

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Night view of the northern end of downtown Houston, a booming metropolis with a vibrant art scene. Wikimedia Commons image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Night view of the northern end of downtown Houston, a booming metropolis with a vibrant art scene. Wikimedia Commons image licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Mike Wolfe (left) and Frank Fritz, History Channel's American Pickers. Photo courtesy HISTORY.

‘American Pickers’ looking for leads in northern Louisiana

 

Mike Wolfe (left) and Frank Fritz, History Channel's American Pickers. Photo courtesy HISTORY.

Mike Wolfe (left) and Frank Fritz, History Channel’s American Pickers. Photo courtesy HISTORY.

FARMERVILLE, La. (AP) – Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz have crisscrossed America, looking through barns and basements for dirty, rusty treasures.

Now, the pair wants to bring their show, “American Pickers,” to Louisiana but they’re looking for help.

Lum Farr, president of the Union Parish Chamber of Commerce, tells The Ruston Leader he was contacted by Cineflix, the company that produces the show, now in its fifth season on the History Channel.

“We would love to have them come to Union Parish, and we need the public’s help to make it happen,” Farr said.

Farr said casting producer Anthony Rodriguez emailed him recently about the program, saying he was looking for people with barns, warehouses or buildings full of odd, unique and interesting collections.

“We also love to explore the history of the locations tied to the items. But know Mike and Frank, of course, we are always looking for great characters,” the email said.

But Farr said the show is not looking for large collections of any particular items, such as doll collections. He said they’re looking for people who have a great variety of items they’ve collected over a period of time.

Wolfe and Fritz consider themselves “modern archaeologists” who sort through junkyards and warehouses for items that can be preserved for future generations to appreciate.

“Hitting back roads from coast to coast, the two men earn a living by restoring forgotten relics to their former glory, transforming one person’s trash into another’s treasure,” the show’s website states. “If you think the antique business is all about upscale boutiques and buttoned-up dealers, this show may change your mind _ and teach you a thing or two about American history along the way.”

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Information from: Ruston Daily Leader, http://www.rustonleader.com

Click to read Auction Central News’ highest-rated article of all time, an interview with the American Pickers, at https://www.liveauctioneers.com/news/index.php/features/people/2288-history-channels-american-pickers-have-put-the-man-into-mantiques

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


ADDITIONAL IMAGE OF NOTE


Mike Wolfe (left) and Frank Fritz, History Channel's American Pickers. Photo courtesy HISTORY.

Mike Wolfe (left) and Frank Fritz, History Channel’s American Pickers. Photo courtesy HISTORY.

Fernando Botero (Colombian, b. 1932-), 'Adam and Eve,' sold for $2.5 million on Nov 24, 2014 at Christie's New York. Courtesy Christie's Images Ltd 2014

Latin American art auctions set artist records

Fernando Botero (Colombian, b. 1932-), 'Adam and Eve,' sold for $2.5 million on Nov 24, 2014 at Christie's New York. Courtesy Christie's Images Ltd 2014

Fernando Botero (Colombian, b. 1932-), ‘Adam and Eve,’ sold for $2.5 million on Nov 24, 2014 at Christie’s New York. Courtesy Christie’s Images Ltd 2014

NEW YORK (AP) – A bronze sculpture by Fernando Botero has set a new auction record for the Colombian artist. The work titled “Adam and Eve” sold for $2.5 million at Christie’s on Monday.

A different version of the auctioned work decorates the lobby of the Time Warner Center in New York City. The previous record for Botero was $2 million for his painting “Four Musicians,” which sold in 2006.

At Sotheby’s, the sale of Latin American art set 12 artist records Monday evening. The works came from the collection of Mexican businessman and arts patron Lorenzo Zambrano.

The highlight of the sale was “Towards the Tower” by the Spanish-Mexican artist Remedios Varo. It sold for $4.3 million. Sotheby’s says it’s the second-highest price for a Latin American female artist at auction.

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Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Skeleton of 'Monty' the Woolly Mammoth. Image courtesy of Summers Place Auctions

Near-complete Woolly Mammoth skeleton auctioned in UK

Skeleton of 'Monty' the Woolly Mammoth. Image courtesy of Summers Place Auctions

Skeleton of ‘Monty’ the Woolly Mammoth. Image courtesy of Summers Place Auctions

BILLINGSHURST, UK – On Wednesday, one of the most complete known Woolly Mammoth skeletons with tusks sold in England for £189,000. Known as “Monty,” the iconic Ice Age mammal was purchased by a private buyer from the UK.

Because of its impressive size of 3.5 meters (11ft 6in) in height and 5.5 meters (18ft) in length, it was suggested that Monty was a male and may have weighed up to six tonnes (6.72 tons) in its lifetime. The 30,000-50,000 year old creature, which had been in an old private Eastern European collection for years, had never before been assembled prior to arriving at the Summers Place auction house in West Sussex, England.

Errol Fuller, the curator of the auction, said: “Although Mammoth are not as rare as some dinosaur skeletons, the chances to buy an almost complete skeleton don’t come up very often. We had interest from private buyers as well as institutions from around the world…”

The most famous animal of the Ice Age, the Woolly Mammoth died out about 10,000 years ago.

To get an idea of what the Mammoth looked like in its prime, just imagine the elephant of today covered in fur – long fur on top with a shorter undercoat – with smaller ears and a shorter tail to minimize frostbite and heat loss. Mother Nature equipped it well to cope with Ice Age temperatures in the steppe that stretched across northern Eurasia and North America.

The Mammoth’s diet was mainly grass and sedges, which explains why it only had four molar teeth, and also stunning, long curved tusks. The woolly Mammoth co-existed with early humans, who hunted them for food and used its bones and tusks for making art, which also explains why complete skeletons are so rare.

Visit Summers Place online at www.summersplaceauctions.com.

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Skeleton of 'Monty' the Woolly Mammoth. Image courtesy of Summers Place Auctions

Skeleton of ‘Monty’ the Woolly Mammoth. Image courtesy of Summers Place Auctions

Terry Kovel set this table with a beautifully traditional Thanksgiving theme. The focal point is Spode china in the 'Floral' pattern, which was introduced in the 1830s. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

From Kovels: Great tips on setting a Thanksgiving table

Terry Kovel set this table with a beautifully traditional Thanksgiving theme. The focal point is Spode china in the 'Floral' pattern, which was introduced in the 1830s. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

Terry Kovel set this table with a beautifully traditional Thanksgiving theme. The focal point is Spode china in the ‘Floral’ pattern, which was introduced in the 1830s. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

BEACHWOOD, Ohio – Collectors who are setting a table for Thanksgiving can look to Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel for inspiration. Their plate, glassware and serving pieces reflect their different collecting styles (and ages) and here are their choices.

Terry Kovel’s table is traditional. It starts with blue and white porcelain plates in the Floral pattern introduced by Spode in the 1830s. The sterling silver flatware was a wedding gift to a family member just after World War I. The pattern is Trianon. Pieces are marked “I.S. & Co.,” the mark of the International Silver Co., and the patent date, 1921. The water goblet is pressed glass from the 1880s. The silver-plated figural napkin ring, made about 1880, is decorated with Japanese fans. Terry bought the sterling silver open salt with a cobalt blue glass liner while on her honeymoon. It was made in England in the 1830s. She paired it with a Victorian silver salt spoon and a Georgian-style pepper shaker. Serving pieces include a Victorian silver ladle and a Georgian long-handle stuffing spoon, both with English hallmarks, a hefty Victorian silver cold meat fork, and a silver fruit spoon made in the early 1800s that was engraved and gold washed during the Victorian era. The gravy dish, cover and underplate are cobalt blue porcelain decorated with gold chinoiserie and a bamboo-shaped handle. It was made by the Ott & Brewer Co., which operated Trenton, N.J., from 1871 to 1892. Terry also uses a cut glass relish dish from the Victorian American Brilliant Period.

Kim Kovel favors a midcentury tablescape. The dinnerware was designed by Eva Zeisel (1906–2011) for Hall China Co. The organic Tomorrow’s Classic set of shapes is one of Zeisel’s most popular. The plate pattern is Dawn, 1952, and the butter dish and vase are Fantasy, 1952–57. Water goblets are Block Crystal’s Watercolor-Green pattern from 1984. Classic Greek and Roman architecture is reflected in Kim’s stainless steel flatware with handles in the shapes of flattened columns—Doric capitals for spoons, Ionic for knives and Corinthian for forks. They were designed in 1992 by architect Robert Venturi for SwidPowell (a studio founded in 1982 that commissions international architects to design tabletop pieces) and made by Reed & Barton Co. Also reflecting columns are the candlesticks, designed by Ettore Sottsass (1917–2007) for Baccarat. They’re called Bougeoir Nusku from Baccarat’s 2002 Rencontre Collection. The backdrop is a tablecloth woven in the 1950s.

Antiques enthusiasts can add one-of-a kind freshness to their tables with unexpected pairings of new, vintage and old accessories.

Terry Kovel is America’s foremost authority on antiques and collectibles. She is the well-known columnist and author of more than 100 books on antiques and collecting. With her daughter, Kim Kovel, she co-authors the best-selling annual “Kovels Antiques and Collectibles Price Guide.” Both Terry and Kim are collectors.

About Kovels.com:

Kovels.com, created by Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel, provides collectors and researchers with up-to-date and accurate information on antiques and collectibles. Kovels’ Antiques was founded in 1953 by Terry Kovel and her late husband, Ralph. Since then, Kovels’ has published some of America’s most popular books and articles about antiques, including the best-selling “Kovels’ Antiques and Collectibles Price Guide.” The brand new 2015 edition is now available in bookstores and in the online shop at Kovels.com. Ralph and Terry were featured in three TV series about antiques and collectibles, The most recent was “Flea Market Finds with the Kovels” on the HGTV cable channel. The Kovels’ website, online since 1998, offers 900,000 free prices and includes a free weekly email, “Kovels Komments.” It give readers a bird’s-eye view of the market through the latest news, auction reports, a Marks Dictionary, readers’ questions with Kovels’ answers and much more.

Visit Kovels online at www.kovels.com

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ADDITIONAL IMAGES OF NOTE


Terry Kovel set this table with a beautifully traditional Thanksgiving theme. The focal point is Spode china in the 'Floral' pattern, which was introduced in the 1830s. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

Terry Kovel set this table with a beautifully traditional Thanksgiving theme. The focal point is Spode china in the ‘Floral’ pattern, which was introduced in the 1830s. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

Reflecting her love of modern design, Kim Kovel created this elegant midcentury tablescape using dinnerware designed by Eva Zeisel for Hall China Co. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

Reflecting her love of modern design, Kim Kovel created this elegant midcentury tablescape using dinnerware designed by Eva Zeisel for Hall China Co. Image courtesy of Kovels.com

Large (18 x 23in) Copeland Spode flow blue turkey platter with hand-colored decoration, English, sold for $989 on Feb. 7, 2010 at Myers Fine Art. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Myers Fine Art

Large (18 x 23in) Copeland Spode flow blue turkey platter with hand-colored decoration, English, sold for $989 on Feb. 7, 2010 at Myers Fine Art. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Myers Fine Art

Elite Works Limoges French porcelain game service, 20 pcs including large scalloped platter, 11 dinner plates and eight side dishes, manuf. 1920-1932. Sold via LiveAuctioneers for $1,320 in Jeffrey S. Evans' Oct. 1, 2013 auction. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Jeffrey S. Evans

Elite Works Limoges French porcelain game service, 20 pcs including large scalloped platter, 11 dinner plates and eight side dishes, manuf. 1920-1932. Sold via LiveAuctioneers for $1,320 in Jeffrey S. Evans’ Oct. 1, 2013 auction. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Jeffrey S. Evans

Doulton Watteau flow blue turkey platter (21 x 17in) with six matching plates. Sold for $1,334 by Strawser Auctions on May 24, 2012. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Strawser Auctions

Doulton Watteau flow blue turkey platter (21 x 17in) with six matching plates. Sold for $1,334 by Strawser Auctions on May 24, 2012. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Strawser Auctions

Wheeling Pottery 'La Belle' flow blue turkey platter and 12 plates, circa 1893-1910. Sold for $1,150 at Burchard Galleries' Jan 22, 2006 auction. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Burchard Galleries.

Wheeling Pottery ‘La Belle’ flow blue turkey platter and 12 plates, circa 1893-1910. Sold for $1,150 at Burchard Galleries’ Jan 22, 2006 auction. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers Archive and Burchard Galleries.