Rolex Cosmograph Daytona

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona chronograph bracelet watch, circa 1996 with stainless steel case with tachymeter bezel. LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Fellows

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona chronograph bracelet watch, circa 1996 with stainless steel case with tachymeter bezel. LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Fellows

 

The Rolex Cosmograph Daytona, introduced in 1963, was designed to meet the demands of professional racing drivers. With its highly reliable chronograph and bezel with tachymetric scale, this model allows drivers to perfectly measure average speeds up to 400 kilometers or miles per hours.

Period furniture to modern art in Ahlers & Ogletree sale March 5-6

Two artworks by Venezuelan artist Jesus Rafael de Soto (1923-2005), including this one titled ‘Homenaje al Humano,’ will be in the auction. Measuring approximately 20in x 26in x 5in, it is estimated at $10,000-$20,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

Two artworks by Venezuelan artist Jesus Rafael de Soto (1923-2005), including this one titled ‘Homenaje al Humano,’ will be in the auction. Measuring approximately 20in x 26in x 5in, it is estimated at $10,000-$20,000. Ahlers & Ogletree image

 

ATLANTA, Ga. – A circa 1775 English George III satinwood marquetry demilune console, two artworks by the renowned Venezuelan artist Jesus Rafael de Soto, a surrealist sculpture by Salvador Dali and two 18th century English portraits by a follower of John Hayls are a few of the nearly 900 lots that will come up for bid March 5-6 at Ahlers & Ogletree in Atlanta.

Read more

Gift to Speed Art Museum to provide free Sunday admission

Artist rendition of the expansion of the Speed Art Museum. Image courtesy Speed Art Museum

Artist rendition of the expansion of the Speed Art Museum. Image courtesy Speed Art Museum

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – A gift from Brown-Forman Corp. will enable visitors to see the renovated Speed Art Museum at no charge on Sundays for the next five years.

Read more

Myers to auction fresh-to-market original paintings from artists’ estates, March 13

Maynard Dixon (Californian, 1875-1946), oil-on-canvas titled Mountain Juniper Sierra Nevada Mountain, est. $40,000-$60,000

In the manner of Maynard Dixon (Californian, 1875-1946), oil-on-canvas titled ‘Mountain Juniper Sierra Nevada Mountain’

 

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Only once in a blue moon does an auction come along that checks off all the boxes on an art collector’s wish list – a sale that contains fresh works by desirable artists not often seen in the marketplace, all with unimpeachable provenance and with very few having auction reserves. Such is the case with Myers Fine Art’s connoisseur’s selection to be auctioned on Sunday, March 13. Almost all of the recently discovered art will be making its first-ever public appearance in the 457-lot sale, with absentee and Internet live bidding available through LiveAuctioneers.com.

Read more

Photo exhibit tells story of Beatles’ 1964 visit to the US

Photographic print of The Beatles by Bill Eppridge, signed by Eppridge. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

Photographic print of The Beatles by Bill Eppridge, signed by Eppridge. Image courtesy of LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

 

DANBURY, Conn. (AP) – Photographs of our country’s historic moments and the people captured within them are imprinted on society’s memory for years to come. In the case of the work of Life magazine photojournalist Bill Eppridge, his six-day period with the Beatles, spent during their visit to the United States in 1964, is just one of many “moments” in his career now being shared with a new audience at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury.

This historic, photographic chronicle of the Beatles’ 1964 visit to the United States, captured by Eppridge, is the latest exhibition at university’s art gallery. The show opened Jan. 19 and continues through Sunday, March 13, at the university’s Visual and Performing Arts Center.

“Bill Eppridge – The Beatles: Six Days That Changed the World, February 1964,” features a collection of 55 black-and-white photographs taken by Eppridge during the British rock group’s visit to New York and Washington from Feb. 7-12, 1964.

Eppridge, who lived in New Milford in his later years, died in October 2013 in Danbury after a 60-year career as a photojournalist. He is widely recognized for capturing iconic images of contemporary history including the Beatles’ Feb. 9, 1964, appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show and the poignant image on June 6, 1968, of a busboy kneeling beside the mortally wounded Sen. Robert F. Kennedy in a Los Angeles hotel kitchen moments after his assassination. “You are not just a photojournalist,” he said, in recalling the Kennedy image. “You’re a historian.”

For exhibit curator Melissa Ralston-Jones, bringing Eppridge’s work to the university was a way to connect the gallery with students and the local community.

“Our mission here at the gallery is to bring in contemporary works and have students work alongside the artists and learn about their work,” she said. “Bill may not be with us any longer, but having (his wife) Adrienne Aurichio knowing so much about it gave us an opportunity to talk about Bill and his life’s work. It’s just incredible. She’s really lovely, and a wealth of knowledge and information.”

The WCSU exhibition of selections from his 1964 Beatles tour photo shoot, consuming more than 90 rolls of film and 3,000 photographs, would have been impossible without the mysterious recovery of these images seven years after they went missing and the painstaking work of Eppridge’s editor and wife, Aurichio, to review and organize this vast photo archive into a comprehensive record of the Beatles’ tour as it unfolded.

The exhibit carries universal appeal, Ralston-Jones added.

“We always try to bring in one exhibit a year that will have a mass appeal, and bring in a new audience,” she said. “We thought this would be well received.”
That’s because “everyone knows the Beatles,” she said.

“There are two girls in my neighborhood, who are 13, and they’re huge Beatles fans,” she said. “They have a Facebook page with 600 followers and they’re all Beatles fans. I asked them to promote the show on their page and they were happy to do it; they were so excited about it. For myself, I was born in 1970 and the Beatles had already broken up, but you could still read about them all the time and hear them.

“My generation is so (accustomed) to reruns, and music from the past, that the Beatles are as relevant as they’ve ever been,” Ralston-Jones added. “They’re timeless. Their music is timeless. So the show does resonate with a lot of people.”

The curator pointed out that the university gallery show is also a chance for people to learn more about Eppridge himself.

“While it’s about the Beatles, it’s really about Bill Eppridge,” she said. “He did the famous Bobby Kennedy (assassination) photo, and many other memorable bodies of work, so people are likely to be interested in seeing more.”

Timing was everything, apparently, for Eppridge when he was sent to cover the Beatles’ arrival in New York City. In a 2014 essay for CBS News marking the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ Ed Sullivan Show appearance, his wife Aurichio said the then-26-year-old Eppridge found himself in the right place on the morning of Feb. 7, 1964, to draw the assignment from Life magazine photography director Dick Pollard to cover the Beatles’ arrival that day at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York.

He followed the Beatles as Life’s photo correspondent throughout the first six days of their U.S. tour, shooting spontaneous images documenting performances, rehearsals and private moments during the tour that established the group as an international rock ’n’ roll sensation.

At the time, Life magazine published just four of the images from Eppridge’s assignment, and the original film submitted to the Time-Life photo lab for processing could not be located when he attempted, several months later, to retrieve the images. By his account, at least seven years passed before the film turned up on his desk with no explanation.

“They were sent anonymously,” Aurichio said. “They had been missing for a long time.”

Aurichio’s role in re-creating Eppridge’s Life photo chronicle of the 1964 Beatles tour began in 1993 when she came across one of his prints from the shoot while researching photographs for a magazine project. Intrigued at the prospect of discovering more photos from the Beatles visit, she soon learned the full story of Eppridge’s recovered film chronicle, which provided the images featured in the WCSU exhibition and in the book, The Beatles: Six Days That Changed the World, released in 2014 by Rizzoli Publishing.

In his acknowledgments for the book, Eppridge noted that Aurichio played a critical part as co-editor in “piecing together my story. I relied on her vision and experience as an editor to research and unravel the photographs, and then pull them together in chronological order.”

Aurichio observed that Eppridge’s photographs of the Beatles’ 1964 visit reflect the fact that “he made pictures as they happened, never staging anything. The pictures are so personal. You know that there were other photographers and media around, but Bill had a way of focusing in on his subjects – excluding the distractions. You feel like Bill was the only photographer there.”

Aurichio believes her late husband would have been pleased to have a local show such as this one at Western.

“Bill had his work shown many times, but he would have been proud to have it local,” she said. “He liked people to see his work. He was a storytelling photojournalist, so it’s the highest accolade you can get, to have your work seen.”

Although the Beatles photo story is historic, it may not have been something her husband would have considered serious work at the time.

“He was aware, of course, of the history being made,” Aurichio said. “He’d been working for 60 years – he’d shot just about everything. But he was not a rock ’n’ roll photographer, he was a photojournalist, so doing something like the Beatles was not as serious in his mind … as a war or a political campaign. But he was a student of history. That’s how he shot everything he did.”

For Aurichio, the Beatles images are an opportunity to see some great photographs, taken at a time when photographers had, perhaps, an easier time getting images of the stars.

“These days, stars control photography much more tightly,” she said. “This is a chance to see something that just doesn’t happen anymore. It was more like photographing Elvis Presley or Frank Sinatra – there were more crowds, more access to the stars, more opportunities. Bill had almost unlimited access to the Beatles for six days. These days, that’s very unusual.”

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1938, Eppridge grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, and became interested in photography at an early age, beginning his career as a sports photographer for a local newspaper at the age of 15. In 1959 he earned his first award for photography in the National Press Photographers Association Pictures of the Year competition. The following year he graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism with honors as “College Photographer of the Year.” Upon graduation he landed an internship at Life magazine, which led to a yearlong around-the-world photo assignment for National Geographic and a coveted position as staff photographer for Life from 1964 to 1972. During his tenure at Life, he covered many of the most noteworthy public figures and historical events of the era, from the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War to the Woodstock music festival and drug addiction in New York.

After Life closed at the end of 1972, Eppridge served as a photojournalist for other national publications including Time and Sports Illustrated. The numerous professional recognitions for his work included the Joseph A. Sprague Memorial Award, the highest honor given by the National Press Photographers Association. His photographs have been shown in exhibitions across the United States, featured in a major show at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington and included in shows at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Ralston-Jones is confident that the exhibit at Western will draw a wider audience of visitors.

“In an art gallery, you never have trouble getting people to come to an opening,” she said. “They know the artist, they’re there to support that person, or they’re from the art world; they want to be there.”

But, she said, if you’re not an art person, you can still come and learn about the Beatles and music and politics, and everything that happened after they came to the United States.

Ralson-Jones says if she had one wish, it would be that Eppridge could witness the opening.

“The only thing that would make (the exhibit) better is to have Bill here,” she said. “It’s the first time it’s been shown close to home. This is in his back yard.”
___

By EMILY OLSON, The Register Citizen

Information from: The Register Citizen, http://www.registercitizen.com

Copyright 2016 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

AP-WF-02-22-16 2025GMT

Spidey sense: Amazing Fantasy comic book sells for $454,100

'Amazing Fantasy' No. 15, marking the debut of Spider-Man. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

‘Amazing Fantasy’ No. 15, marking the debut of Spider-Man. Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

 

DALLAS – A copy of Amazing Fantasy No. 15, the 1962 first appearance of Spider-man, sold at Heritage Auctions in Dallas on Feb. 18 for $454,100, a record price at public auction for the comic. The near-mint, 9.4 CGC copy claimed top lot honors in Heritage’s $5.7 million Comics & Comic Art Signature Auction.

The copy was purchased in 1980 by New York area collector Walter Yakaboski, a comic book collector, who had the opportunity to buy a handful of key early Marvel comic books for the tidy sum of $10,000 – a good bit to spend in those days. Among them was the copy of Amazing Fantasy No. 15, the landmark first appearance of Spider-Man.

The book was purchased by an anonymous collector. Another Spider-Man comic from Yakaboski’s collection drew serious attention as a 1963 copy of The Amazing Spider-Man No. 1 sold for $110,537.

A copy of Detective Comics No. 27 – marking the first appearance of “The Batman” – shocked the auction room floor when it hammered for $167,300, despite its 4.5 CBCS grade and extensive restoration. A high-grade, near-mint 9.4 CGC copy of The Avengers No. 1 sold for $98,587.

Perhaps foreshadowing the success of his big screen debut in Captain America: Civil War, a near-mint 9.8 CGC copy of Fantastic Four No. 52, famous for the first appearance of the Black Panther saw intense bidder interest as it sold for $83,650. Another key book, Tales of Suspense No. 57, introducing fellow film star and Avenger Hawkeye, sold for $47,800.

The auction’s astonishing 99 percent sell-through rate included classics of original comic book art, including John Romita Sr.’s original cover art for The Amazing Spider-Man No. 62. The 1968 cover, depicting a battle between Spidey and Medusa of the Inhumans, measures 12 1/4inches by  18 1/2 inches – a rare and coveted example of the comic master’s larger artworks to cross the block. Competition between 26 different bidders pushed the rarity to $179,250.

Settlement reached over painting stolen by Nazis

‘Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep,’ Camille Pissaro, oil on canvas, 1886. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

‘Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep,’ Camille Pissaro, oil on canvas, 1886. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – An attorney for a French woman who sued the University of Oklahoma over a painting that the Nazis stole from her family says a settlement has been reached and that the university will return the painting to her.

Read more

Where is the LOVE? Philadelphia sculpture moved for rehab

While LOVE Park in Philadelphia is undergoing renovation, Robert Indiana's sculpture has been moved to a temporary location. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

While LOVE Park in Philadelphia is undergoing renovation, Robert Indiana’s sculpture has been moved to a temporary location. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Philadelphia’s iconic LOVE statue has taken a ride to its temporary home while the park named after it gets a multimillion dollar renovation.

Read more

Cottone Auctions to celebrate 30 years in business at March 19 sale

Porcelain enamel on steel titled ‘Modern Painting in Porcelain’ by Roy Lichtenstein, from an edition of six. Cottone Auctions image

Porcelain enamel on steel titled ‘Modern Painting in Porcelain’ by Roy Lichtenstein, from an edition of six. Cottone Auctions image

 

GENESEO, N.Y. – Cottone Auctions will celebrate 30 years in the business with a fine art and antiques auction on Saturday, March 19. Featured will be original artworks by Alexander Calder, Roy Lichtenstein, Josef Albers, Wendell Castle and others, plus Tiffany lamps, period furniture and more.

Read more

Rolex Oyster Perpetual

Rolex, Oyster Perpetual bracelet watch, early 1960s. LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Fellows

Rolex, Oyster Perpetual bracelet watch, early 1960s. LiveAuctioneers.com archive and Fellows

The Rolex Oyster Perpetual is firmly rooted in the pioneering origins of Rolex. It incorporates the first waterproof and dustproof wristwatch, introduced in 1926, with the first self-winding mechanism, introduced in 1931.